The rice situation

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The rice situation
Physical Description:
5 v. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
Publisher:
Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Creation Date:
1959
Frequency:
annual
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Rice trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Rice trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
statistics   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
RS-1-5; Nov. 1956-61.
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for 1960.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004701585
oclc - 40367268
System ID:
AA00008495:00002

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Rice situation (Washington, D.C. : 1962)

Full Text
1-


December 1959


RELEASE


DEC. 24, P. M.


SITU


i RS-


RICE

MIL. CWT.*


Total
supply
aj


1950-51


SUPPLY


ANDMS


AND


DISTRIBUTION


LJCarryover at year end
*.Exports


.1Domestic use


1952-53


1954-55


MARKETING YEAR BEGIUtINfG AUGUST I.
INCLUDE TFRRITORIAL AND 41fr7Aer U
U. 5. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


1956-57


gHMI
amma
WHEMI
amma
WHEW
mmag
mHumi
gagm
mamm
$55$
mmmW
- aggs
mmmW
AmlW
amWW
migZ
mamH
HAWW
mmHm
mi##
mamm
mmai


1958-59
DOUGH


AFOREC'aT


N~ED 6520 I9I III


AGRICULTURAL .ARI CETIG


Sharply higher exports are expect-
edto reduce the U. S. carryover at the
endof the 1959-60 marketing year. As
of July 31, 1959, the carryover was
less than half of what it was three


years earlier,


reflecting record ex-


ports in 1956-57, the impact of the
acreage reserve program in 1957 and


1958, andlowered acreage allotments
beginning in 1956. The carryover was
15. 7 million cwt., in terms of rough
rice. at the end of the 1958-59 mar-


keting year compared with the record
34. 6 million on July 31, 1956 and 18. 2
million on July 31, 1958.


Sm *M m mm


ICE


TIO


*
s-


...::: :35

-iii::::iiiiiiiiiiiiii
H3e


SERVICE


118






DECEMBER


1930


INCLUDES


U. S. DEPARTMENT


SrllOR STATES


OF AGRICULTURE


PRODUCTION


bE~frJHIIJ


1945


AND


DATA FOR 1959 ARE DECEMB'FR


NEG. 6521"


591121


YIELD


1960


I EStIMATES


AG RIuiC U L T iA


mARK fING


SERVICE


Tiee jiadi~


froma' 19l5


a year


havd ~tncreaadth


to 19561 but


earlier


Product ion


record


Lotalea


IBs Bharp


, and almost


Increased


crop in 19551.,


.2 million


each


ac reage


yesc~~~rysCnee L91


In 1955.


half again


In 1959,


as much


cM tar i~~t ai& I9SL


the yields


as the 19L.g-54


year from 1939 to 195.,


allotments


and marketing


except
quotas


are a record


average
for 191.,


33.49


cvn.


22.5?2 ed .
45 and L950.


have been In effect.


1 7 percent
Fol loving


In 1959,


RICE


Price


PRICES


received


by farmers


1940-41


*CO ran 941


AND


1945-46


1944 AND 1946 NO SUPPORT


RATFS


ANNOUNCED


Br AONTNHS.


YEAR BECGfINING


RICE


1940 1950


above


crop


PER CWT


RATES


$6.00


$4.00


LOAN


LOAN RATE


l rr -- -.. .r, .. X -. i


ii.

;It












ii


AUGUST


- -----,1..:..:. i*.".... -*j,


2


-~hit~Z


--


II 1 nr





RS-4 3 DECEMBER 1959


o"C


-i W-u -, L~i


THfl


RIOC


ITUAT


Approved by the Outlook and Situation


Board,


December


1959


CONTENTS


Page


Page


World Situation and Outlook


: Sugary ..
Background .....
SCurrent Domestic
: ffarryover Augus


: 4 per
: tion e
: Postwar


cent;
xpecte'


S..


World rice acreage at record


Situation


high
World


1959 downf


further reduc-
d next August


rice production


trade


in 1959


U. S. exports moved up in


1959
U. S.


exports have wide dis-


1959 production


20 percent


tribution


above
Price's


support
Domestic R


year ea
average


ice


<: 5id ~OutIoobk


rlier


19 cents


Exports


above


Announcements
or 1960 .....


for dollars


increase;


foreign currency sales
important ............


carryover stocks
countries .....


in exporting


quota and


referendum ... ...... ,.
1960 production may be down


slightly
average


if yields


World rice consumption in-
creasing ...............
Rice prices ..............
World rice requirements fo:


are


1960 to


increase


1960 price
minimum


e support
of $4.36


set at
er cwt


Total
cities


world export


availabi l-


legislation


Outlook


for U.


S. rice


TMarket development


work


exports 27
.... .. 29


CCC Sales


Policy


for Rice ................... 29
............................ 31


Index


of Tables


5014IA~:PI


A further


reduction


in the rice carryover


is expected August


, 1960


the result


of sharply


increased exports.


Tentative


estimates


are for 29 mil


lion


cwt.


1958-59.
exports


to be shipped abroad


Domestic use
and domestic u


S


in 1959-60,


is estimated at
e would leave s


t


over 9.3 million


26.4 million cwt.--up
ocks on next August 1


more


than


slightly.
of about


in
Such
13.6 mil-


lion cwt., 1
1956 record.


percent


less


than a


year earlier and


percent


less


than


~"l;~j4


S


1960 marketing


"::


~iiiiiiii;ri;;:ir,;i. ..


Ilr I, !r,((r(l


II Il J r rl r,(r I r r IS r I ,r E





DECEMBER 1959


The 1959 crop
lion or 20 percent 1


is indicated at


arger than a


million cwt.


year earlier.


of rough rice,


increase


reflects


8.8 mil-
expanded


acreage
record


resulting from


yields.


and imports
amounts to


With


the discontinuance


carryover


of 0.1 million cwt.,
69.0 million cwt.


stocks


of the


on :.ugust


Acreag
, 1959


total supply for the


e


Reserve


Program,


of 15.7 million cwt.


1959-60 marketing year


The reduction of more than half


three
reserve
1956.
Apat5S


years


reflects


p program


in 19


carryover was


compared


with


in the U. S. rice carryover


the record exports in l9 6-57
57 and 1958, and lowered acreag


15.7 million


in terms


the record 34.6 million cwt.


in the last


the mpac t of the ac ~reae
,e allotments beginning in


of rough


on August


rice on August
1956 and 18.2


1958.


referendum held


for 1960 by a 90.7 perc
more an the required
same acreage of rice is
and f yields are about
about 51 O lmillFon cft.
and the 1913- 7 average
at 26.6 million cwt, e


ent


on December


vote,


producers


according to the


two-thirds vote of
seeded in 1960 as


equal to
would be


of 53
exports


average


produced,


.1 million.


approved


rice


preliminary report.


the producers
in 1959-4-"e


of the


compared


last
with


With domestic


of 24.6 million cw-t.


quotas
This


voting. If about the
aiotifient is unc


three


years,


53.2 million
disappearance


would hold


a crop of
in 1959
estimated


carryover


August 1,
estimated


1961 at this


2-~.


year


rmntllcn cwt.


s level.


tcp


for 1959-60,


aorts of this size would be below the
belor the 25.1 million in 1952-53 and


below


the record 37


million


exported


in 1956-57,


above


any other year.


The
easti ted a
19585 9, th


season aY r6e price
t $4.67, 16 cents ab


e


season


ave rage


received by farmers


ove


price


W


the support
as 19 cents


rate
above


for rice


in 1959-60


of 64.38 per cwt.


the support


price.


was
rice


The advance m'iAmu natioQna average
announced on becet er at $4.36 per ow
parity price of t5.82 oer cut.


t


price
., 75


support fo
percent of


1960-crop rice
the December 1959


world


world r
acreage


ice cultivation n 1959-60
will exceed last year' re


(August-July)


cord.


Areas


continued


outs ide


to expand and


Cmnmunist


China


harre
which
below


record acreage


produces


that


about


of last


and production.
a third of the


year.


But a drop in output in
world rice crop, reduced


Communist China^
the world total


World production


4,710 million cwt.,


1957-58-
productiox
61 million


of rough


compared


with


Average production in 19
, ecizluding Communist Ch


t~er


1958-59 and


468 million


rice in 19


t,801 million


>0-54


vas 3


is tentatively estimated at


in 1958-59 and


,959 million cwt.


