Florida fluid milk report

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Material Information

Title:
Florida fluid milk report
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher:
U.S., Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla
Creation Date:
June 1979
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Dairy products -- Prices -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: v.1, no.1 (Feb. 1968)
General Note:
Ceased volume numbering with Feb. 1979.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004982513
oclc - 671640633
lccn - 2010229692
System ID:
AA00009168:00002


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text


g/ 14 3


Florida Fluid Milk Report


Upper Florida Marketing Area
Federal Order No. 6
Tampa Bay Marketing Area
Federal Order No. 12
Southeastern Florida Marketing Area
Federal Order No. 13


-


I'jli. of Flori
------ -_


2826 E. Oakland Park Blvd.
Post Office Box 11368
Ft. Lauderdale, FI 33339


JOHN D. NORD
Market Administrator


Market Summary


UPPER FLORIDA
Receipts of producer milk at pool plants
regulated under Order No. 6 during May 1979
totaled 67.2 million pounds. Deliveries were
up 4.3 million pounds from the previous month
and 6.3 million pounds above the same month
of the previous year.
During May, 59.2 million pounds of pro-
ducer milk was classified as Class I -- up
2.3 million pounds from the previous month
and up 3.8 million pounds from May 1978. The
percentage of producer milk in Class I was
88.04% in May compared to 90.36% the previous
month and 90.92% a year ago.
The uniform price to producers during
May was $13.15 per cwt. up 3 cents from
April 1979 and $1.41 above May 1978.

TAPA BAY
Producers delivered 50.4 million pounds
of milk to pool plants regulated under Federal
Order No. 12 during May 1979. Producer milk
deliveries were down 2.8 million pounds from
April 1979 and were up 2.8 million pounds from
May 1978.
Producer milk classified as Class I milk
as used in the computation of the uniform
price to producers totaled 41.4 million pounds.
Class I producer milk totaled 44.6 million
pounds in April 1979 and 41.7 million pounds
during May a year ago. Class I milk was
82.15% of the total producer milk during May
compared to 83.69% last month and 87.47%
during Nay of last year.
The uniform price per cwt. for May milk
was $13.11, an increase (Continued on page 7)


Dairy Situation*


PRODUCTION
Milk production during the first 4 months
of 1979 ran close to a year earlier and showed
no clear evidence of either an expansion or
contraction. Output in April was barely
smaller than a year earlier, after an average
gain of about one-half percent during the first
quarter. Since last September, milk production
has remained within 1 percent of a year earlier.
Output per cow responded somewhat to the
quite favorable milk-feed price relationships,
running between one-half and 2 percent above a
year earlier during January-April. However,
this expansion was modest in light of either
historic trends or the record-best feeding re-
lationships for those months. On April 1,
farmers reported feeding 5 percent more grain
and other concentrates than a year earlier,
following a similar boost on January 1.
The generally cool, wet spring might have
had an impact, as pasture growth was retarded
and farmers may have delayed moving cows onto
pasture. Even so, the influence on the year-
to-year comparisons probably was smaller than
normally expected since the spring of 1978
also was late.
Milk cow numbers have dropped sharply
since the start of the year. In April, the
number of milk cows was down almost 1 percent
from January and from a year earlier. Utility
cow prices in Omaha hit $60 per 100 pounds
during April, more than double the level of
2 years earlier. These very sharp increases
in slaughter cow prices, combined with even
sharper rises in prices of replacement
heifers, probably have (Continued on page 6)
*Reprinted from "Dairy Situation", May 1979.


