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Library Informer

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Title:
Library Informer
Abbreviated Title:
Library Informer
Physical Description:
4 p.
Language:
English
Creator:
Libraries & Instructional Media Services Department
Publisher:
Libraries & Instructional Media Services Department
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas

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Subjects / Keywords:
Libraries -- Newsletters   ( lcsh )

Notes

General Note:
Library Informer (Vol. 1, no. 5)

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Source Institution:
College of The Bahamas
Holding Location:
College of The Bahamas
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID:
AA00008755:00038


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VoloumeVINO.6TheCollegeOfTheBahamasSeptember,October1994A Bj-Monthly Newsletter liz=----, ... .,.... r i I! I TheLibrarian'sDesk 1 extenlj a warmwelcome t:,TheCollegeofThe aI-lamas, andparticularly thelit,rarystaff, to all new fac1.l1tyandstudents. T: our returning -aculty' ancl stUdents, rtrust Hutyou flaye hada restful vacation andare renewed for the bl-lallenging andexcitingyearWe [anticipatethat we will see all ofyou duringthe Jeourse ofthe year, andlook forward to serying IA very specialwelcomeisalsoextended toourlewlibrarian, I'lls VirginiaBallance, who has ssumedresponsibilitiesfortheHildaBowen ibl'ary. She, alongwith IvIissIvielody Rolle,willJ8servingcollegeconstituents at theGrosvenorCloseCampusandwill promotenursing and health literatureane"!serVlces to individualsandgroupsin the nursingandhealthrelatedfields.Thisyearisexpected to be oneof excitementand-Towtll fortilelibrary. TI-18 Collegeof TI-18. has selected asIts theme for the ''ear,I Promoting: Quality Education."Theli1jra.ry taff joinsTheCollegeinthis thrusttowards \provisionof quality service toits customersandwith the team of dedlc!tted I jtrnplc,/ees,striVttoiSrd-lafiGethef':!!'clio:-nts.W?.ysif!whi'::'f!tl"lis!rnaybe accomplisl-led irlclude: adequat6blidget I lall'Jcations forcc.lle,:tiortdevelopment andreplacemerlt"ridupgTading, Ixpediencyinmakinganonlinepublicaccess catalogueavailabletoconstituents,xpandingthenumberofterminalsforelectroniceEveryofinformation,haVingavailabledequateresourcesinprintandnon-printformatsnd whenthisisimpossible,initiatingthelinkage ith therequiredinformationforthepatronfromxternalsources,providingthetimelyisseminationofinformationthroughitsewsletter,TheLibraryInformer,or disphysand -xhibitionandlaunchingtheFriendsoftl-leibrarygroup(anavenueforeachmemberofTheollegecommunitytoparticipate)toassisttheibrarytoattractfinancialandotherresources.I )vel' thelastacademicyear,thelibraryhadIanyfirsts.InOctober1993,thelibraryacqUired, .ntrust,acollectionpaintingswhichhangthroughoutthefirstfloor ofthe library; in April hefirstphaseofthelibraryautomationprojectasrealized;in lvlay thelibraryautomationroject was realized;inMaythelibraryatrosvenorCloseCampuswasrenamedthe"HildaowenLibrary"inhonourofretiredNurse and ursingEducator,MissHildaBowen.TheE-mailacilityalsobecameoperationalintheOakesieldandHildaBowenLibraries. -,iven thedirectionofthelibraryoverthepastear itis anticipatedthatthe1994-95academic ear will prove anothermilestone.AsTheCollege:elebrates20yearsofacademicexcellence,itis trle hope thattheachievement of anadequatelyspaced,furnishedandequippedfacilitywillalsoecome a realityasineducationalenVironments,tisa well-knownfactthatafirstclasslibrarynormallymanifestsitselfthroughthequalityof deliveryandscholarshipinthe !teaching. lea.rning process.Cognizantthat theJexistingcollectionis inadequate,does notncouragescholarlypursuitsbeyondthebasicneeds of teaching, we willstrivetoupgradeitasamatter of urgency. (some accomplisrJments

