Farmers' bulletins and leaflets of the United States Department of Agriculture (for information and use of visitors at t...

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Material Information

Title:
Farmers' bulletins and leaflets of the United States Department of Agriculture (for information and use of visitors at the Fair)
Portion of title:
Farmers' bulletins and leaflets of the United States Department of Agriculture (information for visitors at the Fair)
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Division of Publications
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Office of Information
Publisher:
U.S. Govt. Printing Office.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
1935
Frequency:
annual
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Agriculture -- Bibliography -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
catalog   ( marcgt )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004969097
oclc - 669459692
lccn - 2010229686
System ID:
AA00008557:00002

Full Text
935"


Zr


Farmers'


Bulletins


and


Leaflets


the


United


States


Department


Agriculture


(For


information


and


use of


visitors


the


Fair)


The publications here listed are free on request in limited iiuni'lrs, no more
than 10 to one person. In the form on the last page, list, in numerical order, the
numbers of those desired. On the reverse side, write your name and address
plainly, detach the form at the perforated line, and mail it in a stamped envelop
to the Division of Publications, Office of Information, United States Department
of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
Failure to receive requested bulletins will indicate exhaustion of the free supply.
These may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, Government
Printing Office, Washington, D. C., for 5 cents a copy, unless otherwise priced
in this list. Those beside which an asterisk (*) appears are for sale only.


Accounting-Budgeting-Farm Man-
agement
511 F. Farm bookkeeping.
572 F. A system of farm cost accounting.
782 F. The use of a diary for farm accounts.
924 F. A simple way to increase crop yields
"986 F. Farm practices that increase crop yields in
the Gulf Coast region.
1015 F. Producing family and farm supplieson the


*1463 F.
1475 F.
1545 F.

1546 F.
1553 F.
1562 F.
1564 F.
*1565 F.
1614 F.
1662 F.
1663 F.
1678 F.
1681 F.
1697 F.


cotton farm.
Home supplies furnished by th
Selecting a farm.
Forestry and farm income.
A method of analyzing the farm
The farm lease contract.
Farm inventories.
Successful farming on 80-acre fa
tral Indiana.
Successful farming on 160-acri
central Indiana.
Soil productivity as affected by3
tion.


e farm.


I US!flCv~.


rms in cen-
a farms in
crop rota-


Dry-farming methods and practih
wheat growing min the Columbi
Snake River Basins.
Systems of livestock farming in the
Prnirie Belt of Alabama and Missi
Planning and recording family ex
lures.
Farm practices under corn-borer
tions.
Farm budgeting.
Shall I buy a combine?
Business records for poultry keepers
Husker-shredders in corn-borer con
Winter lepumes for green manure
Cotton Belt.
Safe use and storage of gasoline and
sene on the farm.
Adjusting Corn-Belt farming to mee
borer conditions.
Using soil-binding plants to reclaim
in the South.
Farm practice with leapedeza.
Methods and costs of filling silos


ces in
a and
Black
ssippi.
pendi-
ccndi-


irol
in the
I kero-
t (corn-
gullies

in the


Bees-Honey


*695 F.
961 F.
975 F.
1012 F.
1014 F.
1039 F.
1198 F.
1215 F.
1216 F.
1222 F.
1713 F.


Outdoor wintering of bee3.
Transferring bees to modern hives.
Control of European foulbrood.
Preparation of bees for outdoor wintering.
Wintering bees in cellars.
Commercial comb-honey production.
Swarm control.
Beekeeping in the clover region.
Beekeeping in the buckwheat region.
Beekeeping in the tulip-tree region.
The treatment of American foulbrood.


Berries
S>7 F. Raspberry culture.
901 F. Everbearing strawberries.
*998 F. Culture of Logan blackberry and related
varieties.
1026 F. Strawberry culture. South Atlantic and
Gulf Coast regions.


027 F.
028 F.
013 F.
398 F.


Straw
Straw
Straw
Curra
and


1399 F. Black
1400 F. Estab
1401 F. Mana
1402 F. Crant
1403 F. Dewb


berry culture, western I'
berry culture, eastern U
berry varieties.
nts and gooseberries: '
relation to white-pine b
berry growing.
listing cranberry fields.
going cranberry fields.
erry harvesting and ha
erry growing.


united States.
united States.
Their culture
lister rust.


odling.


Birds


*


497 F. Game, aquatic, and rapacious birds in
relation to man.
506 F. Food of well-known birds.
513 F. Fifty common birds of farm and orchard.
25c.
630 F. Birds useful to the farmer.
684 F. Squab raising.
755 F. Common birds of southeastern United


760 F.


. 1n rU 1


States.
Attracting
States.
Attracting I
Attracting b
S- I-1


birds in northwestern United
birds. Middle Atlantic States.
)irds, East Central States.



























1526 F.
1554 F.
*1565 F.
1572 F.
1589 F.
1590 F.
1608 F.
1615 F.
1638 F.
1649 F.
1658 F.
1660 F.
1662 F.
1669 F.
1678 F.
1690 F.
1698 F.
1701 F.
1703 F.
1715 F.
1720 F.
1442 F.
1729 F.
1737 F.
1738 F.
1743 F.
*56 L.
62 L.


