Livestock, meat, wool market news

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Title:
Livestock, meat, wool market news
Physical Description:
v. : ; 21-23 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service. -- Livestock, Poultry, Grain, and Seed Division
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service. -- Livestock Division
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service. -- Livestock & Seed Division
Publisher:
The Division
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

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Subjects / Keywords:
Meat industry and trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Livestock -- Marketing -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
Statement of Responsibility:
Livestock, Poultry, Grain and Seed Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 27, no. 1 (Jan. 6, 1959) issue.
Issuing Body:
Vols. for <Jan. 16, 1979-May 14, 1983> issued by: Livestock, Meat, Grain and Seed Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture; <Nov. 12, 1983-> by: the Livestock Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture; 1996 issue\d by: the Livestock and Seed Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 47, no. 2 (Jan. 16, 1979).
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 58, no. 40 (Oct. 6, 1990).

Record Information

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University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004691915
oclc - 04512121
lccn - sn 87043107
Classification:
lcc - NOT IN LC
ddc - 338.105
System ID:
AA00008493:00125

Related Items

Preceded by:
Market news (Washington, D.C.)
Succeeded by:
Livestock, meat, and wool weekly summary and statistics


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Full Text



LIVESTOA(



MEAT



WOOL


me ews



WEEKLY SUMMARY

AND STATISTICS


LIVESTOCK DIVISION, AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
WASMINSTON 2ss, D.C. .


Vol. 28, No. 20


Nay 17, 1960


Week ended May 14


Livestock Market Reviews . .
Livestock Market Receipts & *
Stocker and Feeder Statistics .
Estimated Percentage of Stocker and Feeder
Slaughter Cows in Salable Receipts .
Steer Sale Statistics . .
Slaughter at Major Centers .
Estimated Slaughter and Meat Production ..

Cattle Prices . .
Hog Prices .
Hog Purchase Statistics .
Sheep and Lamb Prices .* .


Wool Market Review *
Wholesale Meat Trade Reviews *
Wholesale Dressed Meat Prices


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Cattle and
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Special to this issue 1 "
Early Lamb Situation, May 1, 1960 0. .
Federally Inspected Slaughter, by ons, eril 1960
The Livestock and Meat Situation, t1960 .. *
Heat and Meat Food Products Procesaid Gned #der
Federal Inspection, Mar. 27-Apr. 60 .. .
Storage Holdings of Meats and Lard, Apr- 196&/ .
United States Exports of Meats, March 1960 .
United States Exports of Livestock, March 1960 .
Livestock Prices and Composite Meat Values, April 1960


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MIDWEST LIVESTOCK REVIEW

and

RANGE AND FEEDLOT SALES


Salable receipts of cattle at the 12
markets increased for the second consecutive
week and supplies were largest for any week
since January. The combined total of hog re-
ceipts at the 12 markets and the Interior Iowa-
Southern Minnesota area were slightly reduced
from the previous week while the combined
supply of sheep and lambs showed a slight in-
crease. Prices on slaughter steers and heif-
ers closed mostly steady to 50f lower. Stock-
er and feeder cattle and calves finished steady
to strong and at Sioux City and Oklahoma City
prices were generally 500 up. However, bulk
late sales at Kansas City were unevenly 500-
$1.50 lower. Barrows and gilts advanced 25-750
at most points. Prices on old crop and spring
slaughter lambs were largely steady to 500
higher. Feeder lambs were about steady, ex-
cept steady to 500 lower at Fort Worth.

SLAUGHTER CATTLE AND CALVES Cattle
supplies at the 12 markets were up 4 percent
from the previous week, with the increase
largely due to stepped-up selling of fed steers
and heifers. Cold, wet weather early in the
period kept many farmers out of their fields
and this also was a factor in larger market
supplies. Fairly active trading and moderate
upturns on wholesale dressed beef partially
offset the normally bearish influence of the
largest receipts in about four months. While
slaughter steers closed steady to 500 lower,
prices held around steady at several markets
and instances steady to strong on Choice and
Prime. Bulk of the slaughter steers graded
Good and Choice with nearly 50 percent of the 7
market total Choice. Only 4.2 percent of the
Chicago steer supply Prime, smallest for any
week since last June. However, Prime
steers at that market continued to hold well
above a year ago. Price trends on slaughter
heifers were steady to 50# lower, while cows
sold steady to $1.00 higher at most markets on
seasonally small supplies. Bulls also sold
unevenly steady to $1.00 higher at most cen-
ters. Vealers advanced $1.00 in So. St. Paul,
but held steady in St. Louis National Stock
Yards.
Load Prime 1296# fed steers $33.00 at
Chicago with 12 loads mostly Prime 1175-1360#
$32.25-32.75, average-Choice $26.75-28.50.
Elsewhere high-Choice and Prime $27.50-29.50,
load Prime 1184# $31.00 at Omaha. Bulk Choice
steers over the area $26.00-27.50, Good and
low-Choice $22.50-26.50, Standard and low-
Good largely $19.50-23.50. Few high-Choice and
Prime fed heifers A27.25-28.75. Bulk Choice
heifers $25.75-27.00, up to $27.50 at Chicago.
Good and low-Choice $22.00-26.00. Utility and
Commercial cows largely $16.00-18.50, Canners
and Cutters $13.00-16.50.


STOCKER AND FEEDER CATTLE AND CALVES -
Seasonally moderate receipts of stocker and
feeder cattle and calves at midwest terminals
continued to be made up to a large extent of
500-750# stock steers. Feeder steers from
800-1050# were in relatively limited supply at
most markets as were 400-450# stock calves.
Over-all quality again ranged largely from
high-Medium to average-Choice. Price trends
varied considerably around the market circuit.
Trading often was fairly active and on a
steady to strong basis and at Sioux City and
Oklahoma City prices were generally 500 high-
er. At Denver 500-600# stock steers were 50#-
$1.00 higher while fleshy feeders sold steady.
In contrast at Kansas City prices on most
classes were unevenly 500-$1.50 lower with
trade activity there slow throughout and most
noticeably dull in a late week auction. Varia-
tions in price trends between different mar-
kets this spring have been more pronounced
than normal, however, at this season of the
year a certain degree of unevenness is a usual
condition, reflecting at least to some extent
differences in demand influenced by variations
in growing seasons and weather conditions.
Slaughter cattle prices have shown frequent
fluctuations in recent weeks but generally
have been maintained at levels fairly favorable
to profitable feeding. In addition, there are
abundant supplies of all kinds of feeds through-
out most of the major feeding areas. Thus,
the cautious attitude often shown by both
stocker and feeder buyers in recent weeks
would indicate more than the usual amount of
uncertainty as to what to expect price-wise Im
the months ahead.
Good and Choice 800-1050# feeder steers
bulked at $23.50-26.00. A few loads, mostly
800-850# brought $26.25-26.50 and Choice 763#
reached $28.00. However, Good 950-1000# steers
in some instances sold at $22.00-22.50. Scat-
tered shipments of Choice stock steers, mostly
500-550# short yearlings, brought $30.00; other
Good and Choice yearling stockers $24.00-29.00,
including Choice 700# at $29.00. Bulk Good
and Choice yearling heifers sold from $22.50-
26.00, several loads 525-600# $27.00-28.00
while Choice fleshy 805# feeder heifers
brought $24.85. Choice 337# steer calves
reached $40.00 and a load of 403# $35.00
while Choice 350# heifer calves brought 33.50.
However, most Good and Choice steer calves
sold from $26.00-32.00, same grades heifer
calves $23.00-28.00.

HOGS Terminal Markets Receipts at
the 12 terminals were a little less than the
previous week but slightly more than the same
week a year ago. The consist of the butcher
supply was little changed from a week ago with








mixed U. S. No. 1-35, 200-260# barrows and
gilts predominating. At western Corn Belt
centers a liberal share of the butchers weighed
over 220# with a moderate showing over 300#.
Sows continued to show an increase making up
6-13 percent of the total supply at the various
markets. Although many consignments of barrows
and gilts were sorted for weight and grade
uniformity, bulk of the supply was offered
and sold in mixed lots. Prices fluctuated dur-
ing the week but closed higher for the period
with most of the week's advance on Friday.
Compared with the previous week' s close, bar-
rows and gilts were largely 25-75f higher; sows
steady to 500 higher.
On Friday, U. S. No. 1 and mixed U. S. 1-2,
190-250# barrows and gilts brought $17.00-
17.50; mixed U. S. 1-3, 180-250# $16.00-17.25,
largely $16.25-17.00. Mixed U. S. 1-35, 270-
600# sows bulked at $12.50-15.00.
Feeder pig prices advanced 25-500 at So.
St. Paul and 50-75f at Sioux City. Good and
Choice, mostly Good 1530-160# feeder pigs at
So. St. Paul sold from $15.00-16.00, while
Medium and Good 1530-160# at Sioux City brought
$16.00-16.75.
Average cut-out value advantage of U. S.
No. 1 over No. 3, live basis 200-220# barrows
and gilts was 930 per cwt. based on wholesale
carlot prices of fresh pork cuts at Chicago
May 5 to May 11, 1960 inclusive.
HOGS Interior Iowa-Southern Minnesota
Area Receipts of hogs were slightly larger
than the previous week and were 7 percent
larger than the corresponding week a year ear-
lier. Wet fields early in week turned farmers
attention to marketing hogs and receipts were
fairly liberal. However, supplies were re-
duced after midweek. Compared with the pre-
vious Friday, barrows and gilts under 240#
closed 55-75f higher with heavier weights 40-
75# up; sows steady to 100 higher.
U. S. No. 1-3, 190-240# butchers sold
late from $15.60-16.40 with limited offerings
mixed No. 1-2, 200-220# at $16.40-16.75. Mixed
No. 1-5, 270-400# sows brought $13.25-14.40;
400-550# $11.85-135.65.

