Livestock, meat, wool market news

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Title:
Livestock, meat, wool market news
Physical Description:
v. : ; 21-23 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service. -- Livestock, Poultry, Grain, and Seed Division
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service. -- Livestock Division
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service. -- Livestock & Seed Division
Publisher:
The Division
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

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Subjects / Keywords:
Meat industry and trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Livestock -- Marketing -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
Statement of Responsibility:
Livestock, Poultry, Grain and Seed Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 27, no. 1 (Jan. 6, 1959) issue.
Issuing Body:
Vols. for <Jan. 16, 1979-May 14, 1983> issued by: Livestock, Meat, Grain and Seed Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture; <Nov. 12, 1983-> by: the Livestock Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture; 1996 issue\d by: the Livestock and Seed Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 47, no. 2 (Jan. 16, 1979).
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 58, no. 40 (Oct. 6, 1990).

Record Information

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004691915
oclc - 04512121
lccn - sn 87043107
Classification:
lcc - NOT IN LC
ddc - 338.105
System ID:
AA00008493:00116

Related Items

Preceded by:
Market news (Washington, D.C.)
Succeeded by:
Livestock, meat, and wool weekly summary and statistics


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Full Text


LIVES ew

MEAT T
MEAT WEEKLY SUMMARY


WOOL AND STATISTICS

LIVESTOCK DIVISION, AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
WASHINGTON 28, D.O.
Vol 28, No. 7 February 16, 1960
Week ended February 15
Page
Livestock Market Reviews . 122
Livestock Market Receipts . 125
Stocker and Feeder Statistics . 125
Estimated Percentage of Stocker and Feeder Cattle
and Slaughter Cows in Salable Receipts . 125
Steer Sale Statistics . . 126
Slaughter at Major Centers . 127
Estimated Slaughter and Meat Production . 127
Cattle Prices . . 128
Hog Prices . . 129
Hog Purchase Statistics . 150
Sheep and Lamb Prices . . 151
Wholesale Meat Trade Reviews. . 152
Wholesale Dressed Meat Prices . 133
Wool Market Review. . . 154
Special to this issue
Annual Livestock Inventory, January 1, 1960 155
Federally Inspected Slaughter by Regions, January 1960.. 131
Storage Holdings of Meats and Lard, Jan. 51, 1960 157
Meat and Meat Food Products Processed and Canned under
Federal Inspection, Jan. 5-50, 1960 ER
Livestock Prices and Composite Meat Values, Jan


ASS* -waS






122


MIDWEST LIVESTOCK REVIEW

and

RANGE AND FEEDLOT SALES


Livestock marketing were moderate through-
out most of the midwest due to bad weather con-
ditions, however, hog receipts were rather large
Friday when clear weather prevailed. Slaughter
steers and heifers sold steady to 500 higher for
the week over most of the area with bulk sales
at Chicago 25-75# up. Hog prices advanced
through Thursday but the fairly liberal receipts
Friday sold sharply lower to leave closing sales
steady to 250 higher for the week over a large
part of the Corn Belt. Prices on slaughter
lambs were strong to 50# higher, instances $1.00
up.

SLAUGHTER CATTLE AND CALVES Weather and
road conditions continued as major factors in
the livestock trade throughout the nation's mid-
section. Muddy roads retarded farm to market
shipments early in the period and midweek sup-
plies were reduced by heavy snow and blocked
roads. As a result, the week's supply of cattle
at the 12 markets were only slightly larger than
the previous week when they were the smallest
since last June, Holiday weeks excluded. Com-
paratively small supplies, coupled with steady
to $1.00 higher wholesale beef prices made for
further upturns in cattle prices. However, the
steer and heifer price advance was tempered by
the fact that the percentage of such cattle in
receipts increased and the percentage of cows
decreased for the second week. Oklahoma City
reported the largest fed cattle supply of the
winter and the steer supply of about 326 loads
in Kansas City was one of the largest in three
years. Good and Choice grades continued to
form bulk of the steer and heifer supply al-
though the 14 percent Prime steers in Chicago
was highest since the last week in December,
1958. At most markets steers and heifers steady
to 500 higher but Standard and Good heifers sold
25-50# lower in Sioux City. Most steers and
heifers closed 25-750 higher in Chicago where
the steer average price of $26.56 was highest
for any week in three months. Cows trended
higher at virtually all points with most sales
25-750 higher. Bulls were mostly steady. Veal-
ers sold steady to $1.00 higher in St. Louis
National Stock Yards but were steady to $1.00
lower in So. St. Paul.
Load Prime 1275# slaughter steers in Chi-
cago $29.75, highest since last September. At
some other markets, a few Prime steers reached
$28.00-28.50 while high-Choice sold up to $28.00
in a limited way. Around 20 loads Prime 1100-
1400# steers in Chicago $29.00-29.25 where the
same grade 1425-1500# offerings sold $27.25-
28.00 and load Prime 1779# steers $26.00. Most
Choice steers in Chicago $25.50-27.75, Good
$25.00-26.50. Elsewhere, bulk Choice steers
$24.00-27.00, most Good $22.50-25.50.


High-Choice and Prime heifers at Chi-
cago realized $27.25-28.00; Good and Choice
$22.00-27.50 with most Choice $25.25-27.50.
Elsewhere high-Choice and Prime heifers
brought $26.50-27.25; most Choice $25.00-
26.50; Good and low-Choice $21.50-25.50.
Utility and Commercial coaw bulked at
$14.50-17.00, Canners and Cutters $12.50-
15.50.

STOCKER AND FEEDER CATTLE AND CALVES -
Stocker and feeder steer and calf shipments
from the 10 markets totaled 22,001 compared
to 26,555 the previous week and 231456 a
year earlier. Medium to low-Choice offer-
ings continued to predominate in supplies
with a large share grading Good. Much of
the midwest was plagued with muddy fields
and feedlots and then toward midweek a large
part of the area was hit by a snow storm.
Such conditions could not be considered
favorable for starting a new crop of cattle
on feed or for running calves and yearlings
in fields. Even so, demand proved fully
adequate to absorb the number marketed and
trading was fairly active with prices steady
to 50f higher. Most aggressive demand
centered on well-bred stock cattle that
could be readied for the start of a new
grazing season. A fairly dependable demand
also existed for feeder steers 900# down.
However, outlet continued relatively narrow
for feeders over 1000#.
Choice 593# stock steers brought $28.75,
580# $29.50, and a few Choice 500-550# short
yearlings reached $50.50. Bulk Good and
Choice yearling stock steers sold from
$24.00-27.50, Medium and low-Good $21.00-
24.50. Scattered sales Choice 750-850#
feeder steers were made from $25.50-26.50;
majority Good and Choice steers 800# up
$22.00-25.00. Medium feeders sold from
$19.50-21.50. Good and Choice yearling
heifers bulked $22.00-25.00, Choice 522#
short yearlings $26.50. A few Choice stock
steer calves brought $52.00-355.75, latter
price for 591# offerings. Other Good and
Choice steer calves bulked $26.00-51.50,
same grades of heifer calves $25.00-28.25.
Very few stock cows were marketed but a few
Medium and Good cows sold from $15.00-17.00.

HOGS Terminal Markets Receipts at
the 12 markets were 5 percent less than in
the previous week and 2 percent less than
the same week a year ago. The supply con-
sisted predominantly of mixed U. S. No. 1,
2 and 5 200-250# barrows and gilts. Sows
made up between 4-9 percent at the various
markets. Severe weather conditions in much






125


of the Corn Belt area that created unfavorable
hauling conditions during the middle part of
the week interfered with the normal marketing
pattern. Supplies were below normal through
Thursday but with road conditions improving re-
ceipts were liberal on Friday. Prices also were
influenced by the supply, working progressively
higher through Thursday but declining sharply
on Friday.
Compared with the previous week's close:
Prices on barrows and gilts are largely steady
to 25# higher, instances 500 up except steady
to weak at Indianapolis and steady to 500 lower
at St. Joseph. Sows sold steady to 75# higher.
Mixed U. S. No. 1-5, 180-250# barrows and
gilts closed from $153.00-14.25, largely $15.25-
15.75. Selected lots of No. 1 and No. 1 and 2,
largely sorted for grade and weight uniformity
brought $15.50-14.60, these usually averaging
190-250#. Mixed No. 1-5, 270-550# sows bulked
late at $10.75-12.50.
Feeder pigs sold steady at So. St. Paul but
500 higher at Sioux City. Good and Choice 100-
160# feeder pigs at So. St. Paul closed at $11.00-
11.50; Medium and Good 150-160# at Sioux City
$10.50-11.50.
HOGS Interior Iowa-Southern Minnesota
Area Receipts were approximately 6 percent
less than the previous week and the correspond-
ing period last year. Heavy snowfall in the
southern half of the area, with considerable
drifting, cut supplies sharply at midweek and
caused rather abrupt price variations. Early
price declines were more than recovered on
small receipts at midweek, but these advances
were erased by the end of the week. Closing
prices compared with Friday the previous week
were mainly steady to firm on butchers. Sows
under 400# closed steady to 25# lower with
heavier sows mostly steady. U. S. No. 1-5
200-240# butchers including some 190-200# weights
sold late at $12.45-15.25 with a moderate show-
ing of No. 1 and 2 selected lots at $15.25-15.50
and a few high-yielding lots up to $14.00. Mixed
No. 1-5 270-400# sows brought $10.75-12.00 and a
few to $12.25, while 400-550# sows ranged $8.85-
11.15.