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through1993-1994 budget).BIRTHDA YSDURINGSEPTEMBER &: OCTOBERSept. .4,JacqualynHannaSept. 29, TraceThompson Oct.. 03,JacquelineFergusonOcL15,DeniseTaylorOcL15,RodmanFrobes3.MedicalSurgical ANursingApproach: echted by BarbaraC. Long,[etalj.Published by Mosby, St.Louis: c1993,1695p.7.PhonicsinProperPerspective:ArthurW.Heilman.PublishedbyMacMillan,NewYork:1993,145p. NewBooks ReceivedinCataloging5.ImprovingReading byDeanneK.Milan.Publishedby MceJraw Hill, New York:c1992.,487p.1.AdultNursinginHospital CommunitySettings:edi ted byLennetteOwensBurrell.Publishedby AppletonandLarge. Nor'walk,Connecticut:c19891105p. 6. TheCompleteGuidetoTelemarketingManagement:by TodLinchitz.PublishedbyAmacon: c1990, 333p.4. 1'Tursing Care of the Child BearingFamily:byLaurieN.Wherwen,[etal).Publishedby AppletonandLarge, Connecticut,c1993, 13Z2p. 2. Phvsical ExaminationandHealthAsses'sment: byCarolyn Jarvis. Publishedby Tll.B. Saunders,Philadelphia:c1992 952p.BRIEFSInclosmg,I InVIte you to look for qualityimprovement effortsduring the year. Use the suggestion !jox.Your commentsancl suggestIons willhelpsteerthe library :.ntr'llSrightRemember, customersatisfaction IS our ultimate goal! ENJOY )louryear.{) ) ,i'. LIBRARYSTAFF As webeginthishistoneyear,I invite you to revisit thelibraryandacquaint yourself withtherequirements,resourcesand serV"iceswhich wemakeavailablefor you. Students, pleasedonotleave bags ontablesordeface librar: materials.Helpusensuremaximum access tothelimitedspace and resources by themaJorityratherthanthefew.:REFE185.615E95NewTitlesOnTheReferenceShelvesTheEye ofthe PrizeCivil R.IghtsReaderc1991Arecord(documents speeches andfirsthandaccounts)oftheAmerican CIvil RightsMo .... ernent.8.LanguageinExile:ThreeHundredYearsofJamaicanCreole: byBarbaraLalla.PublishedbyUniversityofAlabamaPress,Tuscaloosa:c1990, 253p.9.InternationalHandbook ofUniversities:13theditionpublishedby M. StocktonPress,NewYork: c1993, 1304p.REF J.461 1993REFPA31H69REFT56.23A Dictionary of r'rIoclernPoll tics: byDavid Robertsor.1993 A guide tothecomplex andtermmology ofpolitics, terms such as, "GlasllGst", "PerestrOlka"are explamed clearly. The Oxford Companion toClassicalLiterature:editedbyM.e. Howatson 2nd. ed. c1989.10.TeachingReadinginContentAreas:byHarold1.Herber. Published byPrentice HallInc.,:NewJersey:c1978, 316p.11. AHistory ofthe TwentiethCentury": by ByronO'Callaghan.Publishedby Longma.n,NewYork: c1987, 315p.Administering HigherEducation in aDemocraticSocietyH36HandbookofIndustrial Engineeril}L editedby GavrieL Salvendy,2nd ed.,1991.byCelesteColganThearticle,"AdministeringHigherEducation