SHEEP AND LAMBS Receipts at the 12
markets were little changed from the previous
week or a year ago. Fort Worth received 46,000
head or around 46 percent of the 12 market
total. Shorn old crop slaughter lambs pre-
dominated in supplies. The volume of spring
lambs was moderate in the midwest, while at
Fort Worth 40 percent of the run was spring
lambs. Demand was fairly good and closing
prices on both spring and old crop lambs at
most terminals was steady to 50f higher with
sales at Fort Worth steady. Slaughter ewes
sold extremely uneven, averaging steady. At
Fort Worth feeder lambs comprised about 35 per-
cent of the supply and closed steady to 50#
lower; elsewhere feeder lambs sold steady.
On closing rounds, Choice and Prime 100-
110# wooled slaughter lambs sold at $21.50-22.50


with several small lots $23.00 at Indianapo-
lis and at Chicago late; most Good and Choice
90-126#, $19.00-21.50. Choice, and mixed
Choice and Prime 85-114# shorn lambs with No.
3 to fall shorn pelts brought $20.50-22.00;
Good and Choice 95-115# $18.00-21.50. Choice
and Prime 80-110# spring slaughter labs
realized $23.50-24.50 with limited volume
mostly Prime $25.00-25.25; most Good and
Choice spring lambs $21.50-24.00. Cull to
Choice shorn slaughter ewes sold from $3.00-
7.00.
In the Interior Iowa-Southern Minnesota
area, sheep and lamb receipts were around 15
percent more than the previous week and fully
20 percent above the corresponding week last
year. Shorn old crop lambs predominated in
receipts. Old crop slaughter lambs closed
fully steady for the week, slaughter ewes
steady to 50 higher; few sales spring lambs
50f higher. Choice with a few Prime 90-105#
shorn slaughter lambs with No. 2 to fall
shorn pelts closed at $20.50-21.00 with a
few high-yielding lambs with No. I and fall
shorn pelts and a few Choice wooled lambs
$21.00-21.50. Few Choice and Prime 80-100#
spring lambs sold at $23.50-24.50. Cull
to Choice shorn slaughter ewes $2.00-5.50.

RANGE AND FEEDLOT SAIES
Note: Shrink on most range and feed-
lot sales none to 5 percent, mostly 4 percent
f.o.b. some with short haul and 3 percent
shrink. All sales for immediate delivery un-
less specified.

ARIZONA, CALIFORNIA, NEVADA, AND UTAH -
Direct trade on slaughter steers and heifers
out of California and Arizona feedlots mod-
erately active, mostly steady; stocker and
feeder cattle and calves slow, mostly steady,
instances 500 lower on heifers; spring and
old crop lambs strong to fully 500 higher.
Slaughter steers 156 loads high-Good
and Choice 850-1200# $27.00-28.00, 9 loads
1050-1100# $28.25 delivered; 23 load string
Good to mostly Choice 950-1000# for July-Au-
gust delivery $26.00; 75 loads high-Good and
Choice 725-1100# $25.90-27.00, delivery
through June; loadlots high-Standard and
Good 950-1200#, $24.00-26.00. iarihter heif-
erst 44 loads high-Good to mostly Choice
750-1000# $26.00-27.00.
Stockers and feeders: For delivery
varying from immediate to June, Good and
Choice 575-850# steers $25.00-26.50, bulk
$24.00-26.50; Medium and Good 525-850# $22.00-
25.00; 350 Medium 800-825# $19.50. Good and
Choice 500-750# heifers $25.00-24.25. Small
lots totaling 650 Good and Choice calves
350-450# $29.00 for steers, $27.00 for heif-
ers.
Lambs: In California, Choice and
Prime wooled and shorn slaughter spring
lambs $22.00-22.85, including 20-25 loads
shorn contracted for up to July 15 delivery






372


at $22.75; 5,100 mostly Choice 115-118# old
crop shorn lambs $19.00, current to early June
delivery.

COLORADO, SOUTHERN WYOMING, WESTERN
NEBRASKA, AND WESTERN KANSAS Trading on fed
cattle direct at feedlots in Colorado moder-
ately active. Fed steers sold fully steady,
heifers steady to strong, instances 25# higher
on Choice. In Colorado 81 loads average-Choice
1100-1275# fed steers $27.00-27.50, numerous
sales $27.25-27.50; 39 loads mostly Choice 1075-
1300# $26.00-27.00, mostly $26.50-26.90; 6 loads
high-Good and Choice $25.00-25.50. Forty loads
average-Choice 775-1075# fed heifers $26.25-
26.75; 108 loads Choice 875-1025# $25.75-26.25,
numerous sales $26.00-26.25; 10 loads Good
750-975# $24.00-25.50; 5 loads Standard and
Good 900# $23.50.
Demand for feeder cattle good, with an
increase in contracts for fall delivery con-
firmed. Cattle for current delivery steady to
weak with contracts for fall delivery strong
to 50# higher. Western Kansast 6 loads Good
and Choice 535-650# feeder steers $24.35-25.60;
5 loads 875-965# in Good slaughter flesh for
further feeding $24.80-25.40; 15 loads mostly
Choice 535-630#? 27.50-28.25; 8 loads Medium
to mostly Good 525# $23.00. Seven loads Good
and Choice 5355-630# feeder heifers $24.25-
25.25. Three loads Good and Choice 470# steer
calves $530.80. Contracts covering over 2,800
head Good and Choice feeder heifers to weigh
650-675# $23.50 for September delivery, $22.50
for October. Colorados20 loads Good and Choice
510-660# feeder heifers $24.15-25.50; 29 loads
Good and Choice heifers for September-October
delivery $22.50-25.00. Over 300 Good and
Choice feeder steers to weigh around 700# at
September delivery $24.00. Wyoming: Over
200 Good and Choice feeder steers to weigh
600-625# at delivery this fall $24.00.
In Colorado fed lambs sold steady to 50#
higher. Sales were confirmed on 22 loads.
Choice and mixed Choice and Prime 102-109# shorn
lambs with No. 1 and 2 pelts $20.00-20.50. West-
ern Kansas: Load Choice to mostly Prime 94#
spring slaughter lambs $24.00. During the past
week or 10 days at least 350,000# of lambs wool
has been sold, mostly at 43-450 a pound grease
basis, some Texas and California 8 month's
lambs wool 35-400, mostly 35-390.

NEW MEXICO, WEST TEXAS, WESTERN OKLAHOMA,
SOUTHWESTERN KANSAS Clovis Area Extremely
dry conditions and moisture needed badly. Di-
rect trade slow; confirmed sales 27 loads
slaughter steers and heifers and 4,000 stock
steers and calves, steady. Fifteen loads Stand-
ard, Good and low-Choice 750-1025# fed steers
$24.00-25.50; 12 loads Standard and Good 750-
925# fed heifers $22.50-24.00. About 1,000
Good and Choice 525-535# stock steers $27.00;
around 3,000 Choice stock calves to weigh 425-
475# at October delivery $30.00 on steers,
$28.00 for heifers.


Amarillo Area Slow, mostly steady. Six
loads Choice and Prime 1400# fed steers $27.50,
55 loads Good and Choice 1048-1200# $25.35-
26.50, 7 loads mostly Good 1050-1200# $23.25-
25.25; 25 loads Good and Choice 800-1020# fed
heifers $24.50-26.25. Good and Choice 760-
1000# feeder steers current delivery $24.00-
26.50 and 700 Choice 600-630# stock steers
$27.00-27.50; 1,700 Good and Choice 550-
?00# heifers $23.25-24.50; few Good and
Choice 400-499# stock calves, $27.00-33.00
for steers, $25.00-29.00 for heifers. Over
1,600 Good and Choice 600-650# steers for
fall delivery $23.50-24.50, few 725-1000#
for August-September delivery $22.50-23.75.

IDAHO, OREGON AND WASHINGTON Fed
steers and heifers mostly steady, limited
sales stocker and feeder cattle steady,
spring slaughter lambs strong to 500 higher,
instances $1.00 higher in southern Idaho;
old crop lambs scarce, steady.
Slaughter steers: Washington and
Idaho Good and Choice 1060-1250# $25.75-
27.50. Canada Good and low-Choice 1050-
1180# $22.00 F.O.B. Slaughter heiferst Wash-
ington Choice 800-100Q0,$25.00-26.25. Idaho -
Good to mostly Choice 883-950# $25.25-26.00.
Stocker and feeder cattle: Washing-
ton Good and Choice 800# steers $26.00.
Canada 8 load string Good and Choice 800-
900# steers $25.00 delivered Washington
feedlot, few Good and Choice 640# $23.00
F.O.B. Canada.
Slaughter lambs: Idaho Choice and
Prime 97-100# spring slaughter lambs in
Idaho pools $23.35-23.65; Choice and Prime
western Oregon spring slaughter lambs $22.50-
23.00; Choice old crop shorn Oregon slaughter
lambs $18.00-19.00.

