Livestock, meat, wool market news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Livestock, meat, wool market news
Physical Description:
v. : ; 21-23 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service. -- Livestock, Poultry, Grain, and Seed Division
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service. -- Livestock Division
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service. -- Livestock & Seed Division
Publisher:
The Division
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Meat industry and trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Livestock -- Marketing -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
Statement of Responsibility:
Livestock, Poultry, Grain and Seed Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 27, no. 1 (Jan. 6, 1959) issue.
Issuing Body:
Vols. for <Jan. 16, 1979-May 14, 1983> issued by: Livestock, Meat, Grain and Seed Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture; <Nov. 12, 1983-> by: the Livestock Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture; 1996 issue\d by: the Livestock and Seed Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 47, no. 2 (Jan. 16, 1979).
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 58, no. 40 (Oct. 6, 1990).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004691915
oclc - 04512121
lccn - sn 87043107
Classification:
lcc - NOT IN LC
ddc - 338.105
System ID:
AA00008493:00034

Related Items

Preceded by:
Market news (Washington, D.C.)
Succeeded by:
Livestock, meat, and wool weekly summary and statistics

Full Text






MEAT



WOOL


WEEKLY SUMMARY

AND STATISTICS


LIVESTOCK DIVISION, AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF
WASHINGTON 2s.


Vol. 50, No. 26


AGRICULTURE


June 26, 1962


Week


Livestock Market Reviews .
Livestock Market Receipts .
Feeder Statistics ..
Estimated Percentage of Feeder
in Salable Receipts .


1 616. .9 .6 .
Cattle an --Slaughter Cows
S* 0 0 0 0 0 a


Steer Sale Statistics . .
Slaughter at Major Centers .
Estimated Slaughter and Meat Production
Cattle Prices . .
Hog Prices .
Hog Purchase Statistics .
Sheep and Lamb Prices . .
Wool Market Review . .
Wholesale Meat Trade Reviews .
Wholesale Dressed Meat Prices


. 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 *0 0
*0 0 0 0 *

0 0 0 0 0
*00 0 a 0 0 0
* 0 0 0 0 0


*00 0 0 0 0
* 0 0 0 0 0 0

* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
. .. .. .. .
. .. .. .. .
. .. .. .. .
.e.ooo. ..o.
. .. ..o.. .
. ..o.. .. .
oo.o .. .. .
. o. .. .. .


Special to this issue

Meat and Meat Food Products Processed and Canned Under
Federal Inspection, Apr. 29-June 2, 1962 .
Pig Crop Report, June 1962 . .0
Stocker and Feeder Cattle and Sheep Received in
Selected North Central States, May 1962 .
United States Exports of Meats, April 1962 .
United States Exports of Livestock, April 1962 .
Number of Cattle and Calves from Canada and Mexico Passed
for Entry into the United States, January-April, 1962.
Retail Sales Value Comparisons of Choice Grade
Beef Carcasses, May 1962 . .. .


Page
482
485
485

485

486
487
487

488
489
490
500
491
492
495


494
496

498
499
499

499

500


s.eIl-als




MIDWEST LIVESTOCK REVIEW
and
RANGE AND FEEDLOT SALES


The number of slaughter steers and heifers
sold out of first hands at the seven markets
totaled 109,600 head compared 111,000 last week
and 120,100 a year ago. Slaughter steers and
heifers sold steady to 50# higher with Choice
and Prime grades showing the most advance. Cows
were steady to 500 higher except 50-750 lower
at Omaha and St. Paul. Barrows and gilts sold
25# to $1.00 higher. Slaughter lambs were
steady to $1.00 lower.

SLAUGHTER CATTLE AND CAMLES Cattle mar-
ketings were virtually on a par with the
previous week, and there was no significant
change in the consist of receipts. Good and
Choice slaughter steers continued to form the
bulk of offerings at most points with cows and
feeding stock again in comparatively small
supply. In view of a better distribution of
receipts from day to day, slaughter steers and
heifers finished the period steady to 500 high-
er despite a lower wholesale dressed beef trade
at most major consuming centers. However,
prices were at their highest early in the week,
and at some points initial gains were erased.
Steers and heifers grading average Choice to
Prime generally showed most strength, and in
Chicago demand was broader for steers weigh-
ing 1250# up than for lighter weights. Trading
on cows was irregular with prices steady to
50 higher except 50-75# lower at Omaha and
St. Paul. Bulls were generally steady to 500
higher, while vealers sold steady.to $1.00 low-
er.
Slaughter steers: Choice steers bulked at
$24.25-26.25, largely $24.25-25.50 at Missouri
River centers. Nothing sold above $26.50 ex-
cept at Chicago where high-Choice and Prime
sold at $26.25-27.75, several loads Prime
1250-1400Q cashed at $28.00-28.50. Receipts
included only a few loads of steers weighing
above 1350#, with the result average weight
continued to run lighter than a year ago.
Bulk Good steers brought $22.00-24.25, Standard
ranging down to $19.00.
Slaughter heifers: Scattered loads of
high-Choice and mixed Choice and Prime heifers
$25.75-26.00. Choice heifers largely $24.00-
25.25, Good mainly $21.75-24.00.
Slaughter cows: The increased showing of
grass cows was a factor in the decline at
markets where cows sold lower. Utility and
Commercial cows largely $14.00-17.50, a few
Commercial to $18.00, and bulk Canner and
Cutter $13.00-16,50.
FEEDER CATTLE AND CALVES Receipts of
feeder cattle and calves at midwest terminal
markets were little different than the season-
ally limited volume which was marketed the pre-
vious week but fell somewhat short of a year


ago. Supplies included a moderate number in
the upper half of the Choice grade and
scattered shipments of Choice and Fancy grades.
However, Good and mixed Good and Choice ship-
mHats predominated with a moderate percent
falling in the Medium grade. Trading far the
most part was fairly active with prices on the
whole showing only slight deviation from a
steady basis. However, both degree of trading
activity and price trends varied somewhat from
market to market. For example, at Kansas City
the market was steady to 25# higher and at
Sioux City steady to strong, while at Omaha
prices ruled steady to easier, spots 25#
lower.
Feeder steers: Good and Choice 800-1050#
largely $22.00-24.50, few Good around 1000#
$21.50. At Omaha few loads Good and mixed
Good and Choice partly fattened 950-1025#
$22.50-23.00 and at Sioux City several loads
mostly Choice 900-1000# $22.75-24.25. Choice
800# occasionally reached $25.50. Good and
Choice 550-750Q $23.50-28.00, few Choice 565-
579# $28.25-29.25. Medium and mixed Medium
and Good 550-75Q? sold from $18.00-24.00. At
St. Paul Comman and Medium 880# Holsteins
brought $18.50.
Feeder heifers: Good and Choice 525-700#
bulked at $22.00-25.00; Choice 725# included
at $24.00 while load Choice 800# $25.60. At
Omaha Choice 504# brought $26.50.
Feeder calves: Two loads Choice and Fancy
594# steers $54.50; bulk Choice 300-550Q
$27.00-52.00; Good and mixed Good and Choice
$24.00-29.00. Choice 5397# heifers brought
$29.00; other heifers of Good and Choice
grades in a 550-500# weight range $22.00-28.75.

HOGS Terminal markets A higher
dressed pork trade stimulated still further
price gains throughout the major hog marketing
area. Barrows and gilts were 25#-$1.25 higher
than the previous week's close, with the ex-
ception of Kansas City and Sioux Falls which
were steady to 25# lower. The latter trend
reflected the narrow shipping demand to the
West Coast. Soews were steady to 50# higher at
the eastern Cora Belt markets and at St. Paul,
In the western part of the area, prices were
steady to 250 lower, extremes 50# lower at
Sioux Falls where there was a sharp increase in
numbers. Sow receipts ranged from 6 percent
at Kansas City to 24 percent at St. Paul.
These percentages were substantially smaller
than the same period a year ago when this
class made up between 25 and 50 percent of the
run at most Corn Belt markets. There was
some evidence that new crop bogs were begin-
ning their regular seasonal movement since
many terminals reported an increase of 180-200C
offerings. Hog receipts at the 12 markets







estimated at 308,000 head were 7 percent
larger than last week and 17 percent above a
year ago.
Barrows and gilts: At eastern Corn Belt
terminals closing sales of U. S. 1-2, 190-240#?
$18.50-19.50, and $16.25-18.75 at western Corn
Belt terminals. No. 1-5, 180-24CW $17.75-18.75,
down to $17.50 at Sioux Falls.
Sows: No. 1-5, 270-400Q closed at $14.25-
15.50, selected lota 270-350# $15.75-16.25 in
the east. No. 2-3, 400-550 $13.25-14.75.
Feeder pigs at St. Paul were strong to 50#
higher, with Choice 120-160# selling at $15.50-
16.50, mostly $16.00. Sioux City prices were
50# higher with Good and Choice 130-170W sell-
ing at $15.00-15.75.
Average cut-out value advantage of U. S.
No. 1 over No. 5 live basis 200-220# barrows
and gilts was 91# per cut. based on wholesale
carlot prices of fresh pork cuts at Chicago,
June 14 to June 20, 1962, inclusive.
Interior Iowa-Southern Minnesota area re-
ceipte totaled 277,000 compared with 260,000
the preceding week and 275,000 in the like
period a year earlier. Supplies were only mod-
erate and usually below demand. Prices moved
upward again, barrows and gilts advanced 65#
to mostly 75# to reach the highest point since
early January. Sows were 15-50# higher, mostly
mostly 25-40# up.
Barrows and gilts: On Friday, U. S. 1-5
200-24(# brought $17.00-17.75, some sales No.
1-2 $17.75-18.00.
Sows: Most U. S. 1-3 270-400# $14.00-
15.40, few No. 1-2 270-500# $15.40-15.75; No.
2-3 400-550# $12.55-14.65.
Interior Illinois Receipts were 99,200
head compared with 97,400 a week earlier and
79,100 a year ago. Demand was good, however,
the beat demand early as same eastern packers
were out of market late. Barrows and gilts
under 240# closed fully 75# higher, extremes
$1.00 higher while weights over 240 mostly
25-50# higher, sons 25-50# higher.
Barrows and giltst On Friday, U. S. 1-5,
190-235# $17.50-18.25, mostly $17.75-18.25;
sorted No. 1-2 200-230# $18.50-19.00j No. 1-3
220-250# $16.75-17.50.
Sows: No. 1-3 250-400# $13.25-15.25, few
$15.50; No. 2.- 400-600# $182.25-1.75.