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ina..appea.rsillti-jeFreedomPapers 5, July,1994):')'thefe':CC'lllerill:,,:,cary Studies. Inlightoftl-le.currentattemptsa.trestructuringTheCollegefor degree grantiil,stMus.Thearticle'NiHbereprintedoverseveral!ssues ofThe Informer[':'!"tl-le':'[the academic community.It is the hopethat it ,,.,rillelicit stimulatingexchange whicl-jffJE('/positivelyimpacttJ-Ie planning i-'"._.. -''.Theportionof the articlefocusing ontheHungarian:Reform Proposal sfloulcl guicleTheCollege'sdeliberationonthe revised C.O.B.Act. Questions similartothose askelj tJ-le HungarianLegislatorscould well beputto Bal-IamianLegislators(despite the social,economic,andpoliticalclifferences) as theyprepareto debate ttlis clocument. TheCollegeI-las,inthepasttwenty years, founditimpossible to effectively administor qualitytertiary education withthepreviouslegislationandsJl0ulcl seek, therefore,to ot,tain affirmative responses to tI-Je questonsposedintll1Sarticle.Ifit candisentangle itself fromthe.familiarbureaucracyproposed in therevise':l act,The College C'::inbeassuredofclevelGpriient'qyflic!-Ivvillpositively influencetl-Ie ancl stabilityof trJeBalyamian C'Jmmunity. A demclcratic society ishighlydepe!1dentongreaterfreed;JminthiS' eclucational en'l7ironment.HungarianHigher Education Reform In October 1992, theHurlgarianParliament's Subcommittee onHigherEducation requestedttE'tttl-Ie Citi2ens DemocracyCorps(CDC} review a draft of aneducation bill underconsideration by tt1e Parliament.Derek Bok, on Hie executive committeeofCDCandpresidentemeritusofHarvardUniversity, travelecl toHungary together with afew colleagues to meet with memtlers ofthe SUbcommittee,officialsfromtheMinistryofEducationandotherministries,representativesoftheAcademyofScienceand the ConferenceofUniversityRectors, professors, stUdents amI others. Bok and his colleagues asked tileHungarianLegislators a numberof quesfions which mightserveas guicles forcountriescontemplating the reformoftheirhighereducation system. Among tl-Iemwere ::1-18 follOWing: *Howwell does thedraft law succeeclinsecuringappropriate'autonomyor 3interrerence ?* Doesthedraft la''I'It adequatelysafeguardthelegitimaterightsand freedoms of teachersanljstudents?* Does the draftlawadequatelyencourage consolidation to achieveeconomies ofscale and other measures byuniversitiestoachievemoreefficientuseofresources?*Howwell does the draftlaw prOVide forthelong-termfinancingofhighereducation?*Does the draftlaw provideadequateencouragement,incentivesandsafeguardsto promoteeducation andresearcfl of highquality l':t: Does the draft law provldeadequatelyforthereintegrationofHungarianhighereclucation with foreignuniversititesandotherinstitutionsofhigherlearningandwiththeinternationalscholarlycommunity?AdministeringHigher Education inADemocraticSociety By CelesteColgan, Ph.D.To Neglectanindividual'seducationtodayisto condemn himorhertomediocritytomorrow.Soit iswith nations. Education isthecornerstoneofa free society, the bedrock upon WI1ichaI strong healthy stateisbuiltandsustained.Thedemandsof a modern eraare beingpushed ateV'er increasing speeds byextraorclinaryadvancesintechnology. Thosesocieties whicr! anticipatetheseadvancesandbestpreparetheirchildrenforthefuturearelikelytoreapthemost benefit from them. Those whicfl do not,willnot.It was thethirdpresidentoftheUnited States, ThomasJefferson, WflO said:"Enlightenthepeoplegenerallyancltyrannyandoppressionsofboth mindandbody will vanisfl likeevilspirits at the da'",'n ofday."Jefferson's may be a somewhat idealized view of tfle matter,but theconnection between education, democracyandeconomicopportunityisvitalto the well-being offree society.Iftherearenoperfectdemocracies,there are--!.'(

