Metabolism of fission products

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Metabolism of fission products radiotellurium
Series Title:
United States. Atomic Energy Commission. MDDC ;
Physical Description:
13 p. ill. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Jacobson, L
Overstreet, R
Chaikoff, I
University of California -- Radiation Laboratory
U.S. Atomic Energy Commission
Publisher:
Technical Information Branch, Atomic Energy Commission
Place of Publication:
Oak Ridge, Tenn
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Fission products   ( lcsh )
Radioactive substances -- Metabolism   ( lcsh )
Tellurium   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
technical report   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Restriction:
"Date Declassified: June 5, 1947"
Statement of Responsibility:
L. Jacobson, R. Overstreet, and I. Chaikoff, et al..
General Note:
Manhattan District Declassified Code
General Note:
Date of manuscript unknown.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 005023434
oclc - 277771673
System ID:
AA00008513:00001

Full Text
I
I


MDDC 1005


UNITED


STATES


ATOMIC


ENERGY


COMMISSION


METABOLISM OF FISSION PRODUCTS-RADIOTELLURIUM


by
L. Jacobson
R. Overstreet
I. Chaikoff, et al.



University of California
Radiation Laboratory


Date Declassified:


June 5


1947


Issuance of this document does not constitute


authority


for declassification


of classified


copies of the same or similar content and title
and by the same authors.


4~


Technical Information Branch


, Oak Ridge,


Tennesse


AEC


, Oak Ridge,


Tenn., 4-20-49--850-A3381


Printed in U.S.A.
PRICE 10 CENTS


Apr~ '9










































Digitized by the Internet Archive


in 2011


with funding from


University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries with support from LYRASIS and the Sloan Foundation


*




















~
V

















METABOLISM OEMFISSION PR OUCTS- RADIQT4URIU


A. PREPARATION OF Te127'29 WITHOUT CARRIER


By L. Jacobson andR. Overstreet


>~> I


O WNE OF METHOD

eth foregoing preparation of radiotellurium without carrier, Te 1 129 is precipitated out of an. aid
midiaixture in HCI on copper sulfide. This serves to separate the element from all of the principle
t ~products except zireonium, columbium, and ruthenium. Following this the CuS is decomposed with
Sand the solution is made 5N in HF. The tellurium is then removed from solution on ruthenium


if de>, separating it from zirconium and columbium.
anji e residue is boiled with HC104 to expel the ruthe:


The ruthenium sulfide is decomposed with HNQOs


^e '127,129 at this stage is in the hexavalent state. Where hexavalent tellurium is desired, the ele-
t precipitated from the perchloric acid solution on a very small amount of Fe(OH)3 (50 micrograms
Ti, tLhe iron precipitate is dissolved in dilute HNOs and the solution is neutralized anid used directly.
equadrivalent tellurium is desired, the element is removed from the perchloric acid soluhition
The iron precipitate is dissolved in HC1 and the Fe is removed by extraction with isopropyl


ether. The Te127129 is then reduced to the metal with hydrazine dihydrochloride and SO,.
tit evaporated to dryness, and the residue is digested with concentrated HNOz. This se
the hydrazine and oxidize the tellurium from the metal to the quadrivalent state.


The solution is
rves to decompose


PhbCEDURE

The source of the tellurium sample described here was a 1.4M UO2(NO)2 solution which had been


prepared by dissolving a. uranium slug from the pile ainHNOg. Then,
treated with concentrated H01 and boiled to remove the nitrate ion.