3,004 million cwt.,


over the


4,274 million


World


rice


an increase


1950-54 average.


iComplete


1959 statistics


data at bhxd indicate


that


total


are not yet


world


trade


available, but estimates based on
, including Communist controlled


areas


, thas year may fall


below that


of 1958,


when a


total of


about


130 mil-


lion cwt.


of milled rice entered


the international market.


In the


o~ )I
I\J'Y


*





DECEMBER 1959


The reduction, which centered in the Communist controlled areas, was
not offset by the increase of about 8 percent in exports from free world areas
in 1959 over 1958.


In 19
40 countries
U. S. dropped
it probably
the position
ment of the
tions largely
Program.


59,
and
d to
rega
wil
past
y as


exports o
a further
fourth p
ined 3rd
1 likely
year was
a result


f
r
OS
pl
be
a
o


U. S. rice were
substantial incr
ition among world
ace which it had
maintained in 1
sharp increase
f lower export p


up
eas
d e
he
960
in
ric


about 7 1
e is expi
xporters
id for a
. The m'
shipment
es under


ent to some
d in 1960. The
1958, but in 1959
ber of years, and
important develop-
European destina-
Payment-in-Kind


world
for do
basis,
which
Public
during


United S
trade, co
liars in
to appro
dollar sa
law 480,
the last


tat
mpa
195
xim
les
in
4


es exports i
red with 10
9 moved from
ately 7.4 mi
advanced.
addition to
years.


n 1959
percent
about
llion.
Sales
cash


represent
t in 1958
5.9 mill
This wa
for forei
sales, ha


ted about
. Estimat
ion hundre
s the their
gn currency
ve been of


percent of total
commercial sales
ight, milled rice
consecutive year in
under Title I of
jor importance


World sto
current crop are
those of last ye
carryover positi
old surplus will


of ri
t expe
which
will b
limit


ce in
cted t
were
e lowe
ed to


exporters hands
.o be materially
the lowest in s
r for short gra
medium and long


from crops previous to the
higher on January 1, 1960 than
veral years. By varieties, the
ns than for other types; the
grain types.


Prices


had made so
instances t
varieties.
on Governme
somewhat do
throughout


me
hey
Pr
nt
wn.
the


of most
advance
were 1
'ices of
contract
Price


ear d


of the


better


s over closing
ower by Novembe
medium grain v
ts for most of
s for short gra
ue to almost a


grade s


of Asian ri


ces at the
The exc
eties from
year but
varieties
station of


end
epti
Asi;
in N
gene
Egyp


June


of 1
on wa
a rem
ovemb
rally
tian


958, b
s for
gained
er wer
were
export


this


year


t in most
ong grain
airly steady
reported
rratic
, a cutoff o


Italian supplies
China.


s in mid-summer,


smaller offerings


of rice


from


Communist


higher
40 perc
quantity
grains


Prices for 1960 are
range of qualities o
ent broken are like
ies of short grains
and other types, com


likely to h
f long and
ly to move
in the mark
pared with


d within reasonab
dium grains while
ound present price
may widen price
59.


le limits for the
grades with 20 to
es or lower. Larger
ranges between short


Advance sales of rice for delivery in 1960,
highest level of any postwar year, indicating the
growth, increased per capital consumption, improved
tendency to depend on more stable free world supply
accordingly, that over-all requirements will be hi


however
influen
economy
ies. I
gher in


are now at the
of population
conditions and a
is likely,
960.


Iljj:::EEEEE~~~jj: EE: ::jj:E j:


RS-4





RB-J4


DECEMBER 1959


The export
same; short grain
despite the likeli
and exports under
ally higher in 196


availability of long and medium varieties will be about the
varieties will be in more plentiful supply than in 1959,
hood of smaller exports from Mainland China. Both commercial
Government programs from the United States should be materi-
0


RICE SITUATION AND OUTLOOK


BACKGROUND
were scarce
by war-time


- Between 1945
and prices ros
and postwar di


important rice pr
production before
during and after
to build until 19
reached a recent-
Though large in ca
production in 195


oducing c


World
he war
4, whe
ear lo
mparis
at 53


Ii
n


and 19.'3,
e steadily
sruptions
countries.
r IIyas
t increase
it was 64


w of
on wi
1.2 mi


world supplies of rice
y. Shortages were caused
which reduced output in
Although U. S. rice

ed rapidly and continued
million cit. In 1957, it


3.0 million cwt, (table i).
h a decade earlier, U. S. rice
lion cwt. represented only about


percent


the world


total.


export
growing
in imp
situat
trade


The
supp
g con
ortin
ion.
began


world
lies
diti
g an
By
to


d r
be
ons
d e
the
mov


ice shortage began to
came more abundant. U
and expanded acreage
xporting countries, i
fall of 1953, prices
e downward from record


ease in
usually
planted
proved t
of rice
levels.


1953 as
favorable
to rice, both
he supply
in world


1953-4
beginning
7.3 mill
another


in the
wing the
the 1954
wt. The
d large


ted States
cord large
marketing
mbination o
4 crop, and


started
1953 c
year t
f these
re duc


building
p, and a
carryov
carryove
exports


up in
the
r was
stocks,
caused the


August
cwt.


19; -


arryo


r to


sharply to about
K iy x x: x. x xxx'xx''xx


26.}7


milli


In view of


allotments an
crop. These
action result
increase in y
highest of re
disappearance
accumulation,
the record hi


again


were


and
gh i


thi
rket
app
n a
per
up
not
car
evel


in effect


Although the
2(1.1 million c.t. by
supplies continued


heavy accumulation


ing q
roved
sharp
acre
to th
suff
ryove
of 3


for the


o o.
ks on
llion


1956


of ri


roc claimed
rendum.
n acreage
1955 crc
, increase
Auguset ie
August 1,


cwt.


ce, acre
for the

, a subs
p to the
in dome

1956 re


age
1953
this
tantial
second
stic


I
r
C


Marketing qi


crop.


carryover on August 1,
the smaller crop and
large and quotas were


1957
record
again


was cut
exports
n neces


Ig
tched
xotas


to

s ary


on





ES-h


DECEMBER 1959


for the 1
than half


were


reduced


as a result


957


crop.


Even


though


e


of those of a year earl


by another


2 million


of a further decline


xport
ier,


cwt.


in 1957


stocks


were


on August


to 18.2 million


in production


brought


less
, 19


cwt.,
about


by participation


in the Acreage


Reserve


Program.


Stocks at


end of the 1958-59


U percent
increase


to 15-7


in exports


mi ii


more


marketing year
on cwt. This


were


resulted


further


from


reduced
a sharp


than offsetting an increase


production.


Dome


stic


disappearance,


including shipments


Territories


million


increased from


cwt.


in 1955


20 million
(table i).


in 1946


The quantity used


brewers, for
The increase


seed


and feed


for food


increased


reflected an


more than


increase


use for food.


in per capital


consumption from a
in population. Do.


below-average


mestic


level


disappearance


as well
in 1956-5


as an increase
7 dropped


2.2 million cwt


brewers
food us


e as wel.


. reflecting a decline
. In 1957-58 there was
1 as use for feed and b


in quantities


a slight
y brewers.


used


reduction
In 1958


disappearance


was reduced


a slight decline


food


use.


In 1951


exports


acco


united


for about


half


production.
to that date,


22.7
rose


million
again


Exports
of 25.


cwt.


to 18.7


in 1952-53


million


and in 1954-
million cwt


reached


cwt.


ml


to 14.


a record
953-54 t
million


. in 1955


Then


level


, up


hey fell


cwt.


in 1


then
956-57


exports


reached


a new record


high of


million


the following year they were
They increased slightly to 1
Table 13, page 28, shows U.


countries


down again,


9.
S.


of destination,


7


million


exports,
1958-59,


to 18.
cwt. ir
milled


with


million


11958-
basis,


cwt.


.59.
by


comparisons


THE CURRENT


DOMESTIC


RICE SITUATION


Carryover Au
14 Percent
Expected


gu
*


st 1, 1959 Down
Further Reduction


Next


August


The rice


rough rice


carryover on August


was less


than


half


, 1959


of the record


of 15


of 3


million


4.6 million


cwt.,


cwt.


in terms


only three


years earlier
14 percent.


reflects a


. During the
The reduction


create


controls


past
in c


year,


arryove


stocks w
r stocks


and the Acreage


ere


Reserve


reduced


during the


Program,


2.5 million
last three


as well


cwt.


years


as a high


level


of exports.


