Doing business with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Doing business with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Physical Description:
ii, 19 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission -- Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization and Civil Rights
Publisher:
The Commission
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Minority business enterprises   ( lcsh )
Small business -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization.
General Note:
"NUREG/BR-0045"--P. 4 of cover.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 005003210
oclc - 09421462
Classification:
lcc - KF2138.1.Z9 U5 1982
System ID:
AA00009151:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

"1, G o"
3tb"
j..% A FG L/
WVi^


Doing Business
With the
U.S. Nuclear
Regulatory
Commission






I-


-- *^POSITORY

Office of Small and
Disadvantaged Business Utilization


U.S. Nuclear Regulatory
Commission








Contents Page


INTRODUCTION ............................................... ii
OFFICE OF SMALL AND DISADVANTAGED
BUSINESS UTILIZATION .................................. 2
DIVISION OF CONTRACTS .................................. 3
HOW TO GET STARTED ....................................... 3
HOW TO FIND OUT ABOUT NRC'S NEEDS ................ 3
Key NRC Personnel ................................................... 3
The Commerce Business Daily ........................................ 6
Procurement Automated Source System (PASS) ....................... 6
Posted Solicitations .................................................. 6
AWARDS, AIDS, AND ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS
FOR SMALL AND DISADVANTAGED BUSINESSES ... 6
Small Business Set-Aside Program .................................... 6
Labor Surplus Area Set-Aside Program................................ 7
Purchases under $10,000 ............................................. 7
Women-Owned Businesses .......................................... 7
Small Disadvantaged Business 8(a) Program........................... 8
Subcontracting Opportunities ......................................... 8
Subcontracting With DOE Laboratories................................ 8
Ames Laboratory ..................................................... 9
Argonne National Laboratory .......................................... 9
Brookhaven National Laboratory ....................................... 9
Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory ......................... 9
Idaho National Engineering Laboratory ................................. 9
Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory ........................................ 10
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory .............................. 10
Los Alamos National Scientific Laboratory ............................. 10
Oak Ridge National Laboratory ........................................ 11
Pacific Northwest Laboratory .......................................... 11
Sandia National Laboratories .......................................... 11
Savannah River Laboratory ............................................ 11
HOW WE DO BUSINESS-THE PROCUREMENT AND
FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROCESS .................... 12
Federal Financial Assistance .......................................... 12
The Procurement Process ............................................. 13
Solicitation .......................................................... 13






i

Contents Page


Noncompetitive Procurement Contracts ............................. 13

Unsolicited Proposals ................................................. 13
Sole Source Procurement Contracts .................................. 14

Competitive Procurement ........................................... 14

Formal Advertising ................................................... 14
Negotiated Procurement .............................................. 15

Evaluation Criteria................................................... 15
Funding Procurement Contracts..................................... 16

Fixed Price........ .................................................. 16
Cost Reimbursement ................................................. 16

NRC PROGRAM OFFICES .................................... 16

Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation .................................. 16
Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards ...................... 17
Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research ................................ 17
Office of Inspection and Enforcement ................................. 18

GLOSSARY ..................................................... 18



















Because of recent organizational changes within the agency,
all references to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's
Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU)
should read Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization and
Civil Rights (OSDBU/CR)








Introduction

Doing Business
with the U.S. Nuclear
Regulatory
Commission


This guide has been prepared to provide clear,
readily understandable information about how
to do business with the Nuclear Regulatory
Commission (NRC). Although the guide should
prove helpful to all firms seeking business
opportunities with NRC, it focuses primarily on
the special needs of and opportunities for small
and disadvantaged business firms.
As a Federal agency, NRC participates in the full
range of programs made available by Congress
for small and disadvantaged business utilization.
These programs apply to small and women-
owned businesses, businesses located in labor
surplus areas, and businesses owned and con-
trolled by economically and socially disadvan-
taged persons. At the present time, small and
disadvantaged firms are providing NRC with a
broad range of essential support, including
technical assistance in the use of statistical
methods, management information system
analyses, socioeconomic research, computer


EXHIBIT 1


EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
FOR OPERATIONS


i-*-
OFFICE OF THE
GENERAL COUNSEL


OFFICE OF OFFICE OF OFFICE OF OFFICE OF
ADMINIS- THE EXECUTIVE RESOURCE INTERNATIONAL
TRACTION LEGAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS
DIRECTOR


OFFICE OF
NUCLEAR MATERIAL SAFETY
AND SAFEGUARDS
July 1, 1982


OFFICE OF
NUCLEAR REACTOR
REGULATION


OFFICE OF
NUCLEAR REGULATORY
RESEARCH








maintenance services, and ADP systems devel-
opment and operation.
This guide also presents an overview of NRC's
procurement and financial assistance programs.
Finally, the guide describes NRC's organization,
showing the primary responsibilities of the
major program offices. Exhibit 1 is an organi-
zational chart of the Nuclear Regulatory Com-
mission and Exhibit 2 shows agency expendi-
tures for a typical fiscal year.
To help you determine whether the goods and
services your firm provides are pertinent to
NRC's needs, a few statements should be made
concerning the mission of this agency. The
Nuclear Regulatory Commission licenses and
regulates the uses of nuclear energy for the
purpose of protecting the public's health and
safety and the environment. Its mission is accom-
plished by issuing licenses to build and operate
nuclear power reactors and by authorizing the