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successfulones, and useful lessons may be clrawn from their experiencesincludingthose inthe field of education. The purposeofthis paperisto pointtospecific practices in theadministration ofhighereducationintheUniteclStatesandother Vtestern Democraciesthatmay haveapplicabilityacrossnationtliJundaries. Ideally, anAmericanuniversity is a laboratoryofdemocracy,inwhichteachersandstudents participate ina free exchangeofideas teacflers sometimesfallshort of themark, the idealisnonetheless important. Anopen dialogue is asfundamental to the systemofhighereducationin the 'UnitedStatesas it is to niC political system.Naturally,there are many cl-lallenges to uniyersity life intrleUnitedStates.Firstand foremostis finances. The federalgOl.Ternment littleto theCOLirJtry's universities and institutionsofhigher learning. TNhile this leaves tlieffl free todetermine nieirowncurriculum and policies,it nlJ!1etheless Imposessubstarltial financialclemancls on tl-leinstitutionsthemselves.Thereareother,relateddifficulties:maintaining high academic and researCflstandards; ensuringthequalityoffaculty appointments;assuringflexibility andrigorinacurriculum;maintainingpoliticalandintellectualfreedom; balancing a moral obligation to educatingthepoor and clisadvantaged against the costsoffinancialaid. In the UnitedStates,it is not just the universityadministrationwhichdetermines hoy.these challenges aretobemet.Interestedgroups, faculty, stUdents, alumni, professional associationsane'! employees often influencetrle discussion. Thesecomplen"lentary and sometimes CGfilpeting voices help ensurethatthe process will remaindemocratic, and intheend, enricl-lirlg. A cl-laracteristicofmoclern democracies is the freedomcitizens have to select from a widevarietyof gooclsand services. Qualityimproves when competitionisvigorous. The same principleofchoice holdstruewithinstitutionsof higher learning;increasingly,it is t,eing applied toprimaryand secondary schoolsas well.4 Students in tfl8 UnitedStates have a largernumberofcolleges anduniversitiesto choose fromthanany otrJer country in theworlc1.Tl-leexistenceofthisnumberofchoicesdirectlybenefits stUdents, whocan selectfrom a vastarrayofsizes, programs and locations the collegesancluniversitieswhich offer the bestopportunitiesto meet their academic andculturalgoals. Tt"le many choices available tostudentsforce schools to compete forqualifiedstudents. This leads some schools toward specialization; for others, the competition obliges them to offerthewidest possitlle selectionofcourses. Schools which fail to meet studentsneeds loseenrollment anclcaneventually tieforced to close. Those which offerthebest choices and maintain the l-liglieststandardsattractthe mosttalentedstudents.TIlereareapproximately600publicfour-yearcolleges anel universitiesintheUnitedStates. Over 1,550colleges anduniversitiesareentirely private. (Altl-IOUgli tI-Jetwo termsareoften used interchangeably, a college refers toaninstitutionwhich offersstudentsonly one degree, typically, a bacllelor's degreeinliberalartsor science. Auniversity,ontheotherhandcan award morethanone degree, and typically a numberofspecializedgraduatedegreesaswell.) Putllic Higfler Education. U.S.statecolleges anduniversitiesaregenerallyfundedinpartbythetaxpayersofanindividualstate. StUdent fees andtuitioncover theremainderofthecosts. These arepublicinstitutions;bydefinition theirprimary purposeisto educatestudentswholivewithin the bordersofthestate.Thusstudentsmay transferfrom one college toanotherwithin HIe statewithlittledifficulty, provided they havetheproper academic standing. Out-of-Stateresidentsmay be accepted tostateschools, butinmostinstancestheyarerequiredtopay higher tuition costs.State colleges anduniversitiesaverage one full-timeteacher or researchfaculty for every16.9stuclen ts. As of trle 1991-1992SCi-IDOl,theaverageannualcost for a full-timestudenttoattend a stateSCI'iool was about$5,700,or about15.5percentof theaverageannual income per memberof the labor force.