SHEEP AND IAMBS Receipts at the 12
markets totaled 80,000 head, compared with
74,000 a week earlier and 71,000 last year.
The expansion in marketing was mainly in the
spring lamb division with the class usually 65
percent or ore of receipts at terminals.
lower carlot dressed lamb prices coupled with
moderate lamb numbers offered at markets influ-
enced price dowturns an slaughter lambs for
the first time in a month. Slaughter lambs
sold steady to $1.00 lower, manaly 50-41.00
off compared the previous week' a close. Slaugh-
ter ewes were steady to 50# lower. Feeders
were scarce, steady, instances 50# higher.


Spring slaughter lambs: Choice and Prime
77-108# $23.00-25.30, few $26.00 to midweek but
closing levels $22.00-24.00, sparingly $24.25-
25.00. Good and Choice 75-105# $18.00-25.00.
Old-crop slaughter lambs: Shorn, Choice
84-110# lambs with an end of yearlings No. 2
to fall shorn pelts $20.50-21.00, few $21.50
early; late sales Good and Choice $17.50-20.00
except at Fort Worth $14.00-16.50.
Slaughter ewes: Shorn, Cull to Good $5.00-
5.50, few $6.00-6.50.
Feeder lambs: At Denver, Fancy spring
lambs 72-9M# $19.00-20.20, Choice and Fancy
62-80# $18.20-19.00. At other points, Choice
and Fancy $16.00-18.00, Good and Choice 45-7Q0
$13.50-17.00 except $10.00-13.50 at Fort Worth.
Interior Iowa-Southern Minnesota area
sheep and lamb receipts totaled 15,000 head,
compared to 12,600 the previous week and 14,500
last year. Demand for slaughter lambs lagged
after midweek despite only moderate receipts.
Slaughter lambs closed the period weak to
mostly 50# lower. Slaughter ewes were
steady.
Spring slaughter lambs: Choice and Prime
80-106# delivered to packing plants $22.00-
23.00 late, few lots high-yielding lambs
$23.50. Few Choice 70-85# $20.00-22.00. Good
and Choice 80-105# $19.00-22.00.
Old-crop slaughter lambs: Shorn, Good and
and Choice 80-U15# with end of yearlings No.
1-5 pelts $18.00-19.50 on the close, few
Choice $20.00; load Choice 100# No. 1 pelts
$21.00 Wednesday.
Slaughter ewes: Cull to Good shorn $2.50-
4.50 few Good fat wasty ewes 150-150# $2.00.

RANGE AND FEEDLOT SAIES

Note: Shrink on most range and feedlot
sales none to 5 percent,mostly 4 percent f.o.b.
some with short haul and 3 percent shrink. All
sales for immediate delivery unless specified.

ARIZONA, CALIFORNIA, NEVADA AND UTAH -
Direct trade an slaughter steers and heifers
rather slow at mostly steady, instances 50#
lower prices, most delivery dates current
through July. Feeder cattle and calves fairly
active at steady prices. Spring slaughter
lambs scarce, few sales fully steady.
Slaughter steers: California-Arizona,
6,925 mostly Choice 900-1125# $25.50-27.00,
2050 Good and Choice 950-120Q $25,00-25.50;
5,500 Standard and Good and mostly Good 900-
1200# $23.40-25.00; 400 mostly Standard 950-
1150 $22.00-25.50. Utah, 100 Good to mostly
Choice 1075-Q100 $24.50-25.00.
Slaughter heifers: California and Ariaona,
700 mostly Choice, 825-900# $25.15-26.00, 2
loads Choice 900o promising high-yield $26.25.
950 Good and Choice 750-90C# $24.40-25.15.
Utah, 120 Good to mostly Choice 875-900Q
$24.00-24.50.
Feeder cattle and calvest Steers, 150







Choice, end of Fancy 600# $27.00; 550 Choice
525-675# $25.00-26.00; 1,750 Good and Choice
450-650# $23.00-24.75; current through October,
2,500 mostly Choice 600-800# $24.00; 1,125 Med-
ium with end of Good 560-800C $20.00-22.00.
Heifers: 300 Choice 300# calves $24.50; 50
mostly Choice 400# $24.00. Mixed steers and
heifers, 2,160 Choice and Fancy 375-485# steers
$26.00-27.00, heifers $24.00-25.00, 130 Good
and Choice 692# steers $24.00, heifers $23.00.
90 Choice 700# steers $24.00, 650# heifers
$23.00.
Spring slaughter lambs: California, 6,200
Choice and Prime 95-110# shorn with No. 2 pelts
$21.00-22.25, bulk $21.50-22.25.

COLORADO, SOUTHERN WYOMING, WESTERN KANSAS
AND WESTERN NEBRASKA Trading direct at feed-
lots on slaughter steers and heifers during
the past week was uneven. Movement was good
late last week with sales confirmed on about
100 loads of steers and heifers through the
weekend and demand continued fairly broad
through Tuesday. However, by Wednesday, trading
turned slow with poor movement and a weak price
trend on carcass beef principle bearish factor.
Slaughter steers and heifers steady to 25# low-
er compared with close of last week.
Slaughter steers: Colorado, 800 average
to high-Choice 1100-1200# $25.30-25.50, includ-
ing two loads mostly high-Choice 1125# $25.50
to West Coast packers f.o.b. loading point;
around 1,500 Choice 1050-1225# $25.00-25.75 late
last week; 1,550 Choice 1000-125Q0 $24.50-
25.25; 600 mixed Good and Choice 975-1200#
$23.50-25.00; 225 Standard and Good 1050-1125#
$20.50-22.50. Nebraska, 450 Choice 1020-1150Q
$24.75-25.00. All steers 4 percent shrink and
majority delivered packing plants unless other-
wise stated.
Slaughter heifers: Colorado, 120 Choice and
Prime 950# $25.75; 1,000 Choice 850-1050#
$24.50-25.25; about 40 loads Choice 850-975#
$24.75-25.35 late last week; 300 mixed Good and
Choice 825-1000# $23.50-24.50 with 120 875# at
$24.25-24.50 to Utah packers f.o.b. loading
point. All heifers 4 percent shrink and ma-
jority delivered to packing plants unless other-
wise stated.
Feeders: Volume continued small, but pri-
ces steady. 750 Choice 680-86Q# steers $22.75-
24.25; 100 Choice 650# heifers $23.00.

NEW MEXICO, WEST TEXAS, WESTERN OKLAHOMA,
SOUTHWESTERN KANSAS Clovis Area Slaughter
steers and heifers in rather limited supply and
movement slow at steady to weak prices. Feeder
cattle slow, steady. Spring slaughter lambs
$1.00-1.50 lower, old-crop shorn lambs mostly
steady; slaughter ewes fully steady; spring
feeder lambs mostly steady.
Slaughter steers: 300 Choice 1077-1150#
$24.50-24.75; mixed Good and Choice 950-10Q#
$24.00-24.65; 10 loads mostly Good 970-100Q#
$23.10-23.75.


Slaughter heifers: Four loads mostly
Choice 925-950# heifers $24.00; Standard and
Good 697-925# $21.50-23.50.
Feeders: For immediate delivery, 1,000
mostly Good 550-682# steers $22.40-23.25; 21
loads mostly Good 445-450# feeder heifers
$22.00-22.10.
Slaughter lambs: 3,000 Good and Choice
78-83# $19.50-21.50; 2,000 Good and Choice old-
crop shorn lambs No. 1 pelts $14.00-15.00.
12,000 Utility and Good slaughter ewes $4.00-
5.50, few Good and Choice $6.00; 13,000 Good
and Choice 60-70# spring feeder lambs $14.00-
16.00; load Choice and Fancy 73# $19.90.
Amarillo Area Trading moderately active,
steers fully steady, heifers steady to 25#
higher. Few feeders for immediate delivery,
fully steady to strong.
Slaughter steers: 100 mostly Choice 1180#
$24.75; 100 Good and Choice 110no $24.00; 75
Good lo100# $25.00.
Slaughter heifers: 500 Good and Choice
840-94Q# $23.25-24.40.
Feeders: 500 Good to mostly Choice 600-
650# steers $24.00-24.50; 250 Choice 600-625#
heifers $23;5,00-25.50; 2,600 Choice and Fancy
450-500# steers $28.00, heifers $26.00; 400-
460# steers $29.00-50.00, heifers $27.00-28.00.

OREGON AND WASHINGTON Slaughter steers
steady to weak; heifers steady to 50# lower;
feeder cattle generally steady; spring slaugh-
ter lambs 75# to $1.00 lower.
Slaughter steers: Washington and Oregon,
Good to mostly Choice 1000-118Q $25.75-27.00.
Slaughter heiferst Washington, Good to
mostly Choice 850-95C0 $24.00-25.00.
Feeder cattle: Washington, most Choice
725# steers $25.00; Good. to mostly Choice
750# steers $25.00 f.o.b. August delivery.
Spring slaughter lambs: Washington,
Choice and Prime 98# $25.00 delivered; Choice
and Priim 95-90 $21.85-22.00 f.o.b. Oregon,
Choice and Prime 90-100# $21.00-22.00 de-
livered. Choice and Prime slaughter and
Choice and Fancy feeders July-Sept. delivery
$17.00-18.50. 1,500 Choice and Prime 90-935
$19.50-20.35 f.o.b.

MONTANA AND NORTHERN WYOMING Limited
volume of fed cattle sold in the country at
steady prices. Feeders alow and mostly steady.
Slaughter lambs moderately active, steady.
Slaughter cattle: 100 Choice 800-1200#
mixed steers and heifers $25.50-24.50.
Feeder cattle: Montana, 700 Choice heit-
ers expected to weigh 675# $22.25, September 15
delivery. 500 Choice steers $23.75, expected
weight 725#, October 15 delivery. South Dakota,
600 Choice steers $24.00, expected to weigh
725# October 15 delivery.
Sheep: Montana, 5,000 Choice spring feed-
er lambs $16.00, expected 50 percent fat at de-
livery October 1. Wyoming 15,000 Choice spring
feeders $16.00, expected to weigh over 80W
and 60 percent fat at delivery in September.









