Livestock, meat, wool market news

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Title:
Livestock, meat, wool market news
Physical Description:
v. : ; 21-23 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service. -- Livestock, Poultry, Grain, and Seed Division
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service. -- Livestock Division
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service. -- Livestock & Seed Division
Publisher:
The Division
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Meat industry and trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Livestock -- Marketing -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
Statement of Responsibility:
Livestock, Poultry, Grain and Seed Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 27, no. 1 (Jan. 6, 1959) issue.
Issuing Body:
Vols. for <Jan. 16, 1979-May 14, 1983> issued by: Livestock, Meat, Grain and Seed Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture; <Nov. 12, 1983-> by: the Livestock Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture; 1996 issue\d by: the Livestock and Seed Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 47, no. 2 (Jan. 16, 1979).
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 58, no. 40 (Oct. 6, 1990).

Record Information

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University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004691915
oclc - 04512121
lccn - sn 87043107
Classification:
lcc - NOT IN LC
ddc - 338.105
System ID:
AA00008493:00127

Related Items

Preceded by:
Market news (Washington, D.C.)
Succeeded by:
Livestock, meat, and wool weekly summary and statistics


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text







MEAT



WOOL


Yeaws



WEEKLY SUMMARY

AND STATISTICS


LIVESTOCK DIVISION, AGRICULTURAL MARKET ICE
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTU
WASHINGTON 25, 0.. 0
Vol. 28, No. 12 '1Mrch 22, 1960
Week ended March 19 \ "


Livestock Market Reviews . .
Livestock Market Receipts .
Stocker and Feeder Statisitics .
Estimated Percentage of Stocker and Feeder
Slaughter Cows in Salable Redeipts .
Steer Sale Statistics . .
Slaughter at Major Centers .
Estimated Slaughter and Meat Production
Cattle Prices . .
Hog Prices . .
Hog Purchase Statisitics . .
Sheep and Lamb Prices . .
Wholesale Meat Trade Reviews .
Wholesale Dressed Meat Prices .
Wool Market Review . .


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Cattle and
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special to this issue

Federally Inspected Slaughter, by Regions, February 1960
Federally Inspected Slaughter at Major Centers,
Calendar Years, 1958-59 *. ** .
Meat and Meat Food Products Inspected "When Offered for
Importation, by Countries, Calendar Year 1959, and by
Months, 1958-59 o *
Meat and Meat Food Products Processed and Canned under
Federal Inspection, Jan. 24-Feb. 26, 1960 .
Number of Livestock from Canada and Mexico Passed for
Entry into the United States, February 1960 .
Storage Holdings of Meats and Lard, Feb. 29, 1960 .
Stocker and Feeder Cattle and Sheep Received in Several
North Central States, February 1960 . .
Pig Crop Report, 10 States, 1960 . .


221

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238-240


be 1-*(A1





218


Marketward movement of livestock in the
midwest has been hampered by severe weather
conditions during each of the past six week's,
and this has been a factor in the general
upturns on most livestock during that period.
For the current week Choice and Prime slaugh-
ter steers closed steady to 50# higher while
other grades were mainly steady to 50# lower,
Prices on barrows and gilts advanced moder-
ately through Thursday, but as in the previ-
ous week, liberal supplies sold sharply lower
Friday. Butchers closed steady to 25# lower
for the week over the western Corn Belt but
25-75# higher in the eastern part of the area.-
Slaughter lamb prices were generally 50#-75#
higher.

SLAUGHTER CATTLE AND CALVES The storm
battered midwest experienced another siege
of foul weather in the last official week of
winter. Consequently, weather and highway
conditions governed supply volume and prices
fluctuated with supplies. One of the worst
storms of the winter choked off shipments
following Monday's 12-market run of some 98,000
cattle, most for any day since January. As a
result, receipts were down 5 percent from the
previous week and were among the smallest
for any week in a year. Supplies were large-
ly slaughter steers and heifers and the major-
ity continued to grade Good and Choice. The
percentage of Prime steers in Chicago at
7.5 was the smallest in three months but
still a third larger than the same week last
year, reflecting the 59 percent increase in
numbers of cattle on feed more than six months
at the start of 1960. The percentage of cows
in receipts increased slightly but remained
small, cows forming only 5 to 10 percent of
arrivals at most markets. Choice and Prime
cattle again made the best showing pricewise,
as the price spread between grades of steers
became the widest since last spring. Choice
and Prime steers sold steady to 50# higher
except Choice $1.00 up in St. Joseph where
receipts were very small due to the weather.
Standard and Good steers were steady to 50#
lower except 504-$1.00 higher in St, Joseph.
Trends on fed heifers were uneven with sales
steady to strong at Chicago, strong to 50#
higher at Kansas City and 50#-$1.00 up at
St. Joseph, but steady to 50# lower elsewhere
with Standard and Good heifers 504-$1.00 lower
at Sioux City. Slaughter cows sold 50# low-
er at So. St. Paul and Sioux City but were
steady to 50# higher at other points. Bulls
sold steady to 500 higher; vealers steady at
St. Louis National Stock Yards but $1.00-
2.00 lower in So. St. Paul.


Average price of steers advanced for
the fourth consecutive week in Chicago and at
$27.49 stood the highest for any week since
last September. At Chicago, a load Prime
1225# slaughter steers cashed at $35.00, 6
loads 1150-1575# $52.50; bulk high-Choice and
Prime $29.50-52.25; Choice $26.75-50.00, mixed
Good and Choice $26.00-26.75; Good $24.00-
26.50. Elsewhere in the midwest high-Choice
and Prime steers realized $27.50-29.50, few
loads largely Prime $50.00 at So. St. Paul
and Sioux City; Choice bulked $26.00-28.00;
Good and low-Choice $25.50-26.50; Standard
and low-Good $20.00-25.50. Mixed Choice and
Prime heifers brought $28.50-29.00 at Chicago
with a load 1150# Prime $29.50, majority
Choice $26.25-28.00, Good and low-Choice
$25.00-26.50. Elsewhere the small volume
of high-Choice and Prime heifers realized
$27.00-27.50, most Choice $25.50-27.00, Good
and low-Choice $22.50-25.50; Standard and low-
Good $19.00-22.50. Utility and Commercial
cows bulked at $16.50-19.00, Canners and
Cutters $14.00-17.00.

STOCKER AND FEEDER CATTLE AND CALVES -
Seasonally moderate receipts of stocker and
feeder cattle and calves found very uneven
outlet and mixed price trends at the various
terminals. Although there was no indication
of a real curtailment in the good pre-spring
demand which had prevailed for stockers and
feeders in recent weeks, heavy snowstorms
throughout the midwest temporarily curtailed
outlet at a number of the major markets along
the Missouri River and prices at those centers
were steady to 50# lower with salesmen often
encountering difficulty in effecting clear-
ances as potential buyers not only were faced
with handling difficulties but often were
confronted with impassable road conditions.
At Kansas City, calves and yearling stockers
sold 50#-$1.00 lower, due chiefly to the
weather. In contrast, at Oklahoma City and
Denver, prices were steady to 50# higher. In
general, at markets where weather conditions
permitted easy movement of cattle back to
farm feedlot or pasture, there was little
difficulty in maintaining prices on at least
a steady basis. The upturn in prices for
slaughter cattle during the past two months
has encouraged considerable interest in feed-
lot replacements and, here too weather per-
mitting, feeder buyers competed rather aggres-
sively with the packer buyers on well bred
fleshy two-way steers suitable for an addi-
tional short turn in dry-lot.
Few Choice 800# steers reached $27.50,
majority Good and Choice feeders 800-1050#


MIDWEST LIVESTOCK REVIEW

and

RANGE AND FEEDLOT SALES






219


$24.00-26.50, occasional sales Good 1000-
1050# $23.50. Medium to low-Good feeders
brought $20.50-25.50. Scattered shipments
Choice 600-635# stock steers brought $29.00-
50.00 and a few 525-550# short yearlings
sold up to $51.75. Other Good and Choice
yearlings ranged $24.00-28.50, including four
loads 750# at $27.65 and a sizable string of
Choice 719# at $28.00. Medium to low-Good
stockers cashed from $21.00-25.50. Good
and Choice yearling stock heifers brought
$23.00-28.00 but not many heifers 675# up
exceeded $25.00. Good and Choice stock steer
calves sold from $26.00-32.00, few $32.50-
55.00. Good and Choice heifer calves bulked
at $24.00-28.00. Medium and Good stock cows
brought $15.50-19.00, few Good young cows
$20.00.

HOGS Terminal Markets Receipts at
the twelve terminals were a little above the
previous week and the corresponding week a
year ago. Supplies were unevenly distributed.
In parts of the area where hauling conditions
were near normal there were substantial in-
creases in receipts while in other areas
where inclement weather interfered with
marketing, receipts were down. Consignments
of mixed U. S. No. 1-5, 190-250# barrows and
gilts made up the bulk of receipts, kinds
over 250# usually in moderate volume although
noticeably increased at So. St. Paul. Price
trends advanced moderately through Thursday,
however as in the previous week, supplies
were liberal Friday and prices declined
rather sharply. Compared with the previous
.week's close, barrows and gilts closed steady
to 25f lower at most western Corn Belt centers
with sales 50# lower at So. St. Paul. However,
sales were 25-750 higher at eastern Corn
Belt markets. The small supply of sows
usually found a broad outlet and prices were
generally strong to 500 higher.
On Friday, mixed U. S. No. 1-3, 190-
260# barrows and gilts at most centers
brought $15.50-16.00. Selected lots of No.
1, and No. 1-2, usually 190-250# mainly $16.00-
16.50. Mixed No. 1-3, 300-600# sows sold at
$15.25-15.00, largely $14.00-15.00.
Prices on feeder pigs advanced $1.00
at Sioux City, and 500 at So. St. Paul. Me-
dium and Good 150-160# feeder pigs at Sioux
City brought $13.50-14.50. Good 100-160#
pigs at So. St. Paul $14.00-14.50, few
$15.00.
Average cut-out value advantage of
U. S. No. 1 over No. 5, live basis 200-220#
barrows and gilts was $1.02 per cut. based
on wholesale carlot prices of fresh pork cuts
at Chicago March 10 to March 16, 1960 in-
clusive.
HOGS Interior lowa-Southern Minnesota
Area The week'sa hog supply 4 percent more


that the previous week, even though a snow
storm curtailed the movement considerably at
mid-week. Receipts were 10 percent larger
than the comparable week last year. prices
advanced through Wednesday but rather sharp
downturns were recorded Friday as a result
of Thursday's liberal marketing. Closing
prices on butchers, compared with the pre-
vious Friday, were largely steady to 150
higher with saws 250 higher. U. S. No. 1-3,
190-240# butchers sold late at $14.75-15.75
and a small supply mostly No. I and 2 se-
lected lots brought $15.75-16.15. No. 1-3
270-400# saws bulked at $13.50-14.75, 400-
550# $12.25-13.75.