The 1959


cent


crop


larger than a


year


estimated
earlier,


at 53.


million cwt.


reflecting increased


8.8 million or


acreage


per-


due to the


AJ 4 n~njp.. .4.. a. 1 Lnr A a n f .f W f- r


~.T4+1~


II


~n n~nnm


Ir: al~n


L ~rr I~UI~~


~ Ir nm rn







DECEMER 1959


I I"


C




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I













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" II"EE Ej"" ""E"ii "" ;;


~o~;l~il





DECEMBER 1959


negligible imports,
69.0 million cwt.


the total


supply for the


1959-60 marketing year amounts


Ibme sti c


million above


following items
(18.6); brewers


use of rice


a year ea
in million


in 1959-60


rlier.


wrler
c t.


use, 5.oC (4.7);


are tentatively estimated at


Dome


estimated


stic


at 26.


use in 195


(1958-59 data are
seed


, 2.1 (2.1)


C million


cwt.1,


9-60


million
is made


in parenthe


and feed,


sharply above


ses)


.5 (0.


the 19.


cwt.,


up of the


Food,


18.8


Exports
million


last


year.


be about


On the basis


13.6 million cwt.


carryove r


the record


34.6


August


million


of these
This


, 195


cwbt.


estimates,


would


and down
in 1956.


be down


carryover


2.1 million


21.0 million


cut.


August
, or 13
or 6l1


, 1960 may


percent,


percent,


from


from


Distribution of


rice


for food


the United


States


1958-


amounted.


to 5.1
average


pounds


per capital,


for 1947-56


down


(table 6


from


.7
14).


on page


pounds


a year


The decline


earlier and


last


year may


the 5.4-pomnd
be


explained


in part


consumption has


held


inventory changes
up relatively well


retail


compared


distribution


with


chann


consumption


els.


Rice


potatoes,


wheat,


and other


starch


products


Postwar


Rice


Product ion


Rice


except


1945 to
a record


yields


for 1951


1954


ds per harvested
and 1958 (figure


in 1955


33.49 cwt., 7


acre


have


on page


was sharp.


percent above


increased


each


The increase


Yields


a year


earlier,


year


since


iRas gradual


harvested acre


but almost


half


1945,
from


in 1959
f again


much as


the 1945-54


average


of 22.52


cwt.


Except


1950


rice


acreage


increased


each year


over following the


from 1939


record


to 1954.


crop and


small


Because
exports


of the increase


in 1954


it became


in the carry-
necessary


to impose


acreage


allotments


and proclaim marketing quotas


for 1955


Although


yields
held


increased


product ion


each year from
well below the


factor in reducing the


size


1955


to 1959,


record 1954


carryover


except


level.


for 1958,


Lower production


but the reduction


reduced


acreage


tion was a major
was not enough


to permit


the discontinuance


of produ


action


controls.


1959 Rice Pro
Above Year


Production


action 20
Earl ier


Percent


The 195
of rough rice.


9 production of
I/ This produ


rice


production


in U


is 20 percent


estimated
above l


at 5


last


.1 million


year and


ciqti


11 percent


above


average.


and larger


The larger production


harvested acreage


with the


year was


latter


due to both


accounting for abou


higher yields
t two-thirds of


the increase
primarily to
33.49 cwt. r


The seeded


the disc


acreage


ontinuance


reached a new record


at 1.6 million,


of the Acreage
high.


moved


Reserve


rather


Program.


r sharply due
The yield at


28,000 cwt.


in minor States


(table


Ij:


~s -4





- i!C-


DECEMBER 1959


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II
ws-4 11 DECEMBER 1959

SRice was harvested from 1,586,100 acres, 12 percent above last year but
Hirr ... %f 9 .


15 pierce
in 1954.
since 19
than hal


5
f


*, JelO W
The ac
, with
of the


average ana jo
reage abandoned
acreage remove
abandonment.


percent oeiow tne record high acreage harvested
is estimated at 1.3 percent, the smallest
d to comply with allotments accounting for more


Production


Louisiana


year's
Arkans
plant
damage
late S
the So


produce
as and
ng was
to the
eptembe
uthern


Tex
ion.
ouis
eces
crop
and
rea.


the Southern area-


,s--to
Reco
ana.
ary.
in Te
early
Howe


high
athe
avy
and
tobe
, th


.0 mi
yield
'was
'ai ns
Louis
C aus'
crop


-Missouri


Ilion cwt.,
s per acre w
favorable fo
received wit
iana in late
ed some lodg
season was


Mississ
about 20
ere esti
r seedin
h hurric
August.
ing and
general:


ippi, A
percent


ated f
and 1
ne Deb
Rains
etarde


very


rkansas,


ove last
issouri,
e re-
aused some
winds in
rest over


good and


harvest


was virtually


complete


November


In Califo
above the 1958 c
previous record
tions were almost
and harvest was
lent.


rnia, pro
rop. The
set last
t ideal.
completed


duc tion
yield
year.
Dry, w
in rec


is
of
Fol
arm
ord


estimated
46.00 cwt.
lowing a go
, windy wea
time. The


at 1
per
od g
their
qua


3.1 million
acre is 1.5
rowing seas'
helped red
lity of the


cwt.,
cwt.
n, ha
ce fi
crop


percent
ove the
st condi-
moisture
excel-


Rice Prices
19 Cents


Average
Above Support


Average
unredeemed loan
1951-52 and 195
export demand.
deliveries to C


ce prices
were abo
55. For
n recent
have giv


ceived by
national
umber of
rs, large
strength


farmers,
support le
years, thi
quantitie
to prices.


eluding an allowance for
Is in all but two years,
resulted from a strong
under support and heavy


In
national
higher pr
price is
at $4.38


1958-59,
average s
iced Ion
estimated
per cwt.


the price to farmers averaged $4.67, 19 cents above the
support of $4.48 per cwt., reflecting a large proportion of
g-grain rice put under the support program. The 1959-60
at $4.54, which is 16 cents above the support rate announced


Farme rs
price support
16). Of the 1
farmers delive
11.0 million c
Century Patna
Of the 15.7 mi
owned 9.4 mill


C
1
r
w
v


put s
ompar
L.6 mi
'ed 6.
t. ou
ere t


llio
ion


light
ed wi
Ilion
3 mil
t of
he pr


n-bushel
cwt.


ly more than
th about a th
cwt. put unds
lion to the C
13.6 million
incipal varie


total


'ourth
.of t
price
The
* under
as del


carryover of


1958-crop ri
crop (table
from the 1958
ore, farmers
Bluebonnet
CCC of the 1


rice


on August


, 1959,


ce under
7, page
crop,
delivered
and
958 crop.


the CCC


Through November
cwt. of 1959-crop rice
1958-crop rice on the s


30, 1959, farmers had placed a total of 5.55 million
under support, compared with 4.35 million cwt. of
ame date a year earlier. Of the 5.55 million cwt.,






RS-4


- 12


Tab le


.- Rice:
by States


DECEMBER 1959


Acreage allotments,
', 1958-60


Apportionment


State


1958


1959


Acres


Acres


19r0
Acres


Arizona
Arkansas
California
Florida
Illinois
Louisiana
Mississippi
issouri
North Carolina


Oklahoma


South Carolina


.. 229
399,01 4
299,767
957
20
475,10
46,7675
4,767
29


2,86


398,855
299,648
956
20

4,6669
4,765


2,845


Termssee


Texas


Total apportioned to States


422,316


422,147


1,651, 730


399,012
299,766
957


4,767
S38f
149
2,846
517
422,313

1,652,296


Unapportioned national reserve


United. States total


t:,652, 596j


1, 652, 596


1,652,596


Conrnodity Stabilizaticn Service,


U. S.D.A.


Table


-Rice:


Acreage and production,


States


, 1958-59


ac reage


Production


State


Planted


1959 1/


Harves


1958


1,000
acres


1,000
acres


1,000
acres
*r-Tta^


..L, I'
acres


1,QQQ


cwt.