750 cc of the solution was repeatedly
The nitrate free solution was then


diluted to 1000 cc, and 3N in HC1.
Fifty milligrams of CuCt was added to the uraniumns solution, and the solution was saturaed with
N asg The mixture was heated to b9iing and, again saturated with H2S. TIe preeipitate 4 (uS was
eepitrifuged out and washed with water. The supernatant liquid and washing were combined a!4set aside.
The CuS was dissolved in aqua regia. The aitrate was expelled from the resulting solution by re-
peated evaporations with concentrated HCL The solution, was then diluted to 1Q0 eq. aQd made 1N in HC1.
50m:g each of barium and strontium and 10 mg each f yttrium, lanthanum, ceiiv, thoriud and cesium
were added, and the copper precipitated with ;S as before. The CuS was centrituged out, ap the super-
ntatt fiquid was discarded.
T he copper precipitate was decomposed f digestiba with a few cc of concentrated HNI. The re-
suting solution was dilutea to about 50 cc atd made 3N i HNO. 10 mg each of yttrium, lanthanum,
Iuia, thorium, zirconium, columbiumm a&t rhtlenttw was added. The initu Af himif4eNl i
t ad te rare earth flUOrides centrifu& out the ltirate was satrteathwithS Phe miatn~
4i ested on the steat #*r li h |t W ~Rt agaki saturated with N. The rutiaenium'sulfide *e
inimt-at wa rentrif nn.d lit swSAf whed *1ith Ske Iri. sonutinn and the. sieyrnltent iin^Td midvni^i '"








2 MDDC 1005


The ruthenium sulfide was decomposed by digestion with a few wc of concentrated HNO3. 5 cc of 70%
HC104 was added and the mixture was boiled until the ruthenium was expelled. 10 mg of ruthenium was
added and the solution was again boiled to expel the ruthenium. The solution was then diluted to about
30 cc and treated with 10 mg of Fe. The solution was made alkaline with NH OH and heated to boiling.
The Fe(OH)s was centrifuged out and washed with dilute ammonia. The supernatant liquid and washings
were discarded.
The iron precipitate was dissolved, 15 cc of 9N HC1, and the Fe was removed from the solution by
repeated extractions with equal volumes of isopropyl ether. The iron-free solution was evaporated to a
small volume and diluted and made 6N in HC1 with a total volume of 12.5 cc. This solution was treated
with 1 g of hydrazine dihydrochloride and 12.5 cc SO2-saturated water. The mixture was boiled for
several minutes and then evaporated to dryness.
The residue was digested with concentrated HNO3 to destroy the hydrazine dihydrochloride. The
solution was finally evaporated several times with concentrated HC1 to remove the nitrate. The resulting
solution contained the radiotellurium in the tellurite (+4) state. The total activity was approximately 120
microcuries as measured with the electroscope.
Hexavalent tellurium was prepared as above, but carried only through the perchloric acid distillation.
50 pg of iron was added to the perchloric acid residue, and the solution made basic with HN40H. The
resulting Fe(OH)3 precipitate was centrifuged, washed, and taken up in a small amount of nitric acid.
Upon assaying, the sample was found to contain 75% telluric tellurium and 25% tellurous tellurium.


CHEMICAL TEST

To a suitable aliquot of the Te127,129 solution, 10 mg each of tellurium, Ru, Sr, Ba, Y, La, Ce, Th, Cs,
Mo, Rh, Sn and Sb were added. The solution was made 3N in HC1, heated to boiling, and saturated with
SO2. The resulting tellurium metal was centrifuged and washed. The filtrate and washings were combined
and boiled to remove SO. 10 mg more of tellurium was added to the solution and tellurium metal again
precipitated as before. The filtrate and washings from the second tellurium precipitation were evaporated
to dryness and measured. 4% of the total activity was found in this fraction, giving a minimum value of
96% for the purity of the Te12,19.



B. TRACER STUDIES WITH Tel27,129

By I. Chaikoff and Associates


The tracer studies of radioactive tellurium were divided into two parts: (1) an investigation of the
tetravalent form, and (2) an investigation of the hexavalent form. The same radioactive isotope was em-
ployed in both cases.