SHEEP AND IAMBS The 12 market re-
ceipts were little changed from a week ago
but were 25 percent less than last year.
Trading was active with price upturns for
dressed lamb providing a bullish influence.
Slaughter lambs sold strong to $1.00 higher
for the week with a large share 50-75#
up. Slaughter ewes and feeder lambs were
steady to 500 higher, instances 750 up on
feeders.
Late in the week, Choice and Prime 90-
118# wooled slaughter lambs sold from $22.50-
23.50, few reaching $24.00; Choice and Prime
116-125# $22.25-23.00. Choice 90-120# wooled
lambs at $22.00-22.75j Good and Choice
$20.00-22.00. Choice and Prime 90-116# shorn
slaughter lambs, most with No. 1 and fall
shorn pelts, brought $21.50-22.50, instances
$22.75-25.00; Choice 90-110# $21.00-22.00;
Good and Choice $20.00-21.00. A limited
volume Choice and Prime 96-110# spring
slaughter lambs sold from $22.00-25.50 with
Prime 95# spring lambs to $24.50. Cull to
Choice slaughter ewes realized $4.00-8.50.
Most Good and Choice 60-90# feeder lambs
brought $20.50-21.50 but reached $22.00-
22.50 at So. St. Paul; Medium and Good
feeders $17.00-20.50.
In the Interior Iowa-Southern Minnesota
area, wooled slaughter lambs were strong to
mostly 500 higher; shorn lambs fully 500
higher, instances 750 up; slaughter ewes
steady, instances 500 higher. The moderate
numbers offered found a broad outlet with
higher dressed lamb prices stimulating de-
mand. Fairly heavy snowfall slowed move-
ment at mid-week, but even so, Interior
receipts were 14 percent more than last
week and 12 percent over a year ago. Choice
and Prime 90-105# wooled slaughter lambs
delivered to packing plants closed from
$22.50-23.00; Choice 90-105# mostly $22.00-
22.50, and Choice 105-115# bulked at $21.50-
22.25. Choice 90-100# shorn No. 1 and fall
shorn pelt slaughter lambs brought $21.00-
22.00 with Choice and Prime high-yielding
shorn lambs $22.00-22.25.






220


RANGE AND FEEDLOT SALES
Note: Shrink on most range and feedlot
sales none to 5 percent, mostly 4 percent f.o.b.
some with short haul and 3 percent shrink. All
sales for immediate delivery unless specified.

ARIZONA, CALIFORNIA, NEVADA, AND UTAH Di-
rect trade on slaughter steers and heifers fairly
active, firm to 500 higher; stockers and feeders
strong, spring slaughter lambs firm to 50# high-
er, old crop steady.
Slaughter steers: In California, 5 loads
Choice 900# for April delivery $29.00; 250 loads
high-Good and Choice 1000-1500# over California
and Arizona $26.50-28.00, current to June deliv-
ery; 118 loads mainly Good 900-1200# $24.75-
26.00; 22 loads Standard and Good 850-1150#/
$22.00-24.50. Slaughter heifers: In California,
9-load string Choice 825-850# for April delivery
$28.00; 73 loads Good and Choice 725-1000# in
Calif, and Arizona $24.90-27.00, for up to May
delivery. Stocker and feeder cattle: Delivery
dates varying from immediate to July. Good and
Choice 525-900# steers $25.00-26.00, heifers
$22.50-26.00; 2,100 Medium to mostly Good 650#
steers $23.90-24.00. Good and Choice 300-450#
steer and heifer calves $28.00-51.00. Lambs:
Choice and Prime 90-100# spring slaughter lambs
in Arizona and California $25.00-24.00; several
thousand mostly Choice mixed slaughter and feeder
spring lambs for immediate thru April delivery
$22.25-23.00, few bands mostly Choice feeders
$19.50-21.50. Choice and Prime 112-118# old
crop shorn slaughter lambs with No. 1 pelts
$20.00-21.00.

COLORADO, SOUTHERN WYOMING, WESTERN NEBRASKA,
AND WESTERN KANSAS Trading on fed cattle very
active with prices strong to 25# higher. In
Colorado 244 loads Choice 1100-1425# fed steers
$26.50-27.25; 61 loads high-Good to average-
Choice 1075-1275# $25.40-26.40, mostly $26.00-
26.40; 10 loads Good 986-1050# $24.40-25.25; 29
loads average to high-Choice 775-1035# fed heif-
ers $26.40-26.60; 151 loads average-Choice 900-
1025# mostly $26.00-26.25; 23 loads high-Good
to average-Choice 900-1025# $25.00-25.75.
Demand for stockers and feeders good with
prices strong to 50# higher. Western Kansas:
19 loads Good and Choice 623-821# feeder steers
$23.10-26.00; 7 loads mostly Choice 592-617#
$27.50-28.00; 19 loads Choice 950# $25.25; 600
Good and Choice 560-600# feeder heifers for up
to May 1 delivery $25.45-25.75. Coloradot 5
loads Good and Choice 820-865# partly fattened
steers $24.50-25.00; 2 loads mostly Choice 605#
$28.00; 4 loads Good and Choice 588# heifers
$25.75; 4 loads 400-450# Good and Choice steer
and heifer calves $28.00-29.00.
Demand good on slaughter lambs, sales con-
firmed on 36 loads. Wooled lambs sold strong
to 750 higher, shorn lambs 50#-$1.00 up. Choice
and Prime 106-117# wooled lambs $22.25-23.00,
late sales $22.75-235.00; Choice and Prime 115-
116# shorn lambs with No. 1 pelts $20.75-21.50.


NEW MEXICO, WEST TEXAS, WESTERN OKLAHOMA,
SOUTHWESTERN KANSAS Clovis Area Direct
trade slaughter steers and heifers extremely
active, 50#4$1.00 higher with most sales for
current to 60 days delivery. Stockers and
feeders active, fully 500 higher. Forty-three
loads low to average-Choice 900-1040# fed
steers $26.00; 5535 loads Good to low-Choice
950-1175# $24.50-25.75; 42 loads Good to
average-Choice 700-825# fed heifers $25.00-
25.75; 3 loads 1117# Utility cows $17.00.
About 7,500 Good and Choice 575-700# stocker
and feeder steers $25.00-27.25; 5,500 same
grades 525-650# heifers $23.00-25.00; 8,000
Good and Choice 425-500# stock calves $28.00-
32.00 steers,and $26.00-28.00 heifers; 800
Good stock cows with calves $225.00-260.00
per pair. Stockers and feeders current to
mid-May delivery. Around 22 loads Choice and
Prime 101-107# No. 1 pelt fed lambs $19.50-
20.50, few 110-116# $18.50-19.00.
Amarillo Area Direct sales all classes
cattle fully steady, 26 loads Choice 1050-
1150# slaughter steers $26.00-26.30; 45 loads
Good and low-Choice 1050-1150# $24.75-25.00;
7 loads Choice 975-1000# fed heifers $25.25-
25.50. Good and Choice stocker and feeder
steers $24.50-28.00; same grades heifers
$23.50-26.00; Good and Choice stock steer calves
$26.00-30.00, heifers $24.00-29.00.

IDAHO, OREGON AND WASHINGTON Fed steers
and heifers fully steady to 500 higher, stockers
and feeders steady; slaughter lambs unchanged.
Good and Choice 1025-1150# fed steers $24.75-
26.50, delivery up to 60 days; Good to mostly
Choice 850-950# fed heifers $24.00-25.00.
Few Good and Choice 700-980# feeder steers
$25.00-26.00; Good and Choice 585# stockers,
steers $27.00, heifers $25.00. Choice and
Prime near 100# wooled and shorn slaughter
lambs $21.25-22.00.

MONTANA, NORTHERN WYOMING AND WESTERN
DAKOTAS Trading moderately active with prices
firm. About 90 head Good to mostly Choice 1045#
partly fattened feeder steers $24.00; 1,700
stock calves for immediate to April 15 delivery
with Good and Choice 450-525# steers $29.00-
31.00 and 400-475# heifers $26.00-27.50; 500
Good and Choice 350-375# stock calves, steers
$55.00, heifers $52.00; 1,100 calves and short
yearlings with Good and low-Choice 3550-580#
steers $27.00-33.00, bulk 420-500# $28.00-50.00
and heifer calves $26.00-28.50.
Slaughter and shearing lambs fairly
active, strong to 500 higher, Good to Prime
108-117# wooled slaughter lambs $20.25-
21.75; Good and Choice 100-105# shearing
lambs $20.50; 1,900 Good and Choice coming
2-year-old whiteface ewes to lamb early
May $26.00 per head. In Wyoming, 400,000#
Medium to Fine 12 month ewes wool from 1960
clip 40-46 O per grease pound F.O.B. loading
point.








