Labor safety service

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Material Information

Title:
Labor safety service a report
Physical Description:
2, 10 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Committee for the Conservation of Manpower in War Industries
United States -- Bureau of Labor Standards
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Labor, Division of Labor Standards
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Industrial safety -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by the labor members of the National Committee for the Conservation of Manpower in War Industries.
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
"September, 1942"--Foreward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004978666
oclc - 03317162
System ID:
AA00008536:00001

Full Text

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A REPORT


BY


THE


LABOR


MEMBERS


the


NATIONAL


COMMITTEE


for the


CONSERVATION


MANPOWER


in WAR


INDUSTRIES


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AnTEINT


OF LABOR


DIVISION


OF LABOR STANDARDS


*: .i


Ar


* ._-.














LABOR

of


MEMBERS

the


NATIONAL


COMMITTEE
MANPOWER I


FOR


THE


CON


SERVATION


INDUSTRIES


JOHN


COYNE,


President,


Building and Construction Trades Department,


American Federation of Labor


JOHN P


Metal


. FREY


Trades Department,


President,


American Federation of Labor


CLINTON


. GOLDEN


, Assistant


the President


United


Steel Workers


of America


HERBERT


W. PAYNE


1/ic


Pres


ident


Textile Workers Union of America


ERIC


PETERSON


General


ice


President


International


Assoc


nation of Machinists


STANLEY


Economic Division,


RUTTENBERG,


Congress of Industrial Organizations














Forward


Industrial safety is of vital importance to organized labor.

An ccident on the job always cuts into a worker's pay en-
velope; it may reduce his ability to earn a living for the rest of
his ife; it may mean death. The best compensation law in the
country doesn't come anywhere near paying full wages. To the
r, even a "minor" injury can mean the lo
acquired through many years of training and experience; the man
who was a skilled mechanic may have to take a job as a watchman--
if he con get one.

Now in wartime, a disabling accident puts the victim on the
sidelines unable to pitch in on the job of defeating enemies who
would deprive him of every right he has gained as an American and

| a union member.
representatives on the National Commi
Conservation of Manpower in War Industries are calling on workers
and their unions all over the country to play a major role in the
campaign against work accidents. The Secretary of Labor appointed
this Committee to enlist the voluntary services of trained safety
men al over the country, and to awaken labor and industry to the
special need for industrial safety in the war effort. Imple-
menting the Committee's work are the continuing services of the
Division of Labor Standards, United States Department of Labor
which dily works with labor on important safety problems.

In this report the Committee's labor representatives indicate
briefly the seriousness of the industrial accident problem, point
out specific action unions can take to combat industrial acci-
dents and show how they can secure assistance in this action.

Washington, D. C.
September, 192







THE


WHITE


HOUSE


WASHINGTON


October 17,


1941


Honorable


The Secretary


of Labor


My dear Miss Perkins:


The urgency of our production needs under the de-
fense program cannot help but deepen concern over the
disclosure that work accidents in 1940 caused an aggre-
gate time loss of close to one and one half billion
man hours.


Aside from the heavy social burden thus inflicted
upon workers and their families, and the money loss oc-
casioned to management, this staggering wastage of ef-
fective manpower seriously slows up plant output today
when quick delivery of equipment and supplies is so
vitally essential to our security.


That is why I am gratified to know that under the
leadership of your Department, the National Committee
for the Conservation of Manpower in Defense Industries
is going forward vigorously with a nation-wide program
to curtail work accidents. It is reassuring to observe
that management and labor are collaborating in an es-
sentially voluntary project, through which a practical
safety service is supplied directly and continuously to
all contractors engaged on Government orders.


I trust that employers everywhere will cooperate
fully with your National Committee, and that every mem-
ber of our great industrial army will actively partici-
pate in a campaign for safety in defense production.

Sincerely yours,







FROM


THE


RECORD -


THE


SERIOUSNESS


OF INDUSTRIAL


ACC IDENTS


TO WORKERS


means


death


injury


on the production


front


as well


as on the


battlefield.


You might


expect


that


accidents


would


increase


at the


same


rate


as em-


ployment


tend
crowd


dii


to increase
ed workshops,


Ring
much
long


times
more
hour


of rapid
rapidly th
s, pressure


expansion
an employ
for incre


of production, ac
ent. New workers


asked


output


cidents
. over-


new chemical


processes--all


the developments


which


have


mar ked


our defense


product ion


efforts


--have


swelled


the flood


of industrial


accidents.