SHEEP AND LAMBS Supplies at the 12 markets
were 19 percent less than a week earlier and 20
percent under a year ago. Heavy snowfall over
a large share of the Corn Belt was a major factor
hampering movement. The reduced marketing found
good outlet which was stimulated by price strength
for dressed lamb at wholesale centers. Conse-
quently, prices on slaughter lambs were strong to
500 higher, instances $1.00 up. Slaughter ewes
and feeder lambs sold steady to 500 higher, in-
stances $1.00 higher on ewes.
Good and Choice 90-115# wooled slaughter
lambs closed from $19.50-20.50. Some 115-125#
Good lambs brought $18.00-19.00. Consignments
mostly Choice 90-114# wooled lambs brought


$20.00-21.00, and a short load Good and
Choice 90# lambs reached $21.75 at Chi-
cago. Good and Choice 84-110# lambs with
No. 1 and fall shorn pelts $18.50-19.50,
lots mainly Choice $19.00-20.00 and to
$20.50 at Chicago. At Fort Worth, Good
and Choice 100-122# slaughter yearlings
with No. 1, 2 and 5 pelts brought $14.00-
15.00. Cull to Choice ewes ranged from
$5.00-6.50 with some sales up to $8.00.
Most Good and Choice 60-85# feeder lambs
sold from $18.50-20.00 and to $20.25 at
So. St. Paul for Choice; Medium and Good
feeders $16.00-18.50.
Some price strength on slaughter lambs
was recorded on all sessions in the Interior
lowa-Southern Minnesota area and for the
week sales were fully 500 higher. Slaughter
ewes were steady. Estimated Interior re-
ceipts were around 17 percent less than the
previous week and slightly under a year ago.
Wooled slaughter lambs comprised bulk of
the run. Around 20 percent of the week's
supply was received from outside the area.
On late rounds, Good and Choice 90-110#
wooled slaughter lambs delivered to packing
plants sold from $19.00-20.00, including
mainly Choice lambs at $19.50-20.00. Choice
wooled lambs reached $20.50 in parts of
Southern Minnesota. Some Good and Choice
110-120# wooled lambs brought $18.00-19.50,
most sales $18.50 up. Good and Choice 90-
105# shorn lambs with No. 1 and fall shorn
pelts realized $18.00-18.50, Choice $18.50-
19.00. Cull to Choice wooled ewes brought
$2.00-5.00.

RANGE AND FEEDLOT SALES
Note: Shrink on most range and feed-
lot sales none to 5 percent, mostly 4 per-
cent f.o.b. some with short haul and 5 per-
cent shrink. All sales for immediate de-
livery unless specified.

ARIZONA, CALIFORNIA, NEVADA AND UTAH -
Direct sales on slaughter steers and heifers
steady to 500 lower, other slaughter classes
fully steady; stockers and feeders steady to
$1.00 higher; slaughter lambs steady to
$1.00 higher. Slaughter steers: 145 loads
high-Good to mostly Choice 900-1125# $26.00-
27.00; 159 loads high-Good and Choice 850-
1200# $24.75-26.00; 25 loads high-Good to
mostly Choice 1150-1550# $24.25-25.50; 9
loads Good 800-1000# $24.00-24.50; 26 loads
Standard and Good 850-1100# $22.00-23.75.
Two loads Choice 1000-1050# $45.50 on
dressed basis. Slaughter heifers: 119
loads Good and Choice 750-1000# unevenly
$24.00-26.00 but liberal share $25.00-25.50;
2 loads Good 1000# in Utah $25.00; 4 loads
Choice 875-950# in California $42.50 on
dressed basis.






124


Stockers and feeders: 850 head Good and
Choice 610-875# steers $25.25-25.00; Good and
Choice 500-712# heifers $22.50-25.00; Good and
Choice 550-450# stock calves, steers $27.00-
29.00, heifers $25.00-27.00.
Slaughter lambs California 6 loads
Good and Choice 90-115# shorn lambs with No. 1
pelts $21.00; 52 loads Good and Choice 105-118#
with No. 1 and some No. 2 pelts $20.00-20.50.
Utah 5 loads Good to mostly Choice 105-113#
wooled slaughter lambs $19.00-20.00.

COLORADO, SOUTHERN WYOMING, WESTERN
NEBRASKA, AND WESTERN KANSAS Trading on fed
cattle direct at feedlots in Colorado was very
active. Fed steers sold steady, heifers steady
to 550 higher, mostly steady to strong. Four-
teen loads 1100-1164# average-Choice fed steers
$26.00-26.60; 67 loads 1100-1520# low to aver-
age-Choice $24.50-25.75, most 1100-1225# at
$25.25-25.75; 4 loads 1160-1500# average-Good
to low-Choice $22.75-24.25. Fifty-nine loads
800-1000# average to high-Choice fed heifers
$26.00-26.25; 100 loads 788-1000# low to aver-
age-Choice $25.25-26.00, late sales mostly
$25.65-26.00; load average-Choice to Prime
1150# $25.35; 11 loads high-Good to low-Choice
900-1035# $25.00-25.00; 5 loads 1025# Utility
cows $15.00.
Demand for stocker and feeder cattle and
calves very good, most sales and contracts
confirmed this week at strong prices. Western
Kansas 8 loads Good and Choice 781-8453#
feeder steers $22.50-24.75; 8 loads same grades
weighing 560-578# $25.25-25.40; 250 Medium to
Good 1O00# steers $17.50. Over 900 Good and
Choice 550-600# feeder heifers $25.00-25.50,
part for early March delivery; 9 loads Good and
Choice mostly Good 707-732# heifers $22.00-22.85.
Around 575 Good and Choice 575-425# heifer
calves $25.00-27.00, mid-March to mid-April de-
livery. Colorado Load Good and Choice 889#
feeder steers $22.50. Eight loads Good and
Choice 625-665# feeder heifers $24.25-25.00.
Southeastern Wyoming 200 Good and Choice 420-
440# heifer calves $28.50.
Fed lambs sold steady to 250 higher. In
Northern Colorado 57 loads mostly Choice 99-
113# wooled slaughter lambs $19.75-20.25, in-
cluding 5 loads going to East Coast packers.
Around 40,000# 1/4-1/2 blood lambs wool brought
45-46# per pound grease basis. Western Slope
of Colorado 2 loads Good to mostly Choice
106-107# wooled lambs to California packer at
$20.50.

NEW MEXICO, WEST TEXAS, WESTERN OKLAHOMA,
SOUTHWESTERN KANSAS Clovis Area Direct
trade all classes cattle and calves very slow,
limited sales fully steady. Three loads low-
Choice 988# fed steers $24.25; 6 loads Good 973-
1112# $25.00-24.00; 8 loads Good 750-775# fed
heifers $23.00-25.50. Around 550 Good and
Choice 575-800# stocker and feeder steers $23.00-
25.50; 500 Good to mostly Choice 375# stock steer


calves $29.00. About 6,000 Good and Choice
104-118# wooled slaughter lambs $18.00-18.50,
near 17,000 same grades 98-114# shorn lambs
with No. 1 pelts $17.00-17.501 1,200 Good and
Choice 79-88# wooled feeder lambs $18.00-18.50
and 1,000 Good and Choice shorn feeders $17.00-
17.50. Recent sale of wools 200,000# fall
lamb wool 450 per pound, grease basis.
Amarillo Area Direct trade slaughter
steers and heifers steady to 25# higher on
confirmed sales 58 loads steers, 29 loads
heifers. Some 8,400 stockers and feeders sold
strong. Good and Choice 1050-1250# fed steers
$24.00-24.75; 7 loads Standard to mostly Good
1000# $22.00; Good and Choice 950-1050# fed
heifers $24.00-25.25. Good and Choice 525-
700# stocker and feeder steers $25.50-28.00;
same grades 500-700# heifers $22.00-26.00;
Good and Choice 525-580# stock steer calves
$28.00-51.50, few heifers $26.00-27.00.

IDAHO, OREGON AND WASHINGTON Slaugh-
ter steers slow, steady to mostly 500 lower;
few sales on fed heifers steady; limited vol-
ume stockers and feeders fully steady to
strong; slaughter lambs steady to 500 higher.
Low to average-Choice 955-120Q0# fed steers
$25.50-26.50 in Washington, including lots
for delivery up to May 1; Good to low-Choice
1070-1150# $25.00-25.75. In Idaho, Choice
1125-1330# steers $25.50-24.00 and a few
Choice 1075# $25.00. Good and Choice 850-
1060# fed heifers in the two states $25.00-
24.00.
Washington Good 1100# stock cows
$225.00 per head with some Medium and Good
$175.00 each. In Idaho, Good and Choice 800-
900# feeder steers $25.00-235.50; same grades
of stock calves, heifers $235.50, steers
$25.50. Oregon Medium and Good 1050-1200#
stock cows $165.00-205.00 each.
High-Good to mostly Choice wooled slaugh-
ter lambs in Washington $19.25; Good coming
2 year-old blackface ewes $27.00 per head.
Idaho Good to mostly Choice 105-108# wooled
slaughter lambs $20.50-20.75 with 119# weights
$19.00. Oregon Choice 104-105# wooled
slaughter lambs $20.00; No. 1 and 2 pelt of-
ferings $19.00.