WEEKLY RECEIPTS OF SALABLE LIVESTOCK AT 12 PUBLIC MARKETS
- ---------- -C Ct cves ffogs : SheSep and lambs -
Market : Mar.1l : ~Mar. MarT1 ~Sr72 ~": Mari.1' ":-arK2- i :r2l9 Mar.7 21


: 1960 -
icago 3............... 37,276
ncinnati ............. 5,750
nver ............... 10,161
>rt Worth ............. 5,845
dianapolis ........... 6,403
nsas City ............ 16,754
:lahoma City .......... 7,744
iaha 5................. 50,676
. Joseph ............. 15,535
. Louis NSY .......... 14,173
oux City .*.....*..... 28,141
St. Paul ............ 20,295
vtal ........... ....... 194,533


Total Mar. 12_ 1960


1959 :
38,901
2,845
8,517
4,880
5,702
19,783
14,198
34,311
13,817
14,506
25,716
17,044
200,020


1960 : 1959 : 1960 : 1959 : 1960 : 1959


882
314
1,744
641
656
960
641
541
1,921
720
7,184
16,269


1,





6,
15,


281 32,048 38,423
721 13,553 12,181
566 5,572 2,543
111 2,905 2,572
436 55,367 36,796
352 14,782 12,525
498 4,753 3,737
848 55,970 54,611
602 19,960 23,985
930 70,979 59,380
194 37,202 32,437


Ch
Ci
De
Fo
In
Ka
Ok
Om
St
St
Si
S.
To


54,688
527,579i


48,611
507,801


.... 204,181 15,121 515,818
INTERIOR IOWA AND SOUTHERN MINNESOTA
Mar. 19, 1960 Mar. 12, 1960 Mar. 21, 1959


5,825 11,077


554
50,566
10,196
1,423
5,865
2,127
9,454
3,348
2,890
7,696
10,850
88,774Z


973
24,550
27,260
1,586
11,619
5,859
14,169
4,676
4,804
5,686


6,796
119,055~


87,320


Hogs ..... 572,000 557,000 557,000
Sheep .... 25,800 22,700 25,100

STOCKER AND FEEDER CATTLE: AVERAGE COST, WEIGHT, AND NUMBER
Week ended : Month : Two monThe
: Mar. 17 : Mar. 10 : Mar. 19 : Feb. 2 Feb. : Jan.-Feb.


Steers 1001# up ............
901-1000 ..........
801-900 .............
701-800 .............
501-700 .............

Total steers 10 markets ......
Av. wts. "n .oo..
Av. cost* ......
" Chicago ........
" I Kansas City .....
" Omaha ...........
" S. St. Paul .....
" Sioux City ......
" Denver ..........
" Ft. Worth .......
" Oklahoma City ...
" S. St. Joseph ...
" St. Louis NS ...
Total calves 10 markets ....
" heifers n ....
" cows ....


1960 2 1960
750 1,114
1,888 2,675
5,224 3,952
2,679 3,413
8,657 8,272

17,198 19,426
724# 752#
$25.11 $24.73
24.83 24.87
25.08 24.753
24.20 24.74
26.72 25.69
25.98 26.39
24.76 25.39
24.67 24.58
23.85 23.65
25.15 24.14
24.59 24.15
6,772 5,245
2,558 2,596
825 414


1959 :
1,857
2,495
5,461
5,948
12,507

26,246
729#
$27.46
26.51
28.06
28.07
24.54
29.80
27.18
26.66
26.70
27.11
25.52
6,578
4,720
764


S1960
2,708
8,058
12,578
14,492
32,516

69,952
732#
$24.05
25.27
23.80
25.88
22.25
25.52
25.55
25.75
25.74
25.66
23.04
51,380
10,581
2,634


: 1959 1960
5,671 5,329
9,549 16,541
12,215 27,363
13,595 54,747
29,591 68,697

70,619 152,477
753# 730#
$26.48 $23.81
25.98 25.37
25.97 25.55
26.61 25.78
24.64 21.96
28.58 25.25
25.70 24.74
27.44 25.29
26.54 22.82
26.17 23.59
25.51 22.82
26,127 85,972
13,532 21,519
5,093 5,515


: 1959
10,570
19,945
27,449
30,538
66,263

154,563
745#
$27.01
26.19
26.05
27.19
24.79
29.01
28.75
27.16
26.26
26.59
25.60
85,532
27,545
7,284


Not adjusted for differences in grade of cattle sold at each market.
ESTIMATED PERCENT OF STOCKER AND FEEDER CATTLE AND SLAUGHTER COWS IN SALABLE RECEIPTS

ansas S. ioux St.'ndian-' Ft. Okla. San
Week ended :Chicago: :0maha: :Louis: a : evere: t :Wichita: tonio
: 2 City J;osephn NSY *City Paul :apolis Dv: Worth City :
Stockers and feeders


Mar. 18, 1960 2
Mar. 11, 1960 2
Mar. 20, 1959 2


Mar. 18, 1960 6 6
Mar. 11, 1960 6 6
Mar. 20, 1959 6 6


42 9
40 13
45 15


8 6
8 4
7 4


4 23 10 5 10
3 18 8 8 10
7 5 4 10
Slaughter cows
11 6 20 6 13
9 5 22 8 18
8 5 23 10 15


60 80
60 70
60 75


37 45
33 50
55 50


20 7 14
20 5 17
20 6 15


20
15
15


656
175'








---- --STEERS SOLD OUT OF FIRST HANDS FOR SLAUGHTER -_ -- -

S Number of head Percent of total : Average weight Average price in
Number of d by grades (pounds) dollars per 100 lb.
-9- ---
Week ended
;~ aIb.7 '~'.~Sr~ 19'r:~r I :TT Er7 Te9":MIar~ I7~:M"ar7 T9-:~Mar. T7:-M-r7 T9r"


------- -:- 1960 -:-


1959 : 1960 : 1959 : 1960 : 1959 : 1960 : 1959
CHICAGO


Prime*****...**.......
Choice..g.....
Good.....o.......
Standard.......
Commercial.....
Utility........
All grades.....

Prime..........
Choice.........
Good...........
Standard.......
Utility........
All grades.....*

Prime..........
Choice.........
Good...,,.....
Standard..c.....
Utility........
All grades.....

Prime..........
Choice.........
Good...........
Standard.......
Commercial.....
Utility.........
All grades.....


Prime..........
Choice.........
Good..........
Standard.......
Commercial.....
Utility........
All grades.....


Prime.........
Choice.........
Good...........
Standard.......
Utility........
All grades.....


Prime......... .
Choice.........
Good...........
Standard.......
Utility.......
All grades.::::


2,003
14,254
9,108
1,155
18
158
26,656

171
5,478
8,928
758
127
15,462


4,115
7,687
460
141
12,509

6
2,849
1,715
709

265
5,542


1,518
12,585
10,122
2,519

262
26,606

56
4,689
10,223
496
184
15,648

15
2,512
4,756
379
207
7,669


1,030
3,9953
494

70
5,587


499 855
3,862 5,507
1,177 935

195 178
5,73355 5,475
-----------


2,816
5,975
468
14
7,273



1,691
1,245
120
10
5,066


20
1,217
5,942
249
48
5,476


1,025
1,487
21

2,553


7.5
55.4
54.2
4.53
.1
.5


5.0
46.5
38.0
9.5

1.0


OMAHA
1.1 .3
55.4 50.0
57.8 65.5
4.9 5.2
.8 1.2

SIOUX CITY
.9 .2
52.9 50.2
61.4 62.0
5.7 4.9
1.1 2.7


- K-
.1
51.4
31.0
12.8

4.7


1,264 1,264 51.36
1,210 1,205 28.22
1,106 1,119 25.97
1,042 1,058 22.46
1,410 21.67
1,017 1,055 19.90
1,170 1,160 27.49


32.75
29.28
27.05
25.51

22.89
28.24


1,182 1,259 28.25 50.25
1,217 1,222 26.78 27.54
1,090 1,115 24.90 25.81
1,061 1,089 20.52 25.15
1,028 1,029 18.69 21.67
1,154 1,146 25.40 26.26

1,288 1,1 1 29.41 3 .29
1,189 1,191 27.16 27.50
1,109 1,151 25.57 25.99
1,075 1,100 21.70 25.92
998 1,156 19.56 22.14
1,155 1,160 25.84 26.27


1,260


18.4
71,5
8.8

1.5


- St-. LTUI s NSY


8.7
67.4
20.5

3.4


15.6
64.1
17.1

5.2


1,112 1,2153
1,076 1,104
1,019 1,077

1,010 1,072
1,084 1,122


1,041
1,0335
981

868
1,017


-- 28.50


1,078
1,0553
1,013

957
1,046


S. ST. J -S-P-

-- .4 -- 1,070
58.7 22.2 1,116 1,162
54.7 72.0 1,075 1,098
6.4 4.5 1,026 1,050
.2 .9 975 897
1,088 1,107
D -DENVER -----------


55.2
40.6
3.9
.53


40.5
58.7
.8


26.57
24.69
22.29

18.553
25.12



27.15
25.16
22.77

19.98
24.71



26.68
25.04
21.07
18.52


25.44


28.05
26.62
24.35

22.52
26.66



27.91
25.95
24.56

22.48
25.90


31.00
27.55
25.87
25.40
21.60
26.11


1,209 1,217 26.36 27.41
1,150 1,158 25.51 26.28
1,145 1,015 20.67 21.75
884 17.50 --
1,175 1,181 25.71 26.72
-am m m m m m m m


1 Data collected by Agricultural Estimates, and Livestock Divisions, A.M.S.


222


Grade








WEEK SLAUGHTER UNDER FEDERAL INSPECTION AT MAJOR CENTERS


Cattle : Calves Hgs
City or Area 2 Mar.19 T Mar.21~: Mar.19 : Mar.21:Mar.19 ~Mar21
1960 : 1959 : 1960 t 1959 : 1960 : 1959


SSheep and lambs
"Mar.19 : Mar.1T
: 1960 : 1959


Boston, New York City Area...
Baltimore, Philadelphia......
Cin.,Cleve.,Detroit,Indpls...
Chicago Area...g...o*
St. Paul-Wise. Areas...,......
St. Louis Area............
Sioux City-So. Dakota Area...
Omaha Area...................
Kansas City...... ........
Iowa So. Minnesota.........
Louf1.Evan*1.Nash*1.Mph's....
Georgia, Florida, Ala. Area..
St. Jo'ph.Wichita, Okla.City.
Ft.Worth,Dallas,San Antonio..
Denver,Ogden,Salt Lake City..
Los Angeles, San Fran. Areas.
Portland, Seattle, Spokane...