MONTANA, NORTHERN WYOMING AND WESTERN
DAKOTAS Trading rather slow, prices fully
steady. Southern Montana, 3 loads average to
high-Choice 1150-1250# slaughter steers $25.25-
25.60. Northern Wyoming, 54 Good and Choice
partly fattened 1030# steers for further
finishing $24.00. Southern Montana, 112
Good and Choice 614# stock steers $25.50;
104 high-Good and Choice yearling feeders,
646# steers $26.00, 566# heifers $24.00;
550 Good and Choice near 500# stock calves
$28.00 on steers and $24.75 an heifers; 260
Good and Choice stock calves for fall deliv-
ery, steers $27.00, heifers $24.00.
Western Montana, 1,000 Good and Choice
short yearling shorn whiteface ewes, $18.00
per head, 400 with lambs at side $25.00
per pair; 800 short yearling ewes $15.00
per head, and 400 mixed age yearling to six-
year-olds, with lambs at side $18.00 per
pair, all for immediate delivery and
to stay within the area. Northern Wyoming,
4,000 Good and Choice whiteface feeder
lambs to weigh near 70# for early October
delivery, $18.00.





Steers 1001# up ............
901-1000 ............
801-900 ............
701-800 .............
501-700 .............


687
1,865
3,115
4,270
13,296


Total steers 10 markets ...... 23,233
Av. wts. 0 ...... 703#
Av. cost* ...... $24.74
" Chicago ......... 25.10
; Kansas City ..... 25.61
" Omaha .......... 25.45
" "n S. St. Paul ..... 23.53
" n nSioux City ...... 26.07
" Denver .......... 25.58
| Ft. Worth ....... 20.85
" Oklahoma City ... 23.13
S f t S. St. Joseph ... 24.68
S St. Louis NSY ... 24.70
Total calves 10 markets .... 6,198
S heifers .... 3,316
cows n .... 466


869
1,872
3,744
4,545
14,214

25,244
705#
$25.02
24.60
25.82
25.13
25.39
26.18
24.76
22.47
25.78
25.37
24.46
6,515
3,876
391


871
1,821
5,258
4,915
9,110


19,975
726#
$28.72
28.79
29.09
29.21
26.70
50.19
28.08
27.48
27.40
28.42
27.12
7,689
4,098
587


* Not adjusted for differences in grade of cattle sold


5,104
8,485
11,811
17,654
50,937


4,632
11,944
16,270
22,548
57,595


11,568
35,805
54,060
67,561
160,519


91,991 112,989 329,513
708# 721# 724#
$25.50 $28.48 $24.50
24.40 28.21 24.14
25.46 28.63 24.51
25.48 29.57 24.52
23.83 26.10 25.23
26.38 29.89 25.71
25.74 28.01 25.05
24.18 27.59 23.82
24.13 26.87 25.41
25.05 27.86 24.20
24.45 27.29 23.66
33,808 30,904 148,122
15,838 22,880 50,435
1,657 2,736 10,689


at each market.


ESTIMATED PERCENT OF STOCKER AND FEEDER CATTLE AND SLAUGHTER COWS IN SALABLE RECEIPTS

| ----r--- -- ----*w ^ ----^.- --- ---_w-- --- --- --- -- -- -- ---- w-- _-----*
: a a :"~~ST ** ***
Kansas :S. St. *Sioux So St.*Indian-* Ft. Okla San
Week ended :Chicagot :Omaha: :Louis: : :I:Denver: F :Wichita:
City Joseph: N *City Paul *apolis W Worth' City Antonio
Stockers and feeders
May 15, 1960 2 46 16 12 5 18 5 8 15 70 75 42 50
May 6, 1960 1 41 17 17 7 25 8 8 12 70 68 49 45
May 15, 1959 2 59 11 15 7 25 5 4 8 50 73 50 35

Slaughter cows
May 15, 1960 6 7 7 5 9 5 25 8 12 15 8 17 15
May 6, 1960 6 7 8 7 8 6 25 10 15 15 10 14 18
May 15, 1959 5 8 7 5 7 4 25 10 12 25 9 19 25


20,815
42,585
59,176
72,598
177,584


372,558
731#
$27.63
26.75
27.51
28.33
25.28
29.45
28.25
27.45
26.54
27.07
26.27
146,612
69,125
13,089


WEEKLY RECEIPTS OF SALABLE LIVESTOCK AT 12 PUBLIC MARKETS
S- - h- ro-s" ~ -e~ad lamEs -
Market : May 4 : May 16i May 14 May 16: May 14: May 16 : May14: May 16
S 1960 : 1959 : 1960 : 1959 1960 959 1960 : 1959
Chicago ............... 44,489 45,919 211 273 38,894 48,958 3,256 4,683
Cincinnati ............. 3,224 2,959 720 846 12,411 9,664 552 751
Denver ................. 11,950 11,641 469 585 5,388 4,052 8,496 9,085
Fort Worth ............. 7,880 6,536 2,268 1,358 53,389 3,834 45,659 57,948
Indianapolis ........... 7,348 6,775 628 531 51,722 31,827 1,144 1,404
Kansas City ............ 19,237 16,756 571 604 18,859 17,573 7,416 8,097
Oklahoma City .......... 9,406 7,499 697 325 4,420 4,215 3,166 2,791
Omaha .................. 41,965 43,602 310 372 45,494 45,780 9,051 10,628
St. Joseph ............. 18,526 16,771 435 314 28,104 31,369 6,074 10,101
St. Louis NSY .......... 16,054 14,014 1,776 2,225 67,749 62,991 2,681 5,340
Sioux City ............. 26,232 27,783 410 517 39,629 54,740 7,376 5,743
S. St. Paul ............ 22,754 19,674 5,301 5,060 41,922 41,950 4,180 2,902
Total .................. 229,025 219,927 13,796 12,810 337,981 33554,951 98,811 97,473
Total May 7, 1960 ...... 219,807 13,649 346,313 97,671
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
INTERIOR IOWA AND SOUTHERN MINNESOTA
May 14, 1960 May 7, 1960 May 16, 1959
Hogs ..... 340,000 335,000 316,000
Sheep .... 24,600 21,500 20,100
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
STOCKER AND FEEDER CATTLE: AVERAGE COST, WEIGHT, AND NUMBER
----------- --Week ended Month : --F'urmo-nts
?tMayl2 : May ~May14 :7 Apr. :~ Apr. -t Jan.- Apr.
: 1960 : 1960 : 1959 : 1960 : 1959 : 1960 : 1959





374

STEERS SOLD OUT OF FIRST HANDS FOR SLAUGHTER l
Aveag*wigt
S Nnber of head Percent of total Average weight Average price in
b o by grades (pounds) !dollars per 100 lb.
Grade - - -- ---- --------- -
Week ended
: May 12 : May14 : May12: May14 1 May12 g May14 : May12 May 14
------16 -: 1959 : 1960 : 1959 : 1960 : 1959 1960 : 1959
CHICAGG


Prime......*...
Choice.........
Good...........
Standard.......
Commercial.....
Utility........
All grades....,

Prime..........
Choice.........
Good...........
Standard.......
Utility........
All grades.....

Prime..........
Choice.........
Good...........
Standard......
Utility.......
All grades.*....

Prime..........
Choice.........
Good...........
Standard.......
Commercial...****..
Utility........
All grades***.*


1,339 1,091 4.2 3.3
19,435 20,711 60.5 62.4
10,014 10,030 31.1 30.2
968 1,059 5.0 3.2

'393 300 1.2 .9
52,147 33,191
--------------------~
OMAHA
137 -- .6 --
8,477 8,607 39.4 57.2
11,431 15,051 53.1 56.4
1,179 1,558 5.5 5.8
-308 137 1.4 .6
21,552 23,153
SIOUX CITY
102 1~ .8 .1
6,654 6,075 51.3 45.9
5,287 6,523 40.8 49.2
843 538 6.5 4.1
88 96 .7 .7
12,974 15,243
----- -------- --- --

2,586 4,085 48.3 64.53
2,154 1,758 40.3 27.7
S466 7.5
585 11.0 -
22 45 .4 .7
5,545 6,352
-----------------------------------T


1,246
1,187
1,088
1,015

1,024
1,151


1,224
1,202
1,116
1,0053

1,029
1,169


1,502 -
1,176 1,175
1,096 1,108
1,091 1,087
1,009 1,051
1,128 1,151

1,317 1,295
1,174 1,188
1,097 1,112
1,080 1,080
944 1,061
1,136 1,146
-- ---- ---

1,147 1,158
1,053 1,052
-- 1,050
982 --
1,057 1,008
1,091 1,105


31.06
27.62
25.59
22.17

19.61
26.94

~ '8.75 ~
26.51
24.82
20.70
18.70
25.24

- -2869 -
26.63
25.12
20.77
18.20
25.65



27.07
25.33

23.34
18.75
25.99


32.48
29.69
28.08
25.81

23.84
29.17


28.61
27.18
24.31
25.25
27.55

351.50~
28.73
27.38
24.49
23.69
27.89


29.05
27.56
24.55

22.05
28.25


Prime..........
Choice.........
Good............
Standard.......
Commercial.....
Utility........
All grades.....**


Prime..........
Choice.........
Good...........
Standard......
Utility........
All grades.....***


Prime...*......
Choice.........
Good...........
Standard.......
Utility .......
All grades.....


