U.S. airborne exports and general imports

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
U.S. airborne exports and general imports
Alternate title:
United States airborne exports and general imports
Portion of title:
Shipping weight and value, customs district and continent
Physical Description:
3 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
Bureau of the Census.
Place of Publication:
Washington
Creation Date:
February 1974
Frequency:
monthly with annual summary
monthly
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Aeronautics, Commercial -- Freight -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with Jan. 1974
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-1976.
General Note:
Prior to Jan. 1976, Supt. of Docs. no. was C 56.210:986-
General Note:
"FT 986."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001209842
notis - AFW0107
oclc - 02173661
lccn - 75641424
issn - 0095-7771
System ID:
AA00008567:00013

Related Items

Preceded by:
U.S. foreign trade. Airborne exports and general imports
Succeeded by:
United States foreign trade. U.S. airborne exports and general imports

Full Text
C 0 :'Y?6.O: 6- 7-7 ;L




," U.S. AIRBORNE EXPORTS

1;V* AND GENERAL IMPORTS


W! 0 FEBRUARY 1974


Shipping Weight and Value;

Customs District and Continent


This report presents statistics on U.S. exports and
imports by air in U.S. Customs district by continent
arrangement. Data have been compiled from Shipper's
Export Declarations (Commerce Form "525-VI and
import entries during the regular processing of statis-
tical data on foreign trade shipments. The Customs
districts shown in this report are those having combined
exports and imports by airvaluedat$1.5million or more
during the preceding calendar year. A complete list of
Customs districts and ports is presented in Schedule D,
Classification of U.S. Customs Districts and Ports for
U.S. Foreign Trade Statistics, January 1, 1974 edition,
as amended.

Exports
These statistics represent exports of domestic and
foreign merchandise combined and include government
and nongovernment shipments of merchandise by air
from the United States to foreign countries. The
statistics, therefore, include Department of Defense
Military Assistance Program- -Grant-Aid shipments,
shipments for economic assistance under the Foreign
Assistance Act, and shipments of agricultural commod-
ities under P.L. 480 (The Agricultural Trade Development
and Assistance Act of 1954, asamended) and related laws.
Shipments to U.S. Armed Forces and diplomatic missions
abroad for their own use are not included in the export
statistics. U.S. trade with Puerto Rico and U.S.
possessions and trade between U.S. possessions are not
included in this report, but exports from Puerto Rico to
foreign countries are included as a part of the U.S.
export statistics. Merchandise shipped through the
United States in transit from one foreign country to
another, when documented as such with U.S. Customs,
is excluded. (Foreign merchandise that has entered the
United States as an import and is subsequently reexported
is not treated as in-transit merchandise, and is included
in this report.) The figures in this report exclude ex-
ports of household and personal effects, shipments by
mail and parcel post, and shipments of airplanes under
their own power.


The value reported in the export statistics generally
is equivalent to a f.a.s. 'free alongside ship) value at the
U.S. port of export, based on the transaction price, in-
cluding inland freight, insurance, and other charges
incurred in placing the merchandise alongside the
carrier at the U.S. port of exportation.

For security reasons, certain commodities are desig-
nated as Special Category commodities, for which
security regulations place restrictions upon the export
information that may be released. The data shown in
this report for individual Customs districts and conti-
nents exclude exports of Special Category commodities,
but overall shipping weight and value totals for Special
Category commodities are shown. A list of Special
Category commodities may be obtained from the Bureau
of the Census.

The statistics on exports of domestic and foreign
merchandise to countries other than Canada reflect fully
compiled data for shipments valued $500 and over
combined with estimated data for shipments valued
$251-4499, based on a 50-percent probability sample
of such shipments. For exports to Canada the statistics
reflect fully compiled data for shipments valued $2,000
and over combined with estimated data for shipments
valued $251-$1,999, based on a 10-percent probability
sample of such shipments. Shipping weight and value
data are also estimated for shipments valued under $251.
These estimates are not included in the data shown for
individual Customs districts.