U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Organization Chart


DATA


REGIONAL OFFICES


REGION
REGION
REGION
REGION
REGION


PHILADELPHIA
ATLANTA
CHICAGO
DALLAS
SAN FRANCISCO


OFFICE OF
INSPECTION
AND ENFORCEMENT















EXHIBIT 2
Program Technical
Support-
Program Direction &Et
Administration
Material Safety 8-
Safeguards


ownership and use of nuclear materials. Be-
cause it is a Federal regulatory agency, NRC
makes rules and sets standards for its licensees.
NRC also sponsors research to support its
regulatory mission; consequently the scope of
its work is technical-review oriented rather
than product or hardware oriented.
NRC Expenditures for a Typical Fiscal Year


Office of Small
and Disadvantaged
Business Utilization
(OSDBU)


The OSDBU is responsible for assisting small,
minority-owned and women-owned firms wish-
ing to do business with NRC. Small firms
located in areas of chronic unemployment are
also encouraged to make their firm's capabilities
known to NRC's OSDBU. Personnel in OSDBU
are prepared to discuss with you the various
preference programs NRC has available. They
can also refer you to NRC technical personnel
who may have a need for your firm's product or
service.

To obtain information from OSDBU, either call
(301) 492-4665 or write to:
Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business
Utilization
U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Washington, DC 20555








The NRC Division of Contracts directs and
coordinates contracting and purchasing activi-
ties for all NRC program offices, with the excep-
tion of agreements with Department of Energy
laboratories. In this capacity, the Division of
Contracts routinely screens all procurement
requests to determine whether such requests
can be accomplished through OSDBU preference
programs. The Division of Contracts also main-
tains the NRC bidders' mailing list of firms with
various occupational specialties. Firms on the
list with the appropriate specialties receive, on a
rotational basis, copies of the solicitation on tasks
necessary to conduct the agency's business.


Division of Contracts


Firms wishing to appear on the NRC bidders' list
should submit Form 129, "Bidder's Mailing List
Application," copies of which are available from
either OSDBU or the Division of Contracts, U. S.
Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington,
DC 20555 (see Exhibit 3). Interested firms
should also submit either a brochure describing
their activities or a corporate capability state-
ment. The corporate capability statement should
describe the kind of products and services the
firm provides. These statements sometimes
include background information about key per-
sonnel, a listing of past contracts with govern-
mental and nongovernmental organizations, and
brief descriptions of past and current projects.


How to Get Started


You may obtain information on NRC's current or
future procurements from any of the following
sources:
The OSDBU can arrange for you to meet with
NRC personnel whose needs may be pertinent
to your firm's capabilities. The questions you
have for NRC personnel in these meetings
should be kept general since program officials
are prohibited from making commitments or
from giving advance information about specific
anticipated purchases to potential suppliers.
Procurement offices generally publicize planned
purchases by placing announcements in the
Commerce Business Daily (CBD). The CBD
informs potential contractors about planned


How to Find Out
About NRC's Needs

Key NRC Personnel







The Commerce
Business Daily















EXHIBIT 3


BIDDER'S MAILING LIST APPLICATION INITIAL APPLICATION FORM APPROVED OM
REVISION 29-RoM
fill in all spaces. Insert "'NA'" in blacks not applicable. Type or print lff entries. See reverse for Instructions.
TO (Bnter nome and address ao Federal agency to wliMcA form I submitted. Include ZIP Code) DATE


I. APPLICANTS NAME AND ADDRESS Include county ad ZIP Cole 1 2. ADDRESS Include county and ZIP Codes TO WHICH SOLICITATIONS ARE
TO BE MAILED (if different tram item I)




3. TYPE OF ORGANIZATION (Check one) 4. HOW LONG IN
INDIVIDUAL -- PARTNERSHIP NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION RESEN BUSINESS
CORPORATION, INCORPORATED UNDER
THE LAWS OF THE STATE OF
S. NAMES OF OFFICERS. OWNERS, OR PARTNERS
PRESIDENT VICE PRESIDENT SECRETARY

TREASURER OWNERS OR PARTNERS

6. AFFILIATES OF APPLICANT i Names, locations uani nature of affiliation See deinifnon on reverse)




7.- PERSONS AUTHORIZED TO SIGN BIDS. OFFERS. AND CONTRACTS IN YOUR NAME (Indicate if aent)
NAME OFFICIAL CAPACITY TEL. NO. (fnal. ar- sae)




1. IDENTIFY EQUIPMENT, SUPPLIES, MATERIALS. AND/OR SERVICES ON WHICH YOU DESIRE TO BID (See atachedl Pederal agency's splm mneal
Noting and insrrurtioni, if anyi