MONTANA, NORTHERN WYOMING AND WESTERN
DAKOTAS Few sales on feeder steers and
stock calves steady; slaughter and shearing
lambs active, strong to fully 250 higher.
In Montana, load Choice 825-850# feeder steers
$24.50; 575 Good and Choice 400-450# stock
steer calves $27.00-29.00.
Eastern Montana and northern Wyoming -
7 loads Good and Choice 104-110# wooled slaugh-
ter lambs $18.40-19.00; 1,550 fall shorn 94-
95# Good and Choice feeder lambs $16.75; 4,400
Good and Choice 2-3 year old wooled whiteface
bred ewes for up to May 1 delivery $24.00-
25.00 per head.






125


WEEKLY RECEIPTS OF SALABLE LIVESTOCK AT 12 PUBLIC MARKETS
- - -CTtle : "clies : ogs : "Sheep "6d lamnbs -
Market :eb. 15~ : Feb. 14 : Feb. 13 : Feb. 14 : Feb. 15 : Feb. 14 : Feb. 135: Feb. 1
: 1960 : 1959 : 1960 : 1959 : 1960 : 1959 : 1960 : 1959
Chicago ................ 41,467 41,069 164 504 30,944 44,845 5,855 12,693
Cincinnati ............. 3,159 2,867 459 575 14,164 13,859 515 677
Denver ................. 8,922 9,652 423 521 5,776 2,567 20,506 29,620
Fort Worth ............. 5,828 4,551 1,859 1,200 2,598 2,205 8,187 13,508
Indianapolis ........... 6,805 6,566 397 436 58,294 44,202 2,096 2,656
Kansas City ............ 20,015 14,425 558 742 19,911 14,725 5,599 6,749
Oklahoma City ......... 7,107 10,509 580 645 5,872 5,107 879 1,430
Omaha .................. 55,647 54,995 312 548 40,956 47,621 11,224 135,719
St. Joseph ............. 15,008 11,416 226 478 26,794 22,576 5,685 7,151
St. Louis NSY .......... 14,042 12,631 1,891 1,850 68,955 58,579 5,490 4,089
Sioux City ............. 26,257 27,095 816 932 59,660 42,597 12,272 8,822
S. St. Paul ............ 20,080 18,517 7,865 8,120 61,174 62,377 15,382 10,267
Total .................. 204,517 194,089 15,3550 16,329 352,876 559,256 89,490 111,381
February 6, 1960 199,141 17,840 570,613 109,984


Hogs .....
Sheep .....


INTERIOR IOWA AND SOUTHERN MINNESOTA
Feb. 15, 1960 Feb. 6, 1960 Feb. 14, 1959
559,000 581,000 380,000
25,100 27,800 24,200


Steers 1001# up
901-1000
801-900
701-800
501-700

Total steers 10 m
Av. wts. H
Av. cost* "
" n Chici
H H H Kans
" Omahi
" S. S
" Siou
" Denv<
" Ft.
" OklaI
" S. Si
" St. I
Total calves 10
heifers "
cows


STOCKER AND FEEDER CATTLE: AVERAGE COST, WEIGHT, AND NUMBER
: Week ended : Month -
: Feb. 11 : Feb. 4 t Feb. 12 : Jan. : Jan. :
: 1960 : 1960 1 1959 : 1960 : 1959 :
.............. 542 542 1,500 2,621 4,899
.............. 1,574 1,490 2,317 8,283 10,594
.............. 5,001 2,918 2,632 14,985 15,236
.............. 5,050 4,819 2,730 20,255 16,743
.............. 7,289 7,981 6,425 56,381 36,672


markets

n
ago
Ls City

t. Paul
x City
er
Worth
homa Ci
t. Jose]
Louis NS
market


......... 15,456
......... 727#
......... $25.65
......... 21.90
......... 25.48
......... 25.40
........******** 22.12
........ 24.99
*******........ 23.59
........ 24.23
ty .***** 25.68
ph ...... 23.01
SY ...... 22.97
s ...... 6,545
......****** 2,599
.**..... 657


17,750
722#
$25.67
25.06
23.47
23.45
21.79
25.07
24.05
22.99
22.72
23.25
23.43
8,605
2,111
772


15,402
758#
$26.59
27.02
25.90
26.77
25.530
28.22
27.07
27.25
26.28
26.22
25.79
6,054
2,991
707


82,525
729#
$25.60
25.49
23.51
23.69
21.70
24.97
24.95
22.67
22.17
23.12
22.59
54,592
11,138
2,881


85,944
758#
$27.47
26.40
26.10
27.69
24.94
29.48
29.29
26.96
26.19
26.77
25.72
59,205
14,013
4,191


Not adjusted for differences in grade of cattle sold at each market.
ESTIMATED PERCENT OF STOCKER AND FEEDER CATTLE AND SLAUGHTER COWS IN SALABLE RECEIPTS
-----------------------------------------------------
SKansas' S. St.: St. :Sioux'S. St.'Indian-' : Ft. : Okla. t : San
Week ended :Chicago: yOmaha :Lous:iy al apols :Denver:Worth City Wichita:Antonio
City Josephl NSY :City Paul :apolis WorthtCity
I :
Stockers and feeders
Feb. 12, 1960 2 52 9 10 6 21 5 7 8 60 57 28 50
Feb. 5, 1960 5 52 12 14 6 26 5 6 6 55 62 40 50
Feb. 13, 1959 2 27 11 20 4 18 5 3 8 60 52 50 45
Slaughter cows
Feb. 12, 1960 6 6 7 6 10 6 27 10 20 15 7 13 20
Feb. 5, 1960 6 8 10 6 15 6 25 7 25 15 8 9 20
Feb. 13, 1959 7 7 8 6 11 5 25 5 12 15 8 14 17
-------------------------------------------------------








STEERS SOLD OUT OF FIRST HANDS FOR SLAUGHTER __

Number of head Percent of total Average weight Average price in.
Number o head by grades (pounds) ;dollars per 100 lb.
Grade -- ----------------
Week ended
: Feb. F-b. 129 : Feb. 11: Fe:b. 19 Feb. lsFeb. 12:: Feb. 11U:1Feb. 12
: 1960 : 1959 : 1960 : 1959 : 1960 : 1959 : 1960 : 1959


Prime..........
Choice.........
Good...........
Standard.......
Commercial.....
Utility........
All grades.....

Prime..........
Choice........
Good...........
Standard.......
Utility........
All grades.....

Prime..........
Choice.........
Good...........
Standard.......
Utility........
All grades.....

Prime..........
Choice.........
Good...........
Standard.......
Commercial.....
Utility........
All grades.....


Prime..........
Choice.........
Good............
Standard.......
Commercial.....
Utility........
All grades.....


Prime..........
Choice.........
Good...........
Standard.***..**....
Utility........
All grades.....


Prime..........
Choice.........
Good..........
Standard.......
Utility........
All grades.....


4,5153
19,790
4,976
1,204
51
215
50,527

204
7,118
10,368
916
190
18,796

3577
5,742
5,158
5553
2253
11,855 3


4,526
3,104
1,205

100
8,755


5
1,655
5,480
1,069

108
6,515



2,5453
4,662
1,0553
36
8,294



1,576
1,182
96

2,654


Data collected by Agricul
See page 151 for revised


CHICAGO
2,585 14.1 9.2
14,546 64.8 51.3
8,515 16.5 29.7
2,452 5.9 8.8
122 .2 .4
167 .7 .6
27,985
------^-------- ^
OMAHA
176 1.1 1.0


6,699
9,922
517
67
17,181

58
4,857
7,1153
501
108
12,617


1,624
4,224
7653

5533
6,644



554
2,512
1,3555

82
4,5053



999
4,057
818
77
5,951


37.9
55.1
4.9
1.0


59.0
57.8
1.8
.4


SIOUX CITY
3.2 .5
48.4 58.5
45.5 56.4
5.0 4.0
1.9 .8

-- ZNA ITr

49.5 24.4
55.6 65.6
153.8 11.5

1.1 .5

ST. LOUIS NSY


.0
26.2
55.1
17.0

1.7


12.5
55.8
50.1

1.8


1,250
1,188
1,096
1,034
1,651
1,074
1,176

1,1727f
1,190
1,156
1,056
1,077
1,163

1,219
1,157
1,149
1,122
1,062
1,155


1,151
1,115
1,065

990
1,125


8053
1,048
1,060
1,014

876
1,046


IS.rom-- -

50.7 16.8 1,129
56.2 68.2 1,115
12.7 15.7 1,087
.4 1.5 972
1,114


1,246 28.28 50.98
1,219 26.56 28.12
1,174 24.85 26.15
1,071 22.25 25.09
1,455 21.11 24.14
954 19.07 22.56
1,194 26.36 27.54

1,254 27.75 29.750
1,227 25.65 26.90
1,165 25.86 25.50
1,166 20.55 25.05
1,085 17.68 21.78
1,188 24.38 26.05
---------------

S1,217 27.98 ~9.43
1,166 26.59 27.24
1,195 24.58 25.44
1,094 20.46 25.25
1,058 17.87 22.09
1,178 25.25 26.05

--- --- ----
1,161 25.06 26.50
1,091 25.65 25.55
1,097 21.92 25.75

1,055 18.15 21.58
1,109 24.08 25.59
----------a-----

S 28.00 --
1,077 25.82 27.47
1,085 24.08 26.05
1,050 21.24 24.66

912 17.89 22.22
1,069 25.99 25.74
---------------


1,185
1,110
1,057
981
1,113


25.30
25.55
20.59
16.90
25.69


DNW -ER -----m -


1,437 51.9 42.8 1,234 1,235 25.153
1,877 44.5 56.0 1,164 1,141 24.00
59 5.6 1.2 1,124 1,085 18.30

5,555 1,199 1,180 24.41
--------- -- -- -----------
tural Estimates, and Livestock Divisions, A.M.S.
January 1960 data for Denver and 7-markets combined.