Since the export figures shown include estimates
based on a sample of low-valued shipments, they are
subject to some degree of sampling variability. The
table on the following page provides a rough guide to
the general level of sampling variability of value totals,
on a 2 chances out of 3 basis. Usually, the higher value
figures will have the lower percent sampling errors.


Inquiries concerning these figures should be addressed to the Chief, Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of the
Census, Washington, D.C. 20233. Tel: Area Code 301, 763-5140.

f t U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, Social and Economic Statistics Administration, BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

K* For sale by the Publications Distribution Section, Social and Economic Statistics Adminstration, Washington, D.C.
re o 20233. Price 10 cents per copy. Annual subscription (FT 900,975, 985, and 986 combined) $3.00.
P4rii o+


FT986-74-2


Issued May 1974










Proportion of cells with
Value totals for sampling variability of:
"Total" and "North
America" of: under under under under
2% 5% 10% 20%


$1,000,000 and over .60 .75 .85 1.00

$500,ooo-$1,000,000 .20 1.00

$100,000-$500,000 .30 .45 .70 1.00

$20,000-$100,000 .35 .70 1.00

Cells of under $20,000 Are likely to have sampling
variability from $3,000
to $15,000


Value totals for Are likely to have sampling
continents of South variability of:
America, Europe, Asia,
Australia and Oceania,
and Africa of:


$300,000 and over Less than 2%

$100,000-$300,000 Less than 5% with over half
of the totals less than 2%

$20,000-$100,000 Generally less than 10%
with over half of the
totals less than 5%

Under $20,000 Generally $500 to $5,000

Cells of $0 Generally less than $500


The sampling variability of shipping weightfigures, in
percentage terms, can be approximated by the percent
sampling variability of value.


Imports

These statistics represent general imports, which are
a combination of imports for immediate consumption and
entries into bonded warehouses. The statistics include
government as well as nongovernment shipments of


merchandise by air from foreign countries to the United
States. However, American goods returned by the U.S.
Armed Forces for their own use a re excluded. U.S. trade
with Puerto Rico and with U.S. possessions and trade
between U.S. possessions are not included in this report,
but imports into Puerto Rico from foreign countries are
considered to beU.S. imports and are included. Merchan-
dise shipped through the United States in transit from one
foreign country to another, when documented as such
through U.S. Customs, is not reported as imports and is
excluded from the data shown in this report. (Foreign
merchandise that has entered the United States as an
import and is subsequently reexported is not treated as
in-transit merchandise and is included in this report.)
Imports of household and personal effects, imports by
mail and parcel post, and imports of airplanes under their
own power are not included.




The Customs value shown in this report represents
the value of imports as appraised by the U.S. Customs
Service in accordance with the legal requirements of
Sections 402 and 402a of the Tariff Act of 1930, as
amended. It may be based on the foreign market
value, export value, constructed value, American selling
price, etc. It generally represents a value in the foreign
country, and therefore excludes U.S. import duties,
freight, insurance, and other charges incurred in bringing
the merchandise to the United States. This valuation is
primarily used for collection of import duties and
frequently does not reflect the actual transaction value.



The statistics shown for individual Customs districts
represent fully compiled data for shipments valued $251
and over. Data for shipments valued under $251, re-
ported on formal and informal entries (informal entries
generally contain items valued under $251), a re estimated
from a 1-percent sample for 1974. Separate shipping
weight and value estimates for shipments valued under
$251 are shown. The shipping weight data are estimated
from the values on the basis of constants that have been
derived from an observation of the value-weight relation-
ships in past periods.



Since the statistics showing total value of imports by
all carriers include sample estimates, they are subject
to sampling variability. In general, the higher value
figures will have the lower percent sampling errors.
Value totals of $500,000 and over will generally have a
sampling variability of less than 3 percent; value totals
of under $500,000 will generally have a sampling
variability of less than $50,000.













February 1974


U.S. EXPORTS BY AIR


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


1 II I1 iIII I I ll 111111 1111lii nlli Ill 111111l
3 1262 08587 7289


February 1974