77 L.
87L.
97L.
107 L.


Laying out fields for tractor plowing.
Harvesting and storing ice on the farm.
Tile-trenching machinery.
Planning the farmstead.
Farm dairy houses.
Sewage and sewerage of farm homes.
Gullies: How to control and reclaim them.
Plain concrete fofa m use.
Greenhouse construction and heating.
Dairy-barn construction.
Beef-cattle barns.
Principles of dairy-barn ventilation.
Farm plumbing.
Farmstead water supply.,
Painting on the farm.
Simple plumbing repairs in the home.
Small concrete construction on the farm.
Practical hog houses.
Rammed earth walls for buildings.
Effective having equipment and practices
for northern Great Plains and inter-
mountain regions.
Clearing land of brush and stumps.
Poultry houses and fixtures.
Shall I buy a combine?
Making cellars dry.
Husker-shredder on eastern Corn-Belt
farms.
Fire-protective construction on the farm.
Operation and care of the combined har-
vester-thresher.
Hay stackers and their use.
Rat-proofing buildings and premises.
Construction of chimneys and fireplaces.
Farm water power.
The use of logs and poles in farm construc-
tion.
Husker-shredder in corn-borer control.
Farm terracing.
Safe use and storage of gasoline and kero-
sene on the farm.
Plowing with moldboard plows.
Heating the farm home.
Corncribs for the Corn Belt.
Reservoirs for farm use.
Methods and costs of husking corn in the
field.
Adobe or sun dried brick for farm build-
ings.
Storage of sweetpotatoes.
Machinery for dusting cotton.
Stop gullies-save your farm.
Farmhouse plans. 10c.
Hotbeds and coldframes.
Preventing cracks in new wood floors.
Why some wood surfaces hold paint longer
than others.
Bracing farm buildings.
Wind-resistant construction for farm
buildings.
Cross-blocking sugar beets by machine.
The barrel seed scarifier.


Canning Drying Pckling-Preserv-
ing (Home)


*900 F.
*984 F.
1075 F.
1172 F.
1186 F.


Home-made fruit butters
Farm and home drying
vegetables.
Unfermented grape Juice.
in the home.
Farm slaughtering and
mutton.
Pork on the farm-kill
*


i.
Ig of


fruits


How to make it
use of lamb and


ing, curing, and


1592 F. Beef production on the farm
1600 F. Dehoraig, castrating, branding,
marking beef cattle.


Cattle:
1412 F.
1443 F.
1470 F.
1532 F.
1573 F.
1604 F.
1626 F.
1723 F.
7L.
*10 L.
*14 L.
16 L.
20 L.
Cattle:


Daitry


Care and management of dairy bulls.
Dairy cattle breeds.
Care and management of dairy cows.
Dairy-herd improvement through coo
tive bull associations.
Legume hays for milk production.
Dairy-herd improvement associations
stories the records tell.
Feeding dairy cows.
Feeding, care, and management of y<
dairy stock.
Feeding dairy cows in summer.
Care of the dairy cow at calving time.
Raising the dairy heifer.
Purebred dairy sires.
Care of the dairy calf.


LW Miscellaneous


pera-

and


mug


1066 F. Determining the age of cattle by the teeth.
51 L. Improving cattle in areas freed of ticks.
Clovers


676 F.


110L.


Hard clover seed and its treatment
hulling.
Alsike clover.
Red clover culture.
Crimson clover: Seed production.
Sweetclover in Corn-Belt farming.
Bur-clover cultivation and utilization.
Sweetclover.
Red-clover seed production in the In
mountain States.
Why red clover fails.


Conservation


1234 F.
1697 F.
1719 F.
*58L.

82 L.
85L.


Gullies: How to control and reclaim them.
Using soil-binding plants to reclaim gullies
in the South.
Improving the farm environment for wild-
life.
Making a model to show how forests pre-
vent erosion.
Controlling small gullies by bluegrass sod.
Strip cropping to prevent erosion.


Corn
*773 F. Corn growing under drought conditions.
*915 F. How to reduce weevil waste in southern


1029 F.
1149 F.
1175 F.
15862 F.
1589 F.
1634 F.
1062 F.
1679 F.
1681 F.
1701 F.
1714 F.
1715 F.
1744 F.


corn.
Conserving corn
Coast States.
Growing corn in
Better seed corn.
Farm practices
tions.
Husker-shredder
farms.


from weevils in the Gulf
the Southeastern States.
under comrn-borer condi-


on eastern


t


iter-


9Th~
A







9


U


Corn-Belt


Growing sugar corn for the cannery.
Husker-shredder in corn-borer control,
Pop corn.
Adjusting Corn-Belt farming to meet corn-
borer conditions.
Cornoeribs for the Corn Belt.
Corn culture.
Methods and costs of husking corn ha the
field.
The what and how of hybrid corn.