27.07
25.45
25.65
21.89
25.46



26.68
25.77
21.68

26.14






127


WEEKLY SLAUGHTER UNDER FEDERAL INSPECTION AT MAJOR CENTERS

-_-------------- -------^ ^- -- ^ --- -- -- g- ---------a ------s"""
t Cattle : Calves Hogs : Sheep and Lambs
City or Area Feb. 15: Feb. 1T: Feb. 1s3: FeF.1T:-Fe-b 13: Fe.ST"Feb. 13 : Feb1.l 7
1960 : 1959 : 1960 : 1959 : 1960 t 1959 : 1960 : 1959


Boston, New York City Area...
Baltimore, Philadelphia .... .
Cin.,Cleve.,Detroit, Indpls..
Chicago Area............*.**
St. Paul-Wise. Areas.........
St. Louis Area.............
Sioux City-So. Dakota Area..,.
Omaha Area...................
Kansas City..................
Iowa So. Minnesota.........
Loutl.Evan'l.Nashtl.Mph's....
Georgia, Florida, Ala. Area..
St. Jo'ph.Wichita, Okla.City.
Ft.Worth,Dallas,San Antonio..
Denver,Ogden,Salt Lake City..
Los Angeles, San Fran. Areas.
Portland, Seattle, Spokane...

Total......................


11,942
7,751
18,552
17,083
27,672
10,781
23,558
36,273
14,348
28,288
6,107
6,279
19,648
8,487
19,1553
26,173
6,874

288,549


Accumulation to date.......1,863,024 424,452 8,049,604 1,596,651
1,671,225 425,956 7,448,240 1,577,124
-------------------------------------------------------------------------


Week ended


ESTIMATED FEDERALLY INSPECTED SLAUGHTER AND MEAT PRODUCTION
-:----_ ---_---- _---_---- p : ~ T I E -P: --
S Beef Veal :(excl. lard) : and Mutton : Total
:~Nn- : ~ ~ 5m- : ~ ) ~V : ~ : "; meat
Pber : Prod.: ber : : ber : : ber :Prod. prod.
-e mil.rb. 100 mil.b 1 0 mil.1b. 1 0 -m-il.b. mil.1b.
1 ',000P mll.."l,000 mi-l?. 1,000omill.lb.~l_.000 iTl.b. milli."b


Feb. 13, 1960 ............... 350 211.4 90 10.1 1,400 185.9 255 13.0 420.4
Feb. 6, 1960 ............... 350 211.4 95 10.6 1,425 192.5 275 14.0 428.5
Jan. 30, 1960 1/ ........... 353 -- 97 1,440 -- 272 -- -
Feb. 14, 1959 .......... 505 186.5 90 10.0 1,385 189.3 271 15.9 399.7
Percentage change from:
Feb. 6, 1960 ............... 0 0 -5 -5 -2 -3 -7 -7 -2
Feb. 14, 1959 ............... 15 13 0 1 1 -2 -6 -6 5
-Average weight T ~ ~-
^- -.---- j- -- ag--- -- _- he -~~~
: hep
Week ended Cattle : Calves : Hogs L : and Lambs
: LTve -Dressed : Li -t-ressed Live:Dressed : lIve : Dresse4 :


Feb. 13, 1960 ..............
Feb. 6, 1960 ...............
Jan. 50, 1960 ...............
Feb. 14, 1959 ..*............


1060
1060
1060
1074


112
112
112
111


133
135
157
157


: Total
Slard
prod.
mil.l1b.


47.7
44.6




- Tard =
yield
per
100 lb.




15.6


I/ Actual slaughter. 2/ Excludes lard.


256,941 62,550 65,688 1218,679 1224,718 235,655


11,451
6,805
16,565
20,802
24,510
9,646
18,574
51,771
10,271
26,405
6,577
5,912
16,586
8,758
16,063
20,564
6,301


8,5153
1,607
5,601
5,970
19,975
1,348

66

9,079
5,414
2,705
1,064
5,625
255
1,061
247


7,580
614
4,557
7,307
21,562
1,501

162

8,112
5,287
2,254
1,327
4,615
451
2,5835
196


51,605
29,097
145,928
52,415
127,595
84,408
105,050
78,704
44,599
285,786
66,426
3355,005
49,241
17,228
20,126
28,808
18,678


45,427
30,681
158,012
51,244
122,489
88,545
97,908
88,257
33,551
516,878
64,442
29,595
57,945
21,185
14,644
26,574
17,569


42,750
4,292
14,018
5,259
15,998
5,209
16,456
16,029

50,502


8,505
12,487
29,182
29,269
4,117


38,457
5,085
14,624
4,651
14,928
4,822
18,477
16,426

28,594


8,113
11,972
56,588
28,03355
5,676

252,426






128


Classification


Steers -
Prime 900-1100#
1100-1500
Choice 900-1100
1100-1500
Good 900-1100
Standard All wts.


Heifers -
Choice*
Good**
Standard


700-900#
600-800
- All wts.


Cows All weights -
Commercial
Utility
Cutter
Canner

Bulls All weights -
Commercial
Utility

Calves 500# down -
Choice
Good
Standard


Vealers -
Choice
Good
Standard


Steers -
Choice
Good
Medium


All wts. -


CATTLE: WEEKLY AVERAGE OF DAILY QUOTATIONS
In dollars per 100 pounds
----------t"------------- -g--------.---^- ---
:: North
a Chicago : Kansas City : Omaha Denver Portland

Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Fb. Feb. Feb.
13: 14 1 14: 15 14 135 14 15 14
1960 1959 1960 1959 1960 1959 2 959 196 1959 1960: 1959
au r attle, calvesand dealers
Slaughter cattle, calves and vealers


28.40
28.40
27.22
26.82
24.85
21.92


26.48

20.52


50.92
51.15
28.88
28.58
26.42
24.50


28.20
25.90
25.25


15.70 20.25
15.52 19.00
14.88)
13.60) 17.52


21.20 25.08
20.20 25.52


30.50
29.00
25.40


35.50
30.50


26.18
26.05
25.80
20.95


25.48
22.90
19.88


16.530
14.92
14.60)
15.52)


27.72
27.55
25.62
22.95


27.92
25.52
23.00


19.88
18.62

16.10


28.00
27.85
26.62
26.12
25.70
20.12


26.48
23.55
19.75


15.90
15.05
15.92)
15.22)


29.98
29.75
28.18
27.82
25.58
23.40


27.50
24.82
22.40


19.75
18.50
16.75


19.00 22.82 19.25 22.62
18.75 22.00 18.75 21.25


24.75
23.25
20.25


28.85
25.75
22.00


29.50
27.50
26.00


34.50
51.50
28.00


25.50
23.75
20.75


25.98
25.52
22.44
18.95


25.62
22.50
19.00


17.25
15.88
14.25)
13.12)


26.98
27.05
24.55
21.85


26.80
24.78
22.10


20.75
19.50
17.00


-- 22.50
19.50 25.00


26.38
25.50
24.88
22.25


24.50
23.00
20.75



15.44
12.62)
10.44)


--

27.62
27.50
26.62
25.538



25.88
24.58


20.25
18.25

15.50


20.75 22.75
21.25 24.25


25.50
22.50


31.50
29.00
25.00


31.00
28.50
26.00


--
27.25
25.00


54.00
51.00
26.50


Feeder and stocker cattle and calves


500-800#
500-800
500-1000


27.75
25.25
21.75


51.50
28.00
25.50


26.62
24.50
20.75


50.50
27.50
24.75


26.75
24.25
20.25


50.62
26.75
25.62


26.00
24.00
21.00


50.75
27.50
24.00


24.50
25.50
20.00


28.50
26.50
25.25


Heifers -
Choice 500-750#
Med. & Gd. 500-750

Cows All wts. -
Med. & Gd.

Calves 300-500# -
Steers -
Good & Choice

Heifers -
Good & Choice


- -- 24.00 27.75 24.38 27.75 23.50 26.75 25.25 27.25
-- -- 19.75 24.75 21.50 23.75 21.25 24.75 20.00 24.25


- -- 16.00 19.25 15.75 20.00



28.45 55.50 50.00 56.00


- -- 26.00 30.50 27.00 55.00


-- 19.25 15.00 --


2/
50.00 57.50 26.25 51.00


27.25 54.00 24.75 28.50


fightt range 600-800# in 1959.
* t. 700-900# 11 1,


S/ Correction: Week Feb. 6 should be $26.25.