TETRAVALENT TELLURIUM

This study was carried out on 36 rats weighing between 200 and 300 g. Three modes of administra-
tion of the radioactive material were used: oral, intramuscular, and lung. The intramuscular injections
(0.4-1.0 cc) were carried out via the thigh muscles of the left leg. The lung administrations (0.2-0.25 cc)
were carried out by means of a lung cannula. The oral administrations (0.4-1.0 cc) were carried out by
means of a stomach tube. Animals were sacrificed at intervals of 1, 4, 16, and 32 days after injection.
There were 9 rats for each interval, 3 for each mode of injection. The injected doses were approximately
5000-6000 counts per second for the oral and intramuscular administrations and aporoximatelv 3000









MDDC


- 1005


The rats were placed in metabolism


cages,


and daily excretions of urine and feces were collected


separately. The daily collection of urine and feces was facilitated by transferring the animals to clean


cages every day.


The old cage was washed down thoroughly with hot water after each transfer


and the


washings were added to the urine.


The orally and intramuscularly injected animals were placed in sepa-


rate cages for the first 4 or 5 days after injection


so that the excretions could be measured for each


animal individually during this interval when the excreta were very active.


After the fourth or fifth day


the 3 animals in each group were combined in one cage and feces and urine collected in common from


each group. A simple device was used to collect urine and feces separately in all


cases.


The three rats


in each group of lung-administered animals were combined in one cage immediately after injection, no


individual collection of excreta being made in this


case.


The rats were fed the regular stock diet and tap


water ad libitum.

Sampling of Tissues
At the time of sacrifice each rat was anesthetized with nembutal and blood withdrawn by heart punc-


ture. The blood was delivered into a weighed, porcelain,


milk ashing dish,


and the weight of the blood


sample was obtained by difference. The animal was first skinned, then the following tissues were removed


and weighed: liver,
tibias, and 2 fibulas


2 kidneys,


spleen,


lungs, heart, brain, mesenteric lymph nodes, bone (2 femurs,


tail fat, mesenteric fat, a sample of gastrocnemius muscle, 2 testes, 2 teeth


(ihncisors), gastrointestinal tract (from the cardiac sphincter to the rectum),


2 thyroids and 2 adrenals.


All of the tissues, were transferred directly to weighed, numbered, milk ashing dishes,


except in the


following instances:
T1. Kidney-In


cases


where a single kidney was too active to count on our counter (for example,


an early interval after intramuscular injection)


6f scissors,


the 2 kidneys were minced well in a beaker with the aid


and 2 aliquots of the kidney mince were weighed out into previously weighed milk ashing


dishes. In some


cases


each single kidney was placed in a milk ashing dish.


When the activity was not


high, both kidneys were placed together in a small beaker for ashing


as described below.


2. Liver-In


cases


where the liver was too active to be counted in its entirety, it was first well


minced with


scissors


and 2 aliquots weighed out into milk asking dishes.


When the entire liver could be


counted, it was placed in a beaker for ashing.
3. Gastrointestinal Tract-After removal from the animal


, the gastrointestinal tract was washed by


forcing water through the lumen. The contents and washings were added to the feces collection of the last


day. The tissue was then rinsed in tap water, blotted on a paper towel, weighed,


and transferred to a


beaker for asking.
4. Muscle-The muscle sample was usually too large to be treated in a milk dish, and therefore it
was transferred to a beaker for ashing.
5. Skin and Hair-After weighing, the skin and hair sample was transferred to a large beaker for
ashing.
6. Carcass-The carcass remaining after removal of all tissues was weighed and then thoroughly


ground in a meat grinder.


The resulting mince was reasonably homogeneous, and 2 aliquots were weighed


and transferred to beakers for ashing.
7. Left leg of intramuscularly-injected animals (site of injection)-The entire left leg minus the
foot was weighed and transferred to a beaker for ashing. Bone and muscle samples were then taken only
from the right leg in intramuscularly-injected animals.
8. Lungs of lung-injected animals-Since the lungs might be expected to be very active in these
animals, the lungs were transferred to beakers for ashing, and an aliquot of the solution of ash taken for
counting.