(inst at Th'nfmitrlnvn ltndrlc


:


f
9








976 F.
1214 F.
1272 F.
1315 F.
1342 F.
1451 F.
1610 F.
1675 F.
1734 F.
3L.
9L.
19 L.
20L.
25L.


Diseases: Animal-Poultry


449 F.
666 F.
713 F.
781 F.
834 F.
1017 F.
1018 F.
1054 F.
1069 F.
1085 F.
1146 F.
1155 F.
1244 F.
1330 F.
1355 F.
1422 F.
1536 F.
1593 F.
1596 F.
*1625 F.
1652 F.
1704 F.
1736 F.
*34 L.
75 L.
89 L.


102 L.
108L.


Rabies or hydrophobia.
Foot-and-mouth disease.
Sheep scab.
Tuberculosis of hogs.
Hog cholera: Prevention and treatment.
Cattle scab and methods of control and
eradication.
Hemorrhagic septicemia, stockyards fever,
swine plague, fowl cholera, etc.
Loco-weed disease.
Tuberculosis in livestock. Detection, con-
trol, and eradication.
Hog lice and hog mange. Methods of
control and eradication.
Dourine of horses.
Diseases of sheep, infections and nonin-
fectious.
Diseases, ailments, and abn rmal condi-
tions of swine.
Parasites and parasitic diseases of sheep.
Blackleg, its nature, cause, and prevention.
Udder diseases of dairy cows.
Infectious abortion of cattle.
Trembles (milk sickness).
Cattle grubs or heel flies with suggestions
for their control.
Tick fever.
Diseases and parasites of poultry.
Bang's disease (infectious abortion).
Anthrax.
Trichinosis: A disease caused by eating
raw pork.
Warts on cattle.
Controlling stomach worms in sheep and
lambs.
EradJi: ji ing tuberculosis from poultryand
SWIlJt.
ContrltmUng kidney worms in swine in the
Sou born States.


Diseases: Berries-Fruits-Nuts


93S
1053
1120
1160
1380
1458
147S
* 1479
1488
1527
1672


Apple bitter-rot and its control.
Control ol cherry leaf-spot.
Control of apple powdery mildew.
Diseases of apples in storage.
Apple -cald anrd its control.
Strawberry diseases.
Apple scab.
Apple blotch.
Diseases of raspberries and blackberries.
Peach brown rot and scab.
Diseases of pecans in the Southern States.


Diseases: Flber-Forage--Grain Crops


*1124 F.
*1212 F.


The brown-spot of corn with suggestions
for its control.
Straighthead of rice and its control.


547 F.
692 F.
735 F


Cooling milk and cream on the farm.
Farm dairy houses.
Renting dairy farms.
Cleaning milking machines.
Dairy-barn construction.
Making and using cottage cheese in the
home.
Dairy farming for beginners.
Care of milk utensils on the farm.
Making American cheese on the farm for
home consumption.
Improved sanitation in milk production.
Making and storing farm butter for winter
use.
Improving dairy herds.
Care of the dairy calf.
Preventing feed flavors and odors in milk.


Rose diseases: Their cause and control.
Bean diseases and their control.
Pea diseases and their control.

Sheep-killing dogs.
Breeds of dogs.


Drainage
805 F. Drainage of irrigated farms.
*815 F. Organization, financing, and administra-
tion of drainage districts.
*1131 F. Tile-trenching machinery.
1606 F. Farm drainage.
Dry Farming
*1163 F. Dry farming in western South Dakota.
1545 F. Dry-farming methods and practices in
wheat growing in Columbia and Snake
River Basins.


Feeds--Feeding


724 F.
1133 F.
1179 F.
1504 F.
1549 F.
1573 F.
1617 F.
1626 F.
1699 F.
1718 F.
1723 F.
1732 F.


Feeding of grain sorghums to lives
Feeding garbage to hogs.
Feeding cottonseed products to liv
Self-feeding versus hand-feeding s
litters.
Feeding cattle for beef.
Legume hays for milk production.
Soybean utilization.
Feeding dairy cows.
Growing root crops for livestock.
Important sugar-beet byproduc
their utilization.
Feeding, care, and management o
dairy stock.
Growing barley for malt and feed.


tock.


restock.
3ws and


,ts


hf young


Fertilizers


921 F.
1250 F.
1496 F.
1663 F.
70L.
71 L.


Principles of liming soils.
Green manuring.
Inoculation of legumes and nonlegumes
with nitrogen-fixing and other bacteria.
Winter legumes for green manure in the
Cotton Belt.
Home mixing of fertilizers.
Fertilizers for pecan soils.


Fire Hazards-Dust Explosions


1512 F.
1590 F.
1643 F.
1667 F.
1678 F.
44L.


Protection from lightning.
Fire-protective construction on the farm.
Fire safeguards for the farm.
Rural community fire departments.
Safe use and storage of gasoline and kero-
sene on the farm.
Fires on farms.


Flax
669 F. Fiber flax.
1650 F. Flaxseed production by power farming
methods in northern Great Plains.
1728 F. Flax-fiber production.
Flowers-Shrubs---Lawns


Roses for the home.
Beautifying the farmstead.
Growing annual flowering plants.
Chrysanthemums for the home.
Dahlias for the home.
Herbaceous perennials.
Garden irises.
Propagation of trees and shrubs.
Transplanting trees and shrubs.
Planting and care of lawns.
Rockeries.


fl-fl--


- ..t -


SDogs
S 1268 F.
1491 F.