June


1979


': r
i R C











Computation of the Uniform Prices

for Producer Milk


CLASS I MILK
CLASS I MILK
CLASS MILK

TOTAL PRODUCER MILK

OTHER SOURCE MILK

TOTAL MILK



CLASS I MILK
CLASS I'MILK
CLASSIIIMILK

TOTAL

ADJUSTMENTS:
HANDLERS' LOCATION ADJ.
OVERAGE
BULK INVENTORY
PACKAGED INVENTORY
OTHER SOURCE RECEIPTS

TOTAL VALUE TO HANDLERS

LOCATION ADJUSTMENTS
FROM PRODUCER
SETTLEMENT FUND

TOTAL VALUE OF MILK

RESERVE

VALUE AT UNIFORM PRICE

UNIFORM PRICE

BUTTERFAT DIFF'L

AVERAGE BUTTERFAT TEST


May 19

Order 6
PRODUCT % OF
POUNDS TOTAL

59,153,546 88.04
8,035,713 11.96


67,189,259 100.00

158,526

67,347,785

Value


$7,950,236.58
869,464.15


$8,819,700.73


$ 22,637.88
2,809.69
2,994.10
2,742.06
21,305.89

$8,872,190.35

-4,773.23

21,603.09

$8,889,020.21

-32,786.48

$8,856,233.73


$13.15*

$ 0.140

3.3114%


'79

Order 12
PRODUCT %OF
POUNDS TOTAL

41,426,222 82.15
9,002,270 17.85


50,428,492 100.00



50,428,492

Value


$5,609,110.46
974,045.61


$6,583,156.07


$ -


1,546.55
1,596.45
16,788.71

$6,603,087.78

9,375.51

22,510.00

$6,634,973.29

-23,797.99

$6,611,175.30


$13.11

$ 0.140

3.2948%


Order 13
PRODUCT %OF
POUNDS TOTAL

62,664,131 93.07
4,667,577 6.93


67,331,708 100.00



67,331,708

Value


$8,610,051.60
505,031.83


$9,115,083.43


$
436.30
26.21
2,413.35


$9,117,959.29

6,707.81

28,918.39

$9,153,585.49

-30,139.05

$9,123,446.44


$13.55

$ 0.140

3.3362%


* 10 cents higher at plants located in or south of Flagler, Levy, Marion or Volusia Counties.










U.S. Milk Production and Prices*


AY _tILK PRoDUKCTION
'.I F TUA .LL iUtiCljAJ(C
FROM PREVIOUS YEAR

May milk production totalled
11.2 billion pounds, virtually
unchangi*d from May 1978. Accumu-
lated production for the first
5 months of 1979 was 51.8 billion
pounds, 140 million pounds above
the !;ame period last year.
Production per cow averaged
1,040 pounds, 7 pounds above a
year earlier and 6 pounds above
May 1977.
Total milk cows averaged
10.7 million head for May, down
1 percent from last year and 2
percent below May 1977.
* Reprinted from "Milk Production",
U.S.D.A., June 13, 1979.



DAIRY PRODUCTS*
APRIL 1979

BUTTER
April butter production was
92.4 million pounds -- 3% higher
than March but 6% less than
April 1978.

AMERICAN CHEESE
Production totaled 192 million
pounds -- up 4% from March and 1%
above a year ago.

TOTAL CHEESE OUTPUT
Excluding cottage cheese, pro-
duction was 304 million pounds, down
2% from the previous month but up
4 percent from the previous year.

OTHER PRODUCTS
Following are changes in April
production compared to a year ago:


CREAMED COTTATE CHEESE
LOWFAT COTTAGE CHEESE
ICE CREAM
ICE MILK
SHERBET
DRY WHOLE MILK
DRY BUTTERMILK
NONFAT DRY MILK
(human use)


- down 4%
- up 3%
- up 5%
- down 4%
- down 3%
- up 25%
- down 13%

- down 9%


* Reprinted from: DAIRY PRODUCTS,
June 1, 1979, Crop Reporting
Board, U.S.D.A.


MILK-FEED PRICE RATIO 1975-1979, BY MONS, AND ANNUAL AVERAGE,

UNITED STATES. BASED ON 16% DAIRY FEED /


MONTH 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979

January 1.14 1.49 1.31 1.50 1.61
February 1.22 1.44 1.26 1.52 1.59
March 1.26 1.43 1.28 1.51 1.58
April 1.22 1.39 1.28 1.47 1.56
May 1.22 1.35 1.23 1.47 1.53
June 1.23 1.28 1.26 1.43
July 1.27 1.30 1.35 1.45
August 1.28 1.34 1.46 1.54
September 1.37 1.34 1.56 1.59
October 1.43 1.37 1.62 1.64
November 1.50 1.38 1.58 1.62
December 1.54 1.34 1.51 1.63
Annual 1.31 1.37 1.39 1.53


1/ Beginning Jan. 1, 1979 the milk-feed ratio is based on 16
percent mixed dairy feed. The monthly U.S. ratios are com-
puted to provide data users with historical information for
use in making comparisons.
Source: "Agricultural Prices", Crop Reporting Board,
U.S.D.A.