12,337 10,784
8,480 7,516
17,474 15,207
16,282 21,517
28,771 22,992
11,868 9,162
20,222 15,634
32,599 27,842
12,364 10,060
28,962 24,419
5,942 5,875
6,887 5,616
18,803 16,142
8,651 8,766
19,847 15,854
24,985 20,048
7,352 6,125


10,709
2,059
5,197
6,349
22,441
1,362

466

8,867
4,112
2,4953
943
3,306
300
1,767
297


10,934
757
4,593
5,598
19,468
1,733

142

7,427
3,269
1,687
993
3,775
400
2,020
1853


50,249 48,820
26,774 31,381
131,921 115,964
34,225 48,709
122,821 98,630
87,242 79,626
85,486 82,447
75,996 76,520
35,706 32,250
290,449 256,273
70,033 55,987
35,096 26,475
40,384 45,221
19,491 20,818
16,538 13,769
25,529 25,506
17,087 14,117


Total...................... 281,826 243,559 70,668 62,979 1163,025 1072,513 218,930 222,410


Accumulation to date.......


Week ended


Mar. 19,
Mar. 12,
Mar. 5,
Mar. 21,


1960 ......
1960 .......
1960 1/ ....
1959 / ....


2,944,720


3,276,008


765,705


763,218


15,511,065


13,907,777


2,724,322


2,700,666


ESTIMATED FEDERALLY INSPECTED SLAUGHTER AND MEAT PRODUCTION

2- T La--b - rPork T -ib- T
Beef Veal :(excl. lard) : and autton 3 Total
: N- : :.im 7u T :fN T d Num: 7 meat
: -Pober er a Prod* -: Prod.: ber : Prod. prod.
:mm m b -*.- :ber : ber : t. er
1,000 mil.Ib. 1,000i.1b. 1 mil.1b. 1,0 0 mil.1b. mil.1b.
........ 340 204.5 100 10.5 1,335 180.4 240 12.2 407.4
........ 335 202.3 92 9.7 1,300 173.4 235 12.0 397.4
........ 349 -- 99 -- 1,360 240 -- --
........ 291 175.8 94 9.9 1,231 167.7 259 13.1 366.5


STotal
lard
prod.

mil.l1b.


42.0
41.9


Percentage change from:


Mar. 12, 1960 ............... 1 1 9 8 3 4 2 2 3 -
Mar. 21, 1959 ............... 17 16 6 6 8 8 -7 -7 11 --
----- ---- ----- ---- ----------------- -
t--Average weight Tb : Lard
Week ended Cattle Calves I Hogs I ~ heep~ : yield
:- D-e-sd: vre -. e- -rv: and lambs 1 per
- -__- -- --- : L17v; -Dreissed7: LTve-.fresise3 T EijVeT.Dj~essd-:t- Lvg 7 Dies ed : 100 lb.


19, 1960 ...............
12, 1960 ...............
5, 1960 ..........,,.,
21, 1959 ...............


1045
1050
1050
1051


601
604
604
604


105
105
107
105


14.4


1/ Actual slaughter. V Excludes lard.


36,252
5,364
9,852
2,314
13,286
4,041
15,0953
10,598

29,538


7,264
15,980
51,938
33,695
5,735


36,801
2,850
14,175
4,290
10,366
4,3354
11,357
13,458

27,288


6,704
25,005
31,654
31,338
4,792














Classification


Steers -
Prime 900-1100#
1100-1500
Choice 900-1100
1100-1300
Good 900-1100
Standard All wts.


Heifers -
Choicer
Good*-*
Standard


700-900#
600-800
- All wts.


Cows All weights -
Commercial
Utility
Cutter
Canner

Bulls All weights -
Commercial
Utility

Calves 500# down -
Choice
Good
Standard

Vealers All wts. -
Choice
Good
Standard


CATTLE: WEEKLY AVERAGE OF DAILY QUOTATIONS
In dollars per 100 pounds
S- : -
, Chicago : Kansas City : Omaha Denver

Mar. Mar. Mar. Mar. Mar. Mar. Mar. Mr
19 21 19 : 21 19 : 21 19 21
1960 1959 1960 1959 1960 1959 1960 : 195

Slaughter cattle calves and vealers


50.75
51.55
28.70
28.85
25.25
22.25


27.52

21.50


18.28
17.58
16.80)
15.15)


52.18
52.85
29.88
29.85
26.90
24.70


27.65
25.55
25.35


20.15
19.25
17.95


27.52
27.50
25.08
22.05


26.62
24.52
21.60


18.50
16.98
15.72)
14.18)


28.92
28.80
26.62
24.05


28.15
26.05
25.55


20.50
19.25
17.00


29.58
29.25
27.55
27.42
24.40
20.80


26.62
25.62
20.00


18.00
16.82
15.52)
14.12)


50.75
50.75
28.65
28.50
25.75
25.40


27.50
24.58
22.12


19.88
18.88
17.12


22.60 25.02 20.75 21.88 20.50 22.65
22.00 23.60 20.50 21.25 20.18 21.15


55.00
51.00
26.50


--
55.00
29.00


27.00
24.50
21.75


29.00
26.25
25.00


28.50
26.50
24.00


52.50
50.50
27.00


27.00
24.50
21.00


26.50
26.50
25.50
19.75


25.78
22.68
19.00


18.28
17.08
15.60)
14.40)


C


North
Portland
Mar. Mar.
19 21
9 1960 1959


27.18
27.05
24.98
21.50


26.72
24.50
21.25


20.75
19.75
17.75


27.62
27.12
26.00
25.00



24.50
22.00


18.50
17.00
14.75)
12.50)


28.50
28.58
27.58
25.50



26.25
24.50


20.75
19.00
16.25


-- 22.75 21.25 22.75
20.50 25.12 21.88 24.00


50.00
26.75
25.50


52.62
50.00
26.00


51.50
28.50
26.00


27.50
25.00


54,00
51.50
27.50


Feeder and stocker cattle and calves


51.25
28.35
25.55


28.55
25.35
21.75


51.25
28.50
25.50


28.60
25.12
21.25


51.58
27.58
24.08


Heifers -
Choice 500-750#
Med. & Gd. 500-750

Cows All wts. -
Med. & Gd.

Calves 300-500# -
Steers -
Good & Choice

Heifers -
Good & Choice


-- -- 25.50 28.50 25.00 28.45 25.50 27.00 25.50 27.25
- 21.75 25.25 21.75 24.40 22.00 24.00 20.50 24.25