Missouri


Mississippi
Arkansas
Louisiana
Texas
California
Minor States


United States


: 415
: 385
S251


:1.440. o


1,608.5


336

379
249
1.0

,415.7


383
453
417
285
1.2


1,587.3


1,092
9,912
10,812
11, 370
11,080
4, 3915

44,396


12,639
12,910
13,136
13,110
-vr Q


53,150


1/ Preliminary.
2_/ Minor States include Arizona,
*t\lr nI a- L .***h -. A (TI3 : : .- -L- n j- .-


Florida,


Illinois,


North Carolina,


South Carolina,


ij


i, 652,






v's-i'


- 13


DECEMBER


1959


4.13 were warehouse-stored and


accounted


for only


14,869 cwt.


1.40 million


farm-stored.


Through November


Purchase


farmers


agreements
repaid


loans on 200,270 cwt.


of rice.


DOMESTIC RICE ANNOUNCEMENTS AND OUTLOOK FOR


1960


1 96O


Rice


Marketing Quota


Re fe rendum


Marketing quotas


for rice


were


proclaimed


on De


member


, 1959.


law requires


the preceding
10 percent.
determination


quotas


for the


marketing year


total


supply


coming crop
(1959-60)


(1960)
exceeds


of rice for the


is 14.2 percent above


the normal


whenever the


the normal


1959-60
supply


total


supply


marketing
figure, 4


supply
by more


year


than


quota


points


above


the marketing quota


level


In the referendum held


for 1960 by


This


more


a 90.
than


7 percent


on December


vote,


the required


according to


two-thirds


vote


producers


approved


the preliminary r
of the producers


e


rice quotas
port 3/.
voting.


1960


Production May


be Down


Slightly


if Yields


Average


The national


rice


allotment


for 1960


,652,


acres


, the minimum


fixed by
The 1960


law.


national


This is the


acreage


producing States


same


allotment


allotment has


same


proportion


that has


been


effect


been apportioned among the


as they


shared


in the


since 1956.


rice-
allot-


acreage


ment


for 1956


(table


If about


yields
about
in 195


same


are about equal


51.0 million


and 53.1


estimated at


cwt.


acreage


to the
would


million,
million


of rice


average


seeded


of the past


be produced,


the 195


3-57


, exports


compare


average.


would


in 1960


three


with


as in 1959,


years,


53.2


With domestic


have


to be 24.6


and if


a crop


million cwt.
disappearance


million


cwt.


For the marketing quota determination,


estimated at 68,969,000 cwt.,


a carryover on August


1959


consisting
15,680,000


the total


a 1959


cwt.


1959-60
crop of


and estimated


supply of
53,139,000
imports o


rice
cwt.,


150,000


cwt.


estimated dome


The normal supply is estimated at 60,
stic consumption of 25,881,000 cwt. f


69,000 cwt.


'or the


1958


based


on an


marketing


year and exports


of 29,


000,000


cwt.


during


the 1959-


60 marketing


year


with


a carryover allowance


3/ Rice rr
1959 crops.
able vote;


cent and for


of 10 percent of


marketing quotas were


For 1959,
for 1958,


]195 5,


producers
?0 percent;


90.2


in effeI
approve
for 19


percent.


the consumption
ct for the 1955,


ed
57,


rice
91.h


quotas by
percent;


and export


total.


1956, 1957, 195
a 86.9 percent


for 1956,


8 and
favor-


8i.6 per-






%iS-4DEDIDB i 1959


.- Rice, rough:


Acreage, yield and production


Southern States,


California and United States, 1930-59


: Harvested acreage Average yield per harvested acre : Production
\ear Southern : : lirte-d Soutered uer Uniteed
: States 1 iaiifornia : States ; States 1 : CaiIfornia: States : States Ij :Californis : States


: 1,000
acres
m, i


1, 00J
acres


764


717
843
967
95-


L,000
acres


817
981I

1,076
lOl*-


1,069

1,457
1,472
1,480
1,501
1i*.84


1,859


Pounds


Pounds


Pounds


2,1u


3,1(5


2,192




1,0-:

1,931



3,.967


3,600

(45
:*:. : uvu:
./< 7:* liSf


2,29i

1,996

2,093
210k^-.


~;" ^3F T 350" "


1,000
cwt.

16,946
16, 361
15,219
13,833
13,685
14,1423
18,196
19,r41
19,859
20,278


20,247

23,400
22, 1'12

2 24,4142
2/24,625
2,27,226
31,496
tJ3055fl


1,000
cvt.


', 248
""r~a


6,26;2
7.913
8,035
io,832
'cia's18


1,000


2O,218 ____

18,129
La, 943
17,571
l11,7153
22,81.1

23,628
2 328

21., 195

29,082


30, 704
32,538
35,261
38,328
whmare


2, j70


: ,1, 673
4i, 666

: /%o 78



1 2/,1


2,555


2,971
2,915
2,9815,
3.'5.?


4,600)


>.3o,5is
2,' 35, 42b
2 30. 560
2,h4C, 593
.'2,,84
2 44,619
2,37,491
2,33,236
2 33,316
?/40,040


10, 92
11,711
12,325
12,164
11. 350


13,110


46,118
48,271
52,918
64,248
55,969
49,503
42,954
44,396
53,150


lude
1945,
6 (84
*3 pr


SouTketn St
s acreage a
2, (41) in


in 1953,


~~iita7


flea


consists


ad production


1946,
5 (55)


of Texas,
in minor


2 (154),
in 1954,


Thijisiana


States,
3 (53)
in 1955


Si Azstantt


in thousand
in 1948, 1 (
, 2 (W4) in


acres
195 i,
1956,


atdl eg inn' ing
and thousand


in 1949, Mi-E1ss1ppi


cut.,


: (25) in
in 1957,


(irn parentneses)


195' 1 ()
- f i in L958


and Missouri.
as folLovs:
51, 6 f78) iin
: (28) in 195


2/ In-
2 (36) tn
1952,


Data published


currently ~


'I.


trale


.- Rice,


mi~jle


equtvsleat:


?otai and per


cbpi ta


consunmp ion,


Continental U.Si


, 1909-58


Year
belgiannin
Au~r~la~


Consumprton


Total 1.,
Mi. i.-
Mi l. Ic..


Per
capital


Year"
beginning
August


Tot l


Cons inrption
Per
I
C~PLrl&


Year


b eginning
Alsguns


SF:t Ic


Consumption


STotal 1
: capitala
Mil. lb. Lb.


632
539
KK K KK K K K


I.9
4.0


5.0
5.1


1 i.h


rable


1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
194(

19148
1949


*)
'e


irU ii


I '-., L


kS-4


,,1946
"L911~





- 15


DECEMBER


1'59


to hold


carryover


August


1961


at this


year's


level.


Exports


of this


size


would b
mill ion


e below


the estimated


in 1952-53


and below


29.0 million
the record 37


for 1959-60,


million


eyporte


below
d in


the
1956-5


but above


any other year.


1960 Rice Price Support Set
At Minimum of $4.36 _Per Cwt.


The advance minimum national


average


price


support for


1960-crop


rice


was announced on D
rice parity price


$5.8e,
for the


support wil
1960 crop'


as in past


January
within


31,
thei


years.
1961; 1
r acreage'


december


1 at


$4.36 per


cwt.,


of $5.82 per cwt.h/ If August
1 be 75 percent of that figure.


will


be carried


Loans and


out through


purchase


oans will mature


allotments


will


percent


of the


parity price


The price


loans and


agreements will


on March 31,
be eligible


1961.


December
is above


support


purchase


be available
Producers


for price


1959


program


agreements,
e through
who remain


support at


above
ments,


stated level


up to


and for recourse


Growers who exceed


their


$50,000 for nonrecourse


loans only to
farm acreage


loans


any production


allotments


will


and purchase


agree-


above this amount.5/
be subject to marketing


quota


June


penalties.
.5, 1960) p


excess


The penalty will amount


cwt.


on their


production may be


excess


to 65 percent


production.


avoided or postponed by


of parity


However,
storage


the penalty on


or by


delivery


to the


None


or any


other


of the production


agency
on farms


designated


which


exce


by the


eded


Department of


their


allotments


Agriculture.
will be


eligible


for price


support.