9. ~. TYPE OF OWNERSHIP (See definitions on reverse)
-MINORITY- BUSINESS ENTERPRISE I OTHER THAN MINORITY BUSINESS ENTERPRISE
10. TYPE OF BUSINESS See definitions on reverse)
MANUFACTURER OR PRODUCER REGULAR DEALER iType 1p REGULAR DEALER (Type I)
SERVICE ESTABLISHMENT CONSTRUCTION CONCERN RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FIRM
[ SURPLUS DEALER (Check this bor if you are also a dealer in surplus good)
11. SIZE OF BUSINESS (See definitions on reverse)
SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN" T--OTHER THAN SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN
(a) AVERAGE NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES (Incl.d- (b) AVERAGE ANNUAL SALES OR RECEIPTS FOR
*If ian are a small business ing afillales) FOR FOUR PRECEDING CALEN- PRECEDING THREE FISCAL YEARS
concern, jill In (a) and (b). DAR QUARTERS

12. FLOOR SPACE (Square feet) 13. NET WORTH
MANUFACTURING WAREHOUSE DATE AMOUNT

14. SECURITY CLEARANCE (U/ applicable, check highest clearance authorized)
FOR TOP SECRET SECRET CONFIDENTIAL NAMES OF AGENCIES WHICH GRANTED SECURITY CLEARANCES (Include dales)
KEY PERSONNEL ------
PLANT ONLY
THIS SPACE FOR USE F THE GOVERNMENT CERTIFICATION
I certify that informatIon supplied herein (Inclmadii all pagse 6lles41)
is correct and that neither the applicant nor any prison (Or Osmewrs) In
connection with the applicant as a principal or officer, = fahr as Isknm .
now deabrred or otherwise deardond tnlilM by any iCgncy of the _iwl
Government from bidding lor Frumihlng m1ntarlai. suppiees, or mrvioes tao
Government or any agency thereof.
SIGNATURE

NAME AND TITLE OF PERSON AUTHORIZED TO SIGN (Type or pritl)

129-105 5WAINPD11MiW .'I .
Presircibd hy G=A. FPR M1 car w is-a














EXHIBIT 3




Persons or concerns wishing to be added to a particular agency's bidder's mailing list for supplies or services shall file
l:k. properly completed and certified Bidder's Mailing List Application, together with such other lists as may be attached to
t"t application form. with each procurement office of the Federal agency with which they desire to do business. If a Federal
has attached a Supplemental Commodity List with instructions, complete the application as instructed. Otherwise,
iBptify in item 8 the equipment, supplies and/or services on which you desire to bid. The application shall be submitted
a signed by the principal as distinguished from an agent, however constituted.

After placement on the bidder's mailing list of an agency, a supplier's failure to respond (submission of bid, or notice in
ujsi|g. that you are unable to bid on that particular transaction but wish to remain on the active bidder's mailing list for that
cular item) to Invitations for Bids will be understood by the agency to indicate lack of interest and concurrence in the
oval of the supplier's name from the purchasing activity's bidder's mailing list for the items concerned.


eIINlTION RELATING TO TYPE OF OWNERSHIP e. Construction concern-means a concern (or person) engaged
(Se item 9) in construction, alteration or repair (including dredging, exca-
vating, and painting) of buildings, structures, and other real
bprltO business enterprise. A minority business enterprise is property.
cdfilied as a "business, at least 50 percent of which is owned
I minority group members or. in case of publicly owned busi. DEF NS RELATING TO SIZE OF BUS
es at least 51 percent of the stock of which is owned by (See item 11)
Wiority group members." For the purpose of this definition, a. Small business concern-A small business concern for the
'iority group members are Negroes. Spanish-speaking Ameri- purpose of Government procurement is a concern, including its
V persons, American-Orientals, American Indians, American- affiliates, which is independently owned and operated, is not
llhos. and American-Aleuts. dominant in the field of operation in which it is bidding on Gov-
F B D ernment contracts and can further qualify under the criteria con-
'AR" OF BUSINESS DEFINITIONS cerning number of employees, average annual receipts, or other
(i. tern 10) criteria as nrescrihbed h the Small RBusiness Administratinn


q. manufacturer or producer-means a person (or concern)
qlii fng, operating, or maintaining a store, warehouse, or other
e hblishment that produces, on the premises, the materials,
e9ljlies, articles, or equipment of the general character of those
Itainl in item 8, or in the Federal Agency's Supplemental Com-
alitK y List, if attached.
,b Regular dealer (Type 1)-means a person (or concern) who
qids. operates, or maintains a store, warehouse, or other estab-
~ument in which the materials, supplies, articles, or equipment
of ..the general character listed in item 8 or in the Federal
Aoqcy's Supplemental Commodity List, if attached, are bought,
in stock, and sold to the public in the usual course of

a. lar dealer (Type 2)-"n the case of supplies of particular
. s (at present, petroleum, lumber and timber products,
1ine tools, raw cotton, green coffee, bay, grain, feed, or
4= W agricultural liming materials, tea, raw or manufactured
q winters). Regular dealer-means a person (or concern)
j&4titg the requirements of the regulations (Cade of Federal
fli"ltions. Title 41. 50-201.101(b)) as amended from time to
S.j prescribed by the Secretary of Labor under the Walsh-
lS Public Contracts Act (Title 41 U.S. Code 35-45). For coal
Ysee- Cade of Federal Regulations, Title 41, 50-201.604(a).