S 17.75 19.50 15.25 18.75



- 30.50 54.75 50.50 35.50


-- 27.25 32.00 27.00 32.75


16.75 19.00 -



31.00 55.75 28.00 51.00


28.25 55.00 25.50 28.50


*Weight range 600-800# in 1959.
* t 700-900# ,i it


Steers -
Choice
Good
Medium


500-800#
500-800
500-1000


29.00
26.25
25.00


27.75
25.00
21.50


50.45
27.90
24.00


25.25
25.50
20.50


28.75
26.75
23.75










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HOGS: AVERAGE COST. WEIGHT, AND NUMBER OF PACKER AND SHIPPER PURCHASES 1/
...----.-..-........... ......................................... ................
r -- -- --- -- -r -- -- -- -- --- -- -
Louis Kan- S. S. 8-
Chi. Nati. sas Omaha Sioux St. St. Indian- mkts.
Week ended cago Stock City a City Joseph Paul apolis corn-
Yards bined
----------- -- ----
AVERAGE COST'- Dollars per 1.00 pounds
Barrows Mar. 19,1960 15.85 15.61 15.94 16.06 15.95 15.90 15.76 15.83 15.83
and Mar. 12,1960 15.58 15.28 15.60 15.85 15.79 15.77 15.82 15.46 15.58
gilts Mar. 21,1959 16.17 15.95 16.04 15.99 15.84 15.98 15.48 16.17 15.95
Mar. 19,1960 13.66 13.80 14.54 14.39 14.44 14.16 14.48 13.66 14.06
Sows Mar. 12,1960 13.52 13.64 13.95 14.10 13.89 13.95 15.89 13.43 15.75
Mar. 21,1959 13.72 13.99 14.04 15.82 13.64 14.10 13.34 13.53 135.72
AVERAGE WEIGHT Pounds
Barrows Mar. 19,1960 233 218 226 256 241 225 236 225 229
and Mar. 12,1960 235 217 224 255 241 224 232 222 227
gifts Mar. _21.1959.. 232 220 231 235 239 228 232 ... .?.......
Mar. 19,1960 449 392 435 424 428 390 408 433 419
Sows Mar. 12,1960 451 401 404 430 445 392 420 439 426
Mar. 21,1959 426 413 415 426 423 402 410 427 419
----------------------------------- ------ -------- ---.--- .
NUMBER OF HEAD -
Barrows Mar. 19,1960 25276 62898 13228 30709 32966 17826 43911 30074 256888
and Mar. 12,1960 23367 62548 14259 31679 25447 19475 36519 35817 249111
gilts Mar. 21,1959 31351 55275 11346 29267 27972 20795 375398 32325 245729
Mar. 19,1960 2544 4009 707 2981 2119 818 3175 2983 19336
Sow. Mar. 12,1960 2534 3002 817 5159 1848 1142 2241 2599 17522
Mar...2_1.95.9....~g5 ....5745. ... ..17 ....5.5.79....25... a87....56Oa...-.67._2las5B
SOWS Percentage of total
Mar. 19,1960 9 6 5 9 6 4 7 9 7
Mar. 12,1960 10 5 5 9 7 6 6 7 7
Mar. 21,1959 9 6 6 11 8 6 9 7 8
1/ Weighted average.
WEEKLY AVERAGE WHOLESALE VALUE OF HOG PRODUCTS DERIVED
FROM 100 LB. LIVE HOG, COMPARED WITH PRICES OF LIVE HOGS, CHICAGO
-' -------"--------------------- ---------------- ,ross"spread
Hog products I/ Hog prices or margin 3/
Mar. 19, 1960 $17.95 $16.12 $1.83
Mar. 12, 1960 17.43 15.68 1.75
Mar. 21, 1959 17.76 ....... 56 ....................
1 / Value of all edible products, fresh basis (lard rendered) in 100 lb. of live hog com-
puted from wholesale prices on carlot basis, Chicago, reported by National Provisioner
daily market report.
2/ Mean of daily quotations on U. S. No. 1, 2 and 3 hogs, 200-220# wt. Chicago.
T/ Difference between wholesale product value and hog prices.
HOG AND CORN PRICES AT CHICAGO AND HOG-CORN PRICE RATIO
Barrows and Corn, Hog-corn
Week ended gilts No. 3 ye ow price ratio
Dollars per Cents per based on
100 pounds bushel : barrows and gilts
-- -- -- -- -----------------~I. i l .. i il i-- j -- -- -- ----l I~ ------tll i-----------------
Mar. 19, 1960 15.85 114.8 13.8
Mar. 12, 1960 15.58 113.8 13.5
Mar. 21, 1959 16.17 120.7 13.4


1/ Simple average price.





227

SHEEP AND IAMBS: WEEKLY AVERAGE OF DAILY QUOTATIONS
In dollars per 100 pounds
-.-------------^-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --- -- -- -^--
S: a : : : : North
Classification : Chicago Omaha : Kansas : Fort : Denver Ogden : Port-
: s City : Worth t : : land
S ------------ -- --------------------------


SLAUGHTER LAMBSt


(Wooled) All wvts.


Prime Mar. 19, 1960
Mar. 21, 1959
Choice Mar. 19, 1960
Mar. 21, 1959
Good Mar. 19, 1960
Mar. 21, 1959

EWES: (Wooled) All wts.
Good and Mar. 19, 1960
Choice Mar. 21, 1959

Cull and Mar. 19, 1960
Utility Mar. 21, 1959

FEEDER LAMBS All wts.
Good and Mar. 19, 1960
Choice Mar. 21, 1959
Shorn basis.


25.25


22. 62
20.52
21.82
20.25


7.75
8.10
6.50
7.50


25.15


22.28
20.32
21.05
19.55


7.00
8.12
5.25
6.25


-- 20.65
-- --


21.62
20.55
20.62
19.80


6.50
6.88
5.50
5.12


-- 20.45 -
-- 19.62 --
-------------


20.15
18.75
19.65
18.25


7.


22.85


22.08
19.75
20.85
18.95


-- 6.35*
-- 9.00
75* 4.55*
- 6.12


18.90
17.50


21.


21.
18
20.
17


6.
6.
4.
4


21.02
18.88


.85
-


22.538


.60 21.88
.20 18.75
.58 21.00
.58 18.25


.50 7.75
.50 8.25
.75 5.75
.00 5.50


-- 18.50
-- 15.50


UNITED STATES FEDERALLY INSPECTED SLAUGHTER BY REGIONS
FEBRUARY 1960 with comparisons
(Thousand head)

Cattle Calves Hogs
: *
C- T9o0- -~5 o T- 1s- Y T19-- o 7 -1s
---------------------------


a
a
a


Sheep & lambs
T9o- 7 -19579


N. Atlantic States .....
S. Atlantic States .....
N.C. States Eastern ..
N.C. States N.Western.
N.C. States S.Western.
S. Central States.......
Mountain States.........
Pacific States..........
Total ..............


110
57
255
471
157
119
106
182
1,457


97
50
245
592
112
106
88
150
1,219


88
24
141
60
9
45
2
20
389


77
25
142
58
9
45
2
22
577


502
552
1,406
2,244
566
480
112
199
S5,841


471
286
1,417
2,505
491
445
86
191
5,686


190 172

107 100
560 558
70 75
60 58
157 161
152 157
1,076 1,c080


Other animals slaughtered under Federal inspection, (number of head): February 1960 Horses
4,299; Goats 1,795; February 1959, horses 5,314; Goats 8,720. 1/ Not available for
publication.
Number of Cattle and Calves from Canada and Mexico Passed for
Entry into the United States
February 1960, with Comparisons
USDA ARS Animal Inspection and Quarantine Div.

-----_--------_------ ------- --------------
o- 9Ko : 9- T99 : 1h65 ---:- 199- -

Head Head Head Head
February 21,865 14,011 44,752 57,023
Jan. Feb. 35,203 35,889 79,262 122,372
Notes During Jan.-Feb. this year 87 sheep and 4,557 hogs were received from
Canada compared with 1, 800 sheep and 473 hogs a year ago.


Region





228


WHOLESALE MEAT TRADE REVIEWS


LESS THAN CARLOT MEAT TRADE REVIEWS

EASTERN SEABOARD Trading on wholesale
meats was very uneven along the Atlantic sea-
board. Movement was extremely slow at most
large consuming centers through midweek with
demand poor. Later in the week, however,
outlet broadened and with trading active,
clearance was complete.
Supplies were normal at most markets,
some scarcity of lamb at Baltimore and beef
slightly reduced at Boston. Receipts at New
York were slightly curtailed, and Prime steer
beef was extremely limited with instances
inadequate. Bulk of available lamb at New
York graded Choice and Prime and weighed 50-
65#.
Compared with the previous week: Steer
beef mostly steady at Baltimore, Boston, and
Washington, instances 500 higher at the lat-
ter market, while sales were mostly 50 lower
at Philadelphia. At New York, Prime steer
beef sold fully $2.00 higher, Choice mostly
steady, instances $1.00 higher, but prices
for Good unchanged. Cow beef sold steady to
$2,00 higher. Veal and calf closed mostly
steady. Lamb sold steady to $2.00 higher with
some sales at Baltimore $5.00 up. Pork loins
sold $1.00-3.00 higher at all markets except at
New York where early sales were steady to $1.00
higher, but late downmturns left prices $1.00
lower at the close. Other fresh pork cuts
sold steady to $3.00 higher, with bulk at
Washington, and Philadelphia on a higher basis.
Kosher steer beef forequarters sold steady to
$1.00 higher, the advance on Prime. Kosher
lamb foresaddles closed $2.00-4.00 up, but
there was no change on veal and calf.

CHICAGO Steer and heifer beef closed
steady to 500 higher for the week after prices
declined on the initial session. Trading was
only moderately active but higher cattle
prices along with reduced supplies due to
heavy snows throughout the midwest had a bul-
lish influence. Ribs moved best of primal
beef cuts in a generally slow trade. Small
supply of veal also advanced despite a slow
trade. Lamb prices showed substantial upturns
making it the sixth straight week that prices
have advanced. Lamb carcasses, fore end
cuts and loins had adequate outlet but some
legs and hindsaddles were carried over, and
some dealers were freezing legs rather than
selling at current rates. Fairly active fresh
pork trade slowed late Wednesday, loins fol-
lowing a lower trend. Veal receipts were
small throughout, supplies other classes


reduced from moderate to small as the week
progressed. Compared to the previous Friday:
Steer and heifer beef steady to 500 higher
cow beef mostly 500 higher; veal $1.00 high-
er; lamb $1.50-2.50 up, pork loins 8-16#
$1.00-1.50 lower; Boston butts 4-8# and
spareribs 3# down steady to 50( higher.

PACIFIC COAST Moderate supplies of
steer beef were fully adequate for a con-
tinued slow movement brought about by con-
siderable resistance to higher prices. Cow
beef receipts were moderate and cleared
readily. Fair outlet prevailed for moder-
ate volume of calf; trading was moderately
active for lamb with supplies normal, spring
lamb appearing in small numbers in Cali-
fornia; fresh and cured pork still liberal
for a rather slow movement. Prices com-
pared with the previous weekta close: Good
and Choice steer beef steady to $1.00 high-
er with Standard about steady; cow beef
steady to $1.00 higher; calf and veal
mostly steady, instances $1.00 higher on
calf at Portland; lamb steady in California
and steady to $1.00 higher in the Pacific
Northwest; fresh pork steady to $4.00 high-
er, the advance mainly at San Francisco;
cured pork steady to $3.00 higher.