363
4,527
1,679

-610
7,179


4,871
4,663
545
41
10,120


3,297
1,248
166
61
4,772


650
5,174
1,229

237
5,290


5,607
4,775
591
42
9,015


--
2,979
1,057
62

4,098


5.6
63.0

23.31
8.1


48.1
46.1
5.4
.4


12.3
60.0
23.2

4.5


40.0
53.0
6.5
.5


1,151
1,050
996

932
1,032



1,140
1,070
1,079
1,015
1,104


1,108
1,051
995

954
1,040


1,151
1,085
1,065
914
1,101


-m -E- --- -- -----


69.1
26.1
3.5
1.3


72.7
25.8
1.5


1,181
1,100
1,104
940
1,154


1,172
1,141
952

1,161


I/ Data collected by Agricultural Estimates, and Livestock Divisions, A.M.S.


27.48
25.42
22.69

19.91
24.50



26.76
24.91
20.63
19.14
25.58


29.08
27.75
26.04

24.07
27.58



28.99
27.36
24.24
22.68
27.82


26.68
25.14
20.93
17.75
26.01


28.56
27.41
25.11

28.21


11- _S*1F.-ju~s"








WEEKII SLAUGHTER UNDER FEDERAL INSPECTION AT MAJOR CENTERS


Cattle Calves -- Hogs Sheep and lambs
City or Area May 14 R May 16~:!Mayli T May T6- Ray 14~I- May 16-,- Ray 14:" May 1
t 1960 : 1959 : 1960 1959 : 1960 t 1959 t 1960 1959


Boston, New York City Area...
Baltimore, Philadelphia......
Cin.,Cleve.,Detroit,Indpls...
Chicago Area.............*
St. Paul-Wisc. Areas.........
St. Louis Area..............
Sioux City-So. Dakota Area...
Omaha Area....... ............
Kansas City..................
Iowa So. Minnesota.........
Lou'1.Evan*1.Nashtl.Mph's....
Georgia, Florida, Ala. Area..
St. Jo'ph.Wichita, Okla.City.
Ft.Worth,Dallas,San Antonio..
Denver,Ogden,Salt Lake City..
Los Angeles, San Fran. Areas.
Portland, Seattle, Spokane...


12,106
9,172
20,907
19,050
52,135
12,136
22,016
58,254
14,145
31,424
6,750
8,285
19,949
12,450
21,233
24,921
7,535


11,745
7,416
18,343
24,052
27,982
10,264
19,449
37,652
11,862
31,421
6,546
5,659
17,269
11,442
19,238
20,661
6,444


9,116
1,974
4,820
5,4753
16,225
1,579

137

7,441
3,061
3,589
1,594
4,556
266
1,646
268


9,345
827
5,100
4,987
15,558
2,458

149

6,449
5,047
2,656
932
4,719
240
2,253
253


50,628
24,112
146,082
55,947
115,597
86,724
89,525
84,526
59,396
268,450
66,747
36,108
46,959
19,264
18,182
27,545
16,262


46,806
51,097
119,0553
50,512
98,900
82,249
80,533
75,743
54,227
259,054
61,538
24,922
44,046
20,159
14,961
27,481
15,041


Total..................... 312,426 287,425 61,545 60,953 1,169,452 1,066,102


Acc5,567,529 1,295,245
Accumulation to date...*... 5,108,583


23,227, 345
1,282,346


22,335,824


54,545
5,155
15,417
5,608
10,008
4,674
10,601
12,648

28,164


11,768
59,800
20,784
54,908
3,674

237,744
4,536,054


56,420
3,156
15,645
4,154
9,287
4,158
13,767
14,926

22,650


9,406
58,556
22,104
26,042
4,763

225,014

4,476,115


ESTIMATFI) FEDERALLY INSPECTED SLAUGHTER AND MEAT PRODUCTION


Beef Veal Pork ITot
Weekeded Beef Veal :(excl. lard) : and button Total
Week ended N OT T -: um-: -: meat
ber e: s : ber r : ber : ro pro.
-------------------- --------l-- .- -l-b-- l- il---------- ----
1,000 mil.]b. 1,000 mil.Ib. 1,000 mil.lb. 1,M mil.lb. mil.lb.


Total
Slard
prod.
mil.lb.


May 14, 1960 ................. 375 224.2 90 10.9 1,345 187.8 265 12.7 435.6 -
May 7, 1960 ................. 570 222.4 92 10.9 1,560 187.5 275 13.2 434.0 -
Apr.50, 1960 ./ ............. 350 94 1,332 252 43.4
May 16, 1959 / .............. 345 208.5 87 10.8 1,219 170.9 255 12.1 402.5 43.0
Percentage change frCm
May 7, 1960 ................. 1 1 -2 0 -1 0 -4 -4 0 -
May 16, 1959 ................. 9 8 3 1 10 10 4 5 8 -

-------- --- -- --------- _----- yield
Week ended Cattle Calves H -ogs a Y per
:tin7e~ressed IXve TiFde:eLd Lve:;esseZ 7 Tai'-s-bFes : 100 lb.


May 14, 1960 ................ 1040 598 215 121 245 140
May 7, 1960 ................ 1045 601 210 119 242 158
Apr.30, 1960 ................. 1050 592 210 119 245 138
May 16, 1959 ................. 1047 604 217 124 246 140
S-Actual slaughter. / Excludes lard------------------------------------.
I/Actual slaughter. V Excludes lard.


98 48 -
98 48 -
99 49 --
98 47 14.5
--- -


UNITED STATES FEDERALLY INSPECTED SLAUGHTER BY REGIONS
APRIL 1960 with comparisons
(Thousand head)
- Cattle Cales Hogs Sheep an---------------------d labs------------------------------d labs
Cattle I Calves : Hogs Sheep and lambs


Region

N. Atlantic States .......
S. Atlantic States .......
N. C. States -Eastern ..
N. C. States N. West ...
N. C. States S. West ...
S. Central States ...
Mountain States .........
Pacific States ..........
Total .................


S s
: 1950 7 1939q 7 15965 U C !939
. 107 104 104 100
5. 39 55 28 26
S 251 277 150 139
. 442 482 49 56
* 145 151 10 11
S 152 121 52 49
.. 114 106 2 2
.. 182 179 20 23


1,412


453
547
1,511
2,086
572
515
104
184


19?9! C lV6 II9?9^
508 173 169
505 1/ I1
1,447 82 100
2,092 294 326
510 68 79
488 120 102
95 155 155
209 185 170


1,435 94 406 5,571 5,652 1,054


1,101


SOther animals s3aughtIered under Federal inspection, number of head): April 1960, horses 5,874;
goats 4,8853 April 1959, horses 5,021; goats 3,296. _/ Not available for publication.
Data furnished by Agricultural Research Service.


0






376


Classification


CATTLE: WEEKLY AVERAGE OF DAILY QUOTATIONS
In dollars per 100 pounds
S: : : -------------
a Chicago : Kansas City Omaha : Denver t
May May May May May : M----ay M--ay ----- May --
:May :May :May : May :May : May :May : May :


: 14 : 16
: 1960 : 1959


: 14
: 1960


: 16 : 14 : 16 :
: 1959 1960 : 1959


Slaughter cattle, calves and vealers


Steers -
Prime 900-1100#
1100-1500
Choice 900-1100
1100-1500
Good 900-1100
Standard All wts.


Heifers -
Choice*
GoodE**
Standard


700-900#
600-800
- All wts.


Cows All weights -
Commercial
Utility
Cutter
Canner


50.50
51.20
28.02
28.10
24.90
22.00


26.78

21.40


17.95
17.25
16.42)
14.70)


52.60
33.00
50.20
50.50
27.58
25.50



26.95
24.85


21.50
19.78
17.92


27.28
27.28
24.88
21.75


26.68
24.25
20.75


19.10
17.15
15.58)
15.80)


29.50
29.50
26.95
24.52


28.90
26.55
235.92


21.00
19.72
17.42


29.62
29.75
27.42
27.42
24.25
20.75


26.78
25.72
20.22


51.72
51.72
29.40
29.50
26.78
24.55


28.55
26.18
24.00


18.00 21.15
16.72 19.48
15.50)2
14.25)17-20


14 :
1960 :




26.42
26.55
25.45
20.10


25.95
25.02
19.25


18.62
17.12
15.58)
14.25)


16
1959.




28.55
28.40
25.60
22.68


27.98
25.48
22.18


21.00
19.75
17.50


Bulls All
Commercial
Utility


weights -


21.05 24.40 19.25 22.00 18.65 25.25
20.40 25.20 19.50 21.25 18.48 22.25


-- 28.50
19.25 25.00


25.00
22.00 24.00


Calves 500# down -
Choice
Good
Standard

Vealers All wts. -
Choice
Good
Standard


51.50
29.00
25.50


54.00
29.50


25.90
25.80
21.15


27.80
25.30
21.90


50.00
27.50
25.25


354.50
52.00
28.50


26.00
25.75
21.00


29.00
26.50
24.00


51.00
29.00
25.50


52.00
50.00
27.50


Feeder and stocker cattle and calves


Steers -
Choice
Good
Medium

Heifers -
Choice
Med. & G


500-800#
500-800
500-1000


500-750#
d. 500-750


Cows All wts. -
Med. & Gd.