The number


the last


full


of accidents


year


before


1940


the National


and 1941


Defense


compared


Program,


with


those


shows what


1939,
it has


cost


us in industrial


manpower


arm against


the Axis:


THE DEAD


r
~L1Y.~
'V


1939
1940
1941


S .16,400
. .18,100
. .. .19.200


THE HALT


AND THE BLIND


1939
1940
1941


S. 109,400
. 89,600
. 100,600


THE INCAPACITATED


1939
1940
1941


. 1


. 2


782,000
060,400


Every worker


a potential


casualty,


one of the


more


than


2 million


are injured


every year


when a worker


injured


he faces


the risk


that he may


one of


the thousands


who die each


year


from


industrial


acci-


dents.


When


a man


is injured


at work,


the extent


of that


injury,


whether


t is


mat ter
before


a scratch
of chance


or a lost


.The only


arm,


a serious


sure


injury


protection


or death,
o prevent


is largely a
the injury--


occurs.


Management


cannot


stop


a minimum.


inj uries


That


the duty


of providing a


Labor must
cooperation


cooperate


means


that


safe workplace.


if injuries


every


man


But that


are to be held


woman


alone
down


employed


frr
I:


war


I





- --










LABOR SAFETY SERVICE


LABOR CAN PLAY


Safety


A MAJOR ROLE


IN INDUSTRIAL SAFETY


is simple in principle but requires considerable


detail in application.


Through the U.


Department of Labor'


technical
; National


Committee and its Division of Labor Standards, safety experts are avail-


able


to assist local


activity.
undertake,


Here


are


unions
a few


in studying hazards and developing safety


active cities


together with an inkling of how to


which unions might profitably


o about the


CHECKING ON SAFETY CONDITIONS


LABOR*


IN LOCAL PLANTS


ROLE


The man on the


job or at the machine


is usually best informed


as to


its dangers.


Union members


should be continually alert to uncover work


hazards in their plants and shops.


To assist


members in spotting hazards,


local


unions should have


men,


such


as shop stewards,


trained in the basic methods of


industrial


safety.


With such


conditions


will


training


have some


these men will


idea of


be more alert


type


to hazardous


action needed


remedy the condition.


the hazard and


They can call


sugge


to the attention of management both


sted remedy either directly or through a pro-


cedure established by


collective agreement


HOW TO GO ABOUT THE


In plants


which have


no organized


safety program


, the special


agents of the Department of Labor are


interested in learning of the


is tenc


actual


or potential


hazards


so that


they may


assist


calling them to the attention of management and in obtaining effective
action.


The Department of Labor's National


Committee


can also help unions


to zive


their key men the basic


training needed


to play a leading part


ex-










LABOR


SAFETY


SERVICE


safety.


The Department


, jointly


with


the United


States


Office


Education,


is sponsoring


safety


training


courses


conduct


engineering coll


eges


in war-production


centers.


courses


usually


iven


weeks


consist


in two


United


of 96 hours


-hour


States


sess


Office


ions


instruction


each


Education


week


over


defrays


and related


a period
all costs,


world
of 1
othE


than


the nominal


charge


for text


material.


asses


are usually


held


in locations


convenient


to workers


plants.


instructors


serving


as special


re experts
agents ot


in industrial
f the Committee


safety
in its


, in many


direc


case


contact


with


war plants.


En trance


requirements


are decided


the local


college


Since


course


is intended


requirement


for practi


is usually


limited


men


a high


production
school ed


jobs


ucation


the education
or its equiva-


lent


in shop experience.


Information


on how


apply


for these


courses


be obtained


writing either


the National


Committee


for the Conservation


of Man-


power


in War


Industries,


Divis


Labor


Standards


U.S


Department


of Labor,
Committee


Washington,


or to


of the Committee


a regional
's regions,


safety cc
together


mnsultant


with


of the
names


and addresses


of regional


consultants


is listed


on the back cover.


F;


OCl


war









LABOR


SAFETY SERVICE


CHECKING ON


POTENTIAL HAZARDS


IN NEW PROCESSES


LABOR'S ROLE


The war has brought to industry many new substances and
Workers usually are the first to know when such developments


dustrial dise


processes.
lead to in-


ase.


Labor has a r
of experts who can


responsibilityy to bring such


give


symptoms to the attention


technical assistance in preventing the disease.