Blood-When the blood was quite active,


treated in milk ashing dishes.


the samples taken for counting were small enough to be


For the later intervals, however, the sample of blood taken for counting


was too large to be treated in a milk ashing dish, and it was delivered into a weighed beaker for ashing.
Blood samples were usually taken in duplicate.
-4 _* -_ ._.. . .. .......- _^ -a __ ^ _*_ -3 a^ JL *!









MDDC


- 1005


Ashing Procedure


Experiment showed that some radioactivity


was lost by ashing at temperatures


as low as 300, even


after previous treatment with HNO3.


For this reason a wet asking procedure was adopted. The tissues


were treated with concentrated HNOs on the steam bath.


The smaller tissues were ashed directly in the


milk ashing


vessels.


The larger tissues were ashed in beakers, and the resulting ash


was either trang-


ferred wholly to a milk asking dish or made up to volume and an aliquot delivered into a milk ashing
dish. Since all of the milk ashing dishes had previously been numbered and weighed, the weight o the
ash remaining after the HNOs treatment could be obtained simply by weighing the vessel plus the ash


and subtracting the weight of the vessel.


The correction to be


applied for a given weight of ash was


obtained from the mass absorption curve.

Mass Absorption Curve


Carcass ash was prepared by ashing several rats in the muffle at 5000


. A saturated solution of this


carcass


ash in HCl was prepared and varying amounts of this solution (0.9 cc) were added'to a


series


of 10 cc volumetric flasks containing the same amount of radioactive tellurium. Aliquots of the re-


suiting solutions were pipetted into weighed milk asking dishes,


bath. After drying, the weight of the ash


and the samples were dried on the steam


was obtained, and the samples were counted. The counts were


compared with the theoretical counts to be expected if no ash solution had been added.
This procedure was carried out twice, and the mass absorption curve (Figure 1) was drawn ua,
plotting mg of ash against correction factor. The correction factor was that factor by which the observed
number of counts had to be multiplied in order to give the number of counts which would have been


obtained with no mass present.


The best curve through the experimental points was a straight line. The


correction factor for various weights of ash was


Ash St.


as follows (from the absorption curve):


Factor


Calculations
The background of the counter and tube used throughout most of this investigation was about 1.2


counts per second. On the bases of variations in the background over a long period of time,


0.2 counts per second was arbitrarily taken


adigure of


as the maximum error of the background count, and samples


which contained an activity equal to background were calculated


.2 counts per second. Samples


containing between 0 and 0.4 counts per second (after subtracting background) were assumed to have


a maximum possible error of 100% and thus they were calculated


as containing




count.


In this way an upper limit was set for the recovery in weak samples. For samples containing


between (1.5 and I cennts per second, only one significant figure was retained for the final recovery.

HEXAVALmN TLL
HEXAVALENTa ^TrE TLBHWM


This study was carried out on 9 rats.


Only oral and intramuscular routes of administration were


employed. The time intervals were


as follows: 4-day oral (3 rats),


4-day intramuscular (3 rats),











MDDC


- 1005


1.0





0
a0.
'a
0



f0
-x *O


i Zd


~to
a..


~J4~ 4


ml

~4


< >~


@


N


I


K ____________________





K _________________________________________ _________________________________________ _________________________________________ ________________________________________


0 .x


MG Al PER CM


Flire 1. Al absorption urte u r eet


~<<


*








MDDC 1005


RESULTS


The results of the o,
1-4 inclusive and the co'
5-6. The oral studies re
absorbed by way of the
luritum was deposited pr
tration, the distribution
the oral studies. The ra
tration were surprising"
the first day by way of tU
equal to the daily excret
dose in both oral and int
with +4 tellurium.
The lungs studies v
due to the fact that such
swallowed by the animal
This tended to obscure 1
tellurium absorbed by v
However, it was very 3
tellurium in the lungs
into the lungs.
Time did not per
station of the data pre
tellurium present in
qualitative difference