CARLWT MEAT TRADE REVIEWS

Volume of carlot sales somewhat below
normal as supplies have been reduced during
recent weeks by moderate livestock market-
ings which in turn were retarded by
severe weather conditions throughout the
midwest. Trading on steer and heifer beef
was moderately active with best movement
late in week. The limited supply of cow
beef cleared readily wiunder good demand.
Lamb supply was also rather small and
prices continued to advance. Pork loins
advanced early in an active trade, how-
ever, at Chicago the closing trade was
slow and late downturns more than erased
the early advance at that center. Steer
and heifer beef closed steady to 500 high-
er for the week. Cow beef sold steady to
500 higher at Omaha, Chicago and Denver,
with most sales 500 up at Philadelphia
and 504-$1.00 up at New York. Lamb car-
casses closed $1.00-3.00 higher. Price
trends on pork loins advanced 500-$2.50
at New York, 500-$1.50 at Philadelphia and
500-$1.00 at Omaha. However, at Chicago
late sales on pork loins showed a $1.00-
1.50 decline for the week.






229


iEOLESALE DRESSED MEAT PRICES LESS THAN CARLOT BASIS
Weekly average of daily quotations in dollars per 100 pounds
.


Classification


Steer beef -
Prime 700-800#
Choice 600-700
700-800
Good 500-600
600-700


Heifer beef -
Choice


Good 500-600
Veal -
Prime 90-120#
Choice 90-120
Good 90-120
Lamb -
Prime 45-55W
Choice 45-55
Fresh pork -
Loins 8-1V
Butts 4-8
Spareriba 5# down
Cured pork -
Hams, smk. skd. -(Cook
before eating) 12-16#
Bacon, smoked, sliced -
1# package (box lots)
Picnics, smoked (Cook
before eating) 4-8#
Lard, 1# carton

BUI
Classification

eChoice 600-700# -----
Choice 600-700#


Good


Heifer beef -


Choice 500-600#
600-700
Good 500-600
600-700
Cow beef All weights -
Utility
Canner and Cutter


Choice


Fresh pork -
Loins


:~ :
* *0
: Mar.19 : Mar.21 : Mar.1l
: 1960 : 1959 : 1960


51.90
48.45
47.40
44.75
44.95


61.50
52.50
47.50


hicLLa


46.00
44.75
42.88
42.88

44.62
44.62
41.50

58.88
54.25
50.50


go San Fran
*


: Mar.21 :l
: 1959 :


46.00
44.50
42.50
42.50


57.00
50.75
47.69


ar.19 :


cisco L sa Anugeles
Mar.21 : Mar.19 : Mar.21


1960 : 1959 :-


45.12
43.50
43.50
42.50

43.50
42.50




55.00


48.00 44.60 46.00 43.50 44.50
46.35 45.05 46.00 42.50 44.50


41.90
37.50
40.10


44.85
31.50
56.50


38.62
33.18
56.58


50.00
38.75
45.00


46.00
45.25
44.50
44.00


1960 t 1959 -


44.00
42.50
45.00
41.00

45.44
42.69
42.00


45.69
44.25
44.00
43.00


55.00 -- --

42.00 40.00
42.00 42.00 40.00


44.00
40,00
45.00


46.75
36.50
42.50


42.25
56.38
42.25


45.00 50.00 51.25 50.25 52.00 53.00 49.00 50.88


44.00 47.00 48.75 49.00 49.00 48.75 50.00


29.50 52.50 3355.00 54.25 30.00 3355.50 32.12 54.50
12.62 13.50 12.50 15.50 15.50 16.50 14.75 14.75

K PRICES CALLOT BASIS WEEK ENDED MARCH 18, 1960
---r-ce-- -II aIdr0. .B. -:1 Frac1s deiverec -d
cag : Denver : h -aNew-ork : hladelha


44.00-45.00
45.50-44.00
45.00-45.50
41.00-41.50
41.00-41.50
40.50-41.00

45.00-43.50
45.00-43.50
39.00-40.00
39.00-40.00

32.50-53.00
33.00-33.50




46.00-47.00
44.50-45.50
43.00-44.00


45.00-44.00
42.25-43.00
42.00

40.50-42.50
40.50-41,00

42.00-43.50
41.75-42.25



32.50-33.50


45,50
42.50-43.50
40.50-42.50
45.50
42.50-43.50
40.50-42.50


8-12# 42.50-45.50


43.25-45.75
42.75-43.25
41.75-42.25

40.50-41.25
40,00-40.50

42.25-42.50
42.00-42.50
38.50-39.00
38.50-59.00

32.00
32.50




44.75-45.25
45.25-44.25
41.75-42.25

42.50-43.50


45.50-47.00
45.50-46.00
44.00-45.00
43.50-44.00
42.50-44.00
42.50-43.50


34.50-55.50





47.50-49.00
46.00-47.50
44.00-45.50


46.00-46.50
45.00-46.00
44.00-45.00
45.00-44.00
43.00-44.00
42.00-43.00


44.50-46.00



34.50-35.00
54.25-34.50

47.50-48.50
46.00-47.50
44.00-44.50
47.50-48.50
46.00-47.50
44.00-44.50


44.00-46.00 45.00-45.50


NewYork


500-600#
600-700


49.60
47.50
46.25
44.00
44.50


64.50
55.50
50.00


47.90
35.00
59.95


58.00


700-800
800-900
500-600
600-700
700-800


Lamb -
Prime


55-45#
45-55
55-65
55-45
45-55
55-65


M






250


BOSTON WOOL MARKET REVIEW


Trading in the Boston wool market
increased but was still rather slow. Most
action was on pulled wools and there were
a few more sales in carpet type wools.
Prices were firm with continued interest
in domestic medium fleeces. Scoured wools
were firm, noils were steady.
A little wool was moving in scattered
areas of the territory States while buyers
were taking up occasional lots of 12 months
Texas wool. Activity in the fleece wool
States again was limited due to another
snow storm and shearing has been delayed at
least three weeks in the mid-western States.
Midweek cables from Australia showed
a good selection of topmaking merino wools
as prices tended upward with the Continent,
Japan and England dominating. Prices at
the Cape markets were firm with an upward
tendency under general competition. The
next sale in New Zealand will be held on
March 23 at 1thnganui and Dunedin. Private
cables indicated prices were advancing in
New Zealand. Trading in Montevideo was
very slow as prices held steady. Trading
was limited in Buenos Aires as prices ad-
vanced.
Fleece 1bols Graded 64s average to
good French combing fleece wool sold at
$1.10 clean basis. Country buyers were
paying around 500 in the grease to the
growers for medium wools.
Territory Mbols Bulk fine and half-
blood good French combing and staple wool
in original bags sold in Montana for future
delivery around $1.15 clean basis delivered
Boston on a core test. Original bag wool
sold in -Woming at estimated clean prices
around $1.15-1.20 delivered East, while a
few clips of lambs wool brought 37-42#
grease basis, f.o.b. Occasional sales of
mixed yearling clips in Oregon brought
from 49-535 in the grease and mixed lambs
wool sold from 45-510, grease basis de-
livered Portland.
Texas Wbols Good 12 months Texas
wool in original bags sold at estimated
clean prices of $1.18-1.20 while average
style 12 months wool sold from $1.12-1.15
clean basis, delivered Boston.
Mohair Confirmed sales of mohair
too limited for a price test.
Foreign Whols Cabled quotations at
week's end follow with combing wools con-
verted to clean U. S. oil-combed yields
and short wools to scouring yields, in bond.
New Zealand, oil-combed No auctions
this week. Montevideo, clean basis -
Unchanged.


61B -
62B -
65B -


Australia
Oil-combed
$1.19 -452
1.17 4553
1.11 454


$1.09
1.04
.99


South Africa
Oil-combed Sicoured yields
7 $1.17 22 $1.11
8 1.16 27 1.06
12 1.16 52 .99
47 1.15 57 .95
48 1.13
52 1.15
53 1.11

Carpet 9bols Rising quotations
from foreign markets follow: Buenos
Aires November second clips 84-85#,
March wools around 824 and fleeces
around 85-86# clean fibers present.
New Zealand fleeces at 860 and crutch-
ings at 81-824.
Mbolen ibols Sales follow:

Scoured Pulled Domestic
64s 2-3" dh. white $1.29
64s 1 -2" white 1.18
64/62s 3-531" ch. white 1.32
58s 1-2" white 1.10
56/588 ave. l" burry
fair color .92
56s 2i-5" white 1.14
56s 2t-35" tinged 1.09
56s l-2" gray .83

Greasy Pulled Domestic
58/60s 2!-5" tinged $1.14 clean

Scoured Pulled Foreign
N. Z. 56/58s 2-5" good color $1.18
Noils 70s Aust. nobles 950; 64s
dom. aniAust. nobles 880; 62s dom.
nobles 790; 70s blended French 760;
64s dom. and Aust. French 73f; 64s dom.
French 710; 64s defective schlumbergers
60.
fbol Tops A fair weight of oil-
combed 54s fleece tops moved recently
and a good demand continued for this
grade.
CLOSING FUTURES QUOTATIONS Mar. 17,
1960 (Furnished by the bol Associates
of the New York Cotton Exchange).
March wool tops $1.465
March wool 1.239
May wool tops 1.494
May wool 1.204































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252


MEAT AND MEAT FOOD PRODUCTS INSPECTED WHEN OFFERED FOR
(USDA ARS Meat Inspection Division)
JANUARY DECEMBER, 1959


S- ------ -- Fresh ;sits and ed3ble off "al
Country of origin beeeT? an L aS t Pork
S Veal S Mutton :
-------------------------------


IMPORTATION


- C ed' eas -
B flnP k abs


Argentina ***********
Australia *****
Brasil ******
Canada ..............
Denmark .............*

Germany ... .**
Holland .wl ...
Ireland .o.......
Mexico .. ....
New Zealand **........**

Paraguay .0*0000*0**
Poland *..............*
Uruguay #....*000.***
All others **.........