Legislation


legislation


L. 85-835)


minimum national allotment for


level of


1,652,596 acres


support for the
percent or more


1959


(the


and 1960


same


enacted


1958 pr


is to continue
as for 1956); (2


crops will be


than 90 percent of


parity,


ovides that (i) The
indefinitely at the


)


the rate


unchanged at not


the level


1957


of price
less than


to be determined by the


Secretary, and (3
70 percent of the
than 65 percent,


the minimum support
parity price and for


with


the maximum to


legislation enacted in 1959 relating
limitation (P.L. 86-80).


level for


1962


remain
to rice


1961


will


and subsequent
at 90 percent.


is the $50,000


be reduced


years


to not


less


The only new


price


support


is


SbetweeTh
between


is set in accordance


75 and 90 percent


with


of parity.


legal
The


provisions


calling


Agricultural Act


for rice


support


of 1958 removed


supply as
5/ The
first ses


the bas
$50, 000
sion of


is


for determining minimum


rice price


limitation on nonrecourse price


the 86th Congress,


will


support


supports,


be applicable


levels.


as enacted by the


to the 1960 crop of


rice.


Such limitation will not


planting of rice
This limitation


by at
applies


apply


least 20 percent


to persons


to producers who


from


th


rather than


reduce their


,eir 1959 planted rice
to individual farming


1960


acreage.
units.


Loans may be made
the excess within


excess


of $50,000 provided


the borrower


agrees to repay


the specified period.


RS-4






Ws-~4


DECEMBER 1959


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RB-it


- 17


DECEMBER


1959


THE WORLD


RICE


SITUATION


AND OUTLOOK 6/


World Rice Acreage
Record High 7


large


World
areas


Agricultural


rice
over


cultivation in 1959-60


the world,


Service


(table


according to


(August-July)


the first


World acreage


will


continued


estimate
exceed i


to expand ill


of the Foreign
ast year's


record.
However,


Areas


out side


due to a


Communi st


drop in Communist


China have


China's


record acreage
output--about a


and production.


third


of the


world


total


production--the


world harvest


below


last year.


World production


471.0 billion
lion pounds


n pounds,
in 1957-58


of rough
compared w
. Average


rice
ith


in 1959-60


480.1


production


is tentatively


million in 1
in 1950-54


958-59


estimated


and 427.4


was 395.9


bil-


billion


pounds.


The record 1959-60 world


acreage


in rice


estimated at 280 million


acres, up 2 mil
24 million more


lion from last


than


year,


average.


11 million


Acreage


over


years


increased in


earlier,


all continent


and
s except


Australia,


where


it approximates


that


of last year.


World rice production,


pounds of rou
lion over the


gh rice,


excluding Communist


an increase


1950-54 average.


of 6.1


Acreage


China,


billion over
increased to


300.4


1958-59


billion
t 46.8 bil-


207 million acres


from


203 million


the year


before.


Also,


the yields


acre were


higher in many


countries


because


of favorable


weather


improved


cultivation.


Asia,
harvest


excluding
in this a


preceding year,


Communist


China,


rea in 1959-60


produces


increased


over


half the world


3.8 billion


and 32.0 billion pounds more than the


poor


pounds o
crop of


crop,


ver the
1957-58.


Production


this


year


is 18 percent


above


average.


Good crops


large st


were


producers next


harvested again
in volume to C


in India,


communist China.


Japan and Pakistan-the


Acreages


1959-60


were


increased and weather


has been generally


favorable.


Production


in Malaya and Korea.
it will exceed last ye


The Philippines expect


bumper


harvest


another


is not


large


crop,


whether


yet known.


Larger crops


are also


being harvested in


the principal exporting


countries of


Asia-Burma,


production of Burma and
half the total world tr


compared with


33.6


Cambodia,


Thai land


Thailand, countries


ade,


is estimated at


billion pounds


Sand
which
35.3


Viet


Nam.


The combined


usually account


billion


pounds


for over


of rough rice,


in 1958-59.


6/ Except for the
and Outlook, was pr


statement on


epared by


1959-60 production,


Dexter


Rivenburgh,


the World


Rice


Rice


Marketing


Situation


Specialist


of the


Foreign Agricultural


Service.


7/ From Foreign Crops and Markets,
November 27, 1959.


World


Summaries,


Crops and


Livestock,


~,,,,,~,,,.,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,







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P





- 20


DECEMBER


1959


Production


in Western Europe


approximate d


that


of last year.


Decreased


production


in Italy


France was


offset


by gains


in Spain,


Portugal and


Greece. In Easter
and Bulgaria shows


n Europe,


an increase


the total estimated acreage


of 16


percent over the


of Hungary,


Rurmania


1950-51 average.


Because


of greatly


higher than average


Rumania'


acreage


increased yields
As a result of
s reporte"to te


acre,


production is


a plan for increase
p sharply in 1959.


33 percent


ed rice product


ever-incre


asking rice production of the


We stern


Hemisphere


is due


to both expanding
largest in 4 years


acreage


and higher yields


as the result


of a 12


percent


acre.
increa


The U. S. crop is


,se


in acreage


6.8 percent gtin in average


yields


acre.


In other


North America-


Mexico,


Central AmeriCa and the


Carribean-the


combined acreage


of 1,325,000


acres


is 70,000 acres ore than the year


before,


and 296,000 above te


average.


The increase


the


last
t


3 year


been


greatest


in Mexico,


Panama and Costa Rica.


The rice acreage


notably i
mate the
March to


of South America


continuing to


n Brasil, Arentina and.. Coo .a is still
South American rieq cro s, whichh will be mainly
Auus t.


advance steadi
too early to e
harvested next


Acreag


and production of


AfPrica


are well above


19 58-59 ,


but not


up to


the 1957-58 records.
the buaper harvest of


Recent reports indicate
2 years ag i


Egypt


s crop may


approximate


Australia


s rice


growing conditions have


year is


indicated.


acreage
been le


is tg to the record level of a
ss favorable so that a smaller


However, the crop sold still


be well


above


year


ago,


but


crop than last
e ave rage.


level of world pr~daction in 1959-60


direct effect on


1.k S.


expos ft


calendar year


in world production will be &sorbed growth


not likely to have


1960.


Much


in population


of the


any
increase


and higher


per capital consuption.


This will be true


for both importing and


exporting


countries.


Favorable production periods are


also


reflected


fair to good


crops in the fringe areas of rice production-the areas


where


a crop


expected only every two or three


ye~ars.


When such production


does


come


the rice
market.


is conswed locally
Regardless of higher


in 1960 will not


vary


and seldom enter


levels of production,


a great deal f om those


the international export


supplies


of previous yea


of quality rice
rs. This


situation is


likely to


continue


some


time.


World Trade


in 1959


1959 world rice


market was


satisfactory from


the standpoint of


major exporters


Viet
were


Exports from the


United


Nam, Briti Gfui na and Australia
down from Cbunist areas, as well


States,


were


Burma,


above those


as for Taiwan,


Thailand,
of 1958.


Egypt,


Combodia,
Exports


Spain,


Italy,


Orj


RS-4


y






RS-4


- 21


DECEMBER 1959


Madagascar and Argentina,


the reduction


was largely due


to the limitation


of supplies


have


rather


no carryover


than


stocks


from


the lack of


as of January


sales.
, 1960.


Some


of these


countries


will


The world market


calendar year


came


was extremely


back


strongly


sluggi
n the


sh


for the


first half


July-December period,


of the


1959


apparently


recovering earlier


ses.


While


that


total


complete


world


trade,


1959


statistics


including Communist


are not yet available,


controlled areas,


it is


may be


estimated


below


that of 1958 when a


total


the international market


Communist


of about
(table 12


controlled areas may


13 billion


page


not be offset


pounds


of milled


The reduction
the increase


rice


entered


centered in
in the free


world


areas


over


last


year of


a probable 8


percent.


Table


9.--Rice,
countries,


milled


equivalent:


calendar years,


Imports


average


into


1951


principal importing
annual 1956-58


Country Average : 1956 1957 : 1958 1/
S1951-55
St.il. lb. Iil. lb. lil. lb. Mil. lb.

Indonesia 905 1,682 1,242 1,504
India 1,168 904 1,750 950
Pakistan --- 972 950 757
Japan 2,438 1,675 765 1,114
Korea 246 43 402 15
Malaya 1,113 1,304 ',163 1,413
Ceylon 884 1,083 1,153 1,063
iong Kong 478 613 690 841
Philippine Republic : 132 93 172 431
Saudi Arabia 103 90 200 150
Cuba 470 300 422 411
Netherlands 151 163 132 151
Western Germany 189 258 197 264
Belgium-Luxembourg 83 182 140 14
France 125 172 196 132
United Kingdom 164 188 186 190
French West Africa 162 212 332 230
Mauritius 106 99 137 145
Other countries 2,360 4,287 3,419 2,679

World total 13.1,277 14,320 13,648 12,554
I


Preliminary


Foreign Agricultural


Service.