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150


HOGS: AVERAGE COST. WEIGHT. AND NUMBER OF PACKER AND SHIPPER PURCHASES 1/
------- ------------ ------------------------ ---------------------- W
Louis Kan- S. S. 8-
Chi. Natl. s Omaha Sioux St. St. Indian- mkts.
Week ended cago Stock City Ca ity Joseph Paul apolis corn-
Yards bined
-------- e e .......................
AVERAGE COST Dollars per 100 pounda
Barrows Feb. 15,1960 15.51 1.50 153.48 13.57 15.54 15.60 13.51 13.70 15.51
and Feb. 6,1960 13.11 13.12 15.24 12.99 12.97 13.17 12.81 15.59 13.06
gilts Feb. 14,1959 15.88 16.04 16.13 15.85 15.76 16.02 15.66 15.95 15.88
Feb. 1 1960 11.29 11"'.64' 11.55 11.73 11.65 11.76 11.1 1.19 11.50
SowS Feb. 6,1960 10.90 11.27 11.18 11.15 11.21 11.37 11.14 10.91 11.11
Feb. 14.959 13.84 1.7.7 13.98 13.68 13.8.69 15.98 5.55 13.56 1572
AVERAGE WEIGHT Pounds
Barrows Feb. 13,1960 252 ,.15 227 237 240 221 228 222 227
and Feb. 6,1960 254 216 229 241 242 224 229 224 250
gilts Feb. 14 1959 240 225 225 245 249 230 253 22 24A
Feb. 15,1960 "450'6 406 ....442.. "458 "442" 3 92 423 424 426
Sows Feb. 6,1960 454 400 419 454 459 379 421 441 428
Feb. 14,1959 447 423 439 435 443 404 419 446 452
NUMBER OF HEAD ------
Barrows Feb. 15,1960 24282 59038 18479 35280 35635 23720 51205 54155 281770
and Feb. 6,1960 54095 58164 14465 46983 37965 21638 51181 52674 297165
gilts Feb. 14,1959 37990 51238 15670 41409 58204 19527 51776 4033555 293949
Feb.S;1l3 O 2410 4252 681 2852 2061 104 2798 2416 18490
Sows Feb. 6,1960 3711 4053 844 4798 2725 1161 2715 2821 22806
Feb. 14.1959 2904 5542 696 5554 2215 1082 3312 2053 19536
sows .Percentage of tota
Feb. 15,1960 9 7 4 7 5 4 5 7 6
Feb. 6,1960 10 6 6 9 7 5 5 8 7
Feb. 14,1959 7 6 5 8 5 5 6 5 6
I/ Weighted average.
WEEKLY AVERAGE WHOLESALE VALUE OF HOG PRODUCTS DERIVED
FROM 100 LB. LIVE HOG. COMPARED WITH PRICES OF LIVE HOGS, CHICAGO
SHog products 1/ Hog prices ?/ :or margin -
Feb. 15, 1960 $15.75 $13.94 $1.79
Feb. 6, 1960 15.47 15.56 1.91
Feb. 14 1959 18.34 16.49 8
S. I l- .i................... ......--.--.1 ?.-.... -.. Q. ........
1 / Value of all edible products, fresh basis (lard rendered) in 100 lb. of live hog com-
puted from wholesale prices on carrot basis, Chicago, reported by National Provisioner
daily market report.
2/ Mean of daily quotations on U. S. No. 1, 2 and 3 hogs, 200-220# wt. Chicago.
T/ Difference between wholesale product value and hog prices.
HOG AND CORN PRICES AT CHICAGO AND HOG-CORN PRICE RATIO
---------------------------------------------- ------- ----------------
Barrows and Corn, : Hog-corn
Week ended gilts No. 3, yellow price ratio
Dollars per Cents per based on
100 pounds bushel barrows and gilts
----------- --------_-------- ------------------------------------ ....
Feb. 15, 1960 15.51 115.4 11.9
Feb. 6, 1960 153.11 113.8 11.5
Feb. 14, 1959 15.88 116.9 15.6
-/ Simple average price.









SHEEP AND LAMBS: WEEKLY AVERAGE OF DAILY QUOTATIONS
In dollars per 100 pounds


* -


Classification


Chicago ;


Omaha : Kansas : Fort
Oaha: City : Worth


: Denver


LAMBS: (Wooled)
Feb. 13, 1960
Feb. 14, 1959
Feb. 13, 1960
Feb. 14, 1959


- All wts.
21.02
19.62

20.22
18.88


EWES: (Wooled) All wts.
Good and Feb. 13, 1960 7.25 5.88 6.50 6.40 5.75 6.25
Choice Feb. 14, 1959 6.75 8.12 6.75 8.25 7.00 8.25


Cull and Feb. 15, 1960
Utility Feb. 14, 1959
FEEDER LAMBS All wts. -
Good and Feb. 13, 1960
Choice Feb. 14, 1959
Shorn basis.


6.58
6.50


4.25
6.25


-- 19.25
-- 19.75


5.25
5.00


7.25* 4.78
-- 6.25


- 17.00
-- 17.50


19.18
19.25


4.00
4.50


4.50
5.50


-- 17.59
-- 16.50


STEERS SOLD OUT OF FIRST HANDS FOR SLAUGHTER (REVISED)
SPercent of total *Average weight Average price in
SNwber of head by grades : (pounds) :dollars per 100 lb.
Grade --- -o---- ------ -u --- -- ---- -9 -~------~ -
-: RevIrsed .- Month o- JanuK8
:7 ke -tem -m :7m 3mamrke a s
: :-:7 markets: :7 market: :7 arke s: :7 aFkets
Denver Denver Denver Denver c
: combined : :combined : : combined : : combined


Prime ...........
Choice .. ..
Good ............
Standard ........
Commercial *.#*
Utility ......
All grades ....


14,889
5,400 168,9753
4,754 128,804
223 20,627
277
55 2,746
10,432 336,516


UNITED


Region


- -
N. Atlantic States ........
S. Atlantic States ........
N.C. States Eastern .....
N.C. States N.Western ...
N.C. States S.Western ...
S. Central States .........
Mountain States ....
Pacific States ............


51.8
45,6
2.1


4.4
50.53
38.3
6.1


1,224
1,164
1,122

1,004
1,193


STATES FEDERALLY INSPECTED SLAUGHTER BY
JANUARY 1960 with comparisons
(Thousand head)

Cattle : Calves


T9o6-
121
40
278
519
165
136
108
197


Total ................ 1,564


*15 9
I ~1YsY 1C" I950-


117
355
285
476
150
127
102
169


1,441


90
24
154
64
10
47
2
22

415


1,242
1,178
1,150
1,064
1,540
1,052
1,154

REGIONS


Hoes


27.98
25.56 25.95
24.10 23.91
19.02 21.21
21.67
17.60 18.23
24.64 24.95


*Sheep & lambs
*


7 1-95 99
1~1!55 ":C I9?o- I


50
164
67
9
49
2
23

424


531
337
1,484
2,654
655
496
120
241


6,516


Other animals slaughtered under Federal inspection, (number of head):
4,948; Goats 3,360 ; January 1959, horses 6,246 ; Goats 10,050 .
Data furnished by Agricultural Research Service.


505
274
1,362
2,497
510
453
95
209


210
131
424
88
68
147
170


199
1/
179
465
98
79
174
178


5,885 1,237 1,322

January 1960 Horses


SLAUGHTER
Choice


Good


Ogden


North
Port-
land


20.55
18.92

19.82
18.12


20.25
18.50

19.12
17.75


18.30
17.75

17.90
17.38


20.10
18.88

19.45
18.25


19.25
18.75

18.50
18.00


19.62
17.75*

19.00
17.16*


- -






152


WHOLESALE MEAT TRADE REVIEWS


IESS THAN CARLOT NEAT TRADE REVIEWS

EASTERN SEABOARD Demand was moderately
broad for virtually all fresh meats with trad-
ing fairly active on most sessions. Receipts
were slightly curtailed in wholesale channels.
However, strike conditions which closed major
chain stores in the Washington Area and par-
tially affected Baltimore retail outlets,
created some disturbance late in the week, due
to rerouting of product to other points. Good
clearance prevailed at markets in strike-bound
sections under broad buyer activity on closing
sessions, mainly provided by independent re-
tail outlets. A late buying flurry at Phila-
delphia, mostly a fill-in trade, was instru-
mental in averting a carryover of beef and pork.
Sales units at New York, mainly houses located
in suburban districts, were well stocked with
steer beef, which will be carried for the
coming week's business. At the same time, it
was disclosed that meat inventories at most
chain store warehouses located on the Eastern
Seaboard were near maximum. Diversion of some
cars enroute, to Washington and Baltimore, was
expected to extend into early next week, bar-
ring an end of strike conditions.
Compared with previous week: Steer beef
steady to strong at Washington and New York,
and strong to $1.00 higher at Philadelphia,
while the undertone at Baltimore was steady to
weak for both steer and cow beef. Cow carcass
prices were fully 50# lower at other markets.
Veal and calf prices were mostly unchanged,
some sales at Philadelphia $1.00 lower, while
weakness permeated the general price structure
for both veal and calf at New York, due in part
to generally poor selection. Lamb prices were
mostly steady at Baltimore and Washington and
fully $1.00 higher at Philadelphia. At the
close prices at New York were steady to $1.50
higher, bulk 50#-$1.00 up. Most of the advance
came late in the week. Pork loins closed steady
to $2.00 higher, with some advance at all mar-
kets except New York. Other pork cuts were
steady to $35.00 higher for the week, pork butts
holding the strongest price position in the
weeks a trade.