I








1617 F. Soybean utilization.
1674 F. Food for children.
1705 F. Milk for the family.
*17 L. Cooking beef according to the cut.
*28 L. Lamb as you like it.
*39 L. Eggs at any meal.
42 L. Good food habits for children.
*45 L. Pork in preferred ways.
48 L. Reindeer recipes.
49 L. Ice creams frozen without stirring.
*66 L. Rabbit recipes.
74 L. Boning lamb cuts.
"81 L. Cooking cured pork.
Forestry-Forest Products
622 F. Basket willow culture.
*1071 F. Making woodlands profitable in Southern
States.


1117 F.
1123 F.


1628 F.
1671 F.
1680 F.


Forestry and farm income.
Growing and planting hardwood
on the farm.
Care and improvement of farm v
Trees for town and city streets.
Planting and care of street trees.
Measuring and marketing farm t
Slash pine.
Tree planting in Great Plains rej
Black walnut for timber and nut
Windbreak as a farm asset.
Idle land and costly timber.
Growing and planting coniferou
the farm.


Planting the roadside.
Trees for roadside planting.
Long-leaf pine primer.
Arbor Day: Its purpose and
Loblolly pine primer.
Propagation of trees and shr
Transplanting trees and shr
Planting and care of shelter
northern Great Plains.
Growing black locust trees.
Shortleaf pine.
Farmers in Northern States


seedlings


roods.


imber.


;ion.
s.


s trees on


observance.
ubs.
ibs.
Sbelts on the


grow timber


as a money crop.
*1693 F. Growing Christmas holly on the farm.
1726 F. Treatment and care of tree wounds.


18 L.
29 L.


Bamboos and bamboo culture.
Farm woods-A savings bank paying
' interest.
Cutting the farm woods "profit wise."
Planting southern pine.
Producing pine nursery stock in the South.
Woods burning in the South.
Good naval-stores practice.
Small trees wasteful to cut for saw timber.
Pulp-wood crops in the Northeast.
Making a model to show how forests pre-


vent erosion.


Why some wood surfaces hold paint longer
than others.
More turpentine, less scar, better pine.
Planting black walnut.
Protect hardwood stands from grating.


Fruits


471 F.
685 F.
727 F.

776 F.
794 F.
917 F.
918 F.


Grape propagation, pruning, and training
The native persimmon.
Growing fruit for home use in the Great
Plains area.
Growing cherries east of RockyMountains.
Citrus-fruit improvement. How to secure
and use tree-performance records.
Growing peaches-Sites and cultural


methods.
Peach varieties and their cle


issifleation.


1876 F.
1687 F.


Lubricating-oil sprays for use on dormant
fruit trees.
Removing spray residue from apples and


pears.
1689 F. Grapa districts and varieties in the United
States.
*1696 F. Deciduous-fruit improvement thrnu h


tree-parformance records.
1739 F. Pear growing in the Pariflc Coast States.
Fur-Bearing Animals
587 F. EconomicvalueofNorthAmerican skunks.
869 F. Muskrat as fur bearer. \Vith notes on its
use as food.
1247 F. American moles as agricultural pests and
as fur producers.
*1519 F. Rabbit skins for fur.
1563 F. Rabbit parasites and diseases.
*1598 F. Mountain beavers in the Pacific North-
west: Their habits, economic status, and


1716 F.
1730 F.
8L.
27 L.
47 L.
Game:


control.
Mole control.
Rabbit production
Mink raising.
Recommendations
farming.
Hygiene in fox fan


L.


to beginners


min fur


ming.


Propagation-Protection


1612 F. Propagation of aquatic game birds.
1613 F. Propagation of upland game birds.
1719 F. Improving the farm environment for wild
life.
1742 F. Game laws for the season 1934-35.


Gardening: Home- School
*218 F. The school garden.
879 F. Home storage of vegetables.
*934 F. Home gardening in the South.
1044 F. The city home garden.
1242 F. Permanent fruit and vegetable gardens.
*1398 F. The dasheen: A southern root crop for
home use and market.
1673 F. The farm garden. 10c.
1746 F. Subsistence farm gardens.
Gardening: Truck-Greenhlouse
232 F. Okra: Its culture and uses.
354 F. Onion culture.
434 F. The home production of onion seed and
sets.
1064 F. Production of late or main-crop potatoes.
1253 F. Seed peas for the canner.
*1320 F. The production of cucumbers in green-
houses.
1338 F. Tomatoes as a truck crop.
*1396 F. The dasheen: A southern root crop for
home use and market.
*1418 F. Lettuce growing in greenhouses.
1509 F. Bean growing in northern Idaho, eastern
Washington, and eastern Oregon.
1563 F. Cucumber growing.
1609 F. Lettuce growing.
1620 F. Growing cucumbers for pickling.
1646 F. Asparagus growing.
1673 F. The farm garden. lOc.
Grains


*786 F.