Calves 500-500# -
Steers -
Good & Choice

Heifers -
Good & Choice


28.75
25.75
22.75


52.75
29.62
27.00


28.40
25.00
21.55


52.00
29.75
26.50


28.25
24.80
21.25


52.50
28.48
25.50


-- 25.40 29.50 25.50 29.50
- -- 21.95 25.75 22.00 25.00


- 17.50 20.25 15.00 19.62



- 29.90 35.50 50.50 55.75


- -- 26.50 52.00 26.75 32.58


27.50
25.00
21.50


50.75
28.50
24.58


26.50
24.25
21.00


28.50
26.50


55.00
52.50
28.50



28.75
27.25
24.25


25.75 29.00 25.25 27.25
22.25 25.25 21.00 24.25


- 19.50 16.25


29.50


56.00 28.25 50.50


28.00 33.50 26.25 28.50


*Weight range 600-800# in
* Ia t 700-900# it


North
Portland


May :
14 :
1960 :




27.62
27.25
26.00
25.25


26.62
25.00
22.50


18.00
17.25
14.50)
12.50)


May
16
1959




29.50
29.25
28.12
26.58



26.88
25.38


21.25
19.25
16.00


1959.
nt


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378
HOGS: AVERAGE COST. WEIGHT, AND NUMBER OF PACKER AND SHIPPER PURCHASES 1/

Louis Kan- S. S. 8-
Chi- Nati. sas Omaha Sioux St. St. Indian- mkts.
Week ended cago Stock City City Joseph Paul apolis com-
Yards bined
- --- -- -- -- -- -- -- -
AVERA G COST Doll]a 1rper 00 p-unds
Barrows May 14,1960 15.79 16.01 15.85 15.97 15.89 16.05 16.08 16.18 15.98
and May 7,1960 15.82 15.83 15.63 15.71 15.60 15.69 15.70 16.06 15.76
gits May .16,1959 16.17 16.13 15.78 15.70 15.76 15.71 15.66 .16.62..15.97
May 14,1960 12.87 13.45 15.21 15.45 15.29 15.45 13.51 12.99 15.25
Sows May 7,1960 12.93 13.45 13.26 13.55 13.44 13.47 13.42 13.06 13.54
May 16.1959 12.87 1.13 12.53 12.94 12 .781....0 15 9X 12.98
AVERAGE WEIGHT Pounds
Barrows May 14,1960 254 225 252 242 245 251 242 250 254
and May 7,1960 240 223 232 241 244 251 242 250 234
gilt May 6,1959... 233.... 222 230 238. ..... 238 229 257 226.... 251..
May 14,1960 454 408 429 419 452 396 411 449 425
Sow" May 7,1960 456 397 425 425 427 407 405 447 422
May1..95.9 ..420 420 421 ...40 .... AQ7407 408 40 90 ..... 44Q 41
NUMBER OF HEAD -
Barrows May 14,1960 51784 58431 17078 38093 34591 25549 29872 26286 261484
and May 7,1960 50407 66469 18909 36274 34794 29241 31254 26286 273614
gilts May.69.50...5 5A57...167...79...29171 .27439 .26.851 26381 25529
May 14,1960 5610 4271 1151 4710 2920 1706 4594 5475 26417
Sw* May 7,1960 2868 4579 1066 3825 3225 1601 5906 2905 23973
May 16.959..49.7.... 5 992.... 6794 416 2118 7100 3...64 34959
sows Percenta e of total
May 14,1960 10 7 6 11 8 6 15 12 9
May 7,1960 9 6 5 10 8 5 11 10 8
--- May 16,959 9 6 ....17 .. 1......2 8 21 1.......6......17...... ....... ..... .........
1/ Weighted average.
WEEKLY AVERAGE WHOLESALE VALUE OF HOG PRODUCTS DERIVED
FROM 100 LB. LIVE HOG. COMPARED WITH PRICES OF LIVE HOGS, CHICAGO
.................... -"-........ "'"..---- ----- -------------- i "r'a .....---......
Hog products I/ Hog prices : o rnargn 3/
May 14, 1960 $18.55 $16.41 $2.12
May 7, 1960 18.45 16.54 2.09
.ay 16 1959 18....62 16.81 1.81
Y_----------------------------------------------------------------
1 / Value of all edible products, fresh basis (lard rendered) in 100 lb. of live hog com-
puted from wholesale prices on carlot basis, Chicago, reported by National Provisioner
daily market report.
2/ Mean of daily quotations on U. S. No. 1, 2 and 3 hogs, 200-220# wt. Chicago.
3/ Difference between wholesale product value and hog prices.
HOG AND CORN PRICES AT CHICAGO AND HOG-CORN PRICE RATIO
---------- --------------------------WW--- ---- ---- -----------------
Barrows and Corn, Hog-corn
Week ended gilts : No. 3, yel low price ratio
Dollars per Cents per based on
100 pounds bushel barrows and gilts
------------------------------------ ---------------- --------------------------------------------
May 14, 1960 15.79 119.4 15.2
May 7, 1960 15.82 120.0 15.2
May 16, 1959 16.17 129.3 12.5
1) Simple average price.


15.2
May 16, 1959 16.17 129.3 12.5
1 Simple average price.





379


BOSTON WOOL MARKET REVIEW


Sales of greasy domestic worsted wools
in the Boston market were again limited due
to scarcity of spot stocks. Most activity
centered in the fleece wool States where
approximately 14 cars of various grades
were sold for future delivery at about
steady prices. Trading on woolen wools
and noils was rather slow at steady prices.
The volume of range sales in the territory
States and Texas was rather small. Demand
was good in all the fleece wool States.
Prices at all the Dominion markets
opened the week slightly easier, but
steadied at midweek. Cabled reports at mid-
week from Australia showed Japan, the Conti-
nent, and England active. Prices were
steady except cross-breds were 2 pence lower.
There will be a sale on May 13 at Wanganui,
New Zealand. There were no price changes
in the Cape auctions on short wools with
very small offerings of combing wools at
the sales. The South American markets were
easier on carpet wools with very little
interest on other grades.
Fleece Wools Graded fine Delaine
sold at $1.15 clean basis, while average
style Delaine brought $1.12 and graded
60/62s good French combing and staple
fleeces moved at $1.10. Graded 56/58s
staple and good French combing wool sold
at $1.08-1.09 while graded 50/56s brought
$1.04-1.05, clean basis. Medium grade
burry fleece wools brought $1.02 clean.
Country buyers were paying 48-52#
grease basis to the growers in Ohio while
41 was paid for fine and 51# for medium
wools in Pennsylvania. From 48-52#, but
mostly 48-500, was paid in Indiana to the
growers. Interest in the local market was
centered on several pools being offered at
auction in Virginia, West Virginia, and
Pennsylvania this week and in the near
future.
Territory Wools Activity in the
territory States was very slow. Graded
California 60/62s good French combing and
staple wool sold around $1.10-1.11 clean
basis, delivered Boston.
Texas Wools Choice graded 64/70s
staple 12 months Texas wool sold at $1.15
clean basis in the local market.
At the sealed bid sale held at Sander-
son, Texas approximately 85-90 percent of
the offerings sold at grease prices rang-
ing from around 46-47#. Buyers estimate
12 months wool around $1.14-1.15 and 8
months wool from $1.05-1.08, clean basis,
delivered East.
Mohair A moderate volume of mohair
sold in Texas at $1.011 for adult and


$1.56W for kid hair to the warehouse.
Foreign Wools Cabled quotations
from foreign markets at week's end
follow, with combing wools converted to
clean U. S. oil-combed yields and short
wools to scouring yields, in bond.


Australia
Oil-combed
61 $1.51
62 1.25
65 1.21
422 1.15
423 1.08
424 1.01
425 .95
South
Oil-combed
7 $1.25
12 1.21
17 1.17
47 1.18
48 1.17
52 1.16
53 1.15


New Zealand
Oil-combed
95 $.93
854 .92
100 .90
107 .87
114 .85
128 .83

Africa
Scoured yields
22 $1.11
27 1.06
28 1.05
32 1.00
33 .95
57 .95


Montevideo Super Skirted (Clean
basis): 64s $1.06, 60/64s $1.04 60s
- $1.00, 58/60s 98#, 56/58S $.955,
50/56s 953, 50s 90f.