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These publi ,:,instit1Jti':'!1svarygreatly!::SiZ8dnd enrc,Ement.There are small-to-me.clium size four-y,:"jr cc'lleges, r'3nging frofn5DDtel2,5DDsttiderJts; c,:,mprehensivestateuniversities,'with at,out 10'[II)Jstudents; anc11argemultipurposeuniversities,,vi-lere.moretJ-lan 20,GOO students::ireenrolle-:1u.s. Higher Education. While some pri",catecc1l6.ges[nay also receiile support fromstate legislatures,most oftheir come from stuclent tuition,privatedonations, foundation or corporate fumls, endowment revenues and federalgrants.Byancllarge,privatecolleges anduniversities have more full-time faculty andresearchersper student thanstateinstitutions,apprOXimately one for every 12.8.This is inlarge measure attributabletothehighertuition costs andlargerendowments foundatmay private colleges. In1991-1992,the averageannualcost perfull-timestudentataprivateuniversitywas about$14,350,or apprOXimately39percentoftheannualincomeofanaverage memberofthelabor force. 1"llhile the sizeCifprivate institutiunsvaries as much as thatofpublicinstitutions, tWD-thirds of tl-lerill-l;:tvec.fJrollmentsof under 2,500st\jljents.Arl\JtJ-ierdistingtiishingcharacteristicof private colleges18theirdiversity.r\l1anyweree.stablis;-H3ClfGrspecificrelig,i,:ILlsor cultural missions. In many ways, these schDols reflect the diversityof theUnitedStatesand the freedom ofindividualgroups topursue religiousand academic experiences oftI-JeirDvm cl-loosing. In the past, ,rirtually everyreligious c1enomination in the UnitedStateshadatleast one college oruniversity affiliated with it. While manyofthesetiesremain,ingeneral, they aremucl-llooser inthe past,andthestudentstheyattractcome from widelydiversebackgrounds. A similarphenomenonistakingplaceincolleges and thatwere all-maleor all-female. Over U1e pasttwogenerations, many men's and women'sinstitutionswith longtraditions have opened uptheir!joors to students ofthe opposite sex. Thismove corresponds to a generaleYolution inU.S. onthesubjectofco-education and, 5 nagging enrollments toa(l(1sUbstann3ny to theirnumbers. Ingeneral,smallprivatecolleges and i.miversitiesstriveto createaml atmosprlereofcommunity ancllearning, to clefine aclearmission aml iclentity for tl-lemselves, and toensurethat theircurriculum and programsreflectthisspecialtradition.Manyof these smallerinstitutionsfocusspecificallyonundergraduateeclucation.QualityofinstructlOnis their lifeblood and highly regarded professors areoften the subjectof vigorous competitionby rival institutions. AdmissionsStandards. Nothing definesaninstitution ofrligllerlearning morethanthequalityofitsstudentbody.Naturally,in a country lil:ethe UniteelStateswhere competitionjsthe andthere are many schools tocl-Ioose from, universitiesgoto considerable lengthstoattractthemosttalentedand prornisingstuclents with morespecifically defined skillsorinterests, inscience,the arts orathletics. .Thissame competitiveness andspecializationdefines the process ofadmissionsinmostofthecountry'srespected colleges anduniversities.Smallreligiouscolleges, for example,may emphasizethespihtual goalsof their incommg studentsasa partofadmissionconsideration.Privatecolleges of allkindstend tobe highly selective;thatis, theyscrutinizethe academicpreparationof the applicant,along with scoresonnationaltests,performanceinsecondary school andthenatureoftheirextracurricularactivities.Withsome notable exceptions, comprehensivestatecolleges andlargerpublic researe!"l universities generally !lave somewhat lower standardsofaclmissions.Generally,they will accept anyone who hasearned a high school cliplomain trleir state. They offer arange of flexibleundergraduateprograms,stressingprofessionaltraining,teclmology, engineering,agricultureandphysicalsciences. Typically, tlley offerhundredsof coursesto fulfill graduationreqUirements. To be continuedinthe nextissueofTheLibraryInformer.

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L., -"'t:...."-.' .,,-.'Reorganizing ReserveBooks,Teaching Practice Text, Microfilll1 CollectionDuring tIlesummerStaffunclertookS'omeactiyities

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