*793 F.
*827 F.
878 F.


I *flflt~ r


Fall-sown gramins in Maryland ai
ginima.
Foxtail millet: Its culture and util
Shallu, or "Egyptian wheat":
maturing variety of sorghum.
Grains for western North and
Dakota.
.-.I -~ 1 A-a


nd Vir-
ization.
& late-
South


--l. = v = w__wMi


IW W W m


I


p








Sudan grass.
Cowpeas: Culture and varieties.
Cowpeas: Utilization.
Growing and utilizing sorghums for forage.
Important cultivated grasses.
Velvet bean.
Cultivated grasses of secondary im-
* portance.
Forage crops and their culture in northern
Nebraska and the Dakotas.
Soybeans: Culture and varieties.
Johnson grass as a weed.
Legume hays for milk production.
The production of Johnson grass for hay
and pasturage.
Reed canary grass.
Soybean hay and seed production.
Soybean utilization.
Winter legumes for green manuring in the
Cotton Belt.
Farm practice with lespedeza.
Vetch culture and uses.
Kudzu, a forage crop for the Southeast.
Lespedeza.
Crested wheatgrass.
la making
Hay caps.
Timothy .
Effective baying equipment and practices
for northern Great Plains and inter-
mountain regions.
High-grade alfalfa hay: Methods of pro-
ducing, baling, and loading for market.
Legume hays for milk production.
The production of Johnson grass for hay
and pasturage.
Soybean hay and seed production.
Hay stackers and their use.
Measuring hay in stacks.
Huron timothy.


Health-Sanitation-Rural Sociology


*450 F.
602 P.
954F.
1173 F.
1227 F.
*1245 F.
*1325 F.
"1388 F.
1408 F.
*1441 F.
"1485 F.
1559 F.
1622 F.
1667 F.
Hogs
1133 F.
1186F


Some facts about malaria.
Production of clean milk.
Disinfection of stables.
Plans of rural community buildings.
Sewage and sewerage of farm homes.
Farmers' telephone companies, organiza-
tion, financing, and management.
Social aspects of rural planning.
Rural planning: Social aspects of recreation
places.
House fly and how to suppress it.
Rural planning-the village.
Rural hospitals.
Rural libraries.
Rural buildings for business and social
uses.
R iral community fire departments.


Feeding
Pork on
ning.
Breeds o
Gastrati
Swine pr
Fitting,
Practica
Hog-lot e
Self-feedi
and lit


garbage to ho ts.
the farm, killing, curing, and man-
f swine.
on of hogs.
education.
showing, and Judging hogs.
I hog houses.
equipment.
ing versus hand-feeding of sows
ters.


Home Economics


*927 F.


Farm home conveniences.


79 L. Rompers.
80 L. Dresses for little girls.
103 L. Quality guides in buying sheets and pillow-
cases.
105 L. Quality guides in buying ready-made
dresses.


Horses-Mules


1535 F.


Breeds of draft horses.
How to select a sound horse.
Horse-breeding suggestions for farmers.
Breeds of light horses.
Feeding horses.
Mule production.
Breaking and training colts.
Care and management of farm work
horses.
Farm horseshoeing.


1511 F.
120 F.
1537 F.
1.57.3 F
1597 F
1602 F.
1605 F.
1617 F.
1663F.
1724 F.
1740 F.
91 L.
100 L.
104 L.
Hay--]
'977 F.
967F.
9901525 F.
1525 F. -


Insects: Animal-Poultry


897 F.
909 F.
980 F.
1057 F.
1070 F.
1085 F.
1097 F.
1330 F.
1503 F.
1596 F.
*1625 F.
1652 F.
5L.
13 L.
8WL.


Sheep tick and its eradication by dipping,
Mites and lice on poultry.
Screw-worms and other maggots affecting
animals.
Fleas and their con trol.
Cattle lice and their eradication.
Spinose ear tick, and methods of treating
infested animals.
Cattle-fever ticks, and methods of eradica-
tion.
The fowl tick and how premises may be
freed from it.
Hog lice and hog mange. Methods of con-
trol and eradication.
Stable fly, how to prevent its annoyance
and its losses to livestock.
Parasites and parasitic diseases of sheep.
Horse bets and their control.
Cattle grubs or heel flies, with suggestions
for their control.
Tick fever.
Diseases and parasites of poultry.
Prevention of round worms in pigs.
Sheep and goat lice, methods of control
and eradication.
Controlling stomach worms in sheep and
Iambs.


Insects: Be rries-PFrults---Nuts


650 F.
*662 F.
675 F.
722 F.
*723 F.
*860 F.
933F.
*1011 F.
*1065 F.
1128 F.
1246 F.


San Jose scale and its control.
Apple-tree tent caterpillar.
The round-headed apple-tree borer.
Leaf blister mite of pear and apple.
Oyster-shell scale and Scurfy scale.
Cranberry insect problems and suggestions
for solving them.
Spraying for the control of insects and
mites attacking citrus trees in Florida.
The wooly white fly in Florida citrus
groves.
The flat-headed apple-tree borer.
Control of aphids injurious to orchard
fruits, currant, gooseberry, and grape.
The peach borer. How to prevent or


Insecticides, Fungicides, Disinfectants
799 F. Carbon disulphide as an insecticide.
926 F. Some common disinfectants.
954 F. Disinfection of stables.
994 F. Commercial bordeaux mixtures. How to
calculate their value.
*1285 F. Lime-sulphur concentrates, preparation,
uses, and designs for plants.
1666 F. Insecticides, equipment, and methods for
controlling g orchard insect pests. 10c.
1676 F. Lubricating -oil sprays for use on dormant
fruit trees.