(See Code of Federal Regulations, Title 13, Part 121, as
amended, which contains detailed industry definitions and re-
lated procedures.)
b. Affiliates-Business concerns are affiliates of each other
when either directly or indirectly (i) one concern controls or has
the power to control the other, or (ii) a third party controls or
has the power to control both. In determining whether concerns
are independently owned and operated and whether or not affilia-
tion exists, consideration is given to all appropriate factors in-
cluding common ownership, common management, and con-
tractural relationship. (See items 6 and 11.)

c. Number of employees-Fn connection with the determination
of small business status, "number of employees" means the
average employment of any concern, including the employees of
its domestic and foreign affiliates, based on the number of per-
sons employed on a full-time, part-time, temporary, or- other
basis during each of the pay periods of the preceding 12 months.
If a concern has not been in existence for 12 months, "number of
employees" means the average employment of such concern and
its affiliates during the period that such concern has been in
existence based on the number of persons employed during each
of the pay periods of the period that such concern has beeo in
business. (See item 11.)


ie efleauligiushmlnt---rmeans a concern (or person) which
S operates, or maintains any type of business which is prin-
O. engaged in the furnishing of nonpersonal services, such
t nof limited to) repairing, cleaning, redecorating, or rental
mR Pperty, including the furnishingsg of oeeessary re-
i rits or other supplies as part of tke services performed.


MOMRCE NS AILY.-The Commerce Business Daily, published by the Department of Commerce. contains iti
,,i.conteemning proppee procureunoets, s.le#, anr contract aswods. For further information concerning this publication, ca
S.' qei ommeie Office. :







Procurement Automated


Procurement Automated
Source System (PASS)











Posted Solicitations


procurement activities of the Federal govern-
ment. Published Monday through Friday, the
CBD lists, by product and service, contracting
opportunities, subcontracting leads, contract
awards, and other business opportunities related
to procurement in the Federal government. The
Commerce Business Daily is available on a
subscription basis from the Superintendent of
Documents, Government Printing Office, Wash-
ington, DC 20402. Ordering information and
rates may be obtained by calling (202) 783-3238.
You can also register with the Small Business
Administration's (SBA) Procurement Automated
Source System (PASS). The purpose of PASS is
to match Federal procurement requirements
with the capabilities of small businesses or
small disadvantaged businesses listed in the
system. The system has significantly improved
contracting and subcontracting opportunities
for these firms. Registration with PASS is free
and entirely voluntary. Applications are available
from either the SBA or the NRC OSDBU. The
mailing address and telephone number of the
SBA office nearest you are also available from
the NRC's OSDBU.
Copies of all solicitations are posted for inspec-
tion and copying at the NRC Public Document
Room (PDR) at 1717 H Street, NW., Washington,
DC, and in the Division of Contracts Bid and
Proposal Room, 2223 Air Rights Building, 4550
Montgomery Avenue, Bethesda, Maryland.


Awards, Aids, and
Assistance Programs
for Small and
Disadvantaged
Businesses


The Small Business Act of July 18, 1958 (P.L.
85-536) declares that the economic well being
and security of the nation depend on the expansion
of free competition which, in turn, requires that
special aid, protection, and assistance be given
to small businesses. Accordingly, NRC makes
available the following range of assistance
programs specifically aimed at small and dis-
advantaged businesses.
* Small Business Set-Aside Program
One method provided by law to assist small
businesses involves special "set-aside" pro-
curements. In a set-aside procurement, either
a single contract or an entire class of con-
tracts (involving, say, all contracts for shuttle
service) may be made available for compe-








tition solely among small business firms.
That is, only small businesses can compete
for this type of set-aside contract.
Announcements for set-aside procurements
are advertised in the Commerce Business
Daily. For complete information about the
kinds of products and services NRC solicits
on a set-aside basis, contact the NRC OSDBU
or Division of Contracts.
* Labor Surplus Area Set-Aside Program
The purpose of the labor surplus area set-
aside program is to direct selected Federal
procurements to sections of the country with
substantial unemployment or underemploy-
ment. Contractors who participate in this
program must either be located in an eligible
labor surplus area or agree to perform a
substantial portion of their work in an eligible
area. The Department of Labor updates infor-
mation regarding labor surplus areas annu-
ally and makes this information available to
personnel in NRC's Division of Contracts.
To make a labor surplus area award, NRC
must first determine whether the bids or
proposals submitted by eligible firms can be
awarded at a reasonable price. Based on
NRC's determination, one of two types of
set-aside awards will be made:
1. solely for small businesses located in a
labor surplus area, or
2. for any business firm, regardless of size,
in a labor surplus area.
Solicitations for labor surplus area awards
appear in the Commerce Business Daily.
* Purchases Under $10,000
NRC purchases of products and services that
cost under $10,000 must be reserved for
small business firms, assuming that two or
more firms submit prices that are competitive
with the current market.
* Women-Owned Businesses
NRC encourages contracts with women-
owned businesses. NRC's affirmative action
program includes incentives to promote busi-
ness opportunities for women-owned busi-
nesses, and collects and disseminates infor-
mation in support of these firms.










