Market

Chicago .......
Denver ........
Fort Worth ....
Indianapolis ..
Kansas City ...
Oklahoma City .
Omaha ........
St. Joseph ....
St. Louis NSI .
Sioux City ....
Sioux Falls ...
So. St. Paul ..
Total .......
June 16. 1962
IrTECIOR IOA A


INTERIOR IL


WEEKLY RECEIPTS OF SALABLE LIVESTOCK AT 12 PUBLIC MARKETS
S -Cattle : Calves Is s 1 I Sheep and lambs
* June 25t June 24 tJune 23 June 24 June 23 t June 24 June 23 June 24
2 1962 1 1961 3 1962 3 1961 t 1962 s 1961 s 1962 t 1961
31,975 37,471 72 249 56,670 28,565 2,242 3,415
7,995 10,149 26 68 4,880 4,257 6,075 5,929
10,366 8,204 1,574 1,180 1,7353 1,855 19,501 10,445
7,408 6,790 404 660 25,569 22,267 1,908 2,462
12,595 15,915 515 416 19,849 14,717 5,162 6,492
8,799 7,812 873 511 3,064 2,254 2,581 5,069
37,540 56,206 260 698 46,498 57,749 9,574 9,522
15,577 16,045 200 294 27,751 24,327 9,511 6,650
15,085 15,764 1,454 1,497 45,089 39,509 3,429 4,075
26,288 27,507 798 805 40,256 55,801 5,613 6,5352
8,756 8,003 39 98 17,580 15,177 7,696 5,256
19,708 19,623 5,642 5,741 59,701 58,958 7,255 6,940
199,870" 207,485 9,857 10',217~ 508i240 26594 79,94" 70,547-
199 444 9,828 288,966 74,058
U------ -----------------------------------
D SOOTHZN MINNESOTA June 25, 1962 June 16, 1962 June 24, 1961
Hogs ...... 277,000 260,000 275,000
Sheep ..... 15,000 12,600 14,500
LINOIS Hogs ...... 99,200 97,400 79,100


FEEDER CATTIEs AVERAGE COST, WEIGHT, AND NUMBER
----------.------ W^ ---?! wAgO_^ JK~f^MJTM ---------
t Week ended t Month 3 Five months
I June 21 J une 14i June 221 May I May- Jan.-May
1962 1 1962 t 1961 : 1962 1961 3 1962 2 1961
-------------------------------------------------------------------------


Steers 1001# up ......... 264 3533 178 1,651 5,087
901-1000 ......... 1,075 788 1,075 6,878 8,641
801-900 .......... 1,695 2,566 2,279 12,743 13,253
701-800 .......... 1,929 3,107 2,972 15,831 21,578
501-700 .. ....... 4.266 4_975 5,802_ 9,811 44,901
Total steers 10 markets.... 9,225 11,569 12,504 76,914 91,460
Av. wt. w .... 735# 752# 719# 716# 719#
Av. cost~ .... $23.64 $23.48 $21.56 t23.91 $22.44
S Chicago ...... 25.65 22.80 21.10 23.72 22.22
Kansas City... 23.50 23.13 21.64 24.18 25.06
Omaha ........ 25.97 23.71 22.11 25.91 22.72
SS. St. Paul... 22.95 21.77 21.41 21.90 20.85
Sioux City.... 24.75 25.02 22.78 25.34 25.48
U D Denver ....... 22.19 23.24 20.71 22.92 22.61
U U Ft. Worth .... 22.99 23.21 20.28 23.37 21.43
Oklahoma City. 25.22 22.77 21.75 25.10 21.56
S S. St. Joseph. 25.74 25.83 21.74 24.15 25.52
St. Louis NST. 22.97 22.84 21.40 23.79 22.15
Total calves 10 markets.. 6,196 5,546 7,058 28,143 34,752
heifers **.. 2,108 2,249 2,4355 17,441 15,166
COWs .* 535 392 526 2,556 2,670
Mot adjusted for differences in grade of cattle sold at each wket.


9,415
58,106
64,289
70,169
198. 091
380,068
715#
$24.04
23.45
24.15
24.27
21.76
25.40
24.05
25.45
25.65
24.11
25.44
177,228
69,206
12,160


15,600
42,470
66,915
85,767
229,195
439,947
714#
$23.82
22.97
23.54
23.90
21.65
25.40
24.68
22.72
22.85
23.91
22.75
197,361
63,567
14,173


_ ESTIMATED PERCENT OF FEEDER CATTLE AND SLAUGHTER COWS IN SALABLE RECEIPTS
Weeee Chi-Kan.s S. St. 'Sioi&S.St.'Indian.'Den- Ft. 5Okla.'Wich-I San
Wek eed t 13m Oma: ,Louis t a t
eek ded cago Josephity l pol ver north City. ita Antonio
------------ -- -- -|gg- --- -- ---- --------------------..~L
Feeders
June 22, 1962 1 25 8 8 6 18 8 5 5 70 65 18 65
June 15, 1962 2 50 7 7 8 20 8 5 6 70 65 17 70
Jume 25, 1961 2 25 8 9 10 19 5 10 5 64 56 28 60
Slaughter cows
June 22, 1962 5 15 8 8 11 b IL 10 20 15 10 25 18
June 15, 1962 4 14 7 6 9 6 15 10 15 15 10 15 16
June 25, 1961 2 10 8 6 8 4 20 10 14 18 12 19 16






STEERS SOLD OUT OF FIRST HANDS FOR SLAUGHTER 1/
S Nber of head Percent of total Average weight Average price in
N by grades (pounds) *dollars per 100 lb.
Grade -----------
: Week ended
: June 21 ~ June 22 : June 21: June 22-: June 21: June 22 : June 21 June 22
: 1962 : 1961 : 1962 : 1961 : 1962 : 1961 : 1962 : 1961
CHICAGO
Prime.......... 1,480 3,498 5.8 11.7 1,266 1,228 27.41 22.82
Choice......... 17,150 18,461 67.6 61.8 1,178 1,213 25.45 21.85
Good .......... 5,734 6,404 22.6 21.4 1,073 1,133 24.07 21.27
Standard....... 941 1,245 3.7 4.2 1,106 1,077 21.23 20.01
Commercial..... .. -- -- --
Utility ........ 76 286 .3 .9 996 1,026 19.89 18.95
All grades..... 25,381 29,892 1,156 1,190 25.12 21.75
---- --- --- -- ----- -----------^^^ ^^ ^^ ^^
OMAHA
Prime.......... 159 105 .6 .5 1,181 1,242 25.75 22.08
Choice......... 10,8553 11,088 50.1 52.7 1,152 1,168 24.79 21.45
Good............ 9,991 7,991 45.8 38.0 1,087 1,108 23.65 20.62
Standard....... 695 1,670 5.2 7.9 1,084 1,107 20.84 19.16
Utility ........ 57 191 .53 .9 955 979 18.97 17.88
All grades..... 21,615 21,045 1,120 1,139 24.15 20.94
---^ -^- -^- -----~n----- ^- --- --------
SIOUX CITY
Prime.......... 44 -- .3 -- 1,178 -- 26.00 --
Choice......... 8,069 8,665 57.2 55.0 1,157 1,171 24.61 21.60
Good........... 5,083 5,936 36.0 37.7 1,083 1,138 235.42 20.81
Standard....... 845 1,158 6.0 7.3 1,071 1,086 20.61 18.62
Utility ........ 62 -- .5 -- 970 -- 19.54
All grades ..... 14,103 15,759 1,124 1,152 23.95 21.10

Prime.......... 48 45 .8 .6 1,201 914 26.01 23.19
Choice......... 2,880 3,255 48.5 40.7 1,157 1,108 25.27 22.18
Good........... 2,458 4,194 41.3 52.5 1,025 1,080 24.00 21.14
Standard....... 498 456 8.4 5.8 1,041 1,057 21.23 19.02
Commercial..... -- -- -
Utility ........ 58 28 1.0 .4 950 1,050 19.15 18.01
All grades..... 5,942 7,986 1,082 1,089 24.40 21.45
ST. LOUIS -S-
Prime.......... ... .......
Choice......... 1,572 1,641 26.53 25.0 1,130 1,098 25.51 22.18
Good........... 4,028 3,867 67.5 58.2 1,029 1,034 24.16 21.65
Standard....... 331 724 5.6 10.8 1,022 990 21.54 20.15
Commercial..... -
Utility ........ 35 411 .6 6.0 962 949 19.536 18.76
All grades..... 5,966 6,643 1,055 1,040 24.51 21.46


Prime......... -- --- ...- --
Choice......... 4,5352 3,323 50.2 38.5 1,131 1,139 24.95 21.59
Good........... 3,849 4,793 44.4 55.5 1,038 1,122 25.66 20.69
Standard....... 464 484 5.4 5.6 1,106 1,062 20.75 18.91
Utility........ 36 .. .4 -- 995 -- 17.25
All grades..... 8,665 8,656 1,088 1,125 24.16 20.95

Prime.......... ---- -- -- -- -- -- -
Choice......... 3,245 35,941 79.0 77.7 1,139 1,202 25.10 21.94
Good........... 834 1,043 20.3 20.6 1,066 1,112 25.67 20.97
Standard....... 28 89 .7 1.7 1,058 1,078 19.06 18.40
Utility........ --- --
All grades..... 4,107 5,075 1,124 1,182 24.78 21.70
I/----------Data collected by Statistical Reporting Srvice, ad Liestck D------ vision, A S.
1/ Data collected by Statistical Reporting Service, and Livestock Divisiosk, A*, K. S.







WEEKLY SLAUGHTER UNDER FEDERAL INSPECTION AT MAJOR CENTERS
S Cattle Calves Hogs_ ISheep and lambs
City or Area 'June 23 TJune 24J ame 2TJune 24T'Jne 23 5June 24 June 3 TJune 24
: 1962 1961 : 1962 1961 : 1962 1961 : 1962 1961


Boston, New York City Area ....
Baltimore, Philadelphia .......
Cin., Cleve., Detroit, Indpla .
Chicago Area ...................
St. Paul- Wise. Areas .........
St. Louis Area ................
Sioux City-So. Dakota Area ....
Omaha Area ....................
Kansas City ...................
Iowa So. Minnesota ..........
Loun1, Evan l.Nashll. Mph's ...
Georgia, Florida, Ala. Area ...
St. Jo'ph. Wichita, Okla. City.
Ft. Worth, Dallas, San Antonio.
Denver, Ogden, Salt Lake City .
Los Angeles, San Fran. Areas ..
Portland, Seattle, Spokane ....