ramuscular experiments using tellurous tellurium (+4) are in Tables
g experiments with telluric tellurium (+6) are indicated in Tables
t approximately 25% of the administered close of the +4 tellurium was
ract. The distribution of the absorbed activity indicated that the tel-
in the blood, liver, and kidney. Following intramuscular adminis-
;orbed activity followed essentially the same pattern as was noted in
,mination of the absorbed tellurium following both routes of adminis-
and a considerable proportion of the tellurium was eliminated during
y. Thereafter the rate of urinary elimination fell sharply and became
ray of the digestive tract. Approximately three fourths of the absorbed


ular studies was excreted during the 3?-day interval


of the experiments


ite unsatisfactory from the point of view of reasonably quantitative data,
siderable proportion of the administered tellurium that is invariably
tuse of the technique employed was absorbed from the digestive tract.
erpretation as to what proportion of the activity in the tissue was from
the digestive tract and what proportion was absorbed through the lungs.
.t from the lung experiment that the amount of pulmonary retention of +4
datively small, probably less than 5% of the quantity originally introduced


ire extensive studies with telluric tellurium and, of course, the interpre-
- is somewhat impaired because of the fact that approximately 25% of the
tavalent preparation was in the form of tellurous tellurium. No major
distribution of the hexavalent tellurbrm were noted following intramuscular


administration, excel
mained unabsorbed a"
sorption of hexavalei
for +4 tellurium. In
one-half of that with
tellurium, it seems
have been reduced tc
the absorbed telluriu
was approximately t
tellurium was emplo


the fact that a significantly higher propo
site of injection. It is also apparent that
.urium was significantly less than was nol
of the fact that the apparent oral ubsorpti
-4 tellurium while the material used in thc
reasonable to conclude that a considerabL
tellurium during its sojourn in the digestive
n the +6 experiments, following both oral a
;ame and also was comparable to the corre:


rtion of the
at the 4-day


administered dose re-
interval the oral ab-


ted at the corresponding time interval
on in the +6 state was approximately
+6 form contained 25% of the +4
e proportion of the +6 tellurium may
re tract. The rates of elimination of
nd intramuscular administration,
spending experiments in which +4


DISCUSSION


The principle prc
first, tellurium, whe
the digestive tract.
taken up by way of i
to tellurous telluric


its of interest arising from the results of the experiments just described are:
.er administered either in the cellurous or telluric state, is absorbed by way of
: seems quite possible that in these experiments the +6 tellurium was not as readily
e digestive tract, and that its assimilation takes place by its first being converted
a, which is then absorbed; secr:ond, the rates of elimination of absorbed tellurium in


both valence states and by both oral and intramuscular administration are rapid and essentially com-
parable. The rates Af excretion during the time intervals studied indicate an approximate one-half time
of retention in the body of 16 days. This is substantially less than the one-half periods of the radio-
active decay of Te"7 and Te'29 which are 32 anc'. 90 days respectively. This observation places tellurium
in the small list c the long-life fission products whose rates of elimination are greater than their rates
of radioactive de. &y. The other members of this group are ruthenium, xenon, and cesium. Third, the
principle organs of deposition for absorbed tellurium are blood, liver, and kidney. On the per gram
It.nn-fj. #-li/ lr4nartiW Tncni Inf i .nn ')ajM +n ^jr d.na .,-. .n-^ n^ rt~-a$4^*n/ 4$,,,, nKt n4'kn^'j. jf4-lr- *SLnf**r'cen Cn nil jnf ikaj








MDDC 1005


Table 1. Recovery


of tetravalent radiotellurium in the tissues of the rat one day after oral or intra-


muscular administration (avg. of


rats).