- 22 -


DECEMBER


U. S. Shares i


Expa


world


Rice Trade


MIL. METRIC TONS


,**. .. .. ,. ** .,,,.,, , ,
OTHERS ""



.. TH ... -. .

.:-. .H~--. ..




BURMA



UNITED STATES


1952


1953
y^ x xMx"


1954 1955 1956 1957 1958
xxxx x x x ex xx exx x xxx'x E xx x xxY P Dx xx x xx xx x xx extC A 3T, x, x x M ~ e x M xxxxe e h a xxxd a


FAS-NEG. 1971


t 8S dropad to ourth patio ng o rice expca*Lrers in
ba th lae I 1 an d will likely mainalno this
l IBt AlMritlit deelophmet in U. S. erprrt. this year has been


1958 because of
pollilon In 1960.


the Iharpp


Incren.


*e evpartsf
be Wao LeedS.
Ira shSF~nls


- Mialonad
eiporten
to Buropea


dret Bwur
deet 1t loam.


U. S. Rice Exports

For Dollars Increase


MIL. CWT.


x;, ~"~t~,,t


TYPE OF SALE

Grant
Barter
Foreign currency
Dollars *


* .. ... ... .
..u.umu.mumm.
mammwmmmumummma
,iiiiiiMHmmiii
SHmiiiiiiiiiiii







SIlillmii


I ***** ***** ..;:1:~


1955


1956


1957


1958


1959


*. -.I-.~-s-. -.- --


n


UtDA


c




NNNNNINNINNNNhIff


RS-4


- 23


DECEMBER


Exports


Moved Up In 1959


U. S.


trade in
,page 22).


exports


are estimated


the calendar year


1959


repres


moving


ent about


from


10 percent


percent
t in 195


of world


gure


of U.


relationship


trend


exports


to the trends


in 195


in any


given


in world
efforts


year


trade--


1955


fact


on the part


did not have


, they often


showed


industry to d


develop world


markets


for U.


rice


began


to affect


this relation-


ship.
five


Market development


years;


appears


was conducted


to be brin


on a worldwide


scale during the


last


results in trade erpans


Exports


Have


Wide


Distribution


Exports
for 1959 are u


of U.


p about


rice


7 percent


are now moving


from


to more


than


further


countries


substantial


Export


increase


expected
exporters


1960.
1958,


While


the U. S.


dropped


it probably regained


to fourth


third


place


position


1959


among


and will


world


likely


maintain this
was the sharp


position
increase


in 1960.


shipments


The past


year


s most


important development


these


were


largely


result of


Payment-in-Kind


Program.


first


saw exports


three months


increase


the U. S


a million


rice
over


marketing year


same


period


(August-October


last


year


Increases


tions


commerce


were Cuba,


ial sal


nerall


West Germhny and


Greece.


occurred


over wide


rice


areas


sold


mLe excep-
for foreign


currencies


were


higher


than


those


year


before


eylon,


Argentina


and Indonesia.


Exports for Dollars
Currency Sales Im

Commercial s


Increase


Foreign


portantIn Reducing


for dollars


Surplus


year


beginning July


1958 moved


from


about
third


Public
10).


5.9 million


cons


ecutive


For the
Law 480


Tab


milled


year that dollar sales


last 4
have b


le 10.


year


years


sales


basis


advan


for foreign
importance,


milled:


beginning July,


, to approximately


ced (figure

currencies
in addition


exports


under Title


to ca


sh sales


by type of


1 954- 58


: : For : : Other .
Year : For dollars : foreign : Barter : programs : Total
*: *currencies *
: Mil. cwt. Mil. cwt. Mil. cwt. Mil. cwt. Mil. cwt.
1954 : --J.4 -- 0.3 8.9
1955 : 6.0 3.1' .2 2.8 12.4
1956 : 5.6 18.0 .7 2.7 27.0
o Ro Q5.1 I/ 1.1 12.1


volume


any direct


opposite


starting


before


of Government


1958 and a


1959)


to European d


estinations;


Shipments


een of major


million for the


on page


--Rice


of
(table





RS-4


-24i


DECEMBER 1959


Total shipments of milled rice for foreign currencies, from the
the Program to the beginning of October 1959, reached nearly 33 million
Shipments represent a series of agreements with 13 countries during the
4 years.


start of
cwt.
last


Table


11.--Rice, milled:
currencies


S. exports under Title I of P.
by country of destination, 1955


(for foreign


Country
of destination


1955


1956


Year beginning July

1957 : 1958


July i,
Sept. 30,


1959-
1959


1,000
cwt.


1,000
cwt.


1,000
cwt.


1,000
cwt.


1,000
cwt.


Argentina
Ceylon
Iceland
India
Indonesia
Israel
Japan
Korea
Pakist hn
Peru
Philippines
Turkey


4i,339
5,921i


-~ a n"
rr82


-
---
---
-- -
49

-
43
h,575
4145
377
---
--


---
1,078
11


1,214
1,214


-- m
808
93

---
904
207

115


--354

3514.


---m~


Total


2,530


18,126


5,089


3,767


31 40


As of Iecember 1,
ageements: Idones ia,
plus for Indie.
& MiimiliKJ~:iJt Mkij&^li:hl p ^ f^-llj^HJ^^ElBH^j'll *y-Ko ; J^lX:*K'J'I HBK rl*^^ KT^^ ^


1959, there remained to be
1,98,000 ewt.; Pakistan,


shipped against existing
77,000 cwT., and 3,300,000


Foreign Aicn ral Service.
TI~ ji Ti il iraiEi *r jnil .... -^ri -riniB***- *u irj.V ....'- ^


Carryover Stocks n
Exporting Co ries


Rice


January
which w
case of
will be
nonexis
China.
grains


stock


1960 are


ere the
Burma
near 1
tent in
By var


Sm
but
ast
Eg
-let


with old


s in exporters' ha
not expected to be
allest in several
carryover stocks
year's levels. C
ypt, Italy, Spain,
ies, the carryover


surplus


limited


nds


from other


materially
years. The
in Thailand
arryover st
Madagascar
stock posi


to medium and


1
re

oc


r than the 1959-C0 crop as of
arger than those of last year,
will be some buildup in the
Viet Nam, Cambodia and Taiwan
ks will be materially down or
Argentina, Brazil and Communist
on will be lower for short


long-grain


types.


: j





we-I'


-25


DECEMBER


1959


The 1
plies being
relatively s
some extent,
the coming y
likely affect


960 r
drawn
mall
this
ear.
t the


ice trade
from work
quantity c
will tend
Possible
over-all


is likely
ing stocks
coming from
* to limit
exceptions
market too


to be simil
and current
accumulate
any abrupt
to this in
strongly.


ar
t
on
ri
i


to the 1959 pattern, sup-
production and only a
from previous crops. To
se in burdensome stocks i
individual countries will n


World Rice


Consumption


Increasing


Per capital consumption of rice


continues


to rise.


According to esti-


mates of the Food
world average is n
tion for 1948-52.
faster than popular
tribute generally
Asia, the Near Eas
about constant--a


OW ao
Shou
tion
thro
t and


cult
15
this
the
out
rica


ure
perc
pro
last
the


slight decrease


Org
ent
ve
de
wor
ent


anizati
higher
correct
cade.
id; the
ral and


was noted


In
2I


of t
.han a
total
c re as
are p
outh


he United
vcrage pe
consumpt
es in con
articular
American


Nations, t
r capital co
ion has ris'
sumption ar
ly evident
consumption


in Cuba.


Rice


Prices


Prices


June
insta
varie
per c
stab].
moved


year
they
Bas
n Jan
this
o $6.


of the better


red to cl
lower by
f.o.b. p
1, 1959 a
e. Long


then


rades
osine


declined


Asian


at
The
grai
$6.2
rcen


the end
exception
, 5 perc
in June
, broken


of 1
n va
ent
--it
. OD


adva


58,
for
roke.
has
ned


nce by
in most
Ig grain
was $5.90
L fairly
.bout $5.6


to $


Medium grain


per cwt


varieties


grades


with


from A
40-42


of January
broken.


1i, :1
Pri


959,
ces


were at about
remained fairly


steady on Government contracts
reported down to $4.00.


for most


of the


year,


but in November were


Prices for short grain varieties generally were erratic throughout t
year due to almost complete cessation of Egyptian exports, a cutoff of
Italian supplies in mid-summer, and smaller offerings from Communist China.