12,511
8,654
21,121
18,205
24,551
11,556
51,526
39,879
15,955
56,647
6,752
9,789
20,689
10,519
26,174
25,924
9,212


12,241
8,406
19,701
16,119
29,102
12,049
29,251
40,582
16,584
54,598
7,168
10,188
19,458
12,624
22,528
26,057
8,075


10,111
1,757
5,766
6,259
8,006
1,242

87

6,248
2,802
5,688
1,098
4,464
165
2,824
245


10,841 53,095 55,645 27,582 42,077
2,024 28,670 27,185 4,046 4,498
4,067 116,254 97,941 12,548 15,917
5,781 45,551 51,781 8,419 6,059
9,278 85,928 85,522 8,097 10,877
1,612 64,963 60,658 5,111 5,215
-- 89,129 85,516 9,709 10,542
110 78,574 67,207 11,058 12,290
-- 54,661 28,571 -- --
6,035 244,102 255,095 25,814 50,528
5,060 51,484 45,197 -- -
4,170 21,554 21,488 --
795 45,547 58,765 9,157 9,606
4,117 12,619 15,224 57,744 51,155
189 14,915 14,270 22,962 28,498
1,648 29,048 29,444 50,515 56,655
205 18,767 13,272 11,510 10,899


Total ...................... 527,424 52,718 1,012,621 222,250
524,511 51,950 926,157 254,774
Accumulation to date ..... 7,28,579 1,480,84 28,482,921 6,44,826 -
7,665,905 1,545,522 27,522,890 6,704,545



ESTIMATED FEDERALLY INSPECTED SLAUGHTER AND MEAT PRODUCTION

Beef Veal (excl._lard); and mutton Total = Total
Week ended -m- N- : Num- I s Num- : meat = lard
ber : Prod. : ter N Prod. -er : Prod. ber ':Prod. prod. prod.

1 -00umi.lb. 1,0000 mi.lb. 1,000 mil.lb. 1,000 mil 1b.mil1.1b.~.i7lT1b.
-a-


June 23, 1962 .......
June 16, 1962
June 2, 1962 / .....
June 24, 1961 V/.....


245.0
248.0

258.9


10.8
10.8

10.0


1,190
1,190
1,105
1,067


169.7
170.4

154.6


10.8
11.5

12.4


456.5 --
440.7 -
-- 56.6
415.9 59.1


Percentage change from:
June 16, 1962 ....... -1 -1 0 0 0 0 -6 -6 -1 --
June 24,_1961 ....... 5 53 15 8 12 10 -11 -15 5 --
----------- ---------------------------
-m Average eight(bA) : Lard
l :. l Sheep ie
Week ended Cattle Calves Hogs and lambs yield
S------- ------- -------- per
t : : : 100lb.
Live ._DressedL Live LDressed. Live Dressed_ Live Dressed: *


June 23, 1962 ........
June 16, 1962 ........
June 2, 1962 1/......
June 24, 1961 1/......


1055
1055
1050
1044


I/ Actual slaughter. 2/ Excludes lard.


14.4












Classification


Steers -


Prime 900-11
1100-13
Choice 900-11
1100-13
Good 900-11
Standard


Heifers -
Choice
Good
Standard

Cows -
Commercial
Utility
Cutter
Canner


CATTLE: WEEKLY AVERAGE OF DAILY QUOTATIONS
In dollars per 100 pounds
7__ __ --- --_- -- -___- -: :: North
Chicago : Kansas City : Omaha Denver a Portland
*
June June June June : June s June : June s June s June June
23 24 23 24 23 24 23 24 235 24
1962 1961 1962 1961 1962 : 1961 1962. 1961 : 1962 1961

Slaughter cattle, calves and vealers

O0# 26.75 23.22 26.18 22.95 -- -
00 27.58 23.00 -- 26.22 22.70 -- -
.00 25.42 22.72 25.52 22.75 25.15 22.08 24.98 22.32 26.95 23.69
00 25.68 22.00 25.50 22.05 25.15 21,72 24.80 21.92 --
.00 25.50 21.50 23.92 21.12 25.00 20.62 22.50 20.45 25.25 22.50
21.25 19.98 21.40 19.12 20.62 18.88 19.50 18.50 22.75 20.50


700-900# 24.98
600-800 --
20.50


17.0
16.58
16.15
14.59


22.52

19.40


16.70
16.90
16.70
15.45


25.25
25.38
20.00


17.38
16.50
15.12
13.88


22.62
21.38
18.75


16.95
16.18
15.45
14.15


25.12
22.80
20.00


17.18
16.30
15.22
13.98


22.22
20.62
18.75


16.90
16.28
15.65
14.78


25.00





16.38
15.25
13,88


22.68

17.75



16.32
15.75
14.42


25.50
24.12
21.00


16.00
15.25
15.25
12,00


22.38
21.06
18.50


15.62
15.13
13.75
12.50


Bulls Yrlgs. excl.
Commercial
Utility

Calves 250-500#
Choice
Good
Standard

Vealers 150-250#
Choice
Good
Standard


Steers 500-800ff
Fancy
Choice
Good

Heifers 500-750#
Choice
Good

Calves -
Steer -
Fancy 500-5509T
Choice "
Good 500-500#
Heifer 500-500#
Fancy
Choice
Good

*Medium and Good.


20.15 18.90 18.12
19.80 19.40 18.75


-- 24.00
-- 22.00
-- 19.00


-- 27.50
-- 25.00
- 20.50


18.25 18.25 19.35
18.50 18.50 19.22


21.70
20.65
18.10


25.20
22.20
18.20


26.40
24.30
21.75


28.00
24.75
21.50


18.75 19.50


19.69 20.15


26.50
25.50
25.50


25.00
23.00
20.00


Feeder cattle and calves


1--
25.90
23.20


27.25
26.38
24.75


25.12
22.50


26.88
24.50


- -- 24.00 23.25 24.62
- -- 21.8S 20.50* 22.75


-- 30.00
S29.00)
25.50)

-- 27.00
24.75)
22.25)


27.00


31.75
29.00)
25.25)


"- 28.25
24.50 26.00)
23.50)


25.65
25.12

25.00
19.50*




28.25



26.00


-- 25.50
- 22.75

-- 23.75
- 20.50*




29.25



27.50












I I I .
I 0



I I S 1
I I HI








0 I | |



I | p iI
I I I
--







I I I


to ) 0 H1









I I I
I I r-1




I (' 2




a) H


in |I I













I I I
I M I I









I ~ HI
I.A ** *



































I I
0











I H











I
I o 1










H


SI I
1 10) H1I





















I '-) r
I Wil I






0H H
IP C |u

















(U I
H>
I I
0


Co Cz

CD CD CD
H H r-H




oHH
*
sam



E- CDr
H H

0 U)











00 CD OD
*E*












t nO 0!
tD CX CD












H H H
com



r-I r-1
W0 t



SCD* CD


I H H












t; ;
D a) COD








1Lo to 101
Z N



U)HN

N CD CD

















CDCD
*1-1 1U1 to

.


00 CD CD
H H- H-
- ** ** *










INO
CD C~ t
in N




)




m N
41 CD CO
.
r 0






o CD U)
*m *







CD CD CD
HH
.0 00

rir4 -


H r-I




* U






CN N




t lCD CD



W e) CD
CD Nt t
* H




t- C. tp
H-1 .H H
) o CD





CD CD C-
H H H

m CD )
OmO
CD CD 01
0o o o



* N N





H H
r-,Ht- H H




r-4 C-4 r-U









H r-H

0 CD 4O

r-1 H H-1
*q *f


. 1

1-1 1- -
om -*-
... 0

00$ *
.. *
P.

40 WM0 0 to 000
H 0NW N5 IV
(f I I I W I
HOOODMOOO
c.*HNN *NNN
ow H 688880
o0 0


2 =
0o m co)
S1 .
pa.


i *n *

11. 4-'
^aa i a a i^

H I H H P
SO C00 0 0 U)

A .II I
SCO C* )O I I
r (D-l ilr-1lU)
o .- 10 o .n I


0
Lo w 0o 11 oo
0m 0M 00 2 00 0
v: t; tZ 10 q; H1 cr
rHH H H H i H m
o r0 ON w Ii
0) N0 t0 IN I


to w v H~t
N *N *1 Ui




rHHH Hi rl
: r.4t
I I





cow co oo c0 oo m o
0 co 0 toon I m
t e t: m 6 I Y
HHH r H H H E-



4 on A
*- ** *** 0
CnDoCDU) t)0DoI I I
rD41 0U)0l -1r1 r I I,


Nla N N
t; t>; l<
CD CD CD
WH 4 H


U) CD CD
w 00
0)0)
H H rH


**
00 CD
H Ho


**
cD 01
H



** ** *
Uo Uo U)
N N N
f*- PN N


N Ni N
to to CD



0'CD
0 C0
* .
NCD f CD
H- H- H-


m co No 43 g CD i
rH o 1 1 H- H-










CDC r- 4 CDc-o
o *



HHH H H I 0 I H H
NNo 0C I owN


-I- r-i r-I
HC-M M m I I r-I
a4 o 0o IHH
*- ( I *






HHH H H 3 l I HHH pc
CDCDC I I .j 1 I 0000
S- I I -l

cD coH CDH c
Ha* 1 I .


r- r-i r-lI I H H







S e l, m e O 0 ,








to t
W too w 4I o CD
-I I i. I I I
w* o I .o .







H I I l I r-z l H H
[* i l t~0000


to I 1 00 0









U) N i IO U


Ni tD 0
CIN H U)
CO CD C'


to


8 r H
tC D
H


I-I I '





In 8 2 o
.


ri H H H-
)0 I N N


HH1 HHH


C l l 0 I
**


CC0 CDCD(0(
HHH rH


tZ e~ to

Ili rl r1
00 N


*A ;



I co 1Lo
i oo C






Ll- r- C
H H Hi
S S








CD CD r-
Hi H H
IOU)







U)N
wmw
H







104U
H rH H

o N
*** **





CD CD- CD
H rH rH

000
IN C- NM
N N


ull
-** *




00 CD N







Nc N !
CH CD CD
H H H

U) LO U)
00 CD 4'!
9 5
H H H


>n n 0





ae Sr
o.U U)

01 05 CD

CD C
HtH H
NN O. ..
CD CD U)


mooo
to (5 0 0
W Mr *r-
aw w w

000
Rl w
gooo



E;
on41

*N w

m
*NNN
0


CD CDI
* N
c co

0 0 Nt
U) Un to
CDC a


7) CD tC
H-l to 0

H- H H
0 0



H H 1-4
0 01



CD C
ICD CD CD
o o H
10 Lo




i o CI
0 ** M


N N
co O
*
t; t; E-
r-i r-1 I


to !o
N NN
H H H






oooo *<
H H H






000
S
ari




An UO 0


to to L
000


S
C1 /1
I I *
0 ll -4
(-l0 W w
C-t w cv


U3o


* *1


II



in o o




f12 m 0
* S S








10 0 W0
H- H- H

NNN I
Ni N C



S0o 0
C-COO 0



CDNC I
U) CD CD
... I






1! (0 IO
to )
HHH I





I- V-l r- I
HHH;
N 0 I












Cio
w 0 D0


* .










*^l *^t q
t-1



HHH I















to o
I N C
I







Ls)N I


0010 I
4< r100









i 1 o
* *







too
oWNt I




... I
*. .