Producer Prices in Selected
Federal Order Markets

(dollars per cwt. for 3.5 milk) Uform
Market Class I Prices Pricesform
Market Class I Prices Prices I/


(JUNE) (MAY)


Tennessee Valley
Louisville
Chicago Regional
Georgia
Memphis
Nashville
New Orleans-Mississippi
Tampa Bay
Southeastern Florida
Upper Florida


12.73
12.33
11.89
12.93
12.57
12.48
13.48
13.58
13.78
13.48


12.69
12.29
11.85
12.89
12.53
12.44
13.44
13.54
13.74
13.44


12.15
11.56
11.15
12.31
12.23
11.59
12.46
13.11
13.55
13.15


1/ Or weighted average of base and excess prices.








Utilization and Cl

at Poc


Southeastern Florida
Order No. 13


Class I Milk
Whole Milk
Skim Milk and Lowfat Milk
Flavored Milk and Milk Drinks
Buttermilk
Total Packaged Class I Disposition
In the Area
Out of the Area
Transfers to Nonpool Plants
Total Class I Disposition
Closing Inventory (Packaged)
Unaccounted for Milk
Total Class I Milk
Percent Change from Last Year
Less Nonpool Recipts I1
PRODUCER MILK IN CLASS I

Class II Milk
Half & Half
Light Cream
Heavy Cream
Frozen Desserts
Other Class II Products
Total Class II Products
Transfers to Nonpool Plants
Closing Inventory (Packaged)
Closing Inventory (Bulk)
Shrinkage
Total Class II Milk
Percent Change from Last Year
Less Nonpool Receipts 1
PRODUCER MILK IN CLASS II
PRODUCER MILK IN CLASS III
Producer Milk All Classes

Average Butterfat Test


MAY 1979
(Pounds) (B.F. Lbs.)


41,087,432
17,892,552
2,994,179
569,465
62,543,628
(58,936,200)
(3,607,428)
106,239
62,649,867
3,923,266
344,298
66,917,431
+1.7
4,253,300
62,664,131


1,024,267
56,787
152,652
1,914,057
1,227,398
4,375,161
1,954,989
173,691
1,369,597
784,625
8,658,063
-17.3
3,990,486
4,667,577


1,375,974
232,896
63,800
7,192
1,679,862
(1,590,313)
(89,549)
2 287
1,682,149
104,672
15,786
1,802,607


112,495
1,690,112


108,398
10,718
55,471
106,035
17 350
297,972
330,515
28,024
76,756
23,136
756,403


200,188
556,215


67,331,708 2,246,327

3.34%


MAY 1978
(Pounds) (B.F. Lbs.)


40,040,512
17,713,362
3,021,457
689,423
61,464,754
(56,599,026)
(4,865,728)
298,180
61,762,934
3,946,565
121,449
65,830,948
+9.4
4,285,658
61,545,290



983,745
55,370
133,593
2,173,503
1,041,286
4,387,497
2,747,528
145,620
2,441,996
742,259
10,464,900
-20.0
4,874,641
5,590,259


1,337,877
227,826
67,349
5 859
1,638,911
(1,519,269)
(119,642)
7 420
1,646,331
104,600
12 942
1,763,873


110 619
1,653,254


104,657
10,456
48,526
120,396
13 849
297,884
429,084
25,337
102,984
29,025
884,314


269,872
614,442


67,135,549 2,267,696

3.38%


I/ Includes, whenever applicable, receipts of other source milk in any form, beginning inventory, and overage.