CHICAGO Trading on steer and heifer
beef moderately active with better demand for
700-900# steer carcasses than there has been
since the first of the year. Cow beef advanced
$1.00-2.00, Utility at the full upturn. Out-
lets were fairly broad for beef hindquarters,
arm and squarecut chucks and rounds. Ribs on
the other hand were slow, weights over 50#
hardest to move. Veal trade again was dull but
in most instances dealers were able to sell
small supplies at steady prices. Trading on
lamb carcasses and hindsaddles was moderately
active while foresaddles were slow but lower


prices stimulated movement somewhat late in
the week. Spareribs were slow but trade on
other fresh pork cuts was fairly active with
loins selling higher than at any time since
November 24, 1959. Beef, lamb and fresh park
supplies were only moderate. Beef largely Good
to average-Choice grades with an increased
showing of carcasses under 700#.
Compared to the previous Friday: Steer
and heifer beef steady to $1.00 higher; cow
beef $1.00-2.00 up; veal and lamb unchanged;
pork loins 8-16# $1.50-2.50 higher; Boston butts
50#-$2.00 higher; spareribs steady.


PACIFIC COAST Choice steer beef under
600# was again limited at Los Angeles but
about adequate while supplies of other steer
beef was liberal for a rather slow trade and
clearance was incomplete. Volume of cow
beef was moderate but about adequate while
calf was in rather limited supply. Lamb pro-
duction was limited but offerings were ample
while fresh pork loins were in small supply,
storms in the midwest was a contributing
factor in limiting incoming shipments. Vol-
vue of other fresh and cured pork was liberal
and more than adequate for a slow movement.
Prices compared with a week ago: Steer
beef steady to $1.00 lower; cow beef steady
at San Francisco and $1.00-2.00 higher else-
where on the West Coast; lamb steady to $5.00
higher, the advance in California; fresh pork
loins strong to $4.00 up; other fresh park
steady to $2.00 higher; smoked meats and
lard mostly steady, instances on sliced bacon
$1.00 higher at Los Angeles.


CARROT MEAT TRADE REVIEWS


Prices advanced on carlots of beef and
lamb although trading was only moderately
active and outlet was rather limited in in-
stances. The advances were prompted by up-
turns in the livestock trade.
Steer beef closed 504-$1.00 higher for
the week at New York, Denver and Philadelphia
with sales steady to 50# higher at Chicago
and strong to 50# higher, instances $1.00
up at Omaha. Heifer beef sold steady to 500
higher at Chicago, and mostly 50# up at Den-
ver and Omaha. Some Good heifer beef advanced
$1.00 at Omaha.
Lamb carcass prices were rather un-
even. Sales were steady at Denver and Chi-
cago, steady to 50# higher at Philadelphia,
and strong to 50# up at Omaha where supplies
were small. At New York, lamb carcasses
were steady to $1.00 higher with the bulk
50# up.








WHOLESALE DRESSED MEAT PRICES LESS THAN CARLOT BASIS
Weekly average of daily quotations in dollars per 100 pounds


New York


Classification


: Fe.
: 15
: 1960


: Feb.
: 14
: 1959


Chicago San Francisco Los
s Feb.: Feb. : Peb.tFeb. -t ?eS.
: 13 : 14. : 13 : 14 : 13
: 1960 : 1959 : 1960 t 1959 : 1960


Steer beef -
Prime 700-800#
Choice 600-700
700-800
Good 400-500
500-600
600-700
Standard 500-600


Heifer beef -
Choice

Good
Veal -
Prime
Choice
Good


Lamb -
Prime
Choice
Good


Fresh pork -
Loins


500-600#
600-700
500-600


90-120#
90-120
90-120


45-55#
45-55
35.-65


8-12#
12-16


Butts 4-8
Cured pork -
Hams, sink. skd. (Cook
before eating) 12-16#
Bacon, smoked, sliced -
1# package (box lots)
Picnics, smoked (Cook
before eating) 4-8#
Lard, 1# carton
Note: Prices at New York
pork cuts between Chicago


48.00
45.75
45.75

42.75
45.25


64.50
553.50
47.50


42.80
40.20
58.20


59.00
57.50
55.50


51.00
48.75
46.75

45.00
45.50


66.00
59.00
55.00


43.00
41.25
39.00


45.20
42.20
56.50


45.00
45.25
42.12
41.38
41.38
39.00


44.58
45.88
40.58


58.50
55.50
50.00



40.50
58.25


37.19
56.19
29.19


46.70
44.50
45.56
43.56
43.56
45.562
42.62


61.00
56.00
53.50


41.25
40.19
35.88


40.55
59.20
32.80


45.75
41.50
44.50
45.50
41.50
41.00


42.50
41.50





55.00



42.75
59.50


42.00
39.00
54.50


45.62
43.50
46.50
45.50
44.50
44.50


60.00



40.50
40.50


46.00
46.00
42.00


45.00
41.00

42.00
40.00
40.00


42.75
41.00
41.00


42.00
42.00
39.25


59.88
39.88
34.50


45.25
43.25

44.75
42.75
45.00


41.00
41.00
37.50


42.62
42.62
36.00


40.00 49.80 46.75 50.69 50.00 56.00 45.00 50.88

56.50 45.40 42.75 50.19 41.00 51.00 45.00 50.00

30.50 33.30 52.75 36.06 30.00 33.50 50.00 55.50
12.25 14.25 11.50 13.75 15.50 18.50 15.75 15.25


exclude locally dressed fresh meats.


Variation in prices in some cured


and New York due in part to differences in processing and packaging.


BULK PRICES CARLOT BASIS WEEK ENDED FEBRUARY 12, 1960


Classification

Steer beef -


Choice


Good


Heifer beef -
Choice

Good


600-700#
700-800
800-900
500-600
600-700
700-800

500-600#
600-700
500-600
600-700


C ~Prices paldF.Oh.B
: CHiEaio- :~ DenVer ""


45.50-44.00
42.00-42.50
40.00-40.50
40.00-40.50
40.00-40.50
39.50-40.00

45.00-45.50
42.00-45.00
38.50-59.00
58.50-59.00


Lamb -
Choice 55-45# 40.50-41.00
45-55 38.00-39.00
55-65 36.00-37.00


42.00-43.50
41.00-41.50
39.00-39.50

38.50-41.00
38.50-39.50

42.25-45.00
41.25-41.50


-- _: -P p--rIces delivered -
- miaha ~:_ "New York 7" PhTllde1lhTa


43.00-43.25
41.25-41.75
39.25-39.75

38.75-59.75
38.25-38.75

42.00-42.50
41.50-42.00
37.50-38.50
37.50-58.00


45.00-46.00
43.50-44.50
42.00-42.50
41.75-42.50
41.50-42.50
41.00-42.00


45.50-46.00
44.00-45.00
42.00-42.50

39.50-42.00
39.00-41.50


- 43.00-45.00

- 39.00-41.00


37.50 41.50-43.00 41.50-42.00
55.00-36.50 36.25-37.25 38.00-41.00 39.00-41.50
33.50-55.00 35.25-35.50 57.00-59.50 58L00-59t0Q.


Angeles
- Feb.
: 14
: 1959






154


BOSTON WOOL MARKET REVIEW


Trading in the Boston wool market was
extremely quiet. Domestic worsted wool
prices were weak with little activity.
Woolen wools were somewhat more active than
worsteds but prices were easier.
Australian prices opened easier on
Monday, but by midweek were uneven. Cabled
reports from Sydney, Melbourne and Perth
indicated prices little changed. Buying
interest largely from the Continent and
China.
South African prices steady to 2i%
lower. No sales this week in New Zealand
but offerings are somewhat lower. South
American markets were quiet.
Fleece Wools Very little activity
apparent in fleece wools. A large weight
of spot 1/4 blood brought $1.0Q5 clean for
May-June delivery. A car of Ohio graded
5/8 and 1/4 (65% 1/4 blood and 55% 5/8
blood) sold near $1.05 clean delivered.
Country buyers continued paying last week' s
prices for grease wool in Ohio and Indiana,
48-500 in Ohio and 45-500 in Indiana.
Territory Wools Activity in terri-
tory wools extremely limited. A graded
64s, about 22" average length, sold near
$1.20 clean, landed. Contracting of wool
on the sheep's back practically nil. Mills
and dealers have been reluctant to make
forward commitments on a declining market.
Country dealers largely holding firm on
offerings of 1959 wools.
Texas Wools Movement of Texas wools
very slow. Average to good yearling 64/70s
selling around $1.25 clean. Few odd lots
of 8-months and clippings selling at steady
to lower prices.
Mohair Action in mohair continued
very slow this week. It is estimated that
about 1/2 the fall clip is still in dealers'
hands. Prices were steady to weak. No
foreign interest present in recent weeks.
Shearing has started in some sections and
should be well under way by next week.
Foreign Wools Cabled reports at
week's end indicate some firmness following
the downward opening. Quotations follow:
Combing wools converted to U. S. Oil-combed
yields and short wools to scouring yields
in bond.
SOUTH AFRICA
Oil-combed Scoured yields
7 $1.11 22 $1.01
8 1.10 27 1.00
47 1.09 52 .95
48 1.07
52 1.06