Subcontracting with DOE
Laboratories


* Small Disadvantaged Business 8(a) Program
The purpose of this program is to assist small
businesses owned and controlled by socially
and economically disadvantaged persons to
compete effectively for contracts with Federal
agencies. The program works through the
Small Business Administration (SBA), which
enters into contracts with Federal agencies
for products and services and then sub-
contracts noncompetitively for those products
and services with firms certified as 8(a) by
the Small Business Administration. Only
firms receiving SBA certification are eligible
to receive Federal contracts under this pro-
gram. Eligible firms include but are not
limited to those owned by Black Americans,
Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, and
Asian-Pacific Americans. NRC's 8(a) program
is administered by the OSDBU.
* Subcontracting Opportunities
Contracts with the government that exceed
$500,000 (or $1 million for public construc-
tion projects), with few exceptions, must
include detailed subcontracting plans for
small and small disadvantaged businesses.
Information regarding potential subcontract-
ing opportunities can be found in the Com-
merce Business Daily. This requirement
applies unless the prime contractor is a small
or disadvantaged business, the contract work
will be performed outside the United States,
the contract is for personal services, or
unless no subcontracting opportunities are
anticipated.
Department of Energy (DOE) national labora-
tories perform a substantial portion of research
and technical assistance work for NRC. Con-
sequently, these labs provide a primary source
of subcontracting opportunities for small and
disadvantaged firms. To obtain information about
these opportunities, contact the Small and Dis-
advantaged Business Specialist at the national
laboratory whose needs most nearly suit your
firm's product or service. You can contact NRC's
Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business
Utilization to obtain the name of the specialist
at each national laboratory.
Listed below are the names and addresses of
DOE laboratories and a brief description of the
principal research each conducts.








* Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa 50011
Ames Laboratory, operated for DOE by Iowa
State University, conducts research princi-
pally in material sciences centering on the
preparation, purification, chemical charac-
terization, and structural identification of new
materials, followed by evaluation and inter-
pretation of their chemical, physical, and
mechanical properties. Other programs in-
clude chemical analyses, pollutant identifi-
cation, solar demonstration, and nuclear
isotope and heavy ion studies.
* Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne,
Illinois 60439
Argonne National Laboratory, Idaho Falls,
Idaho 83401
Argonne National Laboratory, operated for
DOE by the University of Chicago and the
Argonne Universities Association, is princi-
pally involved in reactor development, with
other programs in basic energy sciences,
energy and technology, high-energy physics,
and biomedical and environmental research.
* Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton,
New York 11973
Brookhaven National Laboratory, operated
for DOE by Associated Universities, Inc., is
involved in high-energy physics and research
in basic energy sciences. About 60% of
Brookhaven's effort is devoted to advanced
energy systems, with lesser activity in envi-
ronmental research, conservation, and the
National Synchrotron Light Source Accele-
rator (ISABELLE) currently under construc-
tion at Brookhaven.
* Hanford Engineering Development Labora-
tory, Richland, Washington 99352
Hanford Engineering Development Labora-
tory, operated for DOE by the Westinghouse
Hanford Company, concentrates on breeder
reactor technology, with smaller efforts in
fuel cycle research and development, mag-
netic fusion development and technology,
and nuclear research and applications.
* Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho
Falls, Idaho 93401
Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, ope-
rated for DOE by EG&G Idaho, Inc., and








Exxon Nuclear Idaho Co., Inc. does research
on reactor safety, materials and fuels pro-
cessing, waste management, liquid metal-
cooled fast breeder reactor and geothermal
energy research and development, naval
propulsion reactors testing, and radiological
and environmental research.
* Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, Cali-
fornia 94720
Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, operated for
DOE by the University of California, is prin-
cipally involved in fundamental research in
high-energy and nuclear physics and in the
basic energy sciences. Other research is
conducted on the fundamental biological
processes in plants and animals, and in
energy conservation. The laboratory operates
several accelerators and directs the National
Resource for Computation in Chemistry.
* Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory,
Livermore, California 94550
The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
is operated for DOE by the University of
California. Nuclear weapons design accounts
for approximately half the laboratory's effort
and continues to be its primary responsibility.
The program addresses current weapons
requirements of the Department of Defense,
exploration of new nuclear explosive con-
cepts, a broad range of research and devel-
opment, and the conduct of nuclear tests
essential for exploration and design of
nuclear explosives. Other Livermore Labora-
tory programs include laser fusion technology
development, laser isotope separation meth-
ods, and biomedical and environmental
studies.