Prices of grades with 5 percent broken were moving to European destina-
ations at the beginning of 1959 at $6.90 per cwt. and were quoted as high as
$7.60 at mid-year, reflecting scarcity of Mediterranean supplies. Prices
for new-crop rice ranged from $6.00 to $7.40 as of December 1, 1959.


f.o.b.


Asi


June prices declined to $3
$3.25. Brokens from other


an ports,
.45, and
sources


ned at an average


of $4.


November 1 prices further de
showed proportionate decline


5 per cwt.,
lined to


Prices
:higher range o
percent broken
quantities of
and other tvrnn


r 1960 are likely to hold within reasonable limits for the
qualities of long and medium grains while grades with 20 to 40
are likely to move around present prices or lower. Larger


hort grains
- nrmnnire


in
wi th


the market may
1QoQ.


widen


oniCe


ranges


between


short


N:,i;;


ump-

dis-


rice


had made


some


Brokens,


g


$4 .27





RS-4 26- DECEMBER 1959

Table 12 .- Rice, milled equivalent: Exports from principal world areas,
calendar years,averages 1946-55, annual 1955-58 L/

: Average
Country : 955 1956 : 1957 1958
of origin :1946-50 : 1951-55: : 2/
*


: Mil.


Lb.


Mil.
lb.


lb.


Mil.
lb.


Mil.
lb.


Mil.
lb.


Asia:
Burma


: 2,147
: 1,919


Thailand


2,910
3,042
/3752


Ch~ina


3,616
2,881
'1 ,306


2,80 5


~:8~"" KKL~K


3,474


-L
C


?,504
Rrn


Indochi~na


Taiwan
IranW4,
Other countries
Total


63
1,035
9, 520


9,97?P


i0,_9r6S


Western Hemisphere:
United States
Argentina
Brazl ia
British Guiana


Eao~r;


Other countries
iTMil


1, 389


3r1
51
126


27
85


T39
1,408


1,3Oi---


56
1,


1, 586


Europe:
Bligium-Luxembourg
Italy
spain
Netherlands
Portugal
Other countries


Total


1,251


Africa:
E gypt
Madagascar
Other countries


Total

Australia 7/


548 249 4 11 487 652 /8n1
4 65 98 80 46 128
35 46 78 15639
587 360 587 64. 7. 4'"". '

61 71 96 74 7


World total


7,133


11,280


12,234


14,631


13,651


13,132


SIncludes milled broken semi-
Includes reexports where available.


countries.


/I March 21


- MIarch 20 year.


-milled unconverted and rough in terms of mille
.. ^ ..-< < .. ........ .. ......... ...... .... ..


PnliTnary


r
c


between KIgt and Syria excluded beginning
and 1958 which are calendar years.


)/ Less
-1958.


thar


n 500,000 pounds. om
July-June year, except


Triade


)t


1956,


19517


Foreign Agricultural Service.


791
9~^5


1964
196


*, i


8:


~lroTe
3 :





RS-4


- 27


DECEMBER


1959


World Rice Requirements
for 0 to Increase


Based


ments of
in 1959,
the chea
unlikely
imports
Indonesi
than in
damage f
assess t
are like
local pr
fairly c
highest
populati
tions an
likely,


on the anticipated


some majo
when high
per lower
to import
is likely
a, Malaya,
the last s
rom unfavo
he situati
ly to rema
oduction o
constant.
level of a
on growth,
d a tenden


r


importers


leve
grade
for


to
Ce
eve
rab
on.
in
uti
Adv
ny
in
cy


accordingly,


Is of pro
s and bro
the most
cur in Ja
on and In
1 years.
weather,
Requ i reme
eady, or
k. Weste
ce sales
the post
eased per
depend m


that


overall


level


11 conti
duction
kens. I


part
'pan.
dia.
Part


even
rn He
for d
-uar
' capi
ore o


of 1959-60


world


requirements


will


pr
ted
helI
th
fur
1 c
le
an
po
, E
y.


O


duct ion


ue to be affect
n these areas
the Far East,
he year and a
vy imports wil
istan may need
both Pakistan
it is not yet
he Middle East
ngthen slightly
here requireme
ery in 1960, he
's, indicating
consumption, im
able free worln


be higher i


in 1
d dow
e Phi
their
ontin
ss ri
d Ind
ssibi
urope
despi
will
ver,
infl
ved e
uppli


, require-


0 as they were
demands for
ppines are
duction in
into
next year
* suffered
to fully
nd Africa
the improved
probablyy remain
e now at the


uence of
economic
es. It
n 1960.


condi-
is


Total


World Export


Availabilities


of 19
betwe
(see
about
. 1959.
the 1
tion
areas


January
increase'
levels,


If the in
can be co
supply an
ge 23). T
he same, w
There will
elihood of
export su
because the
1. But v
es in popu
danger of


The degree


crease a
nsidered
d demand
he export
ith short
be some
lower ex
applies fr
volume o
ietted in
nation, i
a build


stability


*ctivi
a fac
should
avai
grai
offse


in the world


tor in
d cont
labili
n vari
t again
of sh
e 1959
vestin
of ov
sed pe
unmana


evidenced


dete
inue
ty of
eties
nst t
ort g
-6(' c
g wil
er-al
r cap
geabil


during


rmarke t


in the last


ing 1960 trends
t the same as t
g and r,ledium va
more plentiful
hort grain posi
s from Mainland
is still frame,
t take place un
rld requirement
consumption and
ocks in 1960 ap
and 1959 should


ntary
til a
s, ad
expe
pears


four months


lation
ast year
will be
han in
cause of
Informa-
r many
r
ted for
d price


unlikely


continue


in 1960.


Outlook


for U.


Rice Exports


Total
increase over
and marketing
ment programs
dollar sales
brown rice in
particular fo.
competition,


have


exports


those
poiic
should
will
the E
nrm.
partic


from


of
ies.
d be
depe1
;urop
This
ular


stronger effect


the United


last ye
Both c
material
nd largely
ean market
could co
ly from s


States


ar, ass urn
omme racial
ly larger
y upon t.
t because
ntinue at
supplies f


on the market


ro


should


g con
export
n toL
comp
f the
he le
m the


than


show


inuance
and exp
.1. The
titive p
volume
els of
Mediterr
did last


a substantial


area,


year


Sales


programs
' Govern-
of
U. S.
in this
the
will


of brown


]


__ _


uh.L


L





- 28-


DECEMBER 1959.:


Table 13.- Rice, milled


equivalent:
countries,


United States exports to specified
1953-58 1/


Year beginning August


Country of
destination


: 1953

1,000
: cwt.


1954


1,000
cvt.


Western Hemisphere:
Canada
British Honduras.
British West Indies
Cuba
Guatemala
Haiti
Netherlands Anti lles
Bolivia


1955


1,000
cwt.


2,927


1956


1,000
cvt.


J4,O54


1957


1,000
cwt.


103
4,246
68


1,000
cwt.

267
25
39
113
24


Colombia
Peru
Venezuela


Other countries
Total

Be gium-Luxembourg
West Germany
INetherlands
Switzerland

Other countries
1Prii"* "-' ^n '" ,"


27 35 162 71 67 224.
6,027 4,475 3,828 5,019 5,~95 1835.

206 460 285 686 76 315
29 38 53 20 30 1,116
12 71 31 50 14
57 53 22 58 2

35 191 96 56 *
i -- ~4~ ~ x I~ ;-- l:~- -~ ;..~ ~ir~<


Asia:
Ceylon
India

IJapande
Japan


Korea,


Reput ii:


PhilSjne
Ryukyu Islasf
Saudi hrabia
Turkey
Othe coutries

Total Oceania
Liberia
French Viest Africa
Other Africa


Dest inaationr not


Total


soec i


fied


expor ra


Section 416 donaLions


Ground rouga


rice


tor anir.al


feed 6


4 59Ci
- -
im


1,078


4,376


a-


4,125
-'
-N A


2,383


2,746.


2,6~3
2O~


~ft Ii


T"" h:


S11i 35 1 9"
9,283 4,297 6,129 17,610 5 769 4,242
17 19 39 47 52 50
67 219 276 248 270 377
--- --- 625 --- --- 526
6 i0 21 19 23 664
8 14 2b 13 17 22
15,748 9,846 11,432 23,826 12,253 13,o08
--- --- 9,7 2,036 83 651
--- -.-- 514 288 --- -


Totel UV


exports


15,1


9,848


12,913


6, 150


12,936


13, 71.