AUSTRALIA
Oil-combed
61 $1.21
62 1.17
78 1.16
78A 1.11
79 1.07
80 1.06
422 1.10
425 1.06
424 1.00


NEW ZEALAND
Oil-combed
95 $.92
854 .91
100 .89
107 .88
114 .87
128 .86


MONTEVIDEO (April shipment)
(Clean basis)


Super
60/64s $1.0575
60s 1.0250
58/60s .9850


Choice
60s $1.0550
58/60s- 1.0150
56/58s- .9925
56s .9650
50s .9510


Carpet Wools Action continued
very slow through the week. Offerings
were again generally lower. Buenos
Aires March second clip was offered at
81-820 while November second clip wools
were offered around 85-85# clean fibers
present. New Zealand carpet fleeces
were offered for shipment at 85-860
clean fibers present.
Woolen wools Sales as follows:


64s
58/60s
56/58s
56s
46/48s


Scoured
1-2"
2-5"
2"
2-5"
2-5)


Pulled Domestic
paint $1.15
stained 1.12
ave. color 1.15
white 1.16
grey .95


Whol Tops The wool tops market
continued very quiet. Most inquiries.
concerned second quarter deliveries of
medium top. Topmakers reluctant to
commit themselves on future deliveries
or prices.


70s
64s
62a


Warp Aust. D/C
- $1.88 60s $1.71
- 1.82 58/60s 1.67
- 1.76


CLOSING FUTURES QUOTATIONS Feb. 11,
1960 (Furnished by the bool Assoc. of
the N. Y. Cotton Exchange)
March wool tops $1.49
March wool 1.175
May wool tops 1.522
May wool 1.185






135


ANNUAL LIVESTOCK AND POULTRY INVENTORY JANUARY 1, 1960
(Following summary based on tne complete report released by the
Crop Reporting Board, AMS, February 12, 1960)

Cattle numbers reached a new high on January 1, 1960. At 101.5 million head numbers were
up 5 percent, or 4.9 million head, from a year earlier. Beef cow numbers increased 7 percent
and all other classes of beef stock were up from a year earlier. Milk cows two years old and
over declined 1 percent to 81.3 million head, the smallest number since 1917. Hog numbers
increased 3 percent from January 1, 1959, due to the increase in the 1959 pig crop. Inventories
of all sheep and lambs were up 2 percent, while stock sheep numbers increased 3 percent from a
year earlier. Horse and mule numbers declined 2 percent during the year. Chicken and turkey
inventories each decreased 4 percent, from January 1, 1959. The total inventory value of all
livestock and poultry on farms and ranches January 1, 1960 was $16.2 billion--down 10 percent
from a year earlier.
CATTLA: The number of cattle and calves on farms and ranches in the United States increased
5 percent during 1959 and reached a new high on January 1, 1960. The total number on hand was
101,520,000 head-13 percent more than the 1949-58 average and 5 percent higher than the previous
record on January 1, 1956. Total cattle and calves increased 9 percent or 8,170,000 head during
the two-year period from January 1, 1958 to January 1, 1960, representing an upward movement in
the cattle cycle. This 9 percent increase is a little sharper than the first two years' upturn
of the last three cattle cycles. It is, however, only a moderate increase &hen compared with
some contiguous two-year periods in the build-up phases of previous cycles. For example, cattle
numbers increased 12,158,000 head or 15 percent from January 1, 1951 to January 1, 1953.
All States except Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Delaware, showed an in-
crease in cattle numbers during 1959. The higher inventory in most States resulted mainly from
an increase in classes of cattle kept for purposes other than milk production. Cattle on feed
January 1, this year in 26 important feeding States, for which comparable data are available,
were up 9 percent from the preceding year. An abundance of feed in most areas of the country
has been an important factor in the increase in cattle inventories. Cattle and calves kept
mainly for beef were up 7 percent from January 1, 1959, and the highest number on record, while
cattle and calves kept for milk were up only about one percent.
Commercial slaughter of cattle and calves in 1959 totaled 30,724,500 head, a decline of 7
percent from 1958 and the lowest since 1952. Cattle slaughter declined 603,600 head and calves
1,542,100.
Imports of 695,000 head of live cattle during 1959 from Canada and Mexico were only three-
fifths of the number imported in 1958. Imports from Canada were only about half, and from Mexico
about three-fourths of what they were in 1958.
HOGS: Hogs and pigs on farms and ranches on January 1, 1960 totaled 58,464,000 head, 3 per-
cent more than a year earlier, 7 percent above the 10-year average, and the largest for the date
since 1952. Compared with a year earlier, hog numbers increased in all regions of the country.
The largest percentage increases occurred in States outside the Corn Belt, with the largest in-
crease--11 percent-in the South Central States. In the North Central States, which account for
about 73 percent of the U. S. total, hog numbers were up only one percent, with increases in some
States more than offsetting decreases in others. The two principal States-Iowa and Illinois--
showed increases of 1 and 4 percent, respectively. Numbers also were up in Ohio and Missouri,
but lower or unchanged in the remaining States in these regions. For the other States, 26
showed increases, 6 remained the same, and 4 showed decreases.
SHE.P: The number of stock sheep and lambs on farms and ranches January 1, 1960 was
29,481,000 head, 3 percent above the 28,497,000 head on January 1, 1959. The number of sheep and
lambs on feed for market at 4,140,000 head was 7 percent less than a year earlier. All sheep and
lambs, including those on feed for market, totaled 33,621,000 head, a gain of 2 percent from
January 1, 1959. All classes of stock sheep increased from a year earlier. Ewe lamb numbers
changed from 4,709,000 to 4,801,000 head, an increase of 2 percent. Ewes one year and over in-
creased from 22,041,000 to 22,759,000 head.
GOATS: The number of all goats and kids on farms and ranches in Texas on January 1 at
3,339,000 head was 6 percent more than the 3,150,000 a year earlier. Total inventory value of
Texas goats was 29.4 million this January compared with 26.1 million on January 1, 1959. The
value per head this January 1 was $8.80 which is 50 cents per head higher than a year earlier.






136


LIVESTOCK AND POULTRY: NUMBER ON FARMS JANUARY 1, 1951-60, FOR THE UNITED STATES
(Thousand head)
Year S Cattle :CoTO 2yrs. H stock : Horses
Year Cattle ows : Hogs heep and miles: Chickens i Turkeys

951...... 82,083 25,568 62,269 27,251 7,036 450,988 5,057
952...... 88,072 25,060 62,117 27,944 6,150 426,555 5,725
955...... 94,241 23,549 51,755 27,595 5,405 398,158 5,086
954...... 95,679 25,896 45,114 27,079 4,791 396,776 4,956
955...... 96,592 25,462 50,474 27,157 4,509 590,708 4,917
956...... 96,804 23,215 55,173 27,012 3,928 582,846 4,925
957...... 94,502 22,916 51,705 26,558 3,574 590,157 5,802
958...... 95,350 22,255 50,980 27,327 3,554 570,884 5,542
959...... 96,650 21,488 56,924 28,497 5,142 585,529 5,925
960...... 101,520 21,5331 58,464 29,481 5,089 566,859 5,675


1 Included in all cattle.
LIVESTOCK AND POULTRY, BY CLASSES, UNITED STATES, JANUARY 1


: Average :
1949-5 : 1958
1949-58
* : a


1959 : 1960


: percent
S-of 1959


1,000 head 1,000 head


Cattle and calves.........******
Kept for milk.*********...........**
Cows 2 yrs. and older...
Heifers 1 to 2 yrs......
Heifer calves****...........**

Other cattle.............*******
Cows 2 yrs. and older...
Heifers 1 to 2 yrs.....
Calves**..*................*******
Steers 1 yr. and older..
Bulls 1 yr. and older...

Sheep and lambs*..........
On feed.*..****.. **....
Stock sheep**............
Lambs........*....*....
Eve...o............. .
Whether and ram........
1 yr. and older........
Ewes****.........*.........
Rams........*.*6**....
Wethers.****......**o........

Hogs and pigs*............****
Under 6 months..........******
6 months and older......
Sows and gilts.........
Others..***..............**********.

Poultry on farms
Chickens**.****o***....*
Hens............... ....
Pullets.................
Other........*.........