HHH I
oo'I




tO I
NI
@r I
a I






HOGS: AVERAGE COST, WEIGHT, AND NUMBER OF PACKER AND SHIPPER PURCHASES 1/
---- ---- --7- -7 -S-" ------------------------ ---^
S : 8. s : : 2 : : a Eight
2 1 Louis Kansas: Sioux 'S. St. S. St.'Indian-' nkta.
Week ended :Chicago: Nat'l.: City Omaha s City tJoseph Paul apolis con-
l : Stock : : t bined
I : Yards : : :
AVERAGE COST Dollars per 100 pounds
Barrows June 23, 1962 17.88 18.17 17.52 17.67 17.56 17.62 17.36 18.38 17.77
and June 16, 1962 16.51 16.64 16.60 16.66 16.56 16.55 16.32 16.84 16.59
gilts June 24, 1961 1&.73 17.03 16.47 16.38 16.39 16.29 15.90 17.14 16.54
June 23, 1962 14.54 14.55 14.43 14.42 14.50- 14.40 14.22 13.99 14.36
Sows June 16, 1962 15.50 13.72 13.74 15.94 13.94 13.75 15.84 15.31 15.72
June 24, 1961 13.52 13.54 15.69 135.76 13.65 15.68 13.78 13.41 15.66
AVERAGE WEIGHT Pounds
Barrows June 23, 1962 258 219 235 240 240 235 238 228 254
and June 16, 1962 239 224 234 241 245 258 241 253 236
gilts June 24, 1961 238 218 251 239 259 252 245 228 254
June 23, 1962 420 414 420 410 397 406 384 453 407
Sows June 16, 1962 445 435 425 415 399 427 591 462 417
June 24, 1961 426 427 422 402 398 408 382 450 406
NUMBER OF HEAD -
Barrows June 23, 1962 27798 38414 17805 35588 31719 24340 24790 20777 221229
and June 16, 1962 25755 40096 15810 355899 27795 21042 23846 24104 210345
gilts June 24, 1961 20666 51162 13126 26823 24195 20626 21444 17801 175845
June 25, 1962 4314 3668 1128 7905 6779 2652 7959 2812 37217
Sows June 16, 1962 3407 5290 1184 6474 5535 1821 7768 3040 52519
June 24, 1961 5026 3047 1092 8485 7523 2856 8925 2600 39554
SOWS Percentage of total
June 23, 1962 15 9 6 18 18 10 24 12 14
June 16, 1962 15 8 7 16 17 8 25 11 15
June 24, 1961 20 9 8 24 24 12 29 13 18
I/ Weighted average.

AVERAGE WHOLESALE VALUE OF HOG PRODUCTS DERIVED FROM 100 LB. LIVE HOG,
COMPARED WITH PRICES OF LIVE HOGS, CHICAGO
Week ended Hog products / Hog prices 2/ Gros spread
S-I : or margin 3/
June 25, 1962 ...... ... $19.09 $18.55 $ .54
June 16, 1962 ........... 18.42 17.15 1.27
June 24, 1961 ........... 18.39 17.38 1.01
I/ Value of all edible products, fresh basis (lard rendered) in 100 lb. of live
hog computed from wholesale prices on carlot basis, Chicago, reported by National
Provisioner daily market report.
2/ Mean of daily quotations on U. S. No. 1,2 and 3 hogs, 200-220# wt. Chicago.
V/ Difference between wholesale product value and hog prices.

HOG AND CORN PRICES AT CHICAGO AND HOG-CORN PRICE RATIO
: Barrows and t Corn 2/ t Hog-corn
Week ended : gilts 1/ : No.3 yeTlow : price ratio
: Dollars-per : Cents per : based on
: 100 pounds : bushel : barrows and gilts

June 23, 1962 .......... 17.88 113.1 15.8
June 16, 1962 .......... 16.51 113.3 14.6
June 24, 1961 .......... 16.73 111.2 15.0
I/ Weighted average. 2/ Simple average.






BOSTON WOOL MARKET REVIEW


Trade in the Boston wool market was very
dull and only an occasional car of greasy do-
mestic combing wool was sold at about steady
prices. Woolen wools and noils were also slow to
move with best demand for restricted supplies of
pulled wools. Occasional small lots of territory
wools and odd lots of 12 months Texas wools were
moved and supplies in the fleece States -were also
small.
There was a poor selection of combing wools
at Sydney and Melbourne, but Australia with Japan
and the Continent were active in a firm market.
Supplies in South America were limited-with little
done. Private treaty offerings in New Zealand
and South Africa were quoted on a very firm basis.
Fleece Wools Graded 64s good French combing
and staple fleece wool sold at $1.25 clean basis,
while graded 60/62s good French and staple brought
$1.15, graded 56/58s staple and good French moved
at $1.09 while 50/54s staple fleeces brought
$1.07, all on a core test. Country buyers were
paying from 50f-535 grease basis but mostly 500-
514 for medium wools to the growers.
Territory Wools Recent sales of 5/8s and
quarter with some low quarter Valley Oregon woolb
brought 500 to the growers while medium lambs
wool sold at 46# grease basis. Approximately
270,000g of bulk fine wools sold in Nevada at
51-51 while other lots of Eastern Oregon and
Nevada 5/8s and half-blood, with an edge of fine,
also moved from 51#-51#. The total approximated
400,000k.
Montana 500,000i, of original bag fine and
1/2 blood staple wool sold from 44#-490 and
estimated to costclean around $1.06-1.17 de-
livered East while 50,0007 of light shrinking
fine and 1/2 blood brought 50.355 grease basis.
Original bag bulk 5/8s and 1/4 blood staple
brought 51.66# while other original bag mixed
clips, about 15,000i sold from 46.50-48# grease
basis. Wyoming 50,000,, of original bag fine
and 1/2 ood staple moved at 45.00 in the grease.
Texas Wools Poor style 12 months wool in
Texas was selling in small quantities at $1.25-
1.28 clean basis, delivered East.
Mohair Spring adult mohair sold in oc-
casionaT small lots at 61# to the warehouse
with a little contracting of fall mohair at 56#
to the warehouse.
Foreign Wools Trading on spot foreign
wools was dormant and offerings were small.
Greasy Cape 7-9 months 64/70s sold for shipment
around $1.27, 6-8 months 64/70s at $1.23 and 64s
about $1.21 clean basis duty paid. Small odd lots
in a variety of types were offered at private
treaty by some South African shippers and there
was a little forward selling for October-November
shipment. Cabled reports at week's end follow
with combing wools converted to clean U. S. oil-
combed yields, in bond:

Australia
Oil-combed
61B $l4177B $1.23
628 1.21 78B 1.19
65B 1.15 79B 1.15


Montevideo Super Skirted Wools


60/64s
60s
60/58s
58/56s
56/50s
50s


$1.05-1.08
1.05-1.05
.99-1.01
.97- .99
.96- .98
.94- .96


Carpet Wools The carpet wool market
was slow and little was done in spot stocks.
Greasy Buenos Aires carpet fleeces were
offered for shipment at 700-720, November
second clips at 660-670 and 56/40s lambs
wool at 624-653 while a Cordoba blend was
offered at 65#. New Zealand fleeces were
priced at 704, early shorn wool at 65 and
702/3 crutchings at 580. A pale yellow India
carpet wool was offered at 650. A spot N. Z.
crutchings wool sold around 614-62#. All
above offered on a clean wool fibers present
basis.
Woolen Wools Sales follow:

Scoured Shorn Domestic
Calif. 58s lambs 1l-2" good color $.80-.81
Scoured Shorn Foreign
Monte. 56/60s lambs good color offered for
shipment at 91#
Noils
Clear Aust. 60/64s nobles 84# for shipment
Clear Cape 64s Schlums. 700
Wool Tops The wool tops market was
quiet with occasional small sales of mostly
fine grades. Quotes follow:


Warp Aust. D/C


70s -
64s -
62s -
60s -
58/60s-


$1.97
1.86
1.79
1.72
1.62 Nomii


Oil-combed
58/60s $1.60 Nomin
56s 1.52 "
So/56s 1.48


Warp Dom. D/C
$1.92
1.81
1.74
1.66
ial 1.56

Territory
$1 1.54
1.52
1.48


Fleece
56s $1.48
50/56s 1.45

CLOSING FU!URES QUOTATIONS June 21,
1962(Furnished by the Wool Associates of the
New York Cotton Exchange)
July wool tops $1.640B
October wool tops 1.609B
64s grade 2.55" minimum length
July wool $1.258B
October wool 1.250B
64s grade 2k ave. stretched length









WHOLESALE MEAT TRADE REVIEWS


LESS THAN CARLOT MEAT TRADE REVIEW

EASTERN SEABOARD Steer beef prices were
steady to 500 lower; cow beef 50-750 higher;
veal and calf steady to $2.00 lower, mostly weak
to $1.00 lower; spring lamb steady to $2.00
higher, the advance confined to Philadelphia;
pork loins $1.00-4.00 higher; other listed pork
cuts steady to $2.00 higher.
Kosher dressed steer forequarters were 50-
$1.50 lower and lamb sold fully $1.00 off. Quo-
tations for kosher veal and calf foresaddles
were unchanged. Outlet was narrow for kosher
meats on most sessions.
Supplies in general were below normal for
all classes but adequate throughout. Trading on
carcass beef opened quite active, but slowed
later when demand broadened for ribs, loins and
rough cuts, while rounds and chucks turned slow.
Weekly clearance was poor at most markets, par-
ticularly forequarters. Most of current decline
posted late. Cow beef moved quite readily as
demand and outlet was fairly broad. Veal and
calf demand centered on scant numbers of Choice
and Prime available as well as front ends all
grades. Small carryover was reported at most
markets. Spring lamb moved well into late mid-
week, but slowness developed thereafter. Early
upturns of $1.00 at New York were fully erased.
Pork cuts enjoyed wide distribution at New York
and prices overall were higher. Most upturn on
loins was scored at Philadelphia where prices
were $2.00-4.00 higher. Pork was quite active
in other areas and good clearance on the Eastern
Seaboard.

CHICAGO Steer and heifer beef sold steady
to 500 lower, veal steady, spring lamb 50O
higher, pork loins 8-16# $1.50-2.00 higher,
Boston butts 4-8# $1.00 higher, spareribs 3# and
down 500-$1.00 higher.
Offerings of steer and heifer beef were in
normal proportions, veal and spring lamb supply
only moderate. Beef in the main graded average-
Good and Choice, while spring lamb primarily
weighed 35-55#.
Carcass beef trade was slow on each session.
For the most part arm and squarecut chucks and
rounds were slow and followed a lower trend. On
the other hand ribs and loins were in moderate
demand but sellers were unable to improve prices.
Moderate demand in the veal division sufficient
to clear offerings. Spring lamb trade generally
moderately active but trade slowed on various
primal cuts, particularly hindsaddles. Demand
was fair for fresh pork, all listed cuts advanc-
ing, loins to the highest level since mid-Janu-
ary.