1539 F.
1573 F.
1597 F.
1605 F.
1615 F.
72L.
99 L.


I








Insects: Fiber----Forage--Grain Crops
725 F. Wireworms destructive to cereal and for-
age crops.
731 F. True army worm and its control.
739 F. Cutworms and their control in corn and
other cereal crops.
752 F. Fall army worm, or "grassworm", and its
control.
*762 F. False chinch-bug and measures for con-
trolling it.
831 F. The red spider on cotton and how to
control it.
835 F. How to detect insect outbreaks and save
grain crops.
875 F. Rough-headed cornstalk beetle in South-
ern States and its control.
891 F. Corn-root aphis and methods of controlling
it.
*915 F. How to reduce weevil waste in southern
corn.
944 F. Controlling the garden webworm in alfalfa
fields.
971 F. Control of clover-flower midge.
982 F. Control of the green clover worm in alfalfa
fields.
1003 F. How to control billbugs destructive to
cereal and forage crops.
1006 F. The wheat jointworm and its control.
1025 F. The larger corn stalk-borer.
1029 F. Conserving corn from weevils in the Gulf
Coast States.
1094 F. The alfalfa caterpillar.
1156 F. Angoumois grain moth.
*1206 F. Corn earworm as an enemy of vetch.
1217 F. Green-bug or spring aphis: How to pre-
vent its periodical outbreak.
1258 F. Webworms injurious to cereal and forage
crops and their control.
1260 F. Stored-grain pests.
1323 F. The wheat strawworm and its control.
1329 F. Boll-weevil problem.
1483 F. Control of insect pests in stored grain.
1484 F. The clover leaf weevil and its control.
1498 F. Chinch bug, how to fight it.
1528 F. The control of the alfalfa weevil.
1543 F. Insects injurious to the rice crop.
1548 F. European corn borer, present status and
1 methods of control.
1566 F. Sorghum midge, with control suggestions.
1595 F. Bollworm or corn ear worm as a cotton
pest.
1607 F. The nematode disease of wheat and rye.
1627 F. The Hessian fly and how losses from it can
be avoided.
1642 F. Chalcid control in alfalfa-seed production.
1651 F. Corn earworm as an enemy of field corn in
the Eastern States.
1657 F. The Great Basin wireworm in the Pacific
Northwest.
1662 F. Husker-shredders in corn-borer control.
1681 F. Adjusting Corn Belt farming to meet corn-


1688 F.
1691 F.


borer conditions.
Insect enemies of the cotton plant.
How to control grasshoppers in cereal
forage crops.
The striped blister beetle on soybeans.
Poisoning the cotton bollweevil.
Cotton-louse control.


Insects: Flowers-Vegetables-Miscel-
laneous


*837 F.
846 F.


Asparagus beetles and their control.
Tobacco beetle and how to prevent damage
by it.


1531 F.

1561 F.
1569 F.
1582 F.
1595 F.
1624 F.
1668 F.
1681 F.
1688 F.
1712 F.
2L.


Tobacco bad worm and its con
Georgia and Florida tobacco-j
region.
Puerto Rican mole cricket.
Earthworms as pests and otherwise
Protection of log cabins, rustic wo
unseasoned wood from injurious
Bollworm or corn ear worm as a
pest.
Mexican bean beetle in the East
control.
The red harvester ant and now to
it.
Adjusting Corn-Belt farming to cor
conditions.
Insect enemies of the cotton plant.
The harlequin bug and its control.
Cutworms in the garden.


itro! in
Tro:. ing

e.
rk, and
insects.
(ot ton
and its
subdue
n poorer


Insects: Forest and Slade Trees


701 F.
705 F.
708 F.
763 F.
*1076 F.
1169 F.
1259 F.
1477 F.
1586 F.
1623 F.


The bagworm: An injurious shade-tree
insect.
The catalpa sphinx.
The leopard moth: A dangerous imported
insect enemy of shade trees.
Orchard bark beetles and pinhole borers
and how to control them.
California oak worm.
Insects injurious to deciduous shade trees
and their control.
Sawfly injurious to young pines.
Preventing damage by Lyctus powder-
post beetles.
The southern pine beetle: A serious enemy
of pines in the South.
Methods of controlling the gypsy moth
and the brown-tail moth.