Total Year 1959 ...
Year 1958 ...*


Pounds

215,041,320
-22,744,945
22t744,9945


51,815,776
49,686,5853
157,645,206


Pounds

57,494,475

788,015


105,286

15,205,215


Pounds

89,509

50,597,278


55,878
54,159
267,587


Pounds
79,590,209
98,764
16,557,243
77,510
505,126


28,600
65,571


- 6,158,455


25,524,529

520,456,559
556,679,581


5,579,710

55,171,497
25,057,711


66,744

51,109,155
49,457,624


4,546,009
157,547

107,184,634
119,242,960


Pounds
5,660
18

7,290,326
1,549,549


200,787
257,112
156,642
-a


-a


84,088

9,504,182
10,817,667


Refused or condemned:
Year 1959 ...
Year 1958 ...

Country of origin



Argentina ..., ,
Australia *****
Brazil ..............
Canada *.............
Denmark .............

Germany ***.**
Holland 1 *****
Ireland ss.sso..*.**
Mexico ............*
New Zealand *........

Paraguay ...*.
Poland ............
Uruguay ... .**
All others ..........

Total Year 1959 ..
Year 1958 ...


1,408,750 1,522,985 157,563 1,4(
2,887,897 1,622,645 142,744 3,5S
SCanne meats asage
S Beef Pork Miscl1. (Trichina:
S: : : treated):


Pounds
52,909,989
549,191
20,543,0853
68,757
180,897


1,762
51,459
167
265


9,105,199
1,836
8,651,956
6,289

91,670,848
108,189,769


Pounds Pounds
404,251 514,584
25,760
-- 58,649
4,485,599 245,554
56,665,648 4,769,760


5,862,507
45,847,200


Pounds
42,C


47,8
1,236,C


)5,433
!1,601
General :
miscel- :
laneous :


Pounds
)00 2,954,504
-- 247,076
-- 57,858
15 5,575,748
72 7,814


48,814 502,051
751,785 187,351


620


-- 195,
4 7,


190,785 -
26,715,202 5,767,290 44
367,182 40,730 -
1,192,557 1,064,829 769,111

119,728,711 11,266,375 2,584,448
122,646,866 13,263,015 1,218,919


20,844
66,070


Total


Pounds
156,200,997
251,546,111
56,796,815
89,720,147
44,914,866


-- 4,415,921
419 47,075,526
-- 52,109,749
688 49,945,915
595 171,188,976


1,984
48,160
154,030

7,008,656
9,570,267


15,454,459
50,484,556
15,454,057
52,579,214

975,684,865
815,944,579


Refused or condemned:
Year 1959 ..*
Year 1958 ...
Note: In addition to
meat from Mexico.


604,765 584,996 95,558 21,843 17,034 5,617,769
625,004 1,149,047 152,686 15,516 164,675 10,543,885
the above, imports for the year 1959 included 658,016 pounds of horse


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234


MEAT AND' MEAT FOOD PRODUCTS PREPARED AND PROCESSED
UNDER FEDERAL INSPECTION
------------- -- -----------^--_-----------
Week ended 1960
*- 6 -
Product : : Feb. : Feb. : Feb. : Feb.
3 30 : 6 : 13 : 20 : 27
(Revised): 6 1 2
-- -- -- :- -- - -s :---

Placed in cure 12000# 1,000# 1,9000# 1,00#
Beef 1/ . 3,251 4,088 2,975 3,426 3,000
Pork / . 64,846 64,977 61,448 65,514 58,507
Other / . 186 96 44 135 15
Smoked and / or dried -
Beef / .. 934 805 857 897 1,157
Pork I/ . 47,382 46,587 44,163 45,150 41,146
Cooked meat -
Beef. e 1,811 1,726 1,660 1,684 1,337
Pork. . 4,626 3,984 4,524 4,782 4,492
Other . 127 40 55 107 19
Sausage -
Fresh finished. 6,017 5,918 5,400 5,565 5,030
To be dried or semi-dried 2,778 2,261 2,581 2,580 2,042
Franks, wieners 11,568 11,925 11,654 12,140 10,784
Other, smoked or cooked 11,869 12,259 11,965 12,432 11,527
Loaf, head cheese, chili,
jellied products. 3,517 3,871 5,627 4,112 5,527
Steaks, chops, roasts 12,159 12,719 11,849 11,967 8,905
Meat extract. .. 32 22 55 64 40
Sliced bacon 1/ 20,233 19,668 19,049 19,685 18,081
Sliced, other /2/ 5,248 5,425 5,155 5,266 4,755
Hamburger . 4,284 3,981 5,562 5,785 5,027
Miscellaneous meat product. 4,664 4,422 5,998 3,760 3,446
Lard, rendered 44,884 45,892 41,627 45,360 34,969
Lard, refined 31,871 52,719 51,571 27,892 25,484
Oleo stock . 1,205 1,465 1,514 1,286 1,211
Edible tallow 6,829 6,854 7,004 6,797 5,958
Rendered pork fat -
Rendered . 1,764 1,653 1,599 1,662 1,422
Refined . 898 1,686 972 1,102 856
Compound containing animal fatl4,860 19,705 16,202 15,506 14,479
Oleomargarine i 5,075 3,974 4,134 5,274 2,818
Canned product (for civilian
use and Dept. of Defense). 55,689 55,259 53,589 53,659 46,445
Total J/ . 366,366 3 71,935 55,39l 55,545 314,020

I/ This figure represents "inspection pounds" as some of the products may
have been inspected and recorded more than once due to having been subjected
to more than one district processing treatment, such as curing first, then
smoking, slicing.
Y/ Includes sliced dried beef, sliced sausage, loaves, etc.
Meat Inspection Branch, Agricultural Research Service.









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255






256 COLD STORAGE HOLDING OF MEATS AND IARD, FEBRUARY 29, 1960


Red meat stocks increased 27 million pounds during February. This was about
average but compares with 83 million during February of 1959. Stocks totaled 624
million pounds on March 1. These red meat stocks were 3 percent below average but
7 percent above a year earlier. Warehouse reductions in beef of 14 million pounds
left 181 million in storage on March 1. These were 4 percent above holdings on
March 1, 1959 and 7 percent above the 1955-59 average. A 45-million pound net
build-up in warehouse stocks of pork during February put the Nation's holdings
at 356 million on March 1. Stocks of 316 million pounds on March 1, 1959 were at
a lower level despite a 75 million pound gain during February. The average Feb-
ruary increase is 39 million. Stocks of frozen picnics increased 1.2 million
pounds during February. National holdings of 9.9 million on March 1 compare with
7.5 million a year earlier. A net increase of 22 million pounds in frozen hams
brought stocks to 72 million which compares with 59 million on March 1, 1959.
Stocks of frozen pork bellies increased 24 million pounds during February to
bring warehouse holdings to 117 million pounds.



UNITED STATES STORAGE HOLDINGS OF MEATS AND LARD, FEBRUARY 29, 9960WITH COMPARISONS
(Includes holdings in public, private and semi-private
cold storage houses and meat packing plants)


S average
-- -------l- y1' -:------1------ -:- --
1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000-lb.
Beef:
Frozen. . 158,207 160,401 182,549 169,482
In cure and cured 10,610 12,657 12,511 11,117
Total . 168,817 175,058 194,860 180,599
Pork, frozen:
Picnics . 1/ 7,325 8,727 9,927
Hams. a / 58,946 50,265 72,047
Bellies . T/ 86,255 92,488 116,581
Other frozen pork cuts. *. T/ 103,902 112,901 112,695
Total . 307,604 256,428 264,579 511,248
Pork in cure or cured:
Dry salt bellies. 1/ 12,525 9,455 10,498
Other dry salt pork T/ 8,560 7,633 6,704
Other pork cuts . T/ 58,838 30,072 28,040
Total . 77,789 59,523 47,158 45,242
Total pork . 385,595 515,951 511,557 356,490
Other meats and meat products:
Veal, frozen. . 15,974 15,792 9,442 8,011
Lamb and mutton, frozen 8,645 11,053 14,046 12,294
Canned meats in cooler. 64,765 68,012 67,286 66,861
Total all meats 641,594 581,866 597,171 624,255
Lard, rendered and refined 2/ 155,818 117,900 135,600 4/
GOVERNMENT HOLDINGS V/ -
Pork. . 7,858 6,700 1,962 1,942
Beef. .. 8,757 2,449 2,150 1,911
-/Not reported separately prior to 1957. g/ In dry and cold storage as reported
by Bureau of Census. 3/ Government holdings are included in the totals and consist
of reported stocks held by U.S.D.A., the Armed Services and other Government agencies.
4/ Not available.