How TO GO ABOUT THE JOB


The Department of Labor through its


Division of Labor Standards can


provide unions with the free


consultant


services of


some of the country'


foremost
problems.


industrial hygienists


to help in


These experts may be able


to give


solving industrial


disease


the assistance needed from


information already in existence.


If no body of knowledge exists on the


subject,


an original


study may be undertaken for use by the union which


made


the request and b


labor and management in other plants


facing the


same problem.


Here is how the Department of Labor,


at union request,


is helping


to prevent dis
important war


ease


in the synthetic rubber industry,


accessories


as barrage balloons and


which produces such


self-sealing


gasoline


tanks.


This


industry has had


the manufacture of munitions.


to find substitutes for toluol


Toluol


substitutes,


, now limited
particularly


ben


zol,


caused death and disease


early in 1942 in a number of


plants


process


from local


ing synthetic rubber.


Complaints began coming in


unions in various parts of the


country.


to Washington


Apprehension among


the workers in one Akron plant resulted in an appeal for immediate action
to the War Production Board.


The War Production Board called upon


the Department of Labor


handle the


job.


Union,


management,


and Government representatives,










LABOR SAFETY SERVICE


well as
called


industrial
together.


hygienists and physicians of national


repute were


This group visited plants and surveyed conditions


where the hazards existed.


Their work had the


immediate effect of dis-


pulling fear and furthering the correction of hazards.


This group has


devoted


laid


to brief and pract


the ground work for a series of publications
ical treatment of each of the various health


hazards involved in the fabrication of synthetic rubber articles and the


means of


controlling these


hazards.


The final


result of


the work will


the reduction of the hazards


to which workers


in one important war


industry are exposed


Another example of this


type of


service is


to be found in the Labor


Standards Division's Special Bulletin No.


5 Control of


Welding Hazards


in Defense


Industries.


Early in 1941


the National


Committee received a


request from the boilermakers' union for an analysis of welding hazards


and suggestions concerning their effective control. T
control of welding hazards represents the response to


'he bulletin on the


this request.


largely the work of Mr.


Drinker


of Harvard,


supplemented by


sistence by safety experts


of the Division and a survey of disabilities


and deaths


among welders conducted by the union.


The publication has


been widely used by the union,


by special


agents of


the committee


plants employing welders,


and by vocational schools training welders


FORMATION OF SAFETY COMMITTEES


Plant, departmental,


and shop safety committees are a common part


of industrial safety


organization


They have always proved most ef-


fective when workers are represented.


Advocacy of


safety committees


representing labor and management is one of the most important


steps


that can be taken by a union which has not already done so to further


the safety of its members on the


job.


as-









LABOR


SAFETY


SERVICE


Department


of Labor


can


provide,


for the guidance


of unions,


examples of how joint


safety


committees


have been


set up


and are functioning


effe


actively.


SAFETY


CLAUSES


BARGA


AGREEMENTS


plant


Safety
working


clauses


in union


conditions


contracts


While


can be


many union


very


contracts


useful in improving


include


references


safety


Unions sho
committees


, few


of them


uld move


at present


now to provide


and the machinery


contain


in their


to correct


effective
agreements


specific


plant


clauses


for joint


safety


safety


and health


hazards.


help


Experts
unions


available


in analyzing


through


industry


the Department


of Labor


will


lad to


hazards.


STRENGTHEN


STATE


SAFETY


LAWS


AND THEIR


ENFORCEMENT


Labor


s efforts


the protection


have


workers


State


Labor


safety


should


laws


study


on the statute


the quality


books
these


laws


and of their


enforcement.


The Department


of Labor


prepare


help


unions


in analyzing


ectiveness


of leg


isolation


rules


inspection,


improving


them


to conform


recognized


standards










LABOR


SAFETY


SERVICE


PUBLICATIONS


OF SPECIAL


INTEREST


TO LABOR


Department


Labor


s Div


vision


of Labor


Standards


has public


shed


this


12-page


book


especial


distribution


throiulgh


unions


contains 6
is devoted


pages


to "What


of tips


Unions


to workers


on how to


work


safel


one page


Can Do.


search


Ir information
and consultant


and assistance


facilities of


in work


pr oc


the Department of Labor


edures


re-


are available.









LABOR


SAFETY


SERVICE


OCCUPAT


ONAL


DISEASE


LEAFLETS


This
to acquain
industrial


series of
t workers


leaflets


with


processes


health


Each


most


them only


1'


hazards connected


leaflet


takes


our
wit


pages, is
h various


the following


designed


types


items


con-


section with a


specific


occupational


ease


or poi


soning:


The types


of work at


which


men are expo


sed to the disease


or poison.