89,612
55,122
25,561
5,561
6,200

54,490
22,061
5,824
16,499
8,544
1,762

51,167
4,067
27,100
4,924
4,082
842
22,177
21,076
840
262

54,478
31,397
23,081
9,039
14,042


407,448
128,650
252,742
26,056


95,350
5533,4135
22,255
5,297
5,8835

59,957
24,287
6,0635
18,491
9,448
1,648

51,3537
4,010
27,527
4,968
4,545
623
22,359
21,526
842
191

50,980
52,861
18,119
8,355
9,764


370,884
127,891
224,619
18,574


1,000 head
96,650
52,755
21,488
5,296
5,951

65,915
25,513
6,820
19,698
10,23355
1,651

32,945
4,448
28,497
5,389
4,709
680
25,108
22,041
860
207

56,924
37,712
19,212
9,500
9,912


383,529
119,549
244,102
19,878


1,000 head
101,520
52,984
21,331
5,454
6,199

68,556
27,2635
7,419
21,095
11,009
1,752

33,621
4,140
29,481
5,561
4,801
760
23,920
22,759
899
262

58,464
38,749
19,715
8,237
11,478


566,859
125,514
223,838
17,507


1
]
]
1
1
1
1
1
1
1


Percent
105
101
99
103
104

107
107
109
107
108
106

102
95
105
105
102
112
104
105
105
127

105
105
103
89
116


96
105
92
88


- --- *I6U as-






137
COLD STORAGE HOLDING OF MEATS AND LARD, JANUARY 31, 1960

The January net-into-storage movement of red meats surpassed gains of a year
earlier and average. The 52-million pound net gain brought total stocks to 596
million on February 1. Although 3 percent below average, these stocks were 19 per-
cent above those of a year ago. A 6-million pound net decline in beef stocks during
January compares with a slight reduction the same month last year and 4 million, the
average decline. Warehouse holdings of beef totaled 196 million pounds on February 1.
For the date last year, 174 million pounds were in storage. Average holdings are 185
million. A net gain of 45 million pounds in pork stocks during January compares with
54 million a year earlier and 37 million, the average. The 309 million pounds in
storage on February 1 were 29 percent larger than stocks held on that date last year,
but 11 percent smaller than average holdings. Stocks of frozen picnics of 8.6 mil-
lion pounds were down about 1 million from January 1, and slightly below holdings on
February 1, 1959. Frozen ham holdings doubled during January to total 56 million
pounds on February 1--above holdings on the same date last year by 15 million. A net
gain of 17 million pounds during January brought holdings of frozen pork bellies to
90 million on February 1. These stocks compare with 55 million pounds in storage on
February 1, 1959.


UNITED STATES STORAGE HOLDINGS OF MEATS AND LARD,


Commodity


Beef:
Frozen. .
In cure and
Total .


. .
cured .


JAN. 31, 1960


(Includes holdings in public, private and
cold storage houses and meat packing


: January s
: 1955-59

1,000 lb.

. 173,008
11,855
. 184,863


January
1959

1,000 lb.

159,569
14,194
173,763


semi-private
plants)


WITH COMPARISONS


December
1959

1,000 lb.

191,105
11,006
202,109


January
1960
1, 00 lb.

183,560
12,558
195,718


Pork, frozen:
Picnics .
Hams. . o
Bellies . .
Other frozen pork cuts. .
Total . .
Pork in cure or cured:
Dry salt bellies. .
Other dry salt pork .
Other pork cuts .
Total . .
Total pork .
Other meats and meat products:
Veal, frozen. .
Lamb and mutton, frozen .
Canned meats in cooler. .
Total all meats .
Lard, rendered and refined 2/
GOVERNMENT HOLDINGS 5/ -
D^V


270,15




2/
76,521
546,642

16,583
8,784
57,780
614,652
1235,858


7 '7Q9


8,896
40,996
54,762
80,052
184,706

12,5329
8,464
54,990
55,783
240,489

15,704
10,118
58,581
498,655
109,100


q A9'3


9,357
28,468
73,023
108,556
219,364

10,327
6,949
27,640
44,916
264,280

9,960
14,794
52,544
543,687
123,700


9 11i


8,559
56,361
89,700
107,599
262,219

9,659
7,085
50,526
47,270
509,489

9,429
13,988
67,055
595,657
4/


1 099


Beef. .. .... 10,612 2,076 1,652 1,951

J/Not reported separately prior to 1957. 2/ In dry and cold storage as reported
by Bureau of Census. 3/ Government holdings are included in the totals and consist
of reported stocks held by U.S.D.A., the Armed Services and other Government agencies.
4/ Not available.


- - --- 14.






158


MEAT AND MEAT FOOD PRODUCTS PREPARED AND PROCESSED
UNDER FEDERAL INSPECTION


Product


Placed in cure -
Beef 2/ . .
Pork j/ . .
Other 1/ .
Smoked and / or dried -
Beef 1/ .
Pork 0/ .. .
Cooked meat -
Beef. . .
Pork. . .
Other . .


Sausage -
Fresh finished. .


. .


S Jan.
. 9
S 1960

1,000#

3,080
74,107
39

900
52,576


1,917
4,957
55

6,618


To be dried or semi-dried 2,4354
Franks, wieners 12,696
Other, smoked or cooked 12,786
Loaf, head cheese, chili,
jellied products. .. 4,032
Steaks, chops, roasts 11,250
Meat extract. 14
Sliced bacon l/ 24,357
Sliced, other j1/ g2/ 5,307
Hamburger . 4,850
Miscellaneous meat product. 5,752
Lard, rendered 52,381
Lard, refined 40,348
Oleo stock .. 1,805
Edible tallow 6,941
Rendered pork fat -
Rendered . 1,933
Refined . .. 1,154
Compound containing animal fat 14,719
Oleomargarine 2,8753


Canned product (for civilian
use and Dept. of Defense).


51,947


TotalI! . 399,767

I/ This figure represents "inspection p
have been inspected and recorded more than
to more than one district processing treaty


Week ended -


Jan.
16
* 1960
1,000#


5,885
77,278
54

977
56,217


1,9453
5,150
41

7,117
2,604
15,465
13,763

3,875
13,108
18
25,642
5,594
5,518
4,016
53,945
43,458
1,774
7,168

2,022
1,441
16,753
3,000

54,072

423,852

ounds" as
once due
ent, such


Jan.
25
1960
1,000#


5,566
70,676
65

860
55,587


1,862
4,995
127

6,505
2,7453
12,067
12,872

5,892
12,422
1355
23,071
5,475
4,601
4,297
48,473
56,112
1,547
7,189

1,83355
1,707
15,063
3,4035

56,205
3595,149'


*
:

*


Jan.
50
1960
1,000#


5,261
65,530
186

946
47,907


1,844
4,627
127

6,017
2,795
11,457
11,907

5,552
15,021
32
20,595
5,265
4,291
4,675
45,851
52,818
1,405
6,886

1,797
951
15,062
5,075

56,774

372,369


-------------
some of the products may
to having been subjected
as curing first, then


smoking, slicing.
2/ Includes sliced dried beef, sliced sausage, loaves, etc.
Meat Inspection Branch, Agricultural Research Service.


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
IIII 1111 I il li II l
3 1262 08735 7140


U. S. Department of Agriculture
Washington 25, D. C.


Postage and fees paid
JJ. S. Department of Agriculture


OFFICIAL BUSINESS


Form AMS-2/16/60
Permit 1001.


University of Florida
Documents Librarians
ii-4-59 The University Libraries
LS-CLS GalnesV lle, Fla.


LIVESTOCK PRICES AT CHICAGO COMPARED WITH WHOLESALE AND COMPOSITE RETAIL
MEAT PRICES AND WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MEAT VALUES AT NEW YORK
: Steers : Lambs : Hogs
: Jan. : Dec. : Jan. : Jan. s Dec7 : Jan. : Jan. : Dec. : Jan.-
: 1960 : 1959 : 1959 : 1960 : 1959 : 1959 : 1960 : 1959 : 1959
Dollars per 100 pounds


Live animal prices
Chicago I/. 27.52 26.50 29.61: 19.90 17.84 19.55: 12.61 11.97
Wholesale meat prices,
New York 2_/ 46.54 46.19 47.88: 42.16 40.50 45.28: -
Cents per pound
Composite retail meat
prices, New York V./ 77.04 77.57 79.36 65.92 64.88 66.20 -

Value of carcass meat from 100# live animal (Dollars)


17.08


Wholesale-New York 4/
Retail New York 5/


27.80
56.21


27.71
36.46


28.75
57.50


20.66
50.17


19.75
30.62


21.21
51.25


17.45 17.52
24.24 24.04


I/ Av. Choice and Prime steers, 900-1100 lb., Choice lambs, and U. S. No. 1, 2 and 5,
220-240# hogs. 2/ Av. Choice and Prime steer beef, 600-800 lb., and Choice and Prime
lamb. 5/ Composite av. of semi-monthly retail quotations on various cuts (incl. lard)
combined in proportion to their respective yields from live weight. 4/ 60 lb. of beef
carcass, 49 lb. of lamb carcass and 60.45 lb. of principal hog products consisting of
smoked, skinned hams, bacon, picnics, fresh loins, Boston butts, spareribs, and carton
lard combined in proportion to their respective yields from live weight. 5_/ 47.0 lb.
of beef cuts, 47.2 lb. of lamb cuts and 58.56 lb. of principal hog products, incl. lard.


140


22.19
29.29




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