Carpet Wools Trading on spot carpet
wools was practically at a standstill.
Buenos Aires November second clip wools
were quoted at about 810 and March wools
around 780 while fleeces were priced at 84-
85# clean fibers present. New Zealand
carpet fleeces were quoted at 80-82#, early
shorn wool and cotta around 790 and type
702/5 crutchings at 76# clean fibers present.
Spot super white vicaneer carpet wools were
offered at 824 and super yellow wools at 70
clean fibers present.
Woolen Wools Sales follow:

Scoured Pulled Domestic
64 1--L-21" white $1.17
64s 1-2" white 1.14
58s 21-5" heavy stain 1.12



CLOSING FUTURES QUOTATIONS May 12,
1960 (Furnished by the Wool Associates
of the New York Cotton Exchange).
May wool tops $1.440
May wool 1.122
July wool tops 1.470
July wool 1.158







WHOLESALE MEAT TRADE REVIEWS


LESS THAN CARROT MEAT TRADE REVIEWS

EASTERN SEABOARD Clearance of fresh
meats was virtually complete for the second
consecutive week at Eastern Seaboard Markets.
Trading was moderately active under good daily
demand. Beef supplies were near normal, ex-
cept a small cut-back of steer beef at Wash-
ington, and cow beef slightly reduced at New
York. Veal and calf unloads were curtailed
around 10 percent at New York, but normal in
other areas. Some Canadian veal was offered
at New York again, this week, but volume less
than the previous week. Normal lamb receipts
were about equally comprised of old crop and
spring carcasses, however, local slaughter
at New York and Philadelphia was mainly spring
lamb. Pork supplies were about normal and
cleared quite early at most points.
Compared with the previous week: Steer
beef sold strong at Washington, steady to weak
at New York, steady to 500 lower at Phila-
delphia, and steady elsewhere. Cow beef,
veal and calf closed steady to $1.00 higher,
with calf and veal fully $1.00 up at New York.
Old crop lamb sold steady to $1.00 lower;
spring lamb steady to $2.00 higher, mostly
$1.00-2.00 up. Pork loin prices were un-
changed at New York, but steady to $4.00 high-
er at other markets with the bulk $2.00-4.00
higher. Other fresh pork cuts mostly steady
except spareribs $1.00-2.00 lower at Washing-
ton, and instances $1.00 lower on Boston butts
at New York. Prices for Choice and Prime
kosher steer forequarters were weak to $1.00
lower, while trends on veal, calf and old
crop lamb were unchanged.

CHICAGO Supplies of beef, lamb and
fresh pork offerings were about normal, with
spring lamb making up only a small portion
of the total lamb supply. Veal supplies were
small. The steer and heifer beef trade opened
moderately active and stronger, however, on
Wednesday's session steer beef lost the early
advance when eastern shipping outlets nar-
rowed. A fairly good demand existed for most
primal beef cuts. Chucks and loins advanced
during the period, with minor declines on
ribs. Trading on veal was only moderately
active but prices were stronger due to small
supplies. Demand was fair for carcass lamb
and all cuts, with clearance of legs complete
for first time in recent weeks. Pork loins
and Boston butts met fair demand the first
three sessions, but trade closed slow, spare-
ribs were slow throughout. Compared to the
previous Friday: Steer and heifer beef sold
steady to 500 higher, cow beef $1.00-1.50 high-
er, veal and lamb steady to $1.00 higher,
spring lamb mostly steady. Pork loins 8-12#
sold steady to $1.00 higher, 12-16# steady to
$1.00 lower, Boston butts 4-8# $1.00-1.50 high-
er, spareribs 3# down $1.00-2.00 lower.


PACIFIC COAST Supply of steer
beef was fully adequate at most points on
the West Coast with some accumulations of
Good carcasses in the Pacific Northwest.
Cow beef continued in small supply. Calf and
veal was in moderate volume but adequate.
Spring lamb fully adequate with some accumu-
lations of Choice and Prime 45-55# carcasses
at Los Angeles. Fresh pork cuts were fully
adequate for a fair demand while cured pork
was liberal at Los Angeles. Prices compared
with the previous week's close: Steer and
cow beef mostly steady; spring lamb steady
to $1.00 lower, the decline in the Pacific
Northwest; fresh park mostly steady, in-
stances $2.00 higher at Los Angeles; cured
pork mostly steady, instances $2.00 lower on
skinned hams at Los Angeles.

CARLOT MEAT TRADE REVIEWS

MIDWEST CARLOT DRESSED MEAT SUMMARY -
Based on reports from major slaughtering cen-
ters in Iowa, Nebraska, Minnesota, Missouri,
South Dakota, Kansas and southwestern Illi-
nois. (Prices F.O.B. Plant basis.)
Steady to higher prices prevailed for
midwest carlot meat with a good demand on beef
and lamb, but only moderate outlet for pork
loins and butts. The supply of steer beef and
pork products was normal; however, heifer beef,
cow beef and lamb supplies were below normal.
Compared with the previous week's closes Choice
600-700# steer beef mostly steady; 700-800#
steady to 50# lower; heifer beef steady to 50#
higher; cow beef and old crop lamb mostly 50f
to $1.00 up; pork loins and butts 50# to $1.00
higher. Clearances were generally complete on
all classes.
Choice 600-700# steer carcasses brought
$42.50-43.50, several carlots for local deliv-
ery $44.00-44.50; Choice 700-800# $42.50-435.50,
Choice 500-700# heifer beef sold from $42.25-
43.50. Utility cow beef $30.50-32.50, closed
$31.00-32.50. Choice and Prime 45-55) old
crop lamb brought $42.00-45.00, mostly $42.75-
44.50. Pork loins 8-12# sold from $39.00-41.00,
closed $39.00-40.00; pork butts 4-8# $28.00-29.00.

CARLOT SUMMARY Chicago, Denver, New
York and Philadelphia. Trading on most meats
moderately active with small volume cow beef
finding very good outlet. Demand general-
ly good for all classes, and with the ex-
ception of cow beef, supplies were about nor-
mal. Steer and heifer beef sold mostly
steady for the week, except heifer carcasses
advanced 50f at Chicago. Cow beef showed
upturns of 504-$1.00 at Philadelphia, and
$1.00-1.50 at Chicago, and was scarce else-
where. Old crop lamb sold strong to $1.00
higher. Pork loins were uneven. At Chicago
loins sold steady to $1.00 lower, while at
Philadelphia loins finished unevenly $2.50-
3.00 higher.







iOLESALE DRESSED MEAT PRICES LESS THAN CARLOT BASIS
Weekly average of daily quotations in dollars per 100 pounds
New York Chicago San Francisco : Los Arn
Classification : A ----------------
SMay 14 :May 16 May 14 : May 16 May 14 : May 16 : May 14
: 1960 : 1959 : 1960 : 1959 : 1960 : 1959 : 1960 t


geles
May 16
-952 _


Steer beef -
Prime 700-800#
Choice 600-700


Good

Heifer beef -
Choice


700-800
500-600
600-700

500-600#
600-700


Good 500-600
Veal -
Prime 90-120#
Choice 90-120
Good 90-120
Spring lamb -
Prime 45-55#
Choice 45-55
Fresh pork -
Loins 8-1:V
Butts 4-8
Spareribs 5# down
Cured pork -
Hams, smk. skd. -(Cook
before eating) 12-16#
Bacon, smoked, sliced -
1# package (box lots)
Picnics, smoked (Cook
before eating) 4-8#
Lard, 1# carton


OTd-c~ro Ta ---bT -- -
BULK
Classification
s


Choice


Good


Heifer beef -


600-700#
700-800
800-900
500-600
600-700
700-800


Choice 500-600#
600-700
Good 500-600
600-700
Cow beef All weights -
Utility
Canner and Cutter
Lamb Old Crop
Prime 55-45#


Choice


Fresh pork -
Loins


45-55
55-65
55-45
45-55
55-65


47.50
46.50
44.25
44.50


60.00
51.50
47.50


55.75
49.20
48.95
47.20
47.20


64.50
55.50
51.00


-
45.95
44.50
45.25
435.25

45.00
45.00
41.88

56.00
50.88
48.00


52.00 47.90* 45.75
51.00 46.20* 45.75


45.00
55.50
41.00


46.90
56.50
45.00


48.50 49.50


44.50


50.00


50.50 52.50
13.50 15.25


PRICES CAEIOT
~Prdices


45.50-44.00
45.50-44.00
43.00-45.50
41.50-42.00
41.50-42.00
41.00-41.50

45.50
43.50
40.50-41.00
40.50-41.00

31.50-352.50
31.50-52.50




45.00-46.00
42.50-44.00
41.00-41.50


42.00
50.68
37.81


--
47.15
46.50
45.00
45.00


46.00
44.50
44.25
45.25

44.50
45.00


61.00 -
56.00 -
52.00 54.00

-- 45.50
46.50* 45.50


44.81
51.25
41.75


46.00
59.00
47.00


48.00
46.50
45.50
44.00

--
--


45.00
43.50
43.00
41.50

44.75
43.50
42.50


--
48.00
46.88
46.00
44.75


-- .. --m
57.00 -.