-~ ~~**~* ~Th-.-. ****** ~*~* ~ -4~~*- ~ ~ ~ ~


Tissue


Oral Administration


Intramuscular Administration


Per Gram


Per Cent Recovery
Per Organ


n Sample


Per Gram


Per Cent Recovery
Per Organ


In Sample


- Blood 0.27 4.7 0.44
BLOOd 0.21 4.7 0.44


Kidneys
Spleen
GJI Tract
M. Lymph Nodes
lungs
Brain

Heart


Borie
Teeth
LeftLeg
T wpoid
Adrnals
Toqes.
iIat
Tkai FHatr
Bkin & Hair


Carcass


'.5
0430
0.081


0.090
0.012
0.013
0.050
0.055


0.019
0.023


-- -
0.095
0.021
1.4
0.39


.01
0.049
-- a


0.01
0.095
0.021
0.095
0.039
0.089


.01
0.049
0.046


0.013
0.022


0,014
0,025
0.093


0.068
0.21
0.025


0.025


0,070


0.070


'4
0.052
0.035


0.12
0.043


O~O41
O~O71


Excreta
Feces


Urine


ALL


Recovery in Tissues
Recovery in Excreta


-U4'-


Total Recovery in Animal









MDDC


Table


- 1005


2. Recovery of tetravalent radiotellurium in the tissues of the rat 4 days after oral or intra-


muscular administration


avg. of 3 rats).


Tissue Oral Administration Intramuscular Administration
Per Cent Recovery Per Cent Recovery
Per Gram Per Organ In Sample Per Gram Per Organ In Sample

Blood 0.23 4.4 0.54 0.82 16.0 0.86
Liver 0.15 1.3 1.3 0.52 4.8 4.8
Kidneys 0.53 0.98 0.98 3.3 6.0 6.0
Spleen 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.60 0.94 0.94
G. I. Tract 0.035 0.39 0.39 0.16 1.7 1.7
M. Lymph Nodes 0.048 --- 0.019 0.27 0.11
Lungs 0.061 0.075 0.075 0.32 0.41 0.41
Brain 0.01 0.02 0.02 0.025 0.042 0.042
Muscle 0.013 1.5 0.18 0.070 7.8 0.51
Heart 0.045 0.036 0.036 0.20 0.14 0.14
Bone 0.055 0.87 0.11 0.37 5.4 0.34
Teeth .06 --- .007 0.15 --- 0.02
Thyroid .4 .009 .009 .5 .013 .013
Adrenals .2 .004 .004 .6 .02 .02
Testes 0.012 0.031 0.031 0.085 0.25 0.25
M. Fat 0.01 --- 0.03 0.11 --- 0.17
Tail Fat .004 --- .007 0.04 --- 0.05
Skin & Hair 0.015 0.85 0.85 0.086 4.5 4.5
Carcass 0.029 3.7 3.7 0.15 18.5 18.5
L. Leg 2.0 21.6 21.6


Excreta Day Urine Feces Urine Feces
1 7.4 61.6 16.2 2.1
2 2.13 8.5 2.9 3.8
3 3.1 1.14 3.3 2.9
4 0.89 0.71 2.6 3.2
13.5 72.0 25.1 12.0
Recovery in Tissues 8.9 61.8
Recovery in Excreta 85.5 37.1
Total Recovery in Animal 94.4 98.9









MDBC


- 1005


Rable & Recovery qi totravalent radiotellurium in the tissues ott.ri l ~day~ alte qral4 or intra-
nussulan adm&aiastration.


Oral Administration
per Cent Recovery


Intramuscular Administration
Per Cent Recovery


Per Gram


Per Organ


In Sample


Per Gram.


Per Organ.


In Sample


KyS
Jianys


Spleen
3 i Noract
li tpmph Nodes


0.036
0.18.
0.094
0.011


0.028


Luags

Muscle


0.41
0.081


-0.030
0.030


0.011


0.015


0.025


.01
0.030


0.055
0.015
0.048


0.028
0.082


0.046


keg

nais
~tea
an
TaM~ Sat


Ski air
Cassas


00.08


0.045
0.069


o.oo~a
0.011


0.051


B~e~et~


Urine


Feces


Urine


Feces


0.11
0.14
o.I
0.12
Q.Q0Q
0,2


0.084
0~O8~I.


0~.Q"8
0.22


SW


o.er'



a-


Recovery in Tissue
Recovery in ESxceta


0,040


O.Q3B


at'








MDDC


- 1005


Table 4.