237


SHIPMENTS OF STOCKER AND FEEDER CATTLE AND SHEEP, FEBRUARY 1960


Stocker and feeder cattle and calves shipped into 8 selected North Central States during
February this year totaled 269,605 head compared with 289,719 head in February 1959--a 7 per-
cent decrease. Of the total cattle and calves received in these States during the month,
116,258 head moved through public stockyards and 153,347 head were received direct. The di-
rect movement was 57 percent of the total this February compared with 54 percent a year ear-
lier. The combined January and February shipments for this year amounted to 647,685 head com-
pared with 672,991 head for the same two months in 1959.
Sheep and lambs shipped into these 8 States in February totaled 160,316 head, up 5 percent
from the 152,539 head shipped in February last year. Of the sheep and lambs received during
February, 61,695 head came through public stockyards and 98,621 moved direct. During January
and February this year, 320,542 head of stocker and feeder sheep and lambs were shipped into
these States, compared with 315,364 head during the same period in 1959.
Data on shipments of stocker and feeder livestock into Wisconsin have been discontinued.
Stocker and Feeder Cattle and Sheep Received in Selected North Central States
February, 1960, with comparisons 1/
Cattle and Calves

: Public Stock :
Public Stock Direct Total
State Yards
February : February : February : January-February
1959 : 1960 : 1959 : 1960 : 1959 : 1960 : 1959 : 1I00

Ohio....... : 3,567 4,061 944 1,521 4,511 5,582 9,675 13,334
Indiana.... 6,089 6,094 2,554 12,458 8,643 18,552 17,646 44,282
Illinois...: 16,994 15,263 29,912 30,789 46,900 46,052 104,501 103,557
Michigan... 1,366 2,245 1,235 1,106 2,601 3,351 4,717 7,363
Minnesota..: 12,200 12,397 17,019 22,673 29,219 35,070 80,565 95,803
Iowa.......: 52,204 51,820 59,069 54,557 111,273 106,377 273,614 255,069
S.Dakota...: 7,659 6,683 6,658 4,105 14,317 10,71: 32,165 24,209
Nebraska.. : 32,579 17,695 39,670 26,138 72,249 43,833 150,108 99,068
Total :132,65d 157,061 289,719 672,991
8 States2: 116,258 153,347 269,605 647,6&5


ieep and Lambs



Ohio.......: 1,151 741 250 586 1,401 1,327 2,471 2,541
Indiana.... 2,464 1,129 2,482 226 4,)4 1,355 7,909 3,803
Illinois...: 5,839 2,870 4,702 16,C i 10,541 18,871 25,450 39,256
Michigan...: 1,103 2,053 --- 1,535 1,103 3, -; 2,790 3,'3
Minnesota.. 15,227 14,581 6,487 12,497 21,713 27,078 58,531 60,55o
Iowa.......: 10,973 15,937 63,154 51,046 74,127 6, 3 151,469 129,,
S.Eakota ... 6,165 6,308 7,695 4,769 13,360 11,077 24,252 27,395
Nebraska...: 16,246 18,076 602 11.961 24.840 i0.7 42.492 45. 22
Total : 59,1io 1^,c 1
8 States2: 1 -:
i/ Data in this report are obtained from offices of State Veterinarians. Under
"Public Stockyards" are included stockers and feeders which were bought at stock-
yards. Under "Direct" are included stockers and feeders from points other than
public stockyards, some of which are inspected at public stockyards while sto-r-
pin.,, for feed, water, and rest en route.


2/ Data for Wisconsin have been discontinued.





258


PIG CROP REPORT TEN STATES

The number of sows farrowed and intended to farrow in the spring of 1960 (Decem-
ber through May) for 10 of the Corn Belt States is 13 percent less than the same
period in 1959 and 13 percent below the 1949-58 average, according to the Crop Re-
porting Board. The number is now estimated at 5,297,000 head for the 10 States (Ohio,
Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, South Dakota, Nebraska, and
Kansas). Farrowings in all 10 States are down this spring from a year earlier. De-
creases range from 7 percent in Ohio and Missouri to 28 percent in South Dakota. A
decrease of 20 percent is indicated in Nebraska, 19 percent in Kansas, 15 percent in
Wisconsin and Minnesota, 12 percent in Iowa, 11 percent in Illinois, and 10 percent
in Indiana. The March 1 survey indicates a decrease of less than 1 percent (25,000
head) from the spring farrowing intentions reported for these States as of December
1, 1959. The 10 States included in this report accounted for 73 percent of the 1959
United States pig crop.
Sows farrowed in the 10 States during December, January, and February totaled
1,746,000 head, 19 percent less than during the same period a year earlier but 55
percent more than average. These farrowings represent 33 percent of the estimated
December-May total--compared with 35 percent of the spring total during the corre-
sponding period a year earlier and the average of 21 percent. On December 1 farmers
reported intentions to farrow 15 percent fewer sows during December-February than a
year earlier. Farmers reports indicate that the number of sows farrowed in December
was down slightly compared with a year earlier with most of the decrease occurring in
January and February.

Sows bred and intended for farrowing in March, April, and May this year in the
10 States total 3,551,000 head, 10 percent less than a year earlier and 26 percent
below average. This is 1 percent or 51,000 head more than the farrowing intentions
reported for these States in December. All 10 States indicate decreases from a year
earlier ranging from 5 percent in Ohio and Indiana to 26 percent in South Dakota.

Reported breeding intentions indicate 2,324,000 sows to farrow during the 1960
summer quarter (June through August) for the 10 States. This is a decrease of 4
percent or 95,000 sows from the 2,419,000 that farrowed during this same period a
year earlier but 21 percent more than average. All 10 States indicate decreases in
sow farrowings for this quarter. Intended decreases are 8 percent in Illinois, 5
percent in Minnesota and Missouri, 3 percent in Indiana and South Dakota, and 2 per-
cent in Ohio, Wisconsin, Iowa, Nebraska, and Kansas.
The number of all hogs and pigs on March 1, 1960 in the 9 States with comparable
data totaled 34,636,000 head. This was 9 percent less than the 37,887,000 head a
year earlier. All States showed decreases, ranging from 5 percent in Illinois to 24
percent in South Dakota. Hogs and pigs 6 months old and over totaled 11,908,000
head, 6 percent less than a year earlier. Total commercial slaughter of hogs for the
United States during January was 11 percent more than a year earlier.
The number of pigs under 6 months of age in the 9 States was 10 percent less
than on March 1, 1959. There is a decrease of 1 percent in the 5-6 month age group
and a decrease of 18 percent in the number under 3 months of age. Indications point
to a slightly larger number of pigs saved per litter for the December-February
period than a year earlier. The 12,569,000 pigs under 3 months old on farms March 1
in the 10 States accounted for 32 percent of all hogs, and the 15,559,000 head in the
6 6 month age group represented 34 percent of the total.





239


The report for these 10 States is made possible by matched funds provided by
State agencies and the United States Department of Agriculture under provisions of
the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946.

Sows farrowing by quarters, Selected Corn Belt States

December through February 1/ March through May
State : Average : : 1960 Average : 960
1949-58 : 1959 1960 :as % of: 1949-58 1959 : 1960 2/:as of
: 1959 : : : 1959
S1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
: head head head Percent head head head Percent

Ohio .....: 128 160 140 88 257 208 202 97
Ind. .....: 245 315 266 84 332 265 256 97
Ill. .....: 213 363 306 84 720 611 561 92
Wis.......: 63 121 87 72 257 198 184 93
Minn. ....: 86 188 147 78 544 420 370 88
Iowa .....: 285 537 433 81 1,592 1,239 1,130 91
Mo. ......: 154 225 200 89 343 342 327 96
S.Dak. ...: 20 53 34 64 294 268 197 74
Nebr. ....: 58 124 87 72 382 290 244 84
Kans. ....: 42 63 46 73 106 92 80 87

Total 10
States ; 1,293 2,149 1,746 81 4,827 3,933 3,551 90

December through May 1/ June through August
State :Av : 1960 Average : 1960
1949-58 1959 : 1960 3/:as % of: 1949-58a 1959 : 1960 2/: as % of
S: : : 1959 : :: 1959
: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
: head head head Percent head head head Percent

Ohio .....: 385 368 342 93 156 178 175 98
Ind. .....: 577 580 522 90 318 299 290 97
Ill. .....: 933 974 867 89 310 447 411 92
Wis. .....: 320 319 271 85 101 128 125 98
Minr. ....: 630 608 517 85 173 237 225 95
Iowa .....: 1,877 1,776 1,563 88 515 659 645 98
Mo. ......: 496 567 527 93 196 263 250 95
S.Dak. ...: 315 321 231 72 39 57 55 97
Nebr. ....: 44o 414 331 80 73 98 96 98
Kans. ....: 148 155 126 81 41 53 52 896
Total 10
Totatesl 10 : 6,120 6,002 5,297 87 1,922 2,419 2,324 96
States'


1/ December preceding year.
2/ Number indicated by breeding intentions reports.
/ Sum of December through February farrowings and March through May
to farrow.


intentions
Continued





240

U. S. Department of Agriculture
Washington 25, D. C.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Postage 3 1262 08735 7181
U. S. Department of Agriculture


OFFICIAL BUSINESS

Form AMS-3/22/60
Permit 1001.


University of Florida
Do.uumenta Librarian
11-4-59 The University Libraries
LS-CLS Gainesville, Fla.


PIG CROP REPORT CONTINUED FROM PAGE 239

Hogs and pigs: Number on farms by classes March 1, Selected Corn Belt States


Total under 6 months 6 months and older All hogs and pigs

State 1960 1 960 : : :1960
1958 1959 1960 .as % of: 1958 : 1959 : 1960 tasoof: 1958 : 1959 : 1960 :as % of
_: : : 1959 : 1959. 1959
1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,00O 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
Head head head Percent head head head Percent head head head Percent
Ohio ..... 1,870 2,063 1,907 92 608 663 628 95 2,478 2,726 2,535 93
Ind. ..... 3,310 3,585 3,330 93 1,244 1,379 1,237 90 4,554 4,964 4,567 92
Ill. ..... 4,525 5,050 4,810 95 2,271 2,494 2,357 95 6,796 7,544 7,167 95
Wis. ..... 1,186 1,351 1,165 86 585 633 581 92 1,771 1,984 1,746 88
Minn. .... 1,826 2,446 2,006 82 1,302 1,464 1,318 90 3,128 3,910 3,324 85
Iowa ..... 6,790 7,675 7,025 92 3,930 4,224 4,160 98 10,720 11,899 11,185 94
Mo. .. 1/ 2,880 3,200 1,003 1,160 3,883 4,360
S.Dak. ... 505 722 508 70 605 654 538 82 1,110 1,376 1,046 76
Tebr. .... 1,315 1,550 1,290 83 745 860 831 97 2,060 2,410 2,121 88
Kans. .... 675 800 687 86 205 274 258 94 880 1,074 945 88

Total 9 22,002 25,242 22,728 90 11,495 12,645 11,908 94 33,497 37,887 34,636 91
States

Total 10
Stal e1 24,882 25,928 12,498 13,068 37,380 38,996
OLaLtes/o _______________________


1/ Data for Missouri for


1959 not available.




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