Insects: Household


1346 F.
1353 F.
*1354 F.
1408 F.
*1472 F.
1570 F.
*1655 F.
*1665 F.
1670 F.
101 L.


House centipede.
Cockroaches.
Flytraps and their operation.
House ants, klands and methods of control.
The bedbug.
Fleas and their control.
Argentine ant as a household pest.
Book-lice, or psocids, annoying household
pests.
Carpet beetles and their control.
Clothes moths and their control.
Yellow-fever mosquito.
House fly and how to suppress it.
Preventing damage by termites or white
ants.
Mosquito remedies and preventive.
The control of moths min upholstered furni-
ture.
The silverfish as a pest of the household.
Hydrocyanic acid gas as a fumigant for
destroying household insects.
Injury to buildings by termites.


Irrigation


864 F.


1243
1348
1404
1518
1529
1556
1630
1635
1683
1703


Practical information for beginners
irrigation.
Border method of irrigation.
Corrugation method of irrigation.
Pumping from wells for irrigation.
Orchard irrigation.
Spray irrigation in Eastern States.
Irrigation of small grain.
Irrigation practices min growing alfalfa.
Surface irrigation in the Eastern States.
Measuring water in irrigation channels.
Reservoirs for farm use.









88 L. Poisoning of livestock by plants that pro-
duce hydrocyanic acid.
Marketing (Cooperative)


1144 F. Cooperative marketing.
*1502 F. Cooperative livestock
tions.


shipping


Marketing---Markets-Market
(General)


associa-

Studies


*1050 F. Handling and loading southern new
potatoes.
*1091 F. Protection of potatoes from cold in transit,
lining and loading cars.
1210 F. Measuring and marketing farm timber.
1232 F. Seed marketing hints for the farmer.


1551 F.
1558 F.
1560 F.
1574 F.
157 SF.
1579 F.
1594 F.
1694 F.
1695 F.
1700 F.
1702 F.
67L.
68L.
73 L.

fL.


Bulk handling of grain.
Preparation of fresh tomatoes for market.
Marketing the cowpe-seed crop.
Marketing poultry.
Marketing eggs.
Preparation of cabbage for market.
Packing apples in boxes.
Selling black walnut timber.
High-grade alfalfa hay: Methods of pro-
ducing, baling, and loading for market.
Marketing farm produce by parcel post.
Preparation of eastern grapes for market.
Preparing strawberries for market.
Preparing Johnson hay for market in the
Black Prairie Belt of Alabama and
Mississippi
Marketing late-crop potatoes.
Containers used in shipping fruits and
vegetables.
Preparation of bunched beets, carrots, and
turnips for market.
Dressing and packing turkeys for market.
Preparing apples for market in barrels and
boxes.
Marketing hay by modern methods.
Preparing peaches for market.
Beef grading and stamping service.
Roadside markets.
Is the public market a good civic invest-
ment?
Preparing wool for market.


Melons


*1145 F. Handling and transportation of canta-
loupes.
1394 F. Watermelons.
1468 F. Muskmelons.
1499 F. The melon aphid and its control.
Mushroom aS
1587 F. Mushroom culture for amateurs.
Nuts
1392 F. Black walnut for timber and nuts.
1501 F. Nut-tree propagation.
10656 F. Peanut growing.
71 L. Fertilizers for pecan soils.
84 L. Planting black walnut.
Oats
1581 F. Oats in the North Central States.
1583 F. Spring-sown red oats.


1611 F. Oats min the western half of the United
States.
1640 F. Fall-sown oat production.
1659 F. Oats [spring] in the Northeastern States.
Paper---Pulp
57 L. Pulpwood crops in the Northeast.
Plants: Breeding-Propagation-Prun-
ing
157 F Propagation of plants.
*181 F. Pruning.
1369 F. Bridge grafting.
1567 F. Propagation of trees and shrubs.
Plants-Poisonous


988F.
1054 F.
1166 F.
1273 F.
88 L.


Larkspur or "poison weed."
The loco-weed disease.
Poison ivy and poison sumac.,
eradication.
Stock-poisoning death camas.
Poisoning of livestock by plants
duce hydrocyanic acid.


Plants-Herbs (Medlclnal)
304 F. Growing and curing hops.
*613 F. Goldenseal under cultivation.
683 F. Drug plants under cultivation.
1184 F. Ginseng culture.
1231 F. Drying crude drugs.
1555 F. Peppermint and spearmint as


and their

that pro-


farm crops.


Potatoes: Irish-Sweet


999 F.
1064 F.
1190 F.
1205 F.
1267 F.
1332 F.
1436 F.
1442 F.
1639 F.
106 L.


Sweetpotato growing.
Production of late or main-crop pot
How to grow an acre of potatoes.
Potato production in the South.
Utilization of flue-heated tobacco
for sweetpotato storage.
Seed potatoes and how to produce
Why potatoes run out.
Storage of sweetpotatoes.
Potato production min the far V
States.
Prevent storage rots of sweetpotatc


toes.

barns
them.