How the disease


Warning
Remedial


action


or poison


- symptoms


be taken


occurs.


the disease.


when


the warning


signs


appear


What
What


management


workers


can do to prevent


can do to


prevent


the disease.


the disease.


There


future.
leaflets


are 20 leaflets


series


with


their


in the series


known


identifying


with


more


"Industrial


number rs


and titles


to be added


Health


Series


are:


Industrial


Skin


Diseases


(De rmat


oses


Anthraco-S il icos


Arsenic
Carbon


Poisoning


Monoxide


Poisoning


Chromium Poi


Mercury


soning


Poisoning


Lead Poisoning


. Benzol
. Silicos
. Wood Al


(Benzene)


cohol


Poisoning


Poisoning


Chlorinated Solve
Carbon Bisulphide
Carbon Dioxide As


nts


Poisonin


phyxiation


Nitrous
Metal F


Fumes


izme


Ammonia P
Manganese


Poisoning


Fever


oisoning
Poisoning


Injury
Hydroge
Anthrax


from Acids
n Sulphide


and Alkalies
Poisoning


The first


leaflet


in the series


is reproduced


on the opposite


page.













LABOR SAFETY


SERVICE


Occupational Dis ses Casse Human Waste


THE CAUSES

AND PREVENTION OF


INDUSTRIAL SKIN DISEASES
(Dervruslo)



INDUSTRIAL HEALTH SEUES 8
No. I


Dlhi Ut o Labor Standards
U. S. Deprtment of Labor
i9n,


WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT
On any sign of skin disorder, no matter haow slight it
seem. commit a doctor. Do not attempt to treat
younelf; to do so may make matter worse and require
a longer time to beaL Cases should be reported to the
State labor department so that coditirns may be cor-
rected to protect other workers.
enmmbwer that ewrb dcovery and near treatment
make for a aborter and mor cwaMe icknea. Late
or megkoted skin dlvMfe may devTlop into a danso
ilness with much unnecery diacomfort. DON'T
WAIT UNTIL THB DAMAGE IS DONEt


ft i B-ommm, the Zmployprs Shoulsdd-
I. RedMuce cotacts or irritane to the skin of wrkenr
as fr as poMimble.
EhaiMante dust by eRleetive exhaust ventilation at
the pn at miisi.
3. Have a phy.ian perform patch tets on workers
before aflling them to ue potentially irritating
substance S&asitfre worker should be placed at
other nark.
4. Conmtantly and cdntinsahy emphadze personal
esalnes to the workers. Provide adequate
washing and bathing facfi ties and individual
locker. Encourage change of clothe for work.
Education in deanasM prevent many unnca-
eary mmet
5. Provide gloves. apron, booted, and other protective
equipment whub it is feasible to use them.
SIutn werkdis ba d of the mt stance
-w nL ___ --..a aJaL .Iaa a .-- n-.* f MR s hl..


INDUSTRIAL SOUIJCES
Skin diseases tesulting from industrial exposure may
occur in almost any field of work. Any foreign tub-
stance can be irritating if it is in continuous contact
with the skin. Skin irritations met frequently result
from poismous or irritating chemicals, greais heat,
cold. dust, friction, platt, and infections.

HOW SKIN DISEASES OCCUR
1. Oil and greae may injure the skin by blocking the
pores and hair follicles and introducint infection
therein.
2. Chemical irritants or caustic agents may hanm the
skin directly.
3. Substances, such as naphtha, petroleum, or benol.
that dissolve and remove the natural oil of the
skin, are injurious.
4. Infections of the skin may arise from hides, wastes,
sand other materials containing disease-producing
germs.
5. Scratching, brushing, or constant rubbing of the skin
injures it and opens the way for infection.
6. There are great differences between people: in some
the skin ix easily irritated by contacts quite hasm-
less to other.

WARNING SIGNS OF INDUSTRIAL SKIN DISEASE
These are so varied that it is impossible to list them
all. Early irritation. are usually shown by a little
reddening of the skin, with itching and burning.
Beter, swellings, and frequent boils may be the first
sign. of industrial skin disease. These Igna are usually
limited to exposed partt of the skin.

iawe-a- t2)


It If -ecomren that Wakers aS ufd-
1. Keepthe skin as dean a possible.
a. Remove ail and greases with thorough washia.
3. Avoid unc 7ry contact with irritating hbstances
and solvents which remove the natural ail of the

4. Avoid sef-treatmat. See a doctor, wr each cue
require Wifnret tfra met
5. Apply t~r firat aid for any cut or break in the skin,
no matte how dilt.
6. Rept any -I spamp sa prompt1.
7. Wear gloves, aproan, and other protective equipment
provided. Use swtective ointment supplied.
8, Rbemem r that ariae is one of the best aefe-
guards agcaht infection of the skin.