Recovery of tetravalent radiotellurium in the tissues of the rat


32 days after oral or intra-


muscular administration (avg. of 3 rats).


Tissue


Oral Administration
Per Cent Recovery


Intramuscular Administration


Per Cent Recovery


Per Gram


Per Organ


In Sample


Per Gram


Per Organ


In Sample


Blood
Liver


0.018
0.0056
0.033


Kidneys
Spleen


0.056
0.070


0.092
0.056
0.070


0.19
0.036


G. I. Tract


M. Lymph Nodes


0.003


0.065


Lungs
Brain
Muscle
Heart
Bone
Teeth


0.072


0.072


0.035


Thyroid
Adrenals
Testes
M. Fat
Tail Fat


0.026


0.064


0.064


Skin& Hair


Carcass


0.001
0.003


0.020
0.056


L. Leg

Excreta (Table 4).


Oral Adm.
7 Recovery


Intramuscular Adm.
% Recovery


Oral Adm.
% Recovery


Intramuscular Adm.
% Recovery


Urine


Feces


Urine


Feces


Urine


Feces


Urine


Feces


0.059
0.054
0.045
0.059
0.055
0.036
0.025
0.030
0.079
0.019
0.046
0.026
0.035


0.095
0.055


0.083
0.20
0.097
0.13
fn nft


0.17
0.094


0.065
0.72


0.008


0.03
0.009


0.56


Recovery
in Tissues


0.18


.41








MDDC


Table 5.


- 1005


The recovery of hexavalent radiotellurium in the tissues of the rat 4 days after oral or intra-


muscular administration (avg. of 3 rats)


Tissue Oral Administration Intramuscular Administration
Per Cent Recovery Per Cent Recovery
Per Gram Per Organ In Sample Per Gram Per Organ In Sample


Blood
Liver


0.077
0.092


Kidneys
Spleen


G. I. Tract


0.055
0.014


0.084


0.084


0.043


M. Lymph Nodes


--- .03


0.084


Lungs
Brain
Muscle
Heart
. Bone
Teeth
L. Leg
Thyroid
Adrenals


0.05


0.084


0.084


0.020


0.084


--- .02


Testes


M. Fat
Tail Fat


Skin & Hair
Carcass


0.005
0.013


0.032
0.068


Excreta


Feces


0.17


Urine


Urine


Feces
3.0
0.73


0.80


Recovery in Tissues
Recovery in Excreta
Total Recovery in Animal


82.1


35.0









MDDC


- 1005


Table 6. Recovery of hexavalent radiotellurium in the tissues of the rat 16 days after
intramuscular administration (avg. of 3 rats).

Tissue Per Cent Recovery
Per Grami Per Organ In Sample


Blood
Liver


Kidneys
Spleen


0.046


M. Lymph Nodes
Lungs


Brain


0.043


Muscle
Heart
Bone
Teeth
L. Leg
Thyroid
Adrenals
Testes
M. Fat
Tail Fat


--- .03


Skin & Hair


Carcass


0.031
0.074


Excreta


Feces


Urine
20.4


Recovery in Tissues
Recovery in Excreta
Tnal f~nwarv in Animnal


G. I. Tract










MDDC 1005


liver. The blood showed the highest per organ content of tellurium, and it is of interest to note that
these relative levels were maintained even up to the 32-day interval.
The small but constant retention of activity in the skeleton, which showed no significant change
throughout the entire 32-day interval, together with the fact that the relative proportion of activity in
the skeleton as compared to other tissues was somewhat lower in the oral experiments as compared
to the corresponding intramuscular experiments, suggests that there may'have been from 2 to 5% of
radioactive impurities in the tellurium preparations employed, such as alkaline earths, rare earths,
zirconium, and columbium. It does not appear that the tellurium shows any significant tendency to
either deposition or retention by the skeleton.























END OF DOCUMENT




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

l1 1111BI BI 11111111111111 llil 111111111
3 1262 08909 7041


V

~ 4
~


-C


Vt-


J


:I