Western


IOS


Poultry and Eggs


1507 F


1508
1524
1538
1541
1554
1694
1727
64
96


Squab raising.
Duck raising.
Goose raising.
Capons and caponizing.
The guinea fowl.
Turkey raising.
Breeds of chickens: I. American, Asiatic,
English, and Mediterranean classes.
Standard breeds and varieties of chickens:


II. Continental, European, Orie
and miscellaneous classes.
Poultry keeping in back yards.
Farm poultry raising.
Incubation and brooding of chickens.
Feeding chickens.
Poultry houses and fixtures.
Dressing and packing turkeys for ma
Selecting hens for egg production.
Construction and packing of an egg c
Protecting poultry from predacious 1


- - a a a ----- a --- -- a a --- ---- a ---


UNITTD STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO


rw
r


~ntal,


rket.
ass.
)irda.


I





mce o
1092 F. Prairie rice culture.
'1195 F. Rice as food [with recipes].
*1240 F. How to grow rice in Sacramento Valley.
1420 F. Handling rough rice to produce high
grades.


Rodents-Predatory
Manxmals


*525 F.
702 F.
1247 F.


Animals-Other


Raising guinea pigs.
Cottontail rabbits in relation to trees ai
crops.
American moles as agricultural pests ai
fur producers.
Mouse control in field and orchard.
Rat control.
Rat-proofing buildings and premises.
Pocket-gopher control.
Mole control.
Woodchuck control in the Eastern State
How to make a cat trap.
Hints on coyote and wolf trapping
Porcupine control in the Western States.
Red-squill powder min rat control.
Hints on bobcat trapping.
Hints on mountain-lion trapping.


it!

'4


s.


Rye
756 F. Culture of rye in the eastern half of the
United States.
1358 F. Growing rye in western half of United
Sattes.
1607 F. Nematode disease of wheat and rye.
Seeds-Seed Production


*428 F.
948 F.
1232 F.
1390 F.
1496 F.
93L.
3


Sheep-
576 F.
810 F.
*840 F.
920 F.
1134 F.
1172 F.
1181 F.
1199 F.
1203 F.
1268 F.
1632 F.
1710 F.
Silos-


Testing farm seeds in the home and in the
rural school.
Rag-doll seed tester: Its use in determin-
ing what ears of corn are fit for seed.
Seed-marketing hints for the farmer.
Vegetableseed for home and market garden.
Inoculation of legumes and nonlegumes
with nitrogen-fixing and other bacteria.
Red-clover seed production in the Inter-
mountain States.


-Goats--Wool
Breeds of sheep for the farm.
Equipment for farm sheep raising.
Farm sheep raising for beginners.
Milk goats.
Castrating and docking lambs.
Farm slaughtering and use of laI
mutton.
Sheep on temporary pastures.
Judging sheep.
TThe Angora goat.
Sheep-killing dogs.
Karakul shQep.
Range sheep production.
Sage


mnb and


578 F. Making and feeding of silage.
825F. Pit silos.
1725 F. Methods and costs of filling tsilos in the
North Central States.
Solls
446 F. Choice of crops for alkali land.
921 F. Principles of liming soils.


1475 F. Soil productivity as affeied by crop rota-
tion.
1629 F. Steam sterilization of soil for tobacco and
other crops.
Sugar Beets
*1042 F. Saving man labor in sugar-beet fields.
1637 F. Sugar-beet culture in the humid area t


1645 F.
1718 F.
97 L.


the United States.
Sugar-beet growing under irrigate in n
Utah-Idaho area. ,
Important sugar-beet byproducts aid
their utilization.
Cross-blockimg sugar beets by machine.


Sugars-Bugaroau --St r
*1034 F. Growing sugarcan for sitp.
"1366 F. Production of maple siup and sugar.
1389 F. Sorgo-sirup tnanufactur.
1619 F. Sorgo for simup production: Culture, Inhe-
vesting, and handling.
Tobacco
523 F. Tobacco curing.
571 F. Tobacco culture.
1580 F. Cigar-tobacco production Penuysy a,
1629 F. Steam sterilization of sqil for tobacco and
other crops.
Tomatoes
1233 F. Tomatoes for anning and manufatung.
1838 F. Tomatoes as a truck crop. i
*1431 F. Greenhouse tomatoes.
Weather
1512 F. Protection of buildings and farm property
from lightnmg.
1588 F. Frost and the prevention of frost damage.
Weeds


6604F.
687 F.
1054 F.
1307 F.
1537 F.
1544 F.
43 L.
95 L.
Wheat
596 F.
885 F.
1168 F.


Weeds, how to control them.
Eradication of ferns from pasture lpds
eastern United States.
The loco-weed disease.
Quack grass.
Johnson grass as a weed.
Common barberry and black stem n.
Wild garlic and its control.
How to control ragweed, the princid
cause of autumn hay fever.


Culture of winter wheat in States.
Wheat growing in Sout rnB
Varieties of winter a ap
eastern United Stes.
Durum wheats.
Soft red winter~wheats.
Polish and roulard heats.
Varieties of hard red winter wheat.
Varieties of hard red sprig wheat.
Varieties of durum wiwat.
Varieties of common wMte wheat.
Varieties of club whok
The combination cleaning and tre
seed wheat.


ml


U nit ii


4Ipgat


Plan on army. as a tJifl.IbSP* in a.nsnn4rnl nrdn~


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3iIII 1262 08856 7184llIiIIli iiiI
3 1282 08856 7184


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