PACIFIC COAST A general upward price
trend on pork featured the market but rather
sharp variations developed on beef and calf.
Steer beef sold steady to 50 lower, mostly
a full 500 lower in So. California but firm
to 500 higher in San Francisco; heifer beef
was steady to $1.00 lower in Portland and
Seattle, steady to 50W lower in Los Angeles
and steady in San Francisco. Calf and veal
generally brought steady prices except in
Los Angeles where the market was $1.00-1.50
lower. Spring lamb sold steady to $2.00
higher, the most advance in San Francisco.
Fresh pork loins worked $2.00-5.00 higher,
other fresh items steady to $2.00 higher ex-
cept shoulders and spareribs steady to $2.00
lower in Los Angeles. Cured pork was steady
to $2.00 higher except in Los Angeles where
sliced bacon advanced $2.00-3.00 and other
items were steady to $2.00 lower.
Supplies of most meats were above normal,
trade rather slow except for a fairly brisk
trade on fresh pork. Warm weather and in-
shipment of beef from other areas were ad-
verse factors in Los Angeles.

CARLOT MEAT TRADE RE_-TEB

CHICAGO, DENVER, OMAHA, NEW YORK AND
- L'QFLPHIA Steer and heifer beef prices
were uneven during the week. Curtailed
slaughter supplies Monday forced prices higher
under fair demand. Later, however, supplies
expanded to near normal levels, demand narrowed
and prices at several shipping and wholesale
centers reverted to steady or lower levels.
Steer and heifer beef closed steady to 75
higher, mostly steady to 500 up at eastern
centers while midwestern and western markets
were steady to 500 lower. Cow beef was mostly
steady to 250 higher except at Chicago where
it was steady to 250 lower. Clearance was
generally complete on all classes.
Spring carcass lamb supplies increased
slightly over the previous week, demand lagged,
and prices were generally lower. Old crop
carcass lamb was in very small supply. Spring
lamb closed steady to $2.00 lower, mostly 500-
$1.50 off. Clearance was near complete.
Demand continued broad this week for
slightly above normal pork supplies and prices
advanced for the third straight week. Loins
were steady to $1.50 higher, pork butts ad-
vanced $1.00-1.50 and fresh hams sold steady
to $1.00 up. Hog sides closed 1.50-2.50
higher at New York and Philadelphia. Clear-
ance was broad on all classes.








1IOLESALE DRESSED NEAT PRICES LESS THAN CARLOT BASIS
Weekly average of daily quotations in dollars per 100 pounds

New York Chicago San Francisco Los Angeles
Classification -- -: :
: June 25 : June 24 0 June 23 June 24 June 23: June 24 June 23 June 24
: 1962 : 1961 : 1-62 : 1961 : 1962 1961 _:_1962 6212-
Steer beef -
Prime 700-800# 45.55 41.90 -- -- -
Choice 600-700 43.75 39.45 41.65 37.38 44.50 39.00 42.44 57.88


700-800
500-600
600-700

500-600#
600-700


43.00
41.00
41.25


Good 500-600 --
Veal -
Prime 90-120# 59.50
Choice 90-120 51.00
Good 90-120 46.80
Spring lamb -
Prime 45-55# 52.60
Choice 45-55 52.60
Fresh pork -
Loins 8-14? 48.20
Butts 4-8 34.60
Spareribs 5# down 46.45
Hams, sink. skd. -
Cook before eating 12-16f 44.75
Fully cooked 10-14# 46.75
Bacon, smoked, sliced -
Ir package (box lots) 52.00
Picnics, smoked (Cook
before eating) 4-8# 50.00
Lard, 1# carton 13.50


38.00
37.50
37.25


57.50
47.70
44.00


41.15
40.25
40.00

41.65
41.65
39.65

55.00
50.00
45.00


35.75
55.38
35.12

36.88
356.88
55.12

55.00
48.00
45.00


45.25
43.75
43.25

43.50
43.50
42.00



55.00


37.25
38.50
37.00

38.50





50.00


41.534
41.68
40.94

42.25
41.75
40.94


36.44
37.00
36.25

37.44
36.28
36.38


40.95 E1.25 40.00 45.25 37.50 45.50 58.58
40.95 51.25 40.00 4t.25 57.50 45.50 58.38


46.30
34.00
48.70

43.75
45.25


46.88
51.69
44.12


42.25
31.75
45.06


-- 44.50
50.00 48.00


59.25


45.75
40.00
49.00


50.50 45.00


50.50
-. 00
45.50


43.00
35.50
46.50


45.50 43.00


50.50 53.25 53.75 55.75 55.50 52.50 51.50

31.25 55.00 33.25 53.50 33.75 30.50 55.00
15.25 14.38 14.75 17.50 18.00 16.00 16.75


BULK PRICES CABLOT BASIS WEEK ENDED JUNE 22, 1962
-- T -a-d" FO ------ --- prce-sdes Tedd~~
Classification -rie pad- O ir c"rie A lvrd- aa
stee? ref------------------- --------------------------------


Good


Heifer beef -


Choice


Good


Cow beef All weig
Utility
Canner and Cutter
Spring lamb -
Prime S0-O
45-1
55-4
Choice 30-
45-i
55-(
Fresh pork -
Loins 8-


59.75-40.00
39.50-39.75
59.00
38.00-38.50
38.00-36.50
38.00-38.50

59.50-59.75
39.50-39.75
57.75-58.00
37.75-58.00

50.25-51.25
30.25-51.50

47.00-48.00
47.00-48.00
47.00-48.00
47.00-48.00
47.00-48.00
47.00-48.00


59.00-39.50
358.50-39.50
38.00

35.00-38.00
35.00-38.00


59.00
59.00
57.00
37.00


39.00-39.50
38.75-39.00
38.50

37.25-38.50
35.00-37.25

59.00-59.25
59.CO-39.25
57.25
37.25


30.50 30.50-50.75
-- 30.50-30.75


45.00-47.00
45.00-47.00
45.00-47.00
45.00-47.00
45.00-47.00
45.00-47.00


47.50
47.50
47.50
47.50
47.50
47.50


44.50 -- 45.75-44.75


41.75-42.00
41.25-42.25
41.00-41.25
36.5C-40. EO
38.50-41.00
38.50-41.00


42.0C-42.25
41.50-41.75
41.00-41.25

39.5C-41.00
59.00-40.50


-- 41.50-42.00
-- 41.00-41.50



-- 52.00-33.25
-- 51.50-32.00


49.C5-52.00
49.00-51.00

49.50-52.00
49.00-51.00


50.00-51.00
48.50-50.00

50.00-51.00
48.50-50.00


* 46.00-47.00


Good

Heifer beef -
Choice


Choice


600-700#
700-800
800-900
500-600
600-700
700-800


500-600#
600-700
500-600
600-700


its -


45#
55
65
45
55
65

1a#





494


MEAT AND'MEAT FOOD PRODUCTS PREPARED AND PROCESSED
UNDER FEDERAL INSPECTION


S- -- -- -- 196 -


Product


Placed in cure -
Beef / .
Pork / .
Other / .
Smoked and / or dried -
Beef )/ ... .
Pork / .
Cooked meat -


Beef. .
Pork. .
Other .


* .
* .
* .


Sausage -
Fresh finished. .
To be dried or semi-dried
Franks, wieners .
Other, smoked or cooked .
Loaf, head cheese, chili,
jellied products. .
Steaks, chops, roasts .
Meat extract. ....
Sliced bacon / ..
Sliced, other 1/ 2/ .
Hamburger . .
Miscellaneous meat product.
Lard, rendered .
Lard, refined .
Oleo stock .
Edible tallow .
Rendered pork fat -
Rendered .
Refined ..


Compound contain g animal fat
Oleomargarine "n n
Canned product (for civilian
use and Dept. of Defense).
Total -/ .


May 5
: 1962

1, 000#

. 5,635
. 56,625
321


785
42,570

957
4,386
76


5,024
2,654
15,058
13,748

4,105
12,296
8
19,606
7,125
4,977
6,015
40,951
28,860
1,198
8,195

1,654
782
17,762
4,549


May 12 : May 19 : May 26
1962 : 1962 : 1962


I., OOC#

2,971
61,850
25

829
45,424


931
4,384
91

4,462
2,078
16,048
14,292

4,560
135,404
15
20,517
7,401
4,987
5,491
42,290
27,258
1,256
8,256

1,665
9533
17,626
4,013


1," 00f

5,578
64,949
15

1,440
50,750


807
5,347
67


4,174
2,531
16,495
14,259

4,556
15,539
17
20,817
7,412
5,009
5,509
58,760
27,5326
1,396
7,601

1,550
651
15,759
5,501


: June 2
: 1962


1,o9 00# _, OOO

3,187 2,697
63,463 55,747
14 9

1,065 866
48,657 41,417


979
4,956
77

35,967
2,094
18,823
15,120

4,799
15,382
10
20,944
7,868
5,250
5,810
39,152
28,280
1,140
8,561

1,640
1,167
15,584
5,482


51,212 49,549 48,850 48,945


720
4,162
84

3,690
2,256
14,550
13,415

4,058
12,827
28
19,514
7,514
4,815
5,152
35,196
24,152
1,069
8,069

1,571
696
14,676
5,219

40,267


362,384 566,627 570,177 321,775


i/ This figure represents "inspection pounds" as some of the products may
have been inspected and recorded more than once due to having been subjected
to more than one distinct processing treatment, such as curing first, then
smoking, slicing.
2/ Includes sliced dried beef, sliced sausage, loaves, etc.
Meat Inspection Branch, Agricultural Research Service.









ww ggm4H
W M8 r4ol
inc 0to a) L- Hi
C H 0 0 H

V) t
U) H-l
0> (0 0 0 -. I|





CV CD(O
we >






O-i T -l 01 to 0 <

t-lOD O E
)00 S 00 I



1o H OU)ri -
Ok ^ f
t <
ND



in r-lm to1 -
wHComH H
*h t
(0 i9% i5


4 I 1. *.I



0 H
I .I I "



I r 10 >-,
I lis 1










W- r410

I)HI
Ile












iti
I1
0








0I 4 -



U 0
*4)