-- 46.00 47.25
45.00 46.00 47.25


48.00
38.00
47.50


43.00
35.50
45.50


45.62
36.50
45.25


52.00 49.00 50.50 51.00 48.75 49.00

55.50 51.75 51.00 52.00 50.50 55.50

54.00 355.75 32.00 55.00 52.00 33.50
15.00 13.50 17.00 16.00 14.75 15.25

BASIS WEEK ENDED MAY 15, 1960
aTdF7o :- Prrces-de]1vee -
enver r : s New-Yrk T-s Fh:law- -p- 1a


42.50-45.00
42.50-42.75
42.25-42.50

39.00-41.00
39.00-41.00

45.00
42.00-42.50
59.50
59.50

52.25


45.75
40.50-42.50
39.75-40.00
45.75
40.50-42.50
59.75-40.00


8-12# 40.00-40.50


42.75-45.00
42.75
42.25-42.75

40.00-41.25
59.75-40.75

45.50
45.50
39.50-39.75
59.50-59.75

51.00-51.50
31.00-51.50


42.75-45.75
40.75

59.00-40.00


45.50-46.00
45.25-46.00
45.00-45.50

43.00-44.00
43.00-43.50









47.00-49.00
44.00-46.00
45.00-44.00
47.00-49.00
44.00-46.00
45.00-44.00


45.50-46.00
45.00-46.00
44.50-45.00
42.00-44.00
42.00-44.00
41.50-45.50


44.00-45.00



53.50-54.50
553.50-34.00

50.00-51.00
48.50-49.50

50.00-51.00
48.50-49.50


41.50-42.50 42.00-42.50


--






382


EARLY LAMB SITUATION, MAY 1, 1960

Early lambs were generally in below average condition on May lj accordingg to the Crop Re-
porting Board. Growth and development of early lambs was retarded by unfavorable spring weather
conditions. The 10 important early lamb States are Missouri, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee,
Texas, Arizona, Idaho, Washington, Oregon, and California.
Spring lambs from the southern San Joaquin Valley in California started moving to market
early in March, and volume movement began the middle of March. This was somewhat earlier than
last year. Eastern shipments of California lambs were well above last year. About all of the
Arizona early lamb crop has been marketed. The movement out of Texas was considerably below
the volume moved during the first three months of 1959. In the Pacific Northwest States heaviest
lamb marketing will be in late July or early August. In the southeastern States the movement
to market will be later than last year due to the slower development of pastures.
Conditions in early lamb States about May 1 were as follows:

California: The fall and winter months were extremely dry in all areas of the State and
stock sheep were maintained by heavy supplemental feeding. General rains began in late January
and continued intermittently through February and March. Pastures responded favorably. In the
Sacramento Valley and northern California moisture was adequate but cold temperatures retarded
growth and pastures did not make normal progress. Temperature in recent weeks has warmed con-
siderably in northern California and pasture feed outlook is now very good in the northern one-
third of the State. Marketings from the southern San Joaquin Valley started earlier than last
year and marketing through April 50th were well above last year.
Arizonat About all of the early lambs have been moved. Pasture feed was plentiful and
lambs developed well.
Texas: A severe winter left ewes in only fair condition. Drying winds in March retarded
pasture development. April weather was cool and damp and resulted in slow gains, Demand for
feeder lambs has been light as a result of the late spring in northern feeding States. The
spring marketing run was underway by May 1, and was expected to peak about May 15.
Northwestern States% Cold and wet weather during the latter part of April retarded pasture
growth. Idaho: The lamb crop was making good progress on May 1. Sheep were beginning to move
up to the intermediate ranges and prospects were for excellent range feed at higher elevations.
Lambs were healthy with only minor and scattered reports of diseases. The peak marketing period
will be in July. Washingtont During the last half of March and the first half of April the
weather was unusually warm and pastures were early; however, in mid-April it turned cold with
heavy rain and snow. The flocks on unprotected ranges suffered and the development of lambs
was retarded. Some heavy losses occurred. Heaviest marketing are expected in late July and
early August. Oregon: Weather conditions were too cold and wet during April over most of the
western part of the State for good plant and grass growth. Lambs were set back by the cold wet
weather, and marketing are expected to be later than usual. Missouri: Spring weather was
unfavorable for lambing. There was heavy snow from mid-February through March. Pastures and
fall seeded grains were late in starting but are now in good condition. Death loss of lambs
was high due to unfavorable weather and the longer than usual confinement period.
Southeastern States: Reports from the three important Southeastern States indicate the
early lambs were in below average condition on May 1. Death losses were higher than a year
earlier. Marketings are expected to be later than usual. Virginia: Severe cold weather and
heavy snows during the heavy lambing period resulted in a higher loss than a year earlier.
Rainfall had been light since the first week of April and pastures were showing the effect of
dry weather. Condition of lambs was below a year earlier, and marketing are expected to be
later. Kentuckys Death loss of ewes was higher than last year due to unfavorable weather and
more disease problems but loss of lambs was about the same as a year earlier. Spring pastures
are later than usual, and condition of lambs is below 1959. Marketings are expected to reach
their peak in June but average later than last year. Tennessee: Severe cold weather in Febru-
ary and March caused heavy losses of lambs and ewes and early lambs were on dry feed most of the
winter. Condition of lambs is the lowest in several years. Spring pastures started late, but
now pasture feed supplies are ample. The bulk of the lambs is expected to be marketed in June,
and will average later than usual. Released May 11, 1960.





583


THE LIVESTOCK AND MEAT SITUATION
Approved by the Outlook and Situation Board, May 5, 1960
Summary
After advancing early this year, prices of meat animals have steadied recently
under pressure of larger marketing. In early spring, prices of cattle and calves
were below last spring but hogs and lambs were near or a little above a year earlier.

Price strength last winter was due to a combination of factors. Demand for meat
has been strong as employment and consumer income picked up following the resumption
in steel production. Renewed optimism among livestock producers this year has meant
an active farm demand for feeding and breeding stock. Moreover, total meat production
declined seasonally due to a smaller pork output, although pork production was above
a year earlier. Commercial meat production in January-March totaled 6,874 million
pounds, up 9 percent from a year ago but down 3 percent from the final quarter of 1959.

Following delays due to unseasonable late-winter weather, marketing have in-
creased in recent weeks and prices have been relatively stable. In late-April, hog
and cattle slaughter were above last year but lamb marketing were about the same as
a year ago. By midyear, hog slaughter will be appreciably below last year and will
continue below throughout the second half of 1960. Fed cattle marketing are expected
to increase further this spring and will probably exceed a year earlier in the second
half. Lamb slaughter will probably climb above year-earlier levels this spring when
new crop lambs make up the bulk of supplies.

The gain in cattle and calf supplies seems likely to bring some reductions in
prices but the declines are not expected to be large. Nor will the impact be the same
on all classes. Fed cattle prices will probably decline moderately during the rest
of this spring-probably about in line with price trends during this period the last
2 years. Withholdings of breeding stock for herd expansion is expected to continue
through 1960, though it may moderate somewhat. Feeder and stocker prices will proba-
bly continue near present levels this spring if pastures develop as well as current
conditions indicate.

Prices of hogs have advanced about $4.00 per 100 pounds from the December low
and a further seasonal advance is likely this spring, in contrast to the relatively
stable prices last spring. Some rise is likely in lamb prices, but last spring's
price rise is not likely to be duplicated. During this summer and fall, lamb prices
seem likely to average near the levels of last year.

The slaughter rate for cattle and calves thus far this year indicates that the
buildup in cattle inventories during 1960 will be somewhat smaller than the 4.9 mil-
lion head added during 1959. Heavy marketing of fed cattle plus substantial imports
of processing meats have kept prices below last year and the rate of expansion seems
to be slowing.

Supplies of beef to consumers will be more abundant during 1960 than in 1959,
but significantly less pork will be available. The year's total meat output is ex-
pected to be about 28 billion pounds, 2 percent above last year.

Cash receipts received by farmers from the sale of meat animals in 1959 totaled
$11,056 million, 1.3 percent less than the $11,185 in 1958. Marketings were larger
for all three species. Prices for cattle and calves were higher in 1959, but for
hogs and sheep and lambs prices were lower than in 1958.





584


MEATS AND MEAT FOOD PRODUCTS PREPARED AND PROCESSED
UNDER FEDERAL INSPECTION


I Week ended


Product


Placed in cure -
Beef. . .
Pork. . .
Other . .
Smoked and /or dried -
Beef. . .
Pork. .. .
Cooked meat -
Beef. . .
Pork. . .
Other . .


Apr.
2
S1960
1.9000#
5,155
75,251
8

815
55,292

1,599
6,757
453


Sausage -
Fresh finished. 4,9453
To be dried or semi-dried 1,915
Franks, wieners 11,982
Other, smoked or cooked 11,995
Loaf, head cheese, chili,
jellied products. 3,489
Steaks, chops, roasts 11,275
Meat extract. . 62
Sliced bacon. . 17,585
Sliced, other . 5,579
Hamburger . 3,638
Miscellaneous meat product. 3,757
Lard, rendorod 40,056
Lard, refined . 31,549
Oleo stock . 1,207
Edible tallow . 6,024
Rendered pork fat -
Rendered . 1,6753
Refined . 902
Compound containing animal fat 15,519
Oleomargarine I f 2,546
Canned product (for civilian
use and Dept. of Defense) 47,902
Total iV. . 365,477


: Apr.
s 9
: 1960
1.0004
2,882
67,254
11

6553
57,008

1,815
7,402
51


4,548
2,605
12,5253
12,651

5,841
10,598
78
17,596
5,468
5,648
4,154
39,788
54,216
1,278
7,549

2,011
1,137
17,541
5,516


45,958
567,358


: Apr. : Apr. : Apr.
: 16 t 25 : 50
: 1960 s 1960 : 1960
19000# 1.000# 12
2,554 2,958 2,956
60,225 57,929 58,591
27 15 29


845
44,101

1,672
4,910
47


4,775
2,256
12,392
12,506

5,664
11,729
111
17,591
5,442
5,5653
5,782
39,5331
34,889
1,504
6,1053

1,617
858
15,212
5,072

45,077
559,656


846
38,891

1,615
5,850
47


4,567
2,350
15,215
12,15533

5,471
11,552
25
18,090
5,658
3,826
5,782
41,965
50,455
1,259
7,149

1,627
828
14,414
3,112

46,168
531,5753


1,740
40,552

1,724
5,969
45


4,507
2,477
14,788
13,646

4,025
11,661
42
18,565
6,177
5,908
5,860
41,782
27,980
1,156
6,428

1,654
841
15,098
2,407

46,267

554,657


---------------------------------------------
I/ This figure represents "inspection pounds" as some of the products may have
been inspected and recorded more than once due to having been subjected to more
than one distinct processing treatment, such as curing first, then canning.
Meat Inspection Branch, Agricultural Research Service.