* Los Alamos National Scientific Laboratory,
Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545
The Los Alamos National Scientific Labora-
tory is operated for DOE by the University of
California. In the field of weapons, which
constitutes about half the activities at Los
Alamos, the laboratory is responsible for the
development of nuclear warheads. Nonwea-
pons work is concentrated on advanced
nuclear reactor designs, the physics of con-
trolled thermonuclear reactions, nuclear
science research, and environment and








safety. The laboratory also operates an 800
MeV proton accelerator.
* Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge,
Tennessee 37830
The Oak Ridge National Laboratory is oper-
ated for DOE by the Union Carbide Corpora-
tion, Nuclear Division. The activities are
largely directed toward four areas roughly
equal in size: fission energy development,
biomedical and environmental research,
basic energy sciences, and magnetic fusion.
In addition, there are growing programs in
fossil energy and conservation. Oak Ridge
houses the fast breeder reactor program and
is responsible for heavy ion research and
superconducting magnet test facilities.
* Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland,
Washington 99352
Pacific Northwest Laboratory, operated for
DOE by Battelle Memorial Institute, works
principally in nuclear fuel cycle research and
development. Other programs include envi-
ronmental research and development, solar
energy, and research in basic energy sciences.
* Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque,
New Mexico 87185
Sandia National Laboratory, Livermore, Cali-
fornia 94550
The Sandia National Laboratories are oper-
ated for DOE by the Western Electric Com-
pany. Sandia's central mission is the develop-
ment of the nonnuclear portions of nuclear
weapons. Sandia is also responsible for
major programs in fossil, solar, and laser
fusion. In addition, NRC sponsors major
projects at Sandia in advanced reactor
research and nuclear fuel cycle safety.
* Savannah River Laboratory, Aiken, South
Carolina 29801
Savannah River Laboratory, operated for
DOE by E. I. du Pont de Nemours and
Company, provides developmental and tech-
nical assistance in all phases of the nuclear
fuel cycle: uranium resource evaluation, fuel
fabrication, isotope production, reactor phy-
sics and engineering, fuel reprocessing,
waste management, environmental monitor-
ing, and heavy water production.








How We Do Business-
the Procurement and
Financial Assistance
Process












Federal Financial
Assistance


An understanding of the procurement and
financial assistance processes will help you to
market your firm to NRC and could help you to
avoid costly delays, mistakes, and other sources
of frustration. Procurement procedures in the
Federal government differ from procurement
practices in private industry because they
involve the spending of taxpayers' dollars. The
Federal procurement process involves other
considerations as well. Not only are Federal
agencies obligated to obtain the best results at
the most reasonable cost to taxpayers, but they
must also carry out national security and social
and economic goals established by Congress.
As a result of these requirements, Federal
agencies have created a formal procurement
process that may seem cumbersome to business
people.
Before proceeding to an overview of the Federal
procurement process, it will be helpful to clarify
the difference between procurement contracts
and financial assistance awards. The govern-
ment uses procurement contracts to acquire
goods and services that are necessary for the
government to carry on its day-to-day business.
The government uses Federal financial assis-
tance awards to provide financial support or
stimulation for projects that will benefit the
public.
The NRC Federal financial assistance program
provides financial assistance in the form of
grants and cooperative agreements. These
agreements support basic and applied research
to advance the scientific knowledge applicable
to nuclear power plant design, operation, siting,
systems, performance, environmental concerns,
and waste disposal. NRC seeks financial assis-
tance applications from educational and non-
profit institutions, state and local governments,
and professional societies.
Organizations receiving Federal financial assis-
tance awards receive several advantages in
pursuing their projects. Grants and cooperative
agreements allow wide latitude for research
because scientific project topics are initiated by
grantees rather than by the government. Once
underway, many grant projects proceed with
little government involvement, as compared
with cooperative agreements.
You can obtain more information about the
Federal financial assistance program by calling








the NRC Grant Officer at (301)492-4297. NRC
also publishes application information for its
assistance program in the FederalRegister just
prior to the beginning of each fiscal year.
The procurement process begins when an NRC
program office identifies a need and writes a
statement of work describing that need in detail.
The statement of work is then submitted to the
NRC Division of Contracts where it is screened
for possible inclusion in award programs for
small and disadvantaged or women-owned
businesses.
A solicitation notice is the means by which NRC
describes its objectives and requirements to the
business community. It contains the information
essential to the business organization that is
preparing its response, or proposal, to the
solicitation.
For the firm preparing the response, a careful
and complete reading of the solicitation is
essential to ensure a full understanding of the
requirement described. Address questions con-
cerning the solicitation to those persons named
in the solicitation. Follow all instructions to the
letter and make no assumptions without first
verifying them. Above all, note carefully the
time and place for submission of the response
and allow sufficient time to ensure delivery
before the time specified. To do otherwise may
result in your response being eliminated from
consideration, regardless of its merits.
* Unsolicited Proposals
An unsolicited proposal is a written offer to
perform work submitted by an organization
or individual solely on its own initiative and
not in response to a request from NRC. NRC
encourages the submission of unsolicited
proposals for unique innovative approaches
and ideas that may merit public support.
Such proposals should not, however, include
advertising material, commercial product
offerings, capability statements, or other
information not relevant to the innovative
idea or approach being proposed. Those
submitting unsolicited proposals should be
aware that such proposals cannot be favorably
considered when the project described dupli-
cates either work already underway or
planned. Also bear in mind that NRC has no
obligation to make an award, even if the