010


HC- L CD^ D I
02 r- OD LO l
in (0
LO W
02 5%
SCD


lo H toO Hoi <'c
4t t 1




ote l l-
V) c o On 0o qd OD
a) HHto 1 i
C- r-1- U) I I

4% 4%
to CD



)o E to to
to 02 0H



in3 o -II l
NO :o tDo ii
w 1 r-1 q
* co
t0 cD


o too m ooton
1O rj U)-1 -tO W
ODH I t- too N








I M 0 to Hgl
CD H N L OD cVt(0
0 tO r-4 3 \l
4% 4k
0N --l



|I IH cO
H





(D 0c

I al I I 0 l C I



r-I




H M C ) H H
4k 9%


H 02


044





i8 l l l oiiom 2



gCoD' 'C O'oo (DO
Sm IHl -N
c~a' ooDt'

.B o



E C- q -H 00
* 9 *. .. 9 *4- *
0 0 0

**)*1* *4-A o C) *0 *u


O r" o u-- ai c; C 'n
* **4 -,-* *,. r0 *
:4 ga o 0 W 0 U
* *Q *r Q S CL 0 *
* C -* H 0 *1 P .0 .

to ) m ( 43 0 310 W 3D
* .O a,*r i *n* *o *v B a
0)) W )0 ) 4Ton
cc t o ) 3 a 4S 9i v 4 4

eS A4 44 9 -H P H .B -H C o P.1
$4 O 43 3 40 > V. 4) 02 0 0H
0 01 >S p o0on E- e co VO) r.


woOU>&,( E-t(OC g oQE> MtQE(X0<


H tO 0) t- 02 2 CO
0V CD W tO r-1 toC'- 0)
inOt U)D to to
*% ft -% 94 9%
NH r-l o
H to
'02 0 (OD I ICD H a0 oM
a)
NO)CDI II


E- tO iHO )I 0)


CNHOW-l00 000 01
O tO to (1 Oto (D
CC)) HD a)
4f ft ft 4% 0,
0\2 to r-1 to <
to

Sw toK tom
oHC Co
LO LO Z C\2 t'-



lO)D O r-l oD Cto to
t^- r- in i OD i IO t



on H 0 D 0
04




V) I I oI
0O V) 0t-'- CD




o% of 0 % J 0% 4
C-2 bo H CD
H to


02 13 I I lIO 0

n (D il (0 to 02N r-


C)l toa U)> C%2 Cl W
W)t t
0% 41 % 4 *f





0-2 tOf r-1 Lof (D
)o'C-o Din D
in00l 1i01 C0 02r
U)CDO) 30) o H



I t





co to -i 0 to
02t--C02(D0 Cr-f Hn
0o tO NH 0
s a ^ t *
02H il In *<

l5% 10%

HI N
I


I
I
I


I




I.























4-P

10


.0
(D)
I4
0
0

0
1o

0
I3
0
10
CI)
0


















0
IO
**
1
0
1


i
0

m
0
o
5







PIG CROP REPORT JUNE 1962

The 19C2 spring pig crop totaled 49,622,000 head, a decrease of 2 percent from the 1961
spring crop, according to the Crop Reporting Board. Sows farrowing during the spring months
totaled 7,009,000 head, only slightly less than in the spring of 1961. The number of pigs saved
per litter was 7.08 compared with 7.18 for the spring of 1961. Fall farrowings for 1962, based
on breeding intention reports, are expected to total 6,077,000 sows, up 2 percent from the
5,967,000 sows farrowing during the fall of 1961. If these fall intentions are carried out and
the number of pigs per litter equals the average with an allowance for trend, the 1962 fall crop
would be 43.0 million head or about 1 percent more than the 1961 crop. The combined spring and
fall crop for 1962 would be 92.6 million head, 1 percent less than 1961, but 2 percent more
than the 10-year average.
The June 1, 1962 inventory of hogs 6 months old and older on farms and ranches was 1 percent
more than on the same date last year.
This report is based on a survey of 172,000 farms and ranches. The data were obtained
largely through the assistance of the Post Office Department and rural mail carriers.
SPRING PIG CROP DOWN 2 PERCENT: The number of pigs saved in the spring of 1962 (December
1961 through May 1962) is estimated at 49,622,000 head. This is 2 percent less than the 1961
spring pig crop of 50,441,000 head and 7 percent less than the 1951-60 average of 53,448,000
head.
Most of the decrease occurred in the heavy producing North Central region where the 1962
spring crop was 2 percent less than in 1961. The West North Central region had a decrease of 3
percent, the East North Central, 2 percent and the North Atlantic States, 2 percent. The spring
pig crop was only slightly less than last year in the South Central region, and showed increases
of 1 percent in the South Atlantic region and 7 percent in the West. The 1962 spring pig crop
was below the 1951-60 average in all regions.
Sows farrowing in the spring of 1962 totaled 7,009,000 head, only slightly less than the
7,029,000 head in the spring of 1961 and 10 percent less than the average of 7,777,000. Spring
farrowings were 3 percentage points less than shown by breeding intentions last December 1. The
percentages that the 1962 spring sows farrowed were of 1961 compared with the intentions reported
last December by regions are as follows: North Atlantic 96 percent now, 94 percent in December;
East North Central, 100 and 102; West North Central, 100 and 105; South Atlantic, 100 and 104;
South Central, 98 and 98; and West, 107 and 95 percent.
Pigs saved per litter this spring averaged 7.08 compared with 7.18 pigs saved last spring
and the 1951-60 average of 6.88 pigs. Despite winter losses due to disease and unfavorable
weather the number of pigs saved per litter this spring has been exceeded only in 1957 and 1961
and equaled in 1959.
The December-February quarter accounted for 36.8 percent of the total spring farrowings
compared with 36.0 percent a year earlier. By months, the percentage of the farrowings this
spring compared with the spring of 1961 were as follows: 7.0 percent for December 1961 compared
with 7.2 in December 1960; 11.8 percent in January 1962 compared with 11.0 percent in January
1961; February 18.0 percent compared with 17.8; March, 24.9 and 24.3; April, 23.6 and 24.8;
and May 14.7 and 14.9 percent.
1962 FALL INTENTIONS UP 2 PERCENT: June 1 reports from farmers on breeding intentions indi-
cate that 6,077,000 sows will farrow during June through November of 1962. If these intentions
are carried out, fall farrowings in 1962 would be 2 percent greater than 1961 and 12 percent
above the 1951-60 average. All of the expected increase in the number of sows to farrow this
fall was accounted for in the Corn Belt. Both the East and West North Central regions show an
increase of 3 percent. The Western region indicates the same number of sows to farrow as a year
earlier. All other regions indicate fewer saws to farrow in the fall of 1962 than a year
earlier ranging from a slight decline in the South Atlantic to a drop of 3 percent in the South
Central region.
If the fall farrowing intentions are carried out and the number of pigs per litter equals
the average with an allowance for trend, the 1962 fall pig crop will total about 43.0 million
head. This would be about 1 percent above 1961 and 15 percent above the 10-year average. The
combined pig crop for 1962 would be 92.6 million head, 1 percent below last year but 2 percent
above average.
HOCS OVER 6 MONTHS JUNE 1 up 1 PERCENT
The number of hogs over 6 months old (including sows) on farms June 1 was 15,893,000 head,
an increase of 1 percent from the 15,712,000 head on hand on the same date last year. Total
commercial hog slaughter January through April of this year was 5 percent more than the corre-
sponding period of 1961.
SELECTED CORN BELT STATES: The number of sows intended for 1962 fall farrowings in 10 of the
Corn Belt States is 3 percent larger than the number farrowing a year earlier. The 10 States -
Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, South Dakota, Nebraska, and Kansas






accounted for about three-fourths of the U. S. pig crop in 1961.
An increase of 4 percent in the number of sows to farrow during the June, July and August
period is indicated by intentions reports from farmers on June 1. The 2,390,000 sows expected
to farrow would be 16 percent above the 1951-60 average for these three months. For the
September-November quarter, the 2,212,000 sows expected to farrow are 2 percent more than a year
earlier and 21 percent1 above average.
In the 1962 spring season the number of sows farrowed in the 10 States totaled 5,420,000
head--about the same level as farrowings during the same period a year earlier. The number far-
rowed during December, January and 'ebruary totaled 1,830,000 sows, 4 percent more than during
the comparable period a year earlier. Sows farrowing during March, April, and May totaled
5,590,000 head, 2 percent less than the number farrowed during the same period in 1961.
ONE PERCENT LESS HOGS AND PIGS IN SELECTED CORN BELT STATES:
The number of all hogs and pigs on farms in 10 Corn Belt States on June 1 totaled
48,840,000 head, down 1 percent from the 49,118,000 head a year earlier. Decreases in Wisconsin
of 4 percent and Minnesota and lova of 3 percent more than offset increases of 5 percent in
Kansas, 2 percent in Indiana, Missouri and Nebraska, and 1 percent in Illinois and South Dakota.
In Ohio numbers were unchanged.
logs 6 months old and over in the 10 States totaled 11,128,000 head on June 1, an increase
of 4 percent from the 10,731,000 head on hand a year earlier. The proportion of sows and gilts
included in the 6 months plus age group was about the same as on June 1, 1961. The number of
hogs and pigs under 6 months of age was 2 percent less than a year earlier, with a decrease of
5 percent in the number under 3 months of age and practically no change in the number 3 to 6
months of age.
Pigs under 3 months of age totaling 25,544,000 head made up 52 percent of the total on
June 1, 1962, compared with 53 percent a year earlier. The 12,168,000 head 3 to 6 months old
comprised 25 percent of the total, the same as a year earlier.
The supplemental data for these 10 States are mado possible by matching funds provided
jointly by State Agencies and the United States Department of Agriculture under provisions of the
Agricultural Martkting Act of 1946.

Sows farroaing, pigs per litter, and pigs saved, spring and fall 1/, 1958-62

S Se a farrowing : Pigs per litter : Pigs savcd
Tear :--- .- -- --- --- --- ----- -- -
: Sprir.g : Fall Spring : Fall : Spring : Fall : Year
: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
head head Numwber Number head head head

UNITED STATES
1958.... : 7,2s1 5,887 7.05 7.17 51,554 42,179 95,553
1959.... : 7,996 6,128 7.08 6,98 56,620 42,775 99,395
iY. .... : 6,790 5,855 6.96 7.02 47,282 41,105 88,587
1961.... : 7,029 5,967 7.18 7.16 50,441 42,701 95,142
19T2.... : 7,009 2/6,077 7.08 5/7.10 49,622 V/43,000 4/92,622
CORN BEIT (North Central States)
1958... : 5,717 4,450 7.14 7.23 40,807 52,177 72,984
1959.... : 6,216 4,581 7.14 7.02 44,552 32,151 76,505
1960.... : 5,269 4,444 7.03 7.05 57,041 51,5536 68,377
1961.... 5,575 4,593 7.24 7.19 40,327 35,043 73,370
1962.... : 5,558 2/4,726 7.09 5/7.10 39,424 5/33,500 4/72,924

1/ Spring, December through Mayl fall, June through November.
W/ Fall farrowing indicated from breeding intentions reports.
-/ Average number of pigs per litter with allowance for trend used to compute indicated number
of fall pigs. Number rounded to nearest 500,000 head.
4/ Spring pig crop plus indicated number of fall pigs.