I/ Includes
milled at 65


urown,
percent.


broken,
2. F


s,2ree n


'rel inin


grams of tle Department of Defense


by ICA ond


s. dipped by the n~ay


ngs and brewers'


rice


and rough rice converted to terns of


tary. 3/ Less than 500 cwt. 4/ Adjusted to inclu
and the International Cooperative Administration.
Sold by tne Coummodity Credit Corporation.


ide all pro-
5/ Programea


Bureau


of the Census and Department of Agriculture.


a:iptLL1P


/


" ". ~~


qJliYLa0T:





EISA


- 29


DECEMBER 1959


rice


represented a rather substantial


quantity


last


season.


under this


category do not compete


with


sales


of milled and


specially proce


ssed rice


To extend or maintain


commercial


sales


for all


types


of rice


will


require


continued and expanded


promotion


efforts


of the


rice industry.


Market


Development


Work


During 1959,


rice


eyJxibits


were


displayed at


international food fairs


in Lausanne,


Switzerland,


and Cologne,


Germany.


These exhibits,


as well


the earlier ones


part


in expanding


in the United Kingdom and


U. S. rice


exports


West


to European


Germany,


countries


played an


, from a


important
quarter of


a million hundredweight


to over two and a


quarter million.


The quality,


nutritive


characteristic


ease


of preparation of U.


S. rice


consti-


tuted


the basic


theme


of the


exhibits.


The representative


association


of the


U. S. rice


industry,


the U. S.


Rice


Export


Development Association,


in cooperation


with


the Foreign


Agricul


tural


Service


completed a survey of the major ri


ce-producing and rice-import-


countries


of Europe


to evaluate


the market


structure


of the rice


trade


the potentials


of the


European market.


As a result


of their findings,


and in


cooperation


promotional p
rice products


roj ect


with the market
to increase th


in Europe


will


development


work under


e consumption and


be inaugurated early


L. 480,


utilization


in 1960.


a 3-year


of rice


These projects, together with
carried on by individual segments of the


the promotional


rice


industry i


work which
n Europe,


is now being
Africa and


other parts of the world,


should


of material


ass


stance


in maintaining


and extending trade


COMMODI

Domestic Sales


in U. S. rice.


TY


CREDIT CORPORATION


SALES POLICY FOR


RICE 8/


Milled Rice


- CCC offers milled rice,


including broken rice,


unrestricted use


rough rice,
basis in st


plus


(dome


stic


perce


;ore warehouse


or export)


nt adjusted
or the dom


at the equivalent


for milling cost,


estic price,


plus


whichever


9 loan rate for
carrying charges,
s higher.


CCC supports


the price


of rough rice,


not milled


rice.


Nevertheless


in recent years


CCC has


carried out a milling program in


order to move rough


rice


stocks out of primary


storage


facilities


thereby release


space needed


.for the coming crop at harvr
inventory, and establishes
to comply with Section 407


time.


CCC thus acquires


"equivalent" minimum


sales


milled, rice in its


prices


of the Agricultural Act of 1949,


for these


in order


as amended.


. 8/
.CCC


From the


sales


Septem


policies,


ber 1959 monthly report of t
activities and dispositions.


,he


General


Sales


Manager on


!ii.





BS-24


- 30


DECEMBER 1959


Rough Rice -
export) at the 1959


charges,


or the


CCC offers


loan


rate,


domestic market


rough


plus 5
price,


rice for unrestricted use


percent,


plus


(domestic


reasonable carrying


whichever is higher.


Export


of U.


Sales

The rice payment-in-kind program is designed to encQura~ the v
S. produced milled and brown rice by the commercial Trad Trom po


production into report channghes through padoments thmarket ic e thUnder bet
the world price and the higher U. S. domestic market price. Under this


program,
payment
(barl ey,


the exporter o
in the form of


oart~s


, corn,


United States


a certificate


grain


Sorghurn


produced


redeemable


and rye)


held


rice may apply
in rough rice


* for an expozr
and feed grains


in CCC inventory.


Export payment


rates effective Lfor a one: week pnerd a~rae'


and announced


by CCC


on Wednesday


of each


week


(Continued on


page


Decbr !
flecemibez,^ ~


C


of export ra


Bement No. 49% dated December
through Decetber 23 is shown
,tes for milled rice under th


1959,


a
e


covering the


as follows as a
payment-in-kind


period


typical announcement
L program.


Whole


Kernels


>4 :ThQ 4I":~i #:4


Group


Class or


Variety


Rate per Cwt.


Patna exceptt the variety. Century
Patrn) ain. Rexoro (except the
variety Rew.rk)


Blue Bonnet, r

Century Patna,


Blue Rose


ties
Blue


!ira an.

Toro,


(including


Improved Blue


Rose,


Magnolia,
Wright ar

Pearl, Ca
Calady ar


Hamrose
Zenith,


d


Rexark


Fortuna

the varie-


Rose,


Greater


and .Arkrose),


Prelude.


Lady


id Nato


ilrose,
id other


Early


<4 B4


$3.07




I



$2.50


Prolific


varieties


Second lHeads

Screenings and Brewers


$2.68

$2.09


The above


rates


apply to


the rice


export


program Announcement Gr-369


as amended.


For the nriod from


to export


323,91i


cwt. of rice


December


through


December


USDi\ accepted offers


under the payment-in-kind program. Since


the begin-


-~~~u 'e 4


- .L - -- I -


-A-L -,


'I


^





ws-4Ij


Dsem"..qEw 1959


- 31


INDE


OF T


Page


Table
number


\.
Acreage Allotments
Allotments by States, 1958-60


Acreage, Yield and Production


United States


By States and United States, 1958 and 1959 ...........
Southern States, California and United States, 1930-59


Acreage, Yield and Production


WJorld


By countries,


average


1950-54, annual


1956-59


Consumption -- United States
Total and per capital consumption, 1909-58


Foreign Trade, U.


S. and Major Countries


Exports from principal world
1955-58 .. ....... ......


areas,


averages


1946-55, annual


Imports into principal importing co'.mtries,
annual 1956-58 ..........................
U. S. exports by countries of destination,
U. S. exports by type of sale, 1954-58 ....


average
1...3-58
1953-5'S


1951-55


U. S. exports under Title I of P. L. 4e0,


19;5 5-59


Prices and Price Support Operations
Average prices received by farmers, U.S., arnd


average


wholesale


prices at New Orleans and San Francisco,


1947-59


Price support operations and price analysis items, 1940-59


Supply and Distribution
United States, 1937-60 ...................................




The next issue of The Rice Situation
: will be released in Jsnu.iRy, 1961.


:::::::::_




R~~~~~~~J~i I ______________


U.S. Department Do Agri
Washington 25, D. C.


OFFICIAL


POSTAGE AND FES PAID
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTU .E


BUSINESS


- 32


RS-4


(continued


from page


Er~


file an o
payment r
exported
applicati
number of


port
offer
ate
with
on f
cwt


ers are


accepted
applicable
iin 90 days
'or payment
,. exported


not required


by CCC
for t
after
, CCC
times


are
e pe
acce
cssue
the


to register


elig
riod
ptan
s a
apple


le to
n whi
. Up
rtifi
able


an export sal
receive the e
ch the offer v
on submission
cate equal in
export payment
br tKPB~d

Export payment certificates are
from CCC stocks at domestic market price
the dollar value of the export payment
CCC stocks through certificate redempti


or brown rice within 180 days after date
time in which to export has been granted


redeemable


in rough rice or feed gra


s and in a quantity equal in value tor
certificate. Rough rice procured from'
n must be exported in the form of mill
of sale by CCC, unles@ an extension .
by CCC. ---I
t:i:


Aside from
made available for


The CCC


the above described
commercial export


credit


export program, rice
shipment only under:


program,


Barter


contracts,


Unusual
cCC.


circumstances


approved


the Executive


NOTICE
I yo7 no nm" aed th puWilts.
check imre reara this a t,
ad yar sUm e U be dropped froS
the mailing list.
X your address should be chaad
write the new address on this e
and return the whole uheet to:
Ab 11istratoe Setvica Dvison (ML)
Arhcutural Marketbig Service
. Department Agriculture
WashingtMon 25, D. C.


CUlfirr