M
(Pounds)

28,150,40
10,761,03
3,150,29
849,31
42,911,03
(39,085,08
(3,825,95
89.92
43,000,96
2,458,15
228,50
45,687,61
+0.2
_4.?61.39
41,426,22



345,99'
16,25.
44,29
3,361,28c
2,622,371
6,390,21
5,534,91:
91,49-
1,844,62
784,051
1-,n 5.j30
+19.7
5,643,03
9,002,271


50,428,49


















MAY 1978
(Pounds) (B.F. Lbs.)


IB.F. Lbs.)

924,109
114.347
34,581
10,978
1,084,015
(984,027)
(99,988)
2,869
1,086,884
59,666
12,845
1,159,395


86,523
1,072,872


36,355
2,940
15,403
243,786
76,002
374,486
390,335
13,671
92,891
29 329
900,712


312,058
588,654


1,661,526


29,580,786
8,982,032
3,691,035
895,056
43,148,909
(39,142,124)
(4,006,785)


43,148,909
2,216,241
223,496
45,588,646
+4.7
3,884,118
41,704,528


329,751
36,642
62,652
3,175,362
2,549,629
6,154,036
3,433,305
95,230
1,811,594
744,754
12,238,919
-11.7
6,265,383
5,973,536


47,678,064 1,600,615

3.36%


MAY 1979
(Pounds) (B.F.


976,915
95,587
43,960
10 605
1,127,067
(1,018,619)
(108,448)


1,127,067
55,827
16,707
1,199,601


98 510
1,101,091


35,137
6,618
22,387
227,334
76 996
368,472
339,899
16,191
68,913
29 894
823,369


323,845
499,524


Lbs.)


41,349,395
11,345,674
4,820,494
1,255,643
58,771,206
(49,201,939)
(9,569,267)
1,168,770
59,939,976
4,067,677
140,083
64,147,736
+8.1
4,994,190
59,153,546



496,332
10,820
63,717
5,762,519
745,885
7,079,273
5,720,661
98,226
1,913,909
724,797
15,536,866
+11.4
7,501,153
8,035,713


67,189,259 2,224,938

3.31%


MAY 1978
(Pounds) (B.F. Lbs.)

38,871,096 1,266,589
10,047,822 140,859
4,707,348 77,509
1,198,255 8,630
54,824,521 1,493,587
(47,485,656) (1,288,099)
(7,338,865) (205,488)
984,159 28729
55,808,680 1,522,316
3,477,574 88,596
81,938 9,437
59,368,192 1,620,349
+3.1
3,989,122 100,985
55,379,070 1,519,364


1,343,997
134,336
77,553
9,599
1,565,485
(1,303,244)
(262,241)
29,939
1,595,424
102,934
15,735
1,714,093


124,665
1,589,428


50,545
1,740
22,080
348,673
1,725
424,763
372,743
15,531
82,024
29,225
924,286


288,776
635,510


47,604
2,143
22,908
336,689
3,921
413,265
319,222
12,561
106,075
20,099
871,222


326,752
544,470


60,911,719 2,063,834

3.39%


;sification of Milk

Plants


Tampa Bay
Order No. 12


Upper Florida
Order No. 6


436,789
11,901
63,803
5,702,747
807,007
7,022,247
3,859,790
83,453
2,274,884
706,395
13,946,769
+1.7
8,414,120
5,532,649












Dairy Situation

(Continued from page 1)

played a major part in the recent
large declines in milk cow numbers.
In March-April, only about a
third of the 33 States that report
monthly milk output showed as large
or larger production than a year
earlier. However, this group con-
tained all of the 5 major dairy
States except Minnesota.


Animals in Transport

Of interest to Florida dairy-
men and ranchers is the announce-
ment that there may be some changes
in the regulations concerning ven-
tilation provided for animals in
transit.
The U. S. Department of Agri-
culture is seeking comments on
adequate ventilation for shipping
containers used to transport warm-
blooded animals in commerce.
According to USDA, the infor-
mation is being sought because of
requests made by the National
committee on Animal Transport and
others to increase the minimum
ventilation requirement in shipping
containers to 25 percent from April
1 through October 1 of each year
due to normal seasonal increases in
temperature.
While these requests were pri-
marily concerned with dogs and cats,
USDA will consider comments covering
all warmblooded animals, since regu-
lations in the Animal Welfare Act
pertain to this category.
All interested persons are in-
vited to express opinions and com-
ments and are asked to include any
facts concerning the adequacy or
inadequacy of the present require-
ments.
Written comments, which must
be received by August 13, 1979,
should be sent to Room 703, Fed-
eral Building, 6505 Belcrest Road,
Hyattsville, Md. 20782.
All written submissions will
be made available to the public.
Official notice of this action is
published in the June 12 Federal
Register.


Farm Costs and Prices*


PRICES RECEIVED INDEX UP 2 POINTS
PRICES PAID INDEX UP 1 PAINJT

The May Index of Prices Received by Farmers increased
2 points (3/4 percent) to 246 percent of its January-Decem-
ber 1967 average, according to the Crop Reporting Board.
Contributing most to the increase since April were higher
prices for hay, wheat, citrus, corn, potatoes and broilers.
Lower prices for cattle, tomatoes, eggs, hogs and soybeans
were partially offsetting. The index was 31 points (14
percent) above a year ago.
The Index of Prices Paid by Farmers for Commodities and
Services, Interest, Taxes and Farm Wage Rates for May 15 was
247, up 1 point (1/2 percent) from mid-April. Lower prices
for feeder livestock were more than offset by higher prices
for feed, fuels and energy, autos and trucks, and family
living items. The May index was 28 points (13 percent) above
a year ago.
The Ratio of the Index of Prices Received to the Index
of Prices Paid, including Interest, Taxes and Farm Wage Rates
was 100 for the momth of May 1979. The ratio was up 1 point
from the previous month and up 2 points from the same period
a year ago.

Reprinted from "Agricultural Prices", issued May 31,
1979, Crop Reporting Board, U.S.D.A.



Manufactured Dairy Product Prices
(cents per pound)
Cheddar
Butter Nonfat Dry Milk Cheese
(92-Score (Spray Process, (Wis. Assembling
Month Chicago) Chicago Area) Points, 40 lb. Blocks)

1978
May 106.71 70.71 102.62
June 106.71 70.75 102.62
July 107.94 70.56 102.92
Aug. 116.71 71.29 109.08
Sept. 115.81 72.33 110.75
Oct. 115.64 73.61 115.52
Nov. 121.12 74.23 117.12
Dec. 118.76 75.71 119.38
1979
Jan. 111.30 76.30 119.50
Feb. 111.30 75.79 118.64
Mar. 114.08 76.46 119.72
Apr. 120.74 77.61 121.25
May 121.80 78.c4 121.11

1977 Avg. 98.43 66.23 96.83


1978 Avg. 109.76 71.06


107.08











Disposition of Packaged

Class I Milk Products

Inside the

Marketing Area


MAY
1979
Pounds


MAY
1978
Pounds


CHANGE
*


ORDER6 55,791,061 54,709,992 +2.2


ORDER 12 45,930,807 45,403,800 +0.8


ORDER13 61,866,252 59,556,095 +3.7


163,588,120 159,669,887 +2.3


NOTE:' The data shown herein includes products
disposed of by producer-handlers, non-
pool distributing plants and other order
plants as well as pool plants.
The quantities shown are actual pounds.
The percentages have been adjusted for
differences in sales days.



Number of Plants

and Handlers

May 1979


ORDER ORDER12 ORDER13

30 15 19


9 8
0 0

0 0

3 9


Market Summary

From page 1


of 5 cents from the previous
month and $1.38 above May of
last year.

SOUTHEASTERN FLORIDA
Receipts of producer milk at
pool plants regulated under Federal
Order No. 13 totaled 67.3 million
pounds of milk during May 1979.
Compared to the previous month,
receipts of producer milk were
up 1.2 million pounds and 0.2
million pounds above May 1978.

In the May equalization
pool, 62.7 million pounds of milk
was classified as Class I. Class I
producer milk was up 1.3 million
pounds from last month, and was
1.1 million pounds above May 1978.
Class I milk was 93.07% of the
total during May compared to
92.75% the previous month and
91.67% during May of the previous
year.
The uniform price to pro-
ducers under Order No. 13 for May
milk was $13.55 per cwt. The
uniform price was up 9 cents from
April and was $1.54 above April
1978.

PRODUCER SUMMARY

Under the three Florida milk
orders, 417 producers delivered
184.9 billion pounds of milk to
pool plants. This compared to
396 producers and 182.3 million
pounds during the previous month
and 372 producers and 175.7
million pounds during May 1978.
Producer milk deliveries in May
were up 1.5% from April and were
5.2% above May of last year.

The average milk delivery
per producer was 14,143 pounds per
day for all producers delivering
to plants under Federal Orders 6,
12 and 13. The average daily
delivery per producer was 10,174
pounds under Order No. 6, 12,119
pounds under Order No. 12 and
29,123 pounds under Order No. 13.


3 MARKET
TOTAL


Total No.
of Handlers
Distributing
Plants
Supply Plants
Part. Reg.
Dist. Plants
Other Order
Plaits
Producer-
Handlers







8 Minimum Order Prices (Per Cwt. for 3.5 Milk) <-o

Month Baic Upper Fla.* Tampa Bay S.E. Fla. 0
and Formula (Order No. 6) (Order No. 12) (Order No. 13)
Price o x
Year
ear A/ bh/ Class 1 Uniform Class I Uniform Class I Uniform

1978 m C
May $9.25 $9.09 $11.94 $11.74 $12.04 $11.73 $12.24 $12.01 2

June 9.26 9.24 12.09 11.95 12.19 11.93 12.39 12.25

July 9.33 9.25 12.10 11.94 12.20 11.91 12.40 12.20

Aug. 9.68 9.26 12.11 12.03 12.21 12.09 12.41 12.26

Sept. 9.90 9.33 12.18 12.13 12.28 12.13 12.48 12.36

Oct. 10.18 9.68 12.53 12.47 12.63 12.47 12.83 12.73

Nov. 10.44 9.90 12.75 12.64 12.85 12.64 13.05 12.88

Dec. 10.60 10.18 13.03 12.90 13.13 12.94 13.33 13.14

1979
Jan. 10.55 10.44 13.29 13.18 13.39 13.18 13.59 13.39

Feb. 10.52 10.60 13.45 13.35 13.55 13.38 13.75 13.57

Mar. 10.59 10.55 13.40 13.25 13.50 13.31 13.70 13.50

Apr. 10.63 10.52 13.37 13.12 13.47 13.06 13.67 13.46

May 10.67 10.59 13.44 13.15 13.54 13.11 13.74 13.55

1977 Avg. 8.58 8.48 11.33 11.37 11.43 11.33 11.63 11.60

1978 Avg. 9.57 9.29 12.14 12.02 12.24 12.02 12.44 12.26

a/ As reported for the month.
h/ Used in the computation of Class I prices for the month.
1 10 cents higher at plants located in or south of Flagler, Levy. Marion or Volusia Counties.


Number of Producers and Average Daily Delivery per Producer
Month I Upper Florida Tampa Bay Southeastern Fla.
and No. of Avg. Daily No. of Avg. Daily No. of Avg. Daily
Year Producers./ Delivery Producers 1/ Delivery Producers 1/ Delivery
I (pounds) (pounds) (pounds)
May 1978 180 12,146 119 11,694 73 29,667
June 176 10,892 120 10,916 73 27,660
July 172 9,938 125 9,993 74 25,781
Aug. 181 9,942 121 9,742 115 17,553
Sept. 179 10,373 116 9,472 113 16,959
Oct. 179 10,825 121 10,429 114 18,222
Nov. 184 11,054 117 11,064 115 18,566
Dec. 171 12,018 126 11,703 115 19,554
Jan. 1979 171 12,417 125 12,386 115 20,106
Feb. 178 12,663 118 12,547 115 20,753
Mar. 201 12,083 122 12,479 115 21,308
Apr. 198 11,443 123 12,940 75 28,934
May 218 10,174 125 12,119 74 29,123
1/ Adjusted to exclude producers who delivered less milk to plants pooled under this
Order than to plants pooled under another Federal Order.




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