Industial Health I Yeur Problem
Apply These Principles For Safety




*: *Girf*t uar~ PtWnc- OFIR19









LABOR SAFETY SERVICE


HOW TO SECURE THESE SERVICES


PUBLICATIONS


The technical


services


that the Department of Labor offers


through


its Division of Labor Standards,


the National


Committee for the Conser-


ovation of Manpower in War


Industries


, and its country-wide organization


of top-flight safety men furnishes


local


unions an unequalled oppor-


tunity for developing sound safety programs of their


own.


Through these


programs unions


help


their members


by protecting their


lives,


limbs,


health,


and earning capacity.


Through


them,


, unions


can render


great wartime service
of skilled manpower,


to their country, by helping to hold down the


time


loss


, and materials caused by industrial accidents.


The need for this


service is


imperative now.


Its value will far outlast


the present emergency.


To secure further information


in touch with


, publications,


the Division of Labor Standards


or direct service, get
, U. S. Department of


Labor,


Washington,


D. C.


, (2)


any one of the


six labor representatives


of the National


Committee


listed on the inside front cover;


regional safety consultant


in your own section of


the country,


whose


name and address appears on the back cover.






SAFETY


YARDS


Here


are


two yardsti


measure


the accident


record


your


plant


accident


frequency


accident


severity


ident


frequency


indi


cates


exposure.


the number
Accident


of dis


abling


severity


injuries


measures


million


number


man-hours


of da


thousand


man-hours


exposure.


Does management


dent


severity?


your


, you


plant


can tell


compute


accident


how your plant


frequency


measures


and acci-
to others


your


various


industry.
industrial


below


class


sifications


are


frequency


based


upon


and


reports


severity


rates


of member


National


than


Safety
general


Council


ave


during


rage expert


1941
ence


They


of Ameri


represent


can


somewhat


better


indus


FREQUENCY


SEVERITY


sabling


Injuries


Days


Lost


000,000 Man-Hours


000 Man-Hours


5.99
7.02


Tobacco


Tobacco
Cement
Steel


Aeronautics


Printing


and Publishing


Glass


Glass


Aeronautics
Automobile


7.40
7.49


Textile
Rubber


Rubber


Chemical
Laundry
Printing
Textile
Machinery
Petroleum


Public


9.48


Automobile
Machinery


Tanning


and Publishing


9.87


10.23
10.66
11.78
12.70
13.17
14.37


Utility


Nonferrous Metal
Sheet Metal


1.04


and Leather


Sheet Metal
Woodwork


Laundry
Transit


1.30


Food


Chemical


Metal Products


Tran


Clay


Products


All Industries
Meat Packing


Tanning
Food


Metal
Paper


and Leather


Products
and Pulp


Quarry
Foundry


Woodworking
Marine
Construction


Clay


Products


15.39
15.70
15.88
16.16
16.61
17.37
17.96
21.27
22.44
22.82
27.11
30.82


Foundry


1.42


Packing


Petroleum


Industries


Marine


Nonf


1.66


2.22


errous


Public
Paper
Steel
Refrig
Cement


Metal


Utility
and Pulp


ration


Construction





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

111 11 1 II IIII I 111 111111 liii
3 1262 08860 0373


REGIONAL


National Committee


for Conservation of Manpower


in War Industries


REGIONAL


CONSULTANTS


Region


John W.


Welch


80 Federal


Boston,


Mass.


James G.


William G


Milton W.


Aldrich


,. Marks


Bowman


, 350 Madison Ave.,


, 12 Ham Bldg., Gree


, 207 Republic Bldg.


New York City.


nsboro. N. C.


Cleveland,


James M.


Cobb,


John D.


Relations,


Pet ree,


Montgomery,


Alabama Department of
Ala.


John M.


Rufus W


Royal f


Sandel,


i. Owen,


I. Ivory,


Rm. 620, 220 S. State St.


300 Keller Bldg.


200 Bush St., R


Houston


Em. 1009


, Chicago,


III.


Tex.


, San Francisco,


U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1942 O 496869


Industrial


Ohio.


Calif.


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