Percentage distribution of spring farrowings, by months, United States
Tear : Dec. I : Jan. :- Feb. : Earch Ail z 7 : :tal
Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent
1951-60... 4.5 8.53 17.0 27.6 27.1 15.5 100.0
1960...... 7.3 11.2 18.5 25.2 23.6 14.2 100.0
1961...... 7.2 11.0 17.8 24.3 24.8 14.9 100.0
1962...... 7.0 11.8 18.0 24.9 25.6 14.7 100.0
SDeceRbereor receng rdW e -ear--- ----- -o--d--
Statistical Reporting Service Crop Reporting Board.





498

SHIPMENTS OF STOCKER AND FEEDER CATTLE AND SHEEP
MAY 1962

Stocker and feeder cattle and calves shipped into 8 selected North
Central States during May 1962 totaled 432 thousand head, 27 percent more
than the number shipped in during May last year. Of the total cattle and
calves received in these 8 States during the month, 159 thousand moved
through public stockyards--23 percent above May 1961. Direct receipts
of cattle and calves during May 1962 amounted to 274 thousand head, or
30 percent more than a year earlier. The direct movement in May was
63 percent of the total, compared with 62 percent a year earlier. Cattle
and calves shipped into these States during January-May 1962 totaled 1, 834
thousand head, 3 percent less than the January-May 1961 total.

May shipments of stocker and feeder sheep and lambs into these 8
North Central States amounted to 189 thousand head, compared with 212
thousand head during May 1961--a decrease of 11 percent. Of the total
received during May, 67 thousand came through public stockyards--53
percent more than May 1961. However, the May 1962 number received
direct totaled 122 thousand head, 28 percent less than a year earlier.
During January-May 1962, 751 thousand head of stocker and feeder sheep
and lambs were shipped into these States, 5 percent less than the January-
May 1961 total.

Stocker and Feeder Cattle and Sheep Received in Selected oorth Central States
May 1961 and 1562 I/

Cattle and Calves


yards Direct Total
State : Jan. May
6_ : 1-i62 : 1 -6 l : '96l : 1,- : 196: 1i6
Ohio.........: 3,700 4,031 1,678 3,423 5,3" 7,454 43,241
Indiana......: 5,524 8,649 16,671 13,248 22 21,S7 :
Illinois.....: 21,566 23,523 47,426 6,147 o 6,592 2,670 3,043 ,:,462
Michigan..... I1'- 3,24o 1,31 3,203 2,977 6 452 l,461 25,-- <
Minnesota....: 9,223 11,0868 4,.- l9, 44 23,552 30,232 17,609 170,440
Iowa.........: 55,763 72,551 55,713 64,557 111,476 137,108 713,j-2 -", 900
South Dakota.: 6,795 10,350 25,994 23,305 32,7- 33,655 110,747 101,644
Nebraska ..... :- -, *..- 77 71 52 102,666 423590 4o0, 144

Total :12,527 210,,. 33 i i111 .,884
8 States : ,524 2 3, 432,134 i -,,522

Sheep and Lambs

Ohio......... : 843 ,. 11,25' 6 &588 ,6 35 -
Indiana..... : 926 .-9. 2,2 4702 4 5 -0 8,'.
Illinois.....: 15,011 5,552 12,: 594 -- 27 3085 69,263 54, .
Michigan.....: 7 8 2069 Sl 2,-, 1,73 2,817 7 7, 3
Minnesota....: 4,158 86," 15 1 0 c3 19,2 7,. 35-623 104,
Iowa.........: 1,44 30,856 1 00,1 6,54 116,3 92,96 37505 341,.
South Dakota.: 4'O. 9, 9,26 3.i_ 190,07 i6 64,
e'ebraska ..... ;. _--0 ._ S. __ ... .034 ...
Total : 43,838 168, 212,-_ 7.3 -
SStates : 67,125 21, _65 751,04
-71 -
-*.- Stockyards are included stockers and feeders ;i- 1 ere %ought at stock-
yards. Under "Direct" are included stockers and feeders ro oirs other than
public s .~, somne of w-ich are inspected at public st.c yards while stopping
for -eed water and rest en route.
Statistical porir'.in Service Crop Feportingr Board.






UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF MEATS

Commodity t April S April

EKPORTS (Domestic) Pounds Pounds
Beef and veal -
Fresh or frozen (except canned) .............................. 652,507 844,786
Pickled or cured (except canned) .............................. 1,175,156 1,600,867
Pork -
Fresh or frozen (except canned) .............................. 2,461,721 2,845,851
Hams and shoulders, cured or cooked ........... ........... 409,170 562,245
Bacon ................... ......... .............. 445,281 459,977
Pork, pickled, salted or otherwise cured .... 1,128,661 1,114,319
Sausage, prep. sausage meats, etc. (exc. canned) ............. 209,585 141,180
Other meat and meat products (except canned) ................... 50,857 2,572
Beef and pork livers, fresh or frozen ......................... 2,800,087 4,054,480
Beef tongues, fresh or frozen .................................. 1,974,984 1,805,048
Other variety meats, (edible offal) ex. cnd. .................. 2,084,254 2,554,576
Meat specialties, frozen, n.e.c. ................................ 215,550 522,794
Canned meats -
Beef and veal .................. .................. ...... 184,551 156,422
Sausage, prep. sausage meats, etc. ............. ............. 66,566 111,975
Hams and shoulders ............................................. 46,566 15,596
Other pork canned ............. .....,.....o. ............. 62,451 80,451
Other meat and meat products ............. .................. 85,660 65,659
Lamb and mutton (except canned) ................................... 141,585 167,725
Lard (includes rendered pork fat) ................................. 42,564,687 26,065,092
Shortenings, chief wt. animal fat (excl. lard) ................ 587,570 401,828
Tallow, edible ................................................. 517,251 152,745
Tallow, inedible ................... ................... ..... 105,844,822 120,652,615
Inedible animal oils, n.e.c. ...................................... 605,586 416,951
Inedible animal greases and fats, n.e.c. ......................... 17,294,957 15.251,228

Compiled from official records, Bureau of the Census.

UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF LIVESTOCK
------------------- --------- ----
April Apil
S_1922 __ 61
.Cattle (for breeding) Number Number
Dairy ......................... 636 1,078
Ex. dairy ..................... 585 888
Other (ex. for breeding) ...... 55 166
Hogs ...............*............ 49 1,356
Sheep ........................... 3,552 2,589
--------------------------------
Compiled from official records, Bureau of the Census.



Number of Cattle and Calves from Canada and Mexico Passed for Entry into the United States
Jan.-Apr. 1962 with comparisons
USDA ARS Animal Inspection and Quarantine Division

Month and period s Canada Mexico
Month and period -1 -9-- --6 -1-- -- ------
S 1962 : 1961 : 1962 : 1961
Head Head. Head' Head.
Jan. ...................... .......... 23,571 22,521 82,886 68,909
Feb ........ ...................... .... 14,694 8,618 83,777 47,411
Miar .......... ....................... 24,412 9,857 85,568 59,976
Apr. .................................... 27,411 14,744 75,675 35,741
Jan.-Apr. ............................... 89,888 55,520 525,904 242,057

Note: During Jan.-Apr. this year 1,455 sheep and 1,621 hogs were received from Canada compared
with 41 sheep and 9,970 hogs a year ago. From Mexico, April 1962 17 hogs.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

S oo I [11[1111111I 1I I
U. S. Department of Agriculture 122 08500 527
Washington 25, D. C.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Form AMS-6/26/62
Permit 1001.


University of Florida
Documents Librarian
11-4-59 The University Libraries
LS-CLS Gainesville, Fla.



SHEEP AD IAMBS: WEEKI= AVERAGE CF DIIILY QUOTATIONS
In dollars per 100 pounds
-------------------------------------------------------------------
: : .: Kansas : Fort : : North
Classification s Chicago: Omaha :City : Worth : Denver : Ogden : Portland

SIAUGHTER IAMBS: (Spring) 75-105!
Prime June 23, 1962 25.22 24.00 25.72 24.70 25.48 21.51
June 24, 1961 19.95 19.15 18.95 19.09 17.75 15.91
Choice June 23, 1962 25.95 25.08 25.50 20.50 22.40 21.85 21.06
June 24,1961 19.50 18.50 17.95 16.95 17.50 17.25 -15.78
Good June 25, 1962 22.50 21.55 21.58 17.50 19.55 19.90 20.25
June 24, 1961 18.60 16.92 16.80 15.75 15.58 16.50 14.75
EWES: (Shorn) 90-150#
Good June 23, 1962 4.50 4.42 4.52 6.25 5.95 4.50 5.00
Good & Ch. June 24, 1961 4.55 3.82 5.00 4.62 2.50
Utility June 23, 1962 4.75 4.58 4.10 5.25 5.10 4.00 3.75
Cull & Util. June 24, 191 4.50 3.72 2.75 5.20_ .50.s .00
Cull June 25, 1962 4.50 5.62 5.50 4.50 5.75 5.00 2.50

FEEDER IAMBS: (Spring) 60-75#
Fancy June 23, 1962 17.50 18.55 19.75 -
Choice June 25, 1062 16.00 15.00 17.25 18.50 15.50
Good & Ch. June_24, 1,_961 15 00 -- 10.00 14. 0 12,58
Good June 25 1962 10.00 15.72 17.00 14.75


RETAIL SALES VALUE COMPARISONS OF 600-POUND CHOICE GRADE BEEF CARCASSES*
May 1962
High Intermediate Low
Percentage of carcass weight in retail cuts 78.9% 74.3% 69.7%
Retail sales value per cwt. of carcass $67.60 $64.10 $60.60
*These values reflect differences in the percentage of retail cuts from carcasses within
the Choice grade. The high and low groups do not represent extremes, but rather are in-
tended to represent carcasses typical of the upper and lower thirds of' the total range in
retail cut yields encountered in 600-pound Choice grade carcasses. Values are calculated
from prices furnished to the Marketing Economics Division of the Economic Research Service
by a large number of selected retailers throughout the country.