The Procurement Process







Solicitation


Noncompetitive
Procurement Contracts








technical evaluation is favorable, because
other priorities or funding limitations may
arise.
Unsolicited proposals should be sent to the
following address:
Operations Support Branch
Division of Contracts
U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Washington, DC 20555
The Division of Contracts will notify you in
writing that they have received your proposal.
Your proposal will be protected as proprietary
information as it undergoes NRC review.
Sole Source Procurement Contracts
Any solicitation that results in the award of a
contract that does not involve competition is
considered a sole source procurement. Both
procurement and financial assistance regu-
lations and the laws upon which they are
based place significant emphasis on the
need for competition in Federal procurement
contracting. Accordingly, competition for NRC
awards is considered the norm, while sole
source awards are the exception. Similarly,
competition is encouraged in financial assis-
tance awards unless restricted by law.
Competitive Procurement The government uses two types of competitive
processes for selecting contractors: formal
advertising and negotiated procurement.
Formal Advertising
Formal advertising has two goals: to gain for
the government the benefits of full and free
competition, and to give all qualified firms
the same opportunity to bid competitively.
There are four procedural steps in formal
advertising. First, the agency prepares the
invitation for bids (IFB); second, the IFB is
announced in the Commerce Business Daily;
third, bids received in response to the IFB are
opened, recorded, and tabulated; and fourth,
a contract is awarded to the lowest bidder
who is determined to be responsible and
responsive to the terms of the solication.
An Invitation for Bids (IFB) is used for soli-
citing bids when detailed specifications con-
cerning the product or service are known and
can be precisely described. Hardware and






15


general supplies are usually solicited through
an IFB. Regulations governing IFB solicita-
tions require that all specifications, terms,
and conditions of the IFB must be accepted
without qualification. All bids are publicly
opened and recorded at the time and place
specified in the solicitation. Awards are most
often made based on price competition among
bidders. Contracts awarded are usually for a
fixed price.
* Negotiated Procurement
Formal advertising applies to procurements
which involve firm, detailed specifications so
that bids are evaluated and an award made
based on price. Such detailed specifications
are not always possible, however, particu-
larly for NRC research and technical assist-
ance activities. For activities like these, NRC
conducts negotiated procurements. This type
of procurement process accommodates the
agency's need for flexibility in evaluating
potential contractors and allows for crucial
factors other than price to be carefully evalu-
ated. These factors may include technical
aspects of the proposal, delivery dates, per-
formance and reporting requirements, and
technical expertise. This process also allows
for proposals to be improved during negotia-
tions. Congress permits procurement by
negotiation as an exception to the formal
advertising method.
To solicit a proposal for this type of procure-
ment, NRC issues a Request for Proposal
(RFP). An RFP often incorporates performance
specifications rather than detailed design
specifications.
Evaluation criteria are the standards by which Evaluation Criteria
NRC measures the proposals it receives. These
criteria are included in the solicitation to provide
offerors with information essential to their
response. Therefore, the solicitation should be
studied carefully before you make a decision
about responding to it.
Make sure that you or your firm has a reasona-
ble chance of receiving an award by responding
only to those solicitations that list criteria you can
meet. Responding to solicitations with require-
ments which you cannot fully meet is a waste of
time and money.








Funding Procurement Procurement contracts are commonly funded in
Contracts one of two ways: fixed price or cost reimbursement.
Fixed Price
In fixed price arrangements, a definite price
for the product or service is agreed to before
the contract is awarded. This price remains
fixed for the life of the contract and is not
ordinarily subject to any adjustment. The
contract is then fully funded at the fixed
amount. This type of funding arrangement
provides the contractor with a keen incentive
to control costs and perform efficiently. This
type of contract imposes a minimum admin-
istrative burden on both NRC and the
contractor because detailed accounts of direct
and indirect costs are not required. Fixed
price contracts are generally used where
reasonably clear designs or performance
specifications are available and where fair
and reasonable prices can be estimated and
established.
Cost Reimbursement
There are several variations of cost type con-
tracts. The cost reimbursement type of con-
tract provides for payment to the contractor
of all allowable costs incurred during per-
formance of the contract. This type of con-
tract may also provide for payment of a fixed
fee (or profit) to the contractor over and
above the allowable costs incurred by the
contractor over the course of the contract.
This funding arrangement entails greater
administrative effort than the fixed price con-
tract because audits of the contractor's
accounting records are required.
Cost type contracts are ordinarily used for
projects where work specifications cannot
be defined exactly, as in research and devel-
opment activities, and where performance
uncertainties are so great that a fixed price
contract would be inappropriate.