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COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS OF MEATS AND LARD, APRIL 50, 1960


Stocks of red meats totaled 642 million pounds on May 1. This was 5 percent
below holdings of a year earlier and 1 percent below average. A net gain of 46
million pounds in pork stocks during April compares with 44 million for the period
last year and 12 million the average. Holdings of 384 million pounds on May 1,
although 5 percent below average were 1 percent above a year earlier. Frozen pork
items displayed a substantial into-storage movement during April. Frozen picnics
were up 6 million to 18 million on May 1; frozen hams up 17 million to 64 million;
and frozen bellies stocks gained 16 million to 151 million on May 1. Beef stocks
totaled 158 million pounds on May 1. For the date last year, 171 million were in
storage while average stocks are 147 million pounds.




UNITED STATES STORAGE HOLDINGS OF MEATS AND LARD, APRIL 50, 1960 WITH COMPARISONS
(Includes holdings in public, private and semi-private
cold storage houses and meat packing plants)
: April : April March April
Commodity : 1955-59 1959 1960 1960
: average : :
1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.
Beef:
Frozen. . 136,515 159,046 154,070 148,599
In cure and cured 10,068 12,064 11,580 9,810
Total . 146,583 171,110 165,650 158,209
Pork, frozen:
Picnics . ... / 11,551 11,695 18,057
Hams. . 65,861 46,829 65,907
Bellies . 127,597 115,771 151,454
Other frozen pork cuts. 119,744 109,593 124,024
Total . 33554,568 524,555 283,888 557,422
Pork in cure or cured:
Dry salt bellies. 12,178 11,548 12,594
Other dry salt pork 9,510 6,171 6,657
Other pork cuts .. 35,176 36,514 27,580
Total . 72,111 56,664 54,03355 46,851
Total pork . 406,479 580,997 557,921 584,253
Other meats and meat products:
Veal, frozen. . 12,749 15,181 7,924 7,884
Lamb and mutton, frozen 9,227 135,478 11,188 11,076
Canned meats in cooler. 72,642 81,199 70,940 80,359
Total all meats .. 647,680 659,965 595,625 641,761
Lard, rendered and refined 2/ 145,593 146,900 152,500
GOVERNMENT HOLDINGS V/ -
Pork. .. 8,529 7,137 2,147 11,122
Beef . 5,453 2,556 1,944 7,695
-/Not reported separately prior to 1957. 2/ In dry and cold storage as reported
by Bureau of Census. 3/ Government holdings are included in the totals and consist
of reported stocks held by U.S.D.A., the Armed Services and other Government agencies.
4/ Not available.





587


UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF MEATS


Commodity :
---RT ------c)~------------------
EXPORTS (Domestic)
Beef and veal -
Fresh or frozen (except canned) .................
Pickled or cured (except canned) ................
Pork -
Fresh or frozen (except canned) ................
Hams and shoulders, cured or cooked .............
Bacon ...........................................
Pork, pickled, salted or otherwise cured, n.e.c..
Sausage, bologna & frankfurters (except canned)..
Meat and meat products (except canned) n.e.c.......
Beef and pork livers, fresh or frozen .............
Beef tongues, fresh or frozen .....................
Variety meats, n.e.c. (except canned) .............
Meat specialties, frozen, n.e.c....................
Canned meats -
Beef and veal .....................................
Sausage, bologna and frankfurters .................
Hams and shoulders ...oooo**.........................
Pork, canned, n.e.c. .....oo....*............*..*..
Meat and meat products, n.e.c. .*..................
Lamb and mutton (except canned) ....................
Lard (includes rendered pork fat) ..................
Shortenings, animal fat (excl. lard) ...............
Tallow, edible .....................................
Tallow, inedible ................*......**.......*...
Inedible animal oils, n.e.c. .......................
Inedible animal greases and fats, n.e.c............
Compiled from official records, Bureau of the Census.
Compiled from official records, Bureau of the Census.


Mar.
1960
PoFuns -

800,990
1,249,618

1,585,011
1,540,044
5,528,254
1,208,119
150,279
157,172
4,191,780
2,287,700
2,502,662
715,586

150,256
88,255
51,287
5535,772
204,557
115,985
55,506,068
15,420
649,524
L0,561,456
256,415
16,969,225


Mar.
1959
Fo-un s-

525,164
1,057,611

605,014
1,465,556
1,945,548
452,857
318,566
7,500
4,145,425
1,745,192
1,598,752
261,144

288,862
154,525
56,589
522,250
445,544
58,565
41,909,852
75,660
546,409
102,525,075
586,915
6,580,681


UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF LIVESTOCK
------------------------------
: Mar. 3 Mar.
1------- 960 1959
N&r -er -


Cattle (For breeding) -
Dairy *........... ................
Ex. dairy ........................
Other (ex. for breeding) ..........
Hog .0 ............ ...
Sheep


805
2,127
27
597
12


451
1,574
26
75
504


Compiled from official records, Bureau of the Census.


------------





388
U. S. Department of Agriculture
Washington 25, D. C.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

P ~ II I II ~III IIIII IIIII II II II IN 111111111111111111I111I11
U S Dp 3 1262 08735 7033
U. S. D


OFFICIAL BUSINESS

Form AMS-5/17/60
Permit 1001.


University of Florida
Documents Librarian
11-4-59 The University Libraries
LS-CLS Gainesville, PFla.


SHEEP AND LAMBS: WEEKLY AVERAGE OF DAILY QUOTATIONS
In dollars per 100 pounds
__ --_ -


Classification


SLAUGHTER LAMBS:
Prime

Choice

Good

SLAUGHTER LAMBS:
Choice

Good

EWES: (Shorn) -
Good and
Choice
Cull and
Utility
FEEDER LAMBS A
Good and
Choice
Cooled basis.


C a Omh Kansas
Chicago Omaha City


Fort Denv er
Worth :


Spi ng)-- All t.
- Ts^rinlg) '- A~llvts.- -- -


May 14, 1960
Ma 16, 1959
ay 4, 90- -
May 16, 1959
May 14, 1960
Ma 16 1959
rSUorn) 10= Ibb.
May 14, 1960
May 16, 1959
May 14, 1960
May 16L 1959
AL :ws.
May 14, 1960
May 16. 1959
May 14, 1960
May 16, 1959
ll w~sT ---
May 14, 1960
May 16, 1959


24.62
~-- 'yc


25.72* 24.80
^L7*- l8-
23.10* 25.25
down
20.35 20.50
22.75 22.20
19.12 19.58
22.22 20.90

5.85* 5.82
7.00 5.50
4.60* 4.52 C
5.80 4.00
-- 21.00
20.25


25.05
25.88
24.58
25.12
23.10
24.12

20.25
21.00

19.75


4.50
4.75*
-350 72*
- .l72- _


23.40 24.75

22.75 23.50
25.55 25.20
22.00 --.
22.50 24.05
85ama 20.58 m e m


18.
19.
18.
19.


85 20.58
50 21.60
:2S 9.:0 -
00 20.68

-- 6.28


- 7.62
f 4.80
- 5.12


O North
Ogden Port-
Sland

2.75 -
S23.00 22762'
25.50 23.16
~ 2700 218&'
22.50 22.50
18.35
18.00

17.00


5.75


5.25


4.75 6.62

2.00 4.56


- 17.85 15.25
- 19.25 -


LIVESTOCK PRICES AT CHICAGO COMPARED WITH WHOLESALE AND COMPOSITE RETAIL
MEAT PRICES AND WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MEAT VALUES AT NEW YORK
SSteers a LaDS --------- o -
: Apr. T Mar. 7 Apr. Apr. 7Mar. Apr Ipr. : Mar. T Ipr.
: 1960 : 1960 : 1959 1961960 960 t 1959 : 1960 : 1960 : 1959
Live animal prices -- lars-prD oimudi --
Chicago ............... 29.29 29.50 52.30 a 22.22 22.64 21.59 I 16.40 15.72 16.55
Wholesale meat prices,
New York .............. 47.04* 47.96 52.26 : 47.49 46.72 45.12: -


Composite retail meat
prices, New York ......


Cents per pound

79.58 78.94 81.61 : 68.29 65.92 66.56 :
Value of carcass meat from 100# live animal (Dollars)


Wholesale New York .... 28.22 28.78 31.56 I 23.27 22.89 22.11 t 19.57 19.11 20.95
Retail New York ....... 37.40 37.10 38.36 : 32.25 51.11 51.42 a 26.15 24.94 28.45
* "Choic'Ze-o- -- y -- -~- -- -- *-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -




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