NRC Program Offices NRC's principal regulatory functions are carried
out by four major program offices:
Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR)
NRR's primary mission is to assure adequate
protection of public health and safety and the








environment in the design, siting, construc-
tion, and operation of nuclear reactors. NRR is
responsible for performing the safety, envi-
ronmental and antitrust reviews of applica-
tions received primarily from utilities for
construction and operation of nuclear power
and non-power plants. Changes to operating
licenses for power and licensing effort are
divided principally among the office's five
divisions which (1) carry out project manage-
ment functions, (2) perform detailed safety
engineering and environmental reviews, (3)
perform detailed performance-oriented eval-
uations for nuclear plant systems, (4) perform
operational, administrative, and people-
oriented reviews for human factors safety,
and (5) assure that basic safety and environ-
mental policies, goals, and requirements are
achieved by the regulatory and licensing
process.
* Office of Nuclear Material Safety and
Safeguards (NMSS)
NMSS licenses and regulates all nuclear fuel
cycle facilities and materials licensed under
the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended.
These licenses are associated with the pro-
cessing, transporting, and handling of nuclear
materials, inculding the review and assess-
ment of their safeguards against potential
threats, thefts, and sabotage. NMSS works
closely with other NRC organizations in
coordinating the waste management and
safeguards program, and in recommending
research, standards, and policy options
necessary for the successful operation of
these programs.
* Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES)
RES plans and implements programs of nu-
clear regulatory research and standards to
support NRC's regulatory activities in nuclear
reactor safety, safeguards, the nuclear fuel
cycle, and environmental protection. These
programs provide a comprehensive basis for
NRC policies and programs for licensing
review, inspection and enforcement, and
other regulatory actions. The office directs
the development of regulations, criteria,
guides, standards, and codes for all stages of
reactor and production and utilization facili-
ties, for the protection of the health and







safety of the public and workers during
possession, use, transfer, and disposal of
nuclear materials, and for the safeguarding
of nuclear materials and facilities.
* Office of Inspection and Enforcement (IE)
IE inspects nuclear facilities and materials
licensed by NRC to determine compliance
with license provisions and to identify con-
ditions that may adversely affect the protec-
tion of nuclear materials and facilities, the
environment, or the health and safety of the
public.


Glossary


Acquisition The acquiring by contract, with
appropriated funds, of property or services by
the Federal Government and for its direct benefit
or use through purchase, lease, or barter,
whether the property or services are already in
existence or must be created, developed, demon-
strated, and evaluated. Acquisition includes
such related functions as determinations of the
particular agency need, solicitation, selection of
sources, award of contracts, contract financing,
contract performance, and contract administra-
tion.


Assistance A relationship the principal pur-
pose of which is the transfer of money, property,
services, or anything of value to a recipient in
order to accomplish a public purpose of support
or stimulation authorized by Federal statute
rather than of acquisition by purchase, lease, or
barter of property or services for the direct
benefit or use of the Federal Government.
Award Any instrument, signed by a contract-
ing officer, providing NRC funds or other re-
sources to an offeror, that permits expenditure
of such NRCfunds or use of such NRC resources.
Contract A legal instrument which defines the
relationship between the Government and a
contractor whenever the principal purpose of the
instrument is acquisition by purchase, lease, or
barter of property or services for the direct use
of the Government.
Contracting Officer An official designated to
enter into or administer contracts and assist-
ance agreements and make related determina-
tions and findings.
Cooperative Agreement An assistance instru-
ment used when substantial involvement is




I


anticipated between the Federal Government
and the State or local government or other recip-
ient during performance of the contemplated
activity.
Cost-Reimbursement Type Contracts A type
of contract providing for payment to the contrac-
tor of allowable costs incurred in the contract
performance, to the extent prescribed in the
contract.
Deliverable A report or product that must be
delivered to satisfy contractual requirements.
Fixed-Price Type Contracts Contracts that
provide for a firm price or, under appropriate
circumstances, for an adjustable price for the
supplies or services being procured.
Government Property Equipment and facili-
ties furnished by the Government for use by a
contractor or recipient, or acquired by a contrac-
tor or recipient at Government expense for use
during the performance of a contract or assist-
ance agreement.
Grant An assistance instrument used when
little Federal Government involvement is antic-
ipated in the performance by the recipient.
Grant Officer A contracting officer who con-
tractually obligates the Government by award-
ing grants.
Small Disadvantaged Business A small busi-
ness concern which is at least 51 percent
owned by one or more socially and economically
disadvantaged individuals; or, in the case of any
publicly owned business, at least 51 percent of
the stock of which is owned by one or more
socially and economically disadvantaged indi-
viduals and whose management and daily busi-
ness operations are controlled by one or more
such individuals.
Solicitation Instrument A formal document
which elicits proposals for acquisition or finan-
cial assistance awards. Solicitation instruments
used by NRC are IFB and RFP.
Subcontract An agreement or arrangement
between a contractor/recipient and any person
in which the parties do not stand in the relation-
ship of an employer and an employee.
Technical Direction The direction or guidance
of the scientific, engineering, and other techni-
cal aspects of a project, as distinguished from the
administrative and business management aspects.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
NUREG/BR-0045 3 111 111 1111111111 08864 81111111111111
NUREG/BR-0045 3 1262 08864 8513




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EBMKH48FS_E4R616 INGEST_TIME 2012-02-29T16:52:52Z PACKAGE AA00009151_00001
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES