Livestock, meat, wool market news

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Title:
Livestock, meat, wool market news
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v. : ; 21-23 cm.
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English
Creator:
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service. -- Livestock, Poultry, Grain, and Seed Division
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service. -- Livestock Division
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service. -- Livestock & Seed Division
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The Division
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
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Frequency:
weekly
regular

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Subjects / Keywords:
Meat industry and trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Livestock -- Marketing -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
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serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

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Additional Physical Form:
Distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
Statement of Responsibility:
Livestock, Poultry, Grain and Seed Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 27, no. 1 (Jan. 6, 1959) issue.
Issuing Body:
Vols. for <Jan. 16, 1979-May 14, 1983> issued by: Livestock, Meat, Grain and Seed Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture; <Nov. 12, 1983-> by: the Livestock Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture; 1996 issue\d by: the Livestock and Seed Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 47, no. 2 (Jan. 16, 1979).
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 58, no. 40 (Oct. 6, 1990).

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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aleph - 004691915
oclc - 04512121
lccn - sn 87043107
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lcc - NOT IN LC
ddc - 338.105
System ID:
AA00008493:00023

Related Items

Preceded by:
Market news (Washington, D.C.)
Succeeded by:
Livestock, meat, and wool weekly summary and statistics

Full Text




MEAT
M A WEEKLY SUMMARY


WOOL AND STATISTICS


LIVESTOCK DIVISION, AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
WASHINGTON 21, D.O.
Vol. 50, No. 12 March 20, 1962
Week ended March 17
Page
vestock Market Reviews . 218
stock Market Receipts . 221
SMAN l6p der Statistics . . 221
ated Percentage of Feeder Cattle and Slaughter
Cows in Salable Receipts . 221
teer Sales Statistics . 222
Sl ghter at Major Centers . 225
Estimated Slaughter and Meat Production 225
Cattle Prices . . 224
Hog Prices . . 225
Hog Purchase Statistics ... 226
Sheep and Lamb Prices . 250
Wool Market Review . . 227
Wholesale Meat Trade Reviews . ... 228
Wholesale Dressed Meat Prices . 229
Special to this issue

Pig Crop Report, 10 States, 1962 . 250
Storage Holdings of Meats and Lard, Feb. 28, 1962. 252
Salable and Total Receipts of Livestock at Public
Markets, in Order of Volume, 1961 255
Sheep and Lambs on Feed and Early Lamb Crop, 1962. 255
Retail Sales Value Comparisons of Choice Grade
Beef Carcasses, February 1962 . 255
The Livestock and Meat Situation, March 1962 256


iell-agll






MIDWEST LIVESTOCK REVIEW
and

RANGE AND FEEDLOT SALES


Marketings of all classes of livestock
were curtailed early in the week by severe weath-
er conditions particularly in the northwest Corn
Belt. However, as weather moderated, late week
marketing were above normal, particularly on
hogs. The week's general trend on slaughter
steers was steady to 500 higher, heifers steady
to 25# higher while cows were largely steady to
50# lower. Price trends were very uneven on
feeder cattle and calves, but were generally
steady to 500 lower. Barrows and gilts were
steady to 50# lower, sows steady to 250 off.
Slaughter lambs sold strong to 500 higher over
most of the Corn Belt.

SLAUGHTER CATTLE AND CALVES Severe weath-
er and snow blocked roads continued to plague
parts of the midwest and. the normal flow of live-
stock to market was again disrupted. The 12
market cattle receipts dropped about 1s percent
below the previous week and the corresponding
week a year ago, even though the early week sup-
ply deficit was reduced somewhat late. Even so,
the 12 market supply was still the smallest for
any non-holiday week in about two years, and
among the smallest in nine years.
Slaughter steers sold steady to 500 higher
and heifers steady to 25? higher at most markets
with best demand for average-Choice to Prime
offerings. Although Prime steers in Chicago
reached new highs since mid-1960, there was a
two-way trend at that center with steers and
heifers average-Choice and below steady to 50g
lower. Cows were generally steady to 500 lower
except 50-75# higher in St. Joseph. Bulls were
mostly steady but dealers sold $2.00-4.00 lower
at St. Paul and weak to $2.00 off at St. Louis.
Bulk of the steers and heifers graded Good and
Choice, the 5 percent Prime steers in Chicago
smallest for any week since mid-1960. At the
same time, the average weight of steers at the
7 markets dropped 12# to 3106#, lightest for any
week since August 1958.
Slaughter steers: Several loads Prime 1175-
1500# steers $31.00-51.25 in Chicago where most
high-Choice and Prime 1100-1450# sold $28.75-
30.75 and most Choice 950-1500# $26.25-28.50.
At other markets, a few loads high-Choice and
Prime steers $28.00-28.50, bulk Choice $25.50-
27.50, mixed Good and Choice $24.75-26.25, most
Good steers $22.00-25.50.
Slaughter heifers: High-Choice and Prime
heifers brought $27.25-28.25 in Chicago with most
Choice $25.50-27.00, Good and low-Choice $22.00-
25.50. At other markets bulk Choice heifers
$24.75-26.25, few high-Choice and Prime $26.00-
27.00, and most Good $21.50-25.00.
Slaughter cows: Utility and Commercial
$15.25-17.50, Canner and Cutter $12.50-16.00.

FEEDER CATTLE AND CALVES Additional
heavy snows accompanied by high winds virtually
stopped the early week movement of livestock in


some areas, particularly in the northern part
of the midwest. Overall receipts of feeder cat-
tle and calves at terminal markets were materi-
ally reduced and demand temporarily curtailed.
The effect on demand was felt not only at markets
in areas where snowfalls were heaviest but also
at some other terminals where order buyer ac-
tivity was slowed because of weather difficul-
ties at destination points. At the same time,
in some areas the nearing approach of a new
grass season plus ample stockpiles of grain
feeds and fairly high price levels for slaughter
cattle encouraged considerable inquiry for cat-
tle in both stocker and feeder flesh. Thus,
price trends and degree of trading activity
varied considerably from one market to another.
At Kansas City steers 750# up were strong to
250 higher, those under 750# steady to 50 low-
er. At Sioux City prices were steady to $1.00
lower; St. Louis steady to 50# higher; Omaha
and St. Joseph steady; Wichita steady to weak
while at Oklahoma City the market was 50#-$1.00
lower.
Feeder steers: Good and Choice 800-1050#
bulked at $22.00-24.50, few loads Choice 900-
10504, mostly a partly fattened kind, $24.50-
25.35. At Sioux City Choice 887# sold at $23.65,
while at Wichita Choice and Fancy 974# brought
$24.50. Few loads Choice and mixed Choice and
Fancy 550-625# $27.25-28.50; bulk Good and Choice
550-750# $25.00-26.50; Medium and mixed Medi-
um and Good 550-750# $18.50-25.50.
Feeder heifers: Load Choice 565# $25.50,
bulk Good and Choice 525-700# $21.00-25.25;
Choice 707# included at $22.75.
Feeder calves: Few loads Choice 400-500D
steers $50.00-31.00; other Good and Choice 350-
550# $24.00-29.00. Good and Choice 550-500#
heLfers chiefly $22.00-27.00, load Choice 574#
$28.50.

HOGS Terminal markets The distribution
of hog supplies was very erratic due to the
storm conditions early in the week. Barrow
and gilt prices were sharply higher early, but
the advance was more than erased after Tuesday
when marketing were liberal and closing sales
were steady to 50# lower, largely 25-50# off.
Sows were generally steady to 25# lower. Re-
ceipts at the 12 markets were the smallest for
any full marketing week since August, 1961.
Sows comprised 7 percent of the 8 market re-
ceipts.
Barrows and gilts: U. S. 1-2, 190-2404
$16.50-17.00, No. 1-3, 190-250# $16.00-16.75,
bulk $16.25-16.50.
Sows: No. 1-3, 270-400# $14.50-15.50,
No. 2-3, 400-5501 $14.00-14.75.
At St. Paul, feeder pigs were steady.
Choice 120-160# sold at $15.00-15.50; Good and
Choice 140-165# feeders at Sioux City 25? low-
er at $14.50-15.00.
Average cut-out value advantage of U. S.








No. 1 over No. 5 live basis 200-2209 barrows
and gilts was 92# per cwt. based on wholesale
carlot prices of fresh pork cuts at Chicago
March 12 to March 15, 1962 inclusive.
Hogs Interior Iowa-Southern Minnesota
area receipts totaled 548,000 head for the week,
compared with 334,000 last week and 335,000 a
year earlier. Butchers and sows closed 15# to
mostly 25# lower than the previous Friday.
Barrows and gilts: U. S. 1-3, 200-240#
closed at $15.25-16.00; U. S. 1-2, $15.75-16.25.
Sows: U. S. 1-3, 270-4004 mostly $13.75-
14.75, No. 2-5, 400-550# $11.85-15.75.
Hogs Interior Illinois Receipts totaled
115,000 compared with 115,S00 the previous week
and 95,500 a year earlier. Demand was good
during week. Barrows and gilts 195-240# com-
prised bulk of supply, sows around 5 percent.
Downturns at midweek more than erased early ad-
vances and barrows and gilts closed 10-25# lower
than previous Friday, sows steady to 25# lower.
Barrows and gilts: On Friday, most U. S.
1-3, 195-2404 barrows and gilts $15.75-16.25,
limited volume No. 1-2, r16.75-17.00.
Sows: U. S. 1-5, 250-400Y $13.00-14.75;
No. 2-5, 400-500, $12.00-13.25.

SHEEP AND LABS Receipts at the 12 ter-
minals totaled 78,000 head, 22 percent below
last week and 51 percent less than the corre-
sponding period a year ago. The reduced market-
Lugs combined with price strength on dressed
lamb stimulated demand at midwest centers and
slaughter lambs finished strong to 500 higher.
Slaughter ewes were steady to 50# higher.
Feeder lambs were mostly steady.
Slaughter lambs: Bulk Choice and mixed
Choice and Prime 90-118# wooled closed at $17.25-
18.25, many sales $17.50-18.00, some sales $18.50
at Chicago and a few $19.00-19.50 at St. Louis.
Good and Choice 80-115# $16.50-17.50. Limited
volume Choice and few Prime 90-114# shorn with
No. 1 and fall shorn pelts $17.00-17.75, few
$18.00; Choice 98-109# with No. 2-3 pelts $16.50-
17.00. Small showing Choice and Prime 69-105#
spring slaughter lambs $17.50-19.00.
Slaughter ewes: Cull to Good wooled $4.00-
8.25, shorn ewes $2.25-7.50.
Feeder lambs: Choice and Fancy 57-96#
wooled $16.00-17.00, Good and Choice 52-91#
$13.00-16.50.
Sheep and lamb receipts in the Interior
Iowa-Southern Minnesota area numbered 21,200
head, a decrease of 15 percent from a week
earlier. Demand was good for the reduced num-
bers available and slaughter lambs sold strong
to 50# higher for the week. Slaughter ewes
strong.
Slaughter lambs: Bulk Choice and few
Prime 90-110# wooled delivered to packing plants
$17.S0-18.00; Choice 110-180# $16.75-17.50.
Good and low-Choice 85-1104 $16.50-17.50. Few
sales Choice with end of Prime 85-1104 shorn No.
1-2 and fall shorn pelts $16.75-17.50; Good and
low-Choice $15.50-17.00.
Slaughter ewes: Cull to Good wooled $2.50-
5.50, few c6.00.


RANGE AND FEEDLOT SALES

Note: Shrink on most range and feedlot
sales none to 5 percent, mostly 4 percent f.o.b.
some with short haul and 3 percent shrink. All
sales for immediate delivery unless specified.

ARIZONA, CALIFORNIA, NEVADA AND UTAH -
Slaughter steers and heifers active, firm to
25# higher, instances 500 up. Feeder cattle
and calves fairly active, firm to 50# higher.
Slaughter lambs moderately active, mostly
steady.
Slaughter steers: California, 40 Choice
1000-1050# $27.75; 225 Choice 1000-1050# $27.50
delivered with about 20# freight. California
and Arizona, 775 mostly Choice 950-1125# $27.25;
20,000 Good and Choice 900-1250# $25.75-27.00;
3,900 Standard to mostly Good 850-1125# $24.50-
25.75; 1,000 Standard and Good 850-1100#
$23.75-24.50. Utah, 150 Good and Choice 1050-
1125# $24.25-24.85. Nevada, 160 Choice 1050-
1075# $25.00.
Slaughter heifers: California and Ari-
zona, 90 Choice 900-950# $26.75-27.00; 4,000
Good and Choice 700-965# $25.00-26.25; 60 Good
800-850# $24.00. Utah, 165 mostly Choice 900-
925# $24.00-24.25.
Feeder cattle: Current to June delivery -
Steers, 880 Choice 450-620# $26.50-27.00; 8,000
Good and Choice 500-755# $24.00-26.00; 660
Medium to low-Choice 600-700# $25.50; 600 Com-
mon and Medium 650-800# $22.40-22.90. Heifers,
1,425 Good to mostly Choice 525-575# $24.00-
25.00; 1,560 Good and Choice 575-650# $22.25-
23.00.
Spring slaughter lambs: California, 20,000
Choice and Prime 90-105# $20.00; 2,000 Choice
and Prime 95# in southern sector $19.00; Ari-
zona, 4,800 Choice and Prime 90-98# $19.00-
19.25. Old crop slaughter lambs: California
and Arizona, 4,900 Choice and Prime 100-118#
with No. I and 2 pelts $17.25-17.50. Utah,
1,400 Choice, end Prime 105-107# wooled $17.00-
17.25.

COLORADO SOUTHERN WOMDNG, WESTERN KANSAS
AND WESTERN NEBRASKA Slaughter steers active,
heifers only moderately active with those
weighing under 925# in rather narrow demand.
Slaughter steers sold steady to 25# higher,
heifers steady to 25# lower.
Slaughter steers: Sales confirmed on
6,900 head. Colorado, shipment Choice and low-
Prime 1050# $27.25; average to high-Choice
1150-1250# $26.50-27.00, some sales for up to
April 15 delivery at sellers, option; bulk
sales Choice 1100-1350b $26.00-26.50; high-
Good and Choice 1000-1225# $25.00-25.75.
Western Nebraska, few loads high-Good and
Choice 1100-1175# $25.00-25.50.
Slaughter heifers: Sales confirmed on
4,500 head. Colorado, average to high-Choice
950-1125# $26.25-26.35, some loads at $26.35,
carrying a few prtae; bulk Choice 875-1050#
$25.50-26.25; high-Good and Choice 850-1000#
$24.50-25.45; few mostly Good 925-975#







$25.00-25.75. Western Nebraska, 55 loads Choice
1025# $26.25 delivered to Colorado packer.
Feeder cattle: Demand good with sales and
contracts confirmed on 1,200 head at fully
steady to strong prices. Western Kansas and
Northern Oklahoma, mostly Choice 600-850# steers
$23.25-25.50; Choice 625-750# heifers $23.00-
24.00; 3 loads Good and Choice 475-550# steers
$27.00-28.00.
Sheep and lambs: Sales confirmed on 20,000
head. Slaughter lambs sold fully steady to
strong. Colorado, Choice and Prime 100-l?0#
wooled largely $17.75-18.00, several shipments
110-120# $17.25-17.75; Choice 100-110# $17.25-
17.50. Choice and Prime 100-108# with No. 1
and 2 pelts $16.00-16.75, few $17.00. Two loads
Choice 94# feeder lambs $16.00.

NEW MEXICO, WEST TEXAS, WESTERN OKLAH04A,
SOUTHWESTERN KANSAS Clovis Area Slaughter
cattle fairly active, strong, instances 25#
higher on heifers; feeders steady.
Slaughter cattle Steers, 320 Good and
Choice 975-1050# $25.50; 1,740 Good, Choice end,
980-1100# $24.90-25.50. Heifers, 120 mostly
Choice 925-950# $25.00; 780 mostly Good, some
Choice, 840-930# $24.25-24.50; 370 Good 619-725#
$24.00-24.50.
Feeder cattle: Immediate thru April, 250
Good and Choice 750-800# steers $23.75; 1,800
Choice yearlings, 650-675# steers $25.75-26.00,
600-650# heifer mates $25.00-253.50; 285 Good and
Choice 575-650# steers $23.75; 590 Good 550-625,#
heifers $22.00-22.75. Feeder calves, 200 Choice
540-375#, steers $30.00-31.00, heifers $28.00;
600 Choice 300# heifer calves $50.00, some
$105.75 per head.
Lambs: Trading slow, prices steady, bulk
New Mexico lambs sold. Slaughter lambs, around
4,400 mostly Choice 92-110# mostly fall shorn
$15.00-15.50, few to $15.75 and small package
Prime 100# $16.00. About 3,000 Choice 80-87#
wooled feeders $14.00-14.50.
Amarillo area Slaughter cattle moderately
active, steady to 250 higher, feeders fully
steady.
Slaughter cattle: Steers, 560 Good to
mostly Choice 1200# $25.50; 380 Good and Choice
1000-1200# $24.25-24.90; 250 Good 700# $24.25.
Heifers, 60 mostly Choice 900# $24.75; 670 Good
and Choice 900-1000# $24.25-24.50.
Feeder cattle: Immediate through May, 800
Choice and Fancy 800-850# steers $24.25; 400
Choice and Fancy 625-70Q0# $24.75; 4,200 Good and
Choice 575-835# steers $23.50-24.00; 560 Medium
to mostly Good 600-70Q0# $22.50-22.80; some 3,000
Good and Choice 600-700# steers for June delivery
$23.50-24.00. Around 125 Choice and Fancy 550#
heifers $24.50; 200 Choice and Fancy 675-700#
$23.50; 765 Good and Choice 500-600# $23.50-
24.00; 400 Choice 600-650# heifers $23.60.

IDAHO, OREGON AND WASHINGTON Slaughter
steers firm in Washington and Idaho but un-
evenly steady to $1.25 higher in Oregon;
heifers steady to 500 up; feeders steady to


strong; slaughter lambs steady, instances 500
higher.
Slaughter steers: Washington, Good and
Choice 1000-1200# $25.50-27.00, some April
delivery; Standard 1100-1275# $22.00-22.25.
Idaho, Good to mostly Choice 975-1345#
$25.00-26.00. Oregon, Choice 1000-1050#
$27.25 delivered; Good to mostly Choice 1050-
1100# $26.75; Good and Choice 1050# $25.00-
25.50. Montana, Choice with few Prime 1050-
1150# $25.00.
Slaughter heLfers: Washington, Good
to mostly Choice 850-1000# $24.50-25.00
for March and April. Oregon, Good and
Choice 800-900# $24.50 March and April de-
livery; Good and Choice 850# $23.75 deliv-
ered. Idaho, Good to mostly Choice 800-925#
$24.00-24.75.
Feeders: Oregon, Choice 650# fleshy
heifers, $23.00 for April delivery. Idaho,
Good to mostly Choice 500-550# steers $26.00-
27.00. Good and Choice 625- heifers $23.50
and 790- steers $24.50, delivered.
Slaughter lambs: Washington, Choice,
few Prime 102# with No. 1-2 pelts $17.50
f.o.b. Oregon, Choice 97-105# with No.
1-5 pelts $17.00-17.75 delivered. Some
Choice No. 3 to fall pelts $17.75-18.75
delivered to California.

MONTANA AND NORTHERN WYOMING Trad-
ing only moderately active on all classes
of cattle with prices steady to strong.
Slaughter steers and heifers: Mon-
tana, 175 high-Good to mostly Choice 1000-
1175# steers $24.50-25.00; 125 high-Good
and low-Choice 750-950i heifers $23.50;
150 mostly Choice 900-1000# mixed steers
and heifers $25.00, delivered by mid-May.
Feeder cattle and calves: Montana,
150 Good and Choice mixed yearlings,
steers $24.00 for fall delivery, heifers,
$22.00 late summer delivery. Feeder
calves, Montana, 700 average and high-
Choice 400-500#, steers $29.00-51.00.
heifers $27.00-28.00; 700 high-Choice and
Fancy 475-500C heifers $29.40, mid-April
delivery; 150 Good and Choice mixed
calves for October delivery $25.00.
Sheep: Trading was slow with prices
fully steady.
Slaughter lambs: Montana, 700
mostly Choice with few Prime 105-11031
$16.75, 3# per head dock for muddy pelts;
1,000 Choice 110# $16.25-16.35; 500 Choice
95-110U $16.50 to western packing plant,
500 at $17.00 to midwest plant.
Shearing and feeder lambs: Montana,
1,000 Choice and Fancy 100-110# shearing
ewe lambs $18.00 per cwt. and in Wyoming,
1,500 Choice with a few Fancy 10Q0 $17.75.
Montana, 5,000 Choice spring feeder
lambs fall delivery $15.00.
Breeding ewes: About 1,900 Good and
Choice mixed ages, full wooled, $17.00-
18.00 per head.







WEEKLY RECEIPTS OF SALABLE LIVESTOCK AT 12 PUBLIC MARKETS
S Cattle 1 _alves &s 1Shee a lambs
Market t Mar. 17 Mar. 18 f Mar. 17: Mar. 18 Mar. 17 Mar. 18 Mar. 17 s Mar. 18
1962 1961 I39.2 1 J_6 1 a6. _61
Chicago ....... 50,445 57,582 105 101 54,006 52,644 4,255 5,048
Denver ........ 7,198 10,667 177 655 5,152 4,796 15,685 22,097
Fort Worth .... 4,955 7,086 755 948 1,664 2,546 13,106 15,297
Indianapolis .. 6,795 6,057 299 559 54,058 52,962 502 1,250
Kansas City ... 17,589 19,890 732 1,075 15,887 16,050 5,941 8,136
Oklahoma City 15,225 10,665 801 691 4,018 5,052 2,075 5,450
Omaha ......... 51,589 55,791 415 464 45,850 54,956 7,506 14,702
St. Joseph .... 15,548 15,925 555 665 19,141 22,003 6,690 9,452
St. Louis NSI 15,216 15,252 1,424 1,494 52,560 55,019 5,229 4,114
Sioux City .... 16,688 25,555 514 415 25,515 51,544 5,225 10,058
Sioux Falls ... 6,010 8,047 2 75 15,180 15,558 5,294 7,604
So. St. Paul .. 18,174 19,145 4,995 7,062 47,747 48,245 10,160 15,105
Total ....... 181,426 207,458 10,550 15,980 296,556 298,975 77,646 112,295
Mar. 10, 1962 208,219 12,466 502,175 99 248
ITgNiIOR IOWA AND SO&THERN MINNESOTA Mar. 17, 1962 Mar. 10, 1962 Mar. 18, 1961
Hogs ...... 548,000 554,000 555,000*
Sheep ..... 21,200 24,500 24,200*
INTERIOR ILLINOIS Hogs ...... 115,000 113,500 95,500 *Revised.
- -- ------------ m.a- -u a- ; -_ --_
FEEDER CATTIBs AVERAGE COST WEIGHT AND NUMBER
-------------- -- --- w V --- --------
Week ended t Month t Two Months
SMar. 15' Mar. 8 'Mar. 16 Feb. Feb. = Jan Feb.
1962 t 1962 1961 1962 1961 1962 1961
Steers 1001# up ......... 459 547 5553 1,796 3,197 3,465 7,406
901-1000 ......... 1,417 1,820 1,595 7,095 7,225 15,575 17,711
801-900 .......... 2,754 2,808 2,692 10,651 12,002 25,898 29,687
701-800 .......... 5,742 2,234 5,017 9,277 11,948 24,146 51,571
501-700 .......... 11,52 __ 740 _15922 24 765 55,259 ._8,72 85 081
Total steers 10 markets..... 19,860 14,949 21,757 55,564 67,609 126,956 169,256
Av. wt. .... 687# 719# 684# 7531# 725# 729# 724#
Av. cos t* .... $24.25 $25.94 $24.22 $25.60 $25.97 $25.51 $24.52
Chicago ...... 23.50 25.25 22.78 22.89 25.12 22.64 25.58
Kansas City... 24.59 24.50 24.62 25.16 23.70 22.96 24.05
w Omaha ........ 24.26 24.79 24.47 23.91 24.09 25.60 24.52
S. St. Paul... 20.08 21.00 22.15 21.29 22.10 21.45 22.08
S Siotx City.... 24.45 24.44 25.11 25.22 25.58 25.02 25.96
D e Denver ....... 25.82 24.07 24.08 25.14 23.12 24.11 25.29
Ft. Worth .... 25.71 25.54 25.15 25.10 23.68 23.11 25.57
S Oklahoma City. 24.61 25.84 25.67 24.05 25.26 25.52 25.52
S. St. Joseph. 24.58 24.25 24.61 25.78 25.97 25.20 25.56
w St. Louis NSY. 25.76 25.41 25.44 22.78 22.77 22.68 22.96
Total calves 10 markets.. 6,565 5,494 7,624 26,053 30,255 86,069 100,325
heifers *" .... 2,602 2,563 2,802 8,998 9,945 20,970 24,361
cows .... 565 485 615 2,515 2,522 5,426 6,968
Not adjusted foray differences in grade of cattle sold at each market.

ESTIMATED PERCENT OF FEEDER CATTLE AND SLAUGHTER COWS IN SALABLE RECEIPTS
Chi-tKan-. 'S. St. Sioux'S.St.tIndian-'Dn- F. Okla.Wich-: San
Week ended c tsag s sma Joseph ity Pal apolia ver Wrth 'City 'ita tAntonio
-t-- Citr t NST tCty Sal t pl- i -
Feeders
Mar. 16, 1962 2 42 8 16 7 14 5 8 10 70 78 58 55
Mar. 9, 1962 2 45 7 13 6 17 8 5 6 65 80 50 55
Mar. 17, 1961 2 45 9 15 8 52 7 10 10 70 75 45 45
Slaughter cowrs
Mar. 16, 1962 5 9 8 4 10- 5 20 10 15 10 6 8 15
Mar. 9, 1962 5 8 8 5 8 6 20 8 15 10 5 15 15
Mar. 17, 1961 5 5 6 5 8 5 25 12 12 10 10 15 20
-------------------------------------------------------------------






222

STEERS SOLD OUT OF FIRST HANDS FOR SLAUGHTER 1/
S Nuber of head Percent of total : Average weight Average price in
Grbr"a by grades (pounds) :dollars per 100 lb.
Grade ----- -- ------- -----------
Gd Week ended
: Mar. Mar.l Mar. 15 Mar. 16: Mar. 15 : Mar. 16 : Mar. 15 : Mar. 16
-. 1962 -1261. _:_ 1_92. _:_ 1 _:_ 196L2_ _- 19i_ 1962_:_ 1969_ _
CHICAGO


Prime..........
Choice.........
Good...........
Standard.......
Commercial.....
Utility........
All grades.....

Prime..........
Choice.........
Good...........
Standard.......
Utility.........
All grades.....

Prime ..........
Choice.........
Good ...........
Standard.......
Utility ........
All grades.....

Prime..........
Choice.........
Good...........
Standard .......
Commercial.....
Utility ........
All grades .....


Prime ..........
Chcice.........
Good...........
Standard.......
Commercial.....
Utility........
All grades.....


1,072 4,161 4.8 15.4 1,232 1,266 50.17 27.12
13,106 16,5307 58.4 60.5 1,168 1,188 27.37 25.59
7,258 5,665 32.3 20.9 1,069 1,122 25.01 23.82
625 698 2.8 2.6 1,028 1,041 22.00 21.20
12 -- .0 -- 1,333 -- 21.62 --
380 230 1.7 .8 1,062 1,046 19.97 19.41
22,453 27,061 1,134 1,181 26.54 25.54
OMAHA
--i i -- - - -
87 150 .5 .9 1,089 1,248 27.32 26.52
6,288 7,461 38.8 47.8 1,150 1,198 25.90 24.72
8,894 7,259 54.9 46.5 1,077 1,123 24.26 25.65
841 690 5.2 4.4 1,111 1,124 20.51 19.59
96 61 .6 .4 981 1,005 19.00 18.17
16,206 15,621 1,107 1,160 24.72 24.02
SIoux CITY
124 79 1.4 .9 1,161 1,295 27.78 26.05
4,361 4,205 50.9 49.3 1,152 1,185 25.91 24.82
3,717 3,709 43.4 43.4 1,062 1,156 25.95 23.59
202 545 2.4 6.4 1,063 1,087 20.57 19.87
159 -- 1.9 -- 1,075 19.21 -
8,563 8,538 1,110 1,159 24.88 23.93
i---- --- -- -


1,957
3,483
294

110
5,844


1,016
3,915
1,110

334
6,375


1,854 33.5 27.3 1,125 1,152 25.76 24.87
4,238 59.6 62.4 1,069 1,090 24.45 25.51
668 5.0 9.8 1,056 1,065 21.59 19.93

31 1.9 .5 1,050 1,055 19.48 18.20
6,791 1,087 1,104 24.66 25.54
--- --ST. LOUI7S SY -


--
992
4,699
1,280

196
7,167


15.9
61.4
17.4

5.3


15.8
65.6
17.9

2.7


1,096
1,011
956

943
1,012


1,085
1,047
990

842
1,056


26.11
24.45
22.20

19.23
24.10


25.33
23.87
21.38

17.98
23.55


Prime.......... -- -- -- -- -- --
Choice ......... 3,056 2,601 34.1 29.8 1,142 1,164 25.71 24.97
Good........... 5,323 5,615 59.4 64.3 1,072 1,126 24.17 23.64
Standard ....... 577 512 6.5 5.9 1,086 1,078 20.57 20.15
Utility........ -- -- -- -.-
All grades ..... 8,956 8,728 1,097 1,134 24.49 23.85
--------_------ -gg----- -_ _
Prime......... -- -- -- -- -- --..
Choice......... 1,136 2,758 49.8 66.8 1,196 1,183 25.94 24.75
Good........... 1,101 1,325 48.3 52.1 1,108 1,148 24.79 23.68
Standard....... 45 19 1.9 .5 1,033 1,241 20.11 19.57
Utility........ -- 25 -- .6 -- 965 -- 18.10
All grades..... 2,280 4,127 1,151 1,171 25.30 24.54
1/ Data collected by Statistical .Reporting Service, and Livestock Division, A. M. S.







WEEKLY SLAUGHTER UNDER FEDERAL INSPECTION AT MAJOR CENTERS
I Cattle : Calves 2 HoRs 'Sheep and lambs
City or Area *Mar_. f7TMr- 18eTlaer. 1r7Fr I-T'8 r 17' M-arl" Tiar.17 TM-r~l~ -~
1962 t 1961 : 1962 1 1961 : 1962 1961 1962 t 1961


Boston, New York City Area ....
Baltimore, Philadelphia .......
Cin., Cleve., Detroit, Indple .
Chicago Area ..................
St. Paul- Wise. Areas .........
St. Louis Area ................
Sioux City-So. Dakota Area ....
Omaha Area .... ......
Kansas City ...................
Iowa So. Minnesota ..........
Lou'l, Evan'l.Nash'1. Mph's ...
Georgia, Florida, Ala. Area ...
St. Jo'ph. Wichita, Okla. City.
Ft. Worth, Dallas, San Antonio.
Denver, Ogden, Salt Lake City .
Los Angeles, San Fran. Areas ..
Portland, Seattle, Spokane ....


11,96
8,62
19,12
14,84
25,78
10,65
24,84
55,00
14,47
51,29
5,78
10,28
21,66
9,21
25,25
25,61
8,29


Total ...................... 298,71

Accumulation to date ....... 5,449,8C


1 11,494
5 8,425
2 18,363
7 14,680
2 26,785
7 9,886
8 18,985
9 55,647
9 15,520
7 29,194
4 5,481
0 9,414
.9 20,942
L5 10,222
6 19,707
.2 26,527
'9 7,825
.8
289,095
18
5,249,240


9,628
1,945
5,247
8,406
18,985
1,154

196

9,089
2,244
2,790
781
2,769
145
1,800
255
65,408


10,722 45,945 46,757
2,595 57,987 32,115
4,168 140,415 1335,548
6,017 49,262 45,975
21,599 124,547 109,077
1,264 86,852 85,559
-- 81,800 95,125
129 75,890 75,910
-- 58,758 56,850
9,896 500,084 506,764
2,563 61,032 70,520
5,756 52,550 59,601
875 48,161 45,589
4,095 17,657 17,933
192 14,818 15,869
1,658 55,295 28,395
208 17.414 15 951


32,928
4,527
10,825
9,419
14,930
4,484
11,535
15,146

55,265


9,555
23,955
49,749
58,512
5,248


1,206,225 263,654


54,741
5,263
11,555
6,467
25,680
4,092
14,895
18,255

59,400


11,658
16,744
58,729
59,106
5,105


69,555 1,199,094 269,662
695,161 12,767,998 5,005,721
711,485 12,418,248 2,804,493


ESTIMATED FEDERALLY INSPECTED SLAUGHTER AND MEAT PRODUCTION
- -- ----- - T- I~ T o- T ~IjnV --T-
Beef Veal Lexcl._ lard) and mutton Total Total
Week ended Num Num- : : Nurm- I. Num- : meat I lard
her rod er : .ro: ber :Prod.er ,Pr prod. prod.
1000- ml.21b. -~000 mil.0b. 1.000 il.b- 1 000 T il.Ib.0li 1b.Zml.1b.


Mar. 17, 1962 ........
Mar. 10, 1962 .......
Feb. 24, 1962/ .....
Mar. 18, 1961 .....


212.0
226.1

216.9


10.4 1,590 189.0
10.4 1,400 192.5
1,520 --
11.8 1,580 188.6


Percentage change from
Mar. 10, 1962 ........ -5 -6 0 0 -1 -2 0 0 -4 --
Mar. 18, 1961 ........ 1 -2 -11 -12 1 0 -5 -8 -2 --
-----------------------------------------Avrg egt~~-----------------.
--------- -Averag weight_(Ib)_ -- Lard
Week ended Cattle I Calves Hogs andShe labs yield
i : : : : : -. d l s t per.
.- Live Dressed. Live nDressed. Live Dressed. Live Dressed: 100 lb.
m e m e m e m m e m m ~ m- & - - --ns o m e o m m


Mar. 17, 1962 .......
Mar. 10, 1962 .......
Feb. 24, 1962 .......
Mar. 18, 1961 .......


1025
1055
1040
1057


I/ Actual slaughter. 2/ Excludes lard.


1.2
15.2


14.2
14.2

15.5


425.6
445.2

452.8


59.7
42.9


, ,














Classifical


Steers -
Prime

Choice

Good
Standard

Heifers -
Choice
Good
Standard


CATTLE: WEEKLY AVERAGE OF DAILY QUOTATIONS
In dollars per 100 pounds
T. --..- ---------- : N- --- orth
: Chicago Kansas City Omaha Denver s Portland
: Mar. Mar. : Mar. Mar.ar. Mar. Mar. Mar. Mar.
tion : 17 : 18 17 : 18 :17 18 :17 18 17 18
1962 1961 1962 1961 : 1962 1961 1962 : 1961 1962 1961
Glau-ter cattle- calves and dealers
D.laughter 2attle, calves-and vealers


900-1100#
1100-1500
900-1100
1100-1500
900-1100


28.95
29.82
27.52
27.65
24.40
21.72


700-900# 26.58
600-800 -
20.75


16.75
16.52
15.68
14.50


27.28
27.15
25.95
25.70
23.75
21.25


25.00

20.10


17.12
17.02
16.40
14.92


26.25
26.02
24.18
21.22


25.82
25.75
20.25


17.18
16.62
15.50
13.78


--

25.50
25.12
23.62
20.40


24.72
22.75
19.75


17.00
16.72
15.95
15.12


27.88
27.98
26.48
26.62
23.75
20.75


25.88
23.08
20.25


17.58
16.50
15.25
15.95


26.75
26.62
25.48
25.55
23.52
20.00


24.80
22.50
19.50


17.48
16.80
15.82
14.98


26.20
26.20
25.45



25.25





16.28
14.85
15.72


--
24.64
24.64
22.32
19.75


25.78
21.62
19.10



16.42
14.95
135.62


27.00

25.00
22.50



25.50
20.75



16.00
14.00
12.25


-
-
25.12
24.75
25.50
20.75


23.75
22.00
19.00



15.56
14.25
15.00


Bulls Yrlgs. excl.
Commercial
Utility

Calves 250-500#
Choice
Good
Standard

Vealers 150-250#
Choice
Good
Standard


Steers 500-800#
Fancy
Choice
Good

Heifers 500-750#
Choice
Good

Calves -
Steer -
Fancy 500-550#
Choice "
Good 500-500#
Heifer 500-500#
Fancy
Choice
Good


20.10 19.42 18.70 17.75 18.75 18.45
19.85 19.58 19.25 17.98 19.00 18.20


29.50
26.50
22.00


26.00
24.25
20.75


29.90
26.40
21.70


25.50
22.00
19.00


29.00
25.25
20.75


28.00
25.00
21.75


26.50
25.50
20.25


19.25 18.50


20.50 19.88


55.50
50.50
26.50


--
25.50
22.00


51.50
29.50
25.50


Feeder cattle and calves


26.75
24.58


27.60
26.55
24.55


26.40
24.08


26.75
24.25


26.58
24.25


27.25
26.00
25.00


-- -- 24.25 25.50 24.50 24.25 24.75
- -- 21.88 20.50* 22.75 20.75* 21.75


.. 530.80 -.
28.95)
"" 25.58) 28.00

.. 27.00 ..
24.50)
-- 23.00) 25.25


51.50 ..
28.75) 28.75
24.75) 28.75

28.75 ..
26.00)
25.25) 25.50


26.58
24.00


24.25
21.50*


52.75 ..
29.50)
27.00) 29.75

51.50 ..
28.75)
26.00) 28.25


--
25.75
24.00


24.00


19.75 20.00*


m-
26.50)
26.00)

--
25.50)
24.00)


*Medium and Good.


Cows -
Commercial
Utility
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Canner











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HOGS: AVERAGE COST, WEIGHT, AND NUMBER OF PACKER AND SHIPPER PURCHASES 1/
--- --- -. T Eight
I : Louis % Kansas' I Sioux IS. St. I S. St.'Indian-' mkts.
Week ended :Chicago: Nat'l.: City : Omaha 1 City IJoseph I Paul apolias con-
s : Stock : I :t t bined
; : Yards t : : s
AVERAGE COST Dollars per 100 pounds
Barrows Mar. 17, 1962 16.51 16.50 16.67 16.47 16.56 16.73 16.15 16.52 16.45
and Mar. 10, 1962 16.41 16.56 16.77 16.54 16.28 16.79 16.32 16.57 16.49
gilts Mar. 18, 1961 17.51 17.58 17.77 17.77 17.63 17.68 17.58 17.72 17.64
Mar. 17, 1962 14.17 14.61 15.23 14.77 14.52 14.94 14.47 14.64 14.61
sows Mar. 10, 1962 14.08 14.72 15.14 14.90 14.51 15.05 14.53 14.54 14.64
Mar. 18, 1961 15.57 16.00 16.37 16.10 15.86 16.24 15.74 15.49 15.88
AVERAGE WEIGHT Pounds
Barrows Mar. 17, 1962 253 221 231 256 257 228 231 226 250
and Mar. 10, 1962 233 222 251 236 240 229 251 227 251
gilts Mar. 18,_ 1961 235 219 231 237 242 5 ~25 _
Mar. 17, 1962 451 429 414 450 457 402 415 436 428
Sows Mar. 10, 1962 456 422 421 429 446 402 418 448 431
Mar. 18, 1961 453 405 433 434 447 414 423 448 430
NUMBER OF HEAD -
Barrows Mar. 17, 1962 26987 48895 14282 39857 21088 17151 38862 50152 257252
and Mar. 10, 1962 26032 42449 12522 36678 28202 17753 45453 28079 254968
gilts Mar. 18, 1961 26216 47198 14598 29881 28034 19799 38504 28872 252902i
Mar. 17, 1962 2170 2698 981 5755 1562 1095 5072 2391 17504
Sows Mar. 10, 1962 2210 2927 953 3505 2070 1636 5207 25531 18859
Mar. 18, 1961 1993 3919 749 3346 1993 1380 2448 2519. 8347 _
SOWS Percentage of total
Mar. 17, 1962 7 5 6 9 6 6 7 7 7
Mar. 10, 1962 8 6 7 9 7 8 7 8 7
Mar. 18, 1961 7 8 5 10 7 7 6 8 7
I/ Weighted average.

AVERAGE WHOLESALE VALUE OF HOG PRODUCTS DERIVED FROM 100 LB. LIVE HOG,
COMPARED WITH PRICES OF LIVE HOGS, CHICAGO
Week ended Hog products Hog prices 2/ Gross spread
-e -roduc Ho p or margin 3/
Mar. 17, 1962 ............... $18.44 $16.65 $1.79
Mar. 10, 1962 ............... 18.50 16.80 1.50
Mar. 18, 1961 ............... 19.92 17.88 2.04
I/ Value of all edible products, fresh basis (lard rendered) in 100 lb. of live
hoi computed from wholesale prices on carlot basis, Chicago, reported by National
Pro.risioner daily market report.
2/ Mean of daily quotations on U. S. No. 1,2 and 3 hogs, 200-220# wt. Chicago.
_/ Difference between wholesale product value and hog prices.

HOG AND CORN PRICES AT CHICAGO AND HOG-CORN PRICE RATIO
; Barrows and : Corn 2/ : Hog-corn
Week ended gilts 1/ : No.3 yeTlow t price ratio
s Dollars per : Cents per : based on
: 100 pounds : bushel : barrows and gilts
Mar. 17, 1962 ............ 16.51 109.5 14.9
Mar. 10, 1962 ............ 16.41 108.8 15.1
Mar. 18, 1961 .......... 17.51 115.4 15.2

I/ Weighted average. 2/ Simple average.






BOSTON WOOL MARKET REVIEW


A substantial volume of greasy domestic
combing wools was moved in the territory States,
but supplies at the Boston market continued very
small. Prices were about steady.
Trading on woolen wools was slow. Noils were
about steady.
Trading in Montana and Wyoming was moderate-
ly active at about steady prices, and a modest
volume of fine wool was sold in the Bakersfield,
California area. Activity again was slow in
Central and East Texas because of inclement
weather. Heavy snowstorms also hampered shearing
in many of the fleece wool States.
According to private cables at midweek, the
Australian markets continued firm with some types
a penny higher with demand largely from Japan,
Eastern Europe and the Continent. The New Zealand
auctions held strong with demand good, while in
South Africa, France was the main buyer with some
support from the United States. The South Ameri-
can markets were firm with Montevideo quotations
up a penny.
The United States Department of Commerce
announced that the production of woolen and
worsted fabrics during the fourth quarter,
October-December,1961, amounted to 68.9 million
finished linear yards. This compared to the July-
September, 1961 production of 74.3 million linear
yards. The October-December, 1960 production was
59.0 million linear yards.
The Crop Reporting Board of the United States
Department of Agriculture announced the average
price received by farmers for wool on Februaty 15,
1962 was 42.1f per grease pound. This compared
to 41.1f for January 15, 1962 and 39.00 for
February 15, 1961.
Fleece Wools There were occasional sales
of medium wools in the fleece States at $1.05-
1.07 for graded 56/58s, and $1.05-1.05 for 50/54s,
clean basis, delivered.
Territory Wools Montana: Around Dillon,
1,100 bulk medium grade fleeces at 48.5f and
1,300 bulk half-blood at 45#; Winnett, 5,200 bulk
half-blood 45#-46#; Harlowton, 6,500 bulk half-
blood 454 all grease basis, 5,000 fleeces of fine
at $1.18, clean basis, delivered. Wyoming: About
18,000 fleeces of bulk half-blood with some fine
brought from 1.10-1.15 clean, delivered, while
approximately 5,000 fleeces of bulk half-blood
sold at 410-44#, grease basis. Arizona Practi-
cally all wool was cleaned up at this time. About
72 000 pounds of fine and half-blood sold around
456g grease basis, f.o.b. this week. California -
Bulk fine wool in Bakersfield sold at an estimated
clean price of $1.16-1.21, delivered. A modest
weight of fine Roswell wools moved around $1.25,
clean.
Texas Wools Trading was slow, but oc-
casional lots of good 12 months sold around $1.22-
1.25, clean basis, while 8 months wool were esti-
mated to cost around $1.05-1.08, delivered.
Mohair Spring mohair moved at 71 and 68*
for adult and $1.01l for kid, while straight kid
sold recently at $1.161 to the warehouse. Trade
in tke local market continued dull.


Foreign Wools Spot foreign wools were
slow. Cabled reports at week's end follow with
combing wools converted to clean U. S. oil-combed
yields and short wools to scouring yields, in
bond.


South Africa
Oil-combed


77B
78B
78AI
79B
80B


Mon
Sk


$1.12 6C
1.1 6
1.11 6C
1.09 58
1.09 5E
1.06

Australia
Oil-combed
$1.22 452
1.19 4355
1.18 454
1.16 455
1.13


itevideo Super
idrted Wools
)/64s $1.02
0s .98
/58s .96
/56s .95
>/50s .92


$1.07
.97
.95
.86


New Zealand No auctions this week.
Carpet Wools Trade continued slow in
carpet wools. Greasy Buenos Aires lambs wool for
carpet use sold around 714 clean wool fibers
present. Greasy Buenos Aires November second
clip were offered at 710-72*, March wools at 680-
69#,fleeces at 75oe and lambs around 710, while
New Zealand fleeces were offered at 750 and
second shear wools around 70f. Yellow Pakistan
and India carpet wools were offered at 650-67a
and a pulled white Aleppo wool at 71e all clean
wool fibers present for shipment.
Woolen Wools Sales follow:


Scoured Shorn Domestic
Tex. 8 mos. $1.15
Calif.med. lambs
white .78
Greasy Pulled Domestic
(Clean basis)
62s 2-5" choice $1.16
Scoured Shorn Foreign
Aust. 60/64s, white
fleece $1.22
Aust. 64/70s locks &
pieces .90
Aust. 60s locks &
pieces $.83-.85
Monte 56/60s lambs .98


Scoured Pulled Foreign
N. Z. 56/58s, 2j-5"
ch. white $1.16
Noils
Aust. 58s, nobles $.78
Clear, Dom. 58/56s
nobles .64
Clear, Aust. 64/70s
Schlums. .70
Cape 70s Schlums. .89
B.A. 64s .56
Dom. 62s French .50
Ave. Aust. 56/58s,
Schlums. .52


CLOSING FUTURES QUOTATIONS Mar. 15, 1962
(Furnished by the Wool Associates of the New York
Cotton Exchange)
March wool tops $1.625 (Bid)
May wool tops 1.615 (Bid)
64s grade 2.55" minimum length
March wool $1.260
May wool 1.252
64s grade 24" ave. stretched length









WHOLESALE MEAT TRADE REVIEWS


LESS THAN CARLOT MEAT TRADE REVIEW

EASTERN SEABOARD Steer beef sold steady
to $1.00 higher; cow beef steady to 500 higher,
except some Commercial 50# lower at Philadelphia;
veal mostly steady, except at New York where
both veal and calf declined fully $2.00; lamb
sold $1.00 lower at Philadelphia, fully steady
to $1.00 higher at New York and steady at other
points. Pork loins were $1.00-2.00 lower at
New York and steady to $1.00 lower at Washington,
but other markets $1.00 higher; Boston butte
steady to $1.00 lower; other pork cuts mostly
steady.
Prices were mostly strong to 500 higher for
Choice and Prime kosher steer forequarters.
Lamb, veal and calf sold steady.
Supplies were normal at all markets except
Philadephia where receipts were below normal.
Clearance of veal and calf was incomplete at
New York while some beef was carried at Phila-
delphia and Washington. Clearance was fairly
complete at other Seaboard markets. Trading in
general was moderately active and demand fair.
Early trade was slowed by rain and windy weather,
but late trade action improved. Beef demand was
generally well balanced and moderately broad
with most interests active on all sessions.
Demand for veal and calf narrowed at New York
and prices were lower for first time in several
weeks. Lamb opened very slow, but late improve-
ment in demand aided both prices and clearance.
Pork loins moved well except at New York where
demand was narrow.

CHICAGO Steer beef sold steady to 50#
higher, heifer beef fully steady, veal $1.00-
2.00 lower, lamb 50# higher, pork loins 8-16#
$1.00-2.50 lower, Boston butts 4-8# fully $1.00
lower, spareribs 3# down steady to 500 lower.
Small recent veal offerings increased to
moderate this week. Supply of beef, lamb and
fresh pork was normal although some shipments
were delayed in transit because of heavy snow
and bad weather west of Chicago. Beef supplies
in the main were Good to low-Choice, Prime
rather scarce.
Carcass beef scored slight price advances
despite a slow trade. Rounds and ribs were also
slow but for the most part steady rates were
maintained. Arm and squarecut chucks and loins
had fairly broad outlets. The veal market was
lower with trade slow on somewhat increased
supplies. This was the first downturn recorded


in the veal division in better than a month.
Carcass lamb trade was fairly active in most
quarters. Hindquarter meat cleared best of
primal cuts, ribs slowest. Generally, lamb
stews and shoulders moved fairly well. Fresh
pork trade slow throughout.

PACIFIC COAST Carcass steer and heifer
beef met a poor demand and trading was slow
with prices weak to 500 lower in Los Angeles.
In San Francisco and the Pacific Northwest
both classes sold moderately active, firm to
$1.00 higher. Cow beef was moderately active,
strong to $1.00 higher in Northern California
and the Portland-Seattle area but was slow,
$1.00-1.75 lower in Southern California. Calf
and veal sold moderately active, mostly steady
in San Francisco. Veal was steady to $1.00
higher in the Pacific Northwest. Calf was
slow, weak to 50# lower and veal sales too
limited for price test in Los Angeles. Lamb
sold fairly active, steady to 50# lower. A
small volume of spring lamb was available in
Los Angeles and San Francisco. Fresh pork
loins, spareribs and Boston butte were weak to
$1.50 lower, the greatest decline was on
loins and in Los Angeles, other fresh cuts
were steady. Cured pork fairly active, steady.

CARLOT MEAT TRADE REVIEW

CHICAGO, DENVER, OMAHA, NEW YORK AND
PHILADELPHIA Prices advanced on steer and
heifer beef influenced mainly by below normal
offerings. Demand continued moderate. Steer
beef sold steady to $1.00 higher, mostly 25-
50# higher. Part of the advance was lost in
late trading. Heifer beef sold steady to 75#
higher, mostly steady to 256 higher. Cow beef
was steady to $1.00 lower with Canner and Cut-
ter $1.50-2.00 lower at Philadelphia. Clear-
ance was good on beef offerings.
Demand was moderate and trading slow on
below normal supplies of lamb and prices were
steady to $1.00 higher. Clearance was gener-
ally complete.
Supplies of pork were below normal and
trading uneven with loins steady to 50 higher
at Chicago and steady to 500 lower at Omaha.
Pork butts sold steady to 50 lower while
fresh hams ranged from 50 to $2.00 higher.
Pork carcasses sold steady to 500 lower at
New York and Philadelphia. Clearance was
largely complete.








iOLESALE DRESSED MEAT PRICES LESS THAN CARLOT BASIS
Weekly average of daily quotations in dollars per 100 pounds
New York Chicago San Francisco : Los Angeles
Classification- -=- ------------- --------
3 Mar. 17: Mar. 18: Mar. 17: Mar. 18: Mar. 17: Mar. 18: Mar. 17: Mar. 18
-----.....-- -- .1-6-- 1 L _:_ L-9. 2 aL _:_ LU_- 1 ._1 L _' 9 I L2- _11L
Steer beef -
Prime 700-800# 46.25 44.25 .. --..
Choice 600-700 45.75 44.25 44.225 43.25 4462 4A2 00 4412 A4l


Good

Heifer beef -
Choice


700-800
500-600
600-700

500-600d
600-700


45.00
43.00
43.25


Good 500-600 --
Veal -
Prime 90-120# 62.90
Choice 90-120 54.90
Good 90-120 49.40
Lamb -
Prime 45-55# 38.25
Choice 45-55 38.25
Fresh pork -
Loins 8-1?4 45.60
Butts 4-8 35.50
Spareribs 35 down 40.00
Hams, smk. skd. -
Cook before eating 12-16# 46.50
Fully cooked 10-14# 48.50
Bacon, smoked, sliced -
1# package (box lots) 48.50
Picnics, smoked (Cook
before eating) 4-8# 33.00
Lard, 1# carton 14.00


42.75
41.50
41.75


63.00
55.70
49.20


43.38
41.75
41.31

44.00
44.00
40.75

59.00
55.50
50.00


41.75
40.50
40.50

41.50
41.50
59.25

61.25
55.25
50.25


44.00
43.12
42.50

43.75
43.25
42.00



55.50


41.00
41.00
39.25

39.50





53.00


42.94
42.88
41.44

43.44
42.88


59.88
40.62
39.25

40.75
40.12
59.88


58.35 37.00 39.358 38.50 39.00 38.50 39.50
38.10 37.00 39.38 38.50 39.00 38.50 39.50


46.70
37.80
41.10

47.50
49.50


43.15
31.62
36.56


44.00
36.69
38.00


-- 50.00
51.50 55.50


50.00
41.50
43.50


50.00
42.50
46.50


50.00 50.00


47.00
37.50
40.50


46.75
41.50
42.88


48.50 49.12


50.00 49.50 54.75 52.00 57.00 48.00 54.38

33.00 35.00 56.75 33.75 55.00 34.00 35.00
18.00 14.38 17.25 17.50 18.00 16.75 19.00


BULK PRICES GABLOT BASIS WEEK ENDED MAR. 16, 1962
S- ~ ~aIdF0BT ~ E:~-- csd I d
Classification Ciao eer Pce iKew-ir T R el a
teer eef- ------ --------- -


Good


Heifer beef -
Choice

Good


600-700#
700-800
800-900
500-600
600-700
700-800

500-600#
600-700
500-600
600-700


Cow beef All weigh
Utility
Canner and Cutter
Lamb -
Prime 55-4


Choice


Fresh pork -
Loins


ts -


L5#


45-55
55-65
55-45
45-55
55-65


42.50-43.00
42.00-43.00
42.00-43.00
39.50-40.50
38.50-40.00
38.50-40.00

42.50-42.75
42.50-42.75
38.50-39.00
38.50-39.00

31.00-31.50
30.50-31.00

36.00-37.00
34.50-35.50
32.50-34.50
36.00-37.00
34.50-35.50
32.50-34.50


41.50-42.00
41.00-42.00
41.00-41.50

37.00-40.00
37.00-40.00

40.75-41.50
40.75-41.50
38.00-40.00
38.00-40.00

31.50-32.00


34.50-35.50
33.50-34.50
30.50-32.50
34.50-35.50
33.50-34.50
30.50-32.50


42.00-42.50
42.00-42.50
41.75-42.25

39.50-40.50
37.50-39.50

41.75-42.00
41.75-4U.00
38.25-38.50
38.25-38.50

30.00-30.75
30.00-30.25

35.25-36.25
33.75-35.25
32.25-33.25
35.25-36.25
33.75-35.25
32.25-33.25


44.50-45.50
44.00-45.00
44.00-44.75
39.50-42.00
39.50-42.00
39.50-42.00


44.75-45.25
44.50-45.00
44.00-44.75

40.00-43.00
39.50-42.50


-- 44.25-45.00
-- 44.00-44.50



-- 32.50-33.00
-- 30.50-31.50


38.00-39.50
36.50-37.50
35.00-36.00
38.00-39.50
36.50-37.50
35.00-36.00


37.50-38.50
36.50-37.50
35.00-35.50
37.50-38.50
36.50-37.50
35.00-35.50


8-1Za 41.00-41.50


Choice


41.00


-- 43.00-43.50










PIG CROP REPORT MARCH 1962

The number of sows farrowed and intended to farrow in the spring of 1962 (December through
May) for 10 of the Corn Belt States at 5,540,000 head is 2 percent more than the same period in
1961 but 6 percent below the 1951-60 average, according to the Crop Reporting Board. Eight of
the 10 States show an increase in spring farrowings compared with a year earlier. The increases
range from 1 percent in Kansas to 6 percent in Indiana and South Dakota. An increase of 2 per-
cent is indicated for Iowa, Missouri, and Ohio; and 3 percent in Illinois and Nebraska. States
showing decreases are Wisconsin (down 6 percent) and Minnesota (down 2 percent). The present
increase of 2 percent in spring farrowings in the 10 States, compares with an increase of 4 per-
cent as indicated December 1, 1961. The 10 States included in this report accounted for 77 per-
cent of the 1961 United States pig crop.

Sows farrowed in the 10 States during December, January, and February totaled 1,791,000
head, 1 percent more than during the same period a year earlier and 19 percent more than average.
These farrowings represent 32 percent of the December-May expected total compared with 35 percent
last year and the 10-year average of 25 percent. On December 1, 1961, farmers intended to in-
crease December-February farrowings 6 percent, 5 percentage points above the present estimate.
Most of the increase in December-February farrowings occurred in December and January while
February was down slightly compared with a year earlier.

Sows bred and intended for farrowing in March, April, and May this year in the 10 States
totaled 3,749,000 head, 2 percent more than a year earlier but 15 percent below average. In-
creases from a year earlier were indicated by 6 of the 10 States, ranging from 3 percent in
Nebraska to 9 percent in Indiana. Decreases were indicated in Kansas, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.
Missouri showed no change from the previous year. The March 1 intentions for these months are
1 percent or 40,000 head less than the intentions reported in December.

Reported breeding intentions indicate 2,422,000 sows to farrow during the 1962 summer quar-
ter (June through August) for the 10 States. This is an increase of 5 percent or 114,000 sows
more than the 2,308,000 that farrowed during the same period in 1961 and is 18 percent above the
June-August 10-year average. Increases from a year earlier were indicated by all 10 States for
this quarter. Intended increases are 21 percent in Kansas; 10 percent in South Dakota; 6 per-
cent in Minnesota; 5 percent in Illinois, Missouri, Nebraska, and Wisconsin; 4 percent in Iowa;
5 percent in Indiana; and 1 percent in Ohio.

The number of hogs and pigs on farms March 1, 1962, totaled 41,027,000 head. This number
is 2 percent larger than the 40,345,000 head a year earlier. Inventory numbers were the same
as March 1, 1961, in Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, while increases in the remaining 7 States ranged
from 1 percent in Ohio and Wisconsin to 11 percent in South Dakota.

Hogs and pigs 6 months old and over totaled 15,806,000 head or 3 percent more than a year
earlier.

The number of hogs and pigs under 6 months of age was 1 percent larger than a year earlier.
The number under 3 months of age was 2 percent smaller. The decrease is the result of fewer
pigs saved per litter, since more sows farrowed. The number 3-6 months of age was 4 percent
larger than for March 1, 1961. The 12,469,000 pigs under 3 months of age was 30 percent of all
hogs and pigs in the March 1 inventory and the 3-6 months age group at 14,752,000 pigs repre-
sented 36 percent of the total.

This report for these 10 States is made possible by matching funds provided jointly by
State agencies and the United States Department of Agriculture under provisions of the Agri-
cultural Marketing Act of 1946.

Statistical Reporting Service Crop Reporting Board.







Hogs and pigs: Number on farms by classes March 1, Selected Corn Belt States


: Total under 6 months 6 months and older All hogs and pigs
State : : 1962 : : : 1962: : : 1962
1961 : 1962 :as % of : 1961 : 1962 :as % of:1961 :1962 :as % of
l : : 1961 : : : 1961: : : 1961
: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
: head head Percent head head Percent head head Percent
Ohio .: 1,953 1,977 101 M4 "36 100 2,587 2,613 101
Ind. .: 5,610 3,719 105 1,498 1,542 103 5,108 5,261 103
Ill. .: 4,850 4,969 102 2,207 2,500 104 7,057 7,269 103
Wis. .: 1,177 1,191 101 545 548 101 1,722 1,759 101
Minn. *. 2,120 2,180 105 1,265 1,205 95 5,385 3,585 100
Iowa *. 7,275 7,140 98 4,627 4,762 105 11,902 11,902 100
Mo. .s 2,800 2,785 99 1,018 1,055 101 5,818 3,818 100
S. Dak. .: 641 720 112 551 605 109 1,192 1,525 111
Nebr. .: 1,550 1,595 105 858 865 105 2,588 2,460 105
Kans. .: 902 945 105 284 512 110 1,186 1.257 106
Total 10 :
States .: 26,878 27,221 101 15,467 15,806 105 40,545 41,027 102


SHEEP AND IAMBS: WEEKLY AVERAGE OF DAILY QUOTATIONS
In dollars per 100 pounds
------- ------ ---- ---an Fort :-- T
Classification :Chicago: Omaha : Cit- + Worth : Denver
----- -- --- -. --- ---**- -- -- --- -
SIAUGHTER IAMBS: (Wooled) 80-110#
Prime Mar. 17, 1962 18.25 17.85 17.88 17.88
Mar. 18, 1961 18.48 17.52 --
Choice Mar. 17,l 1962 18.00 17.48" ~17.0o- 19.10- I67T9 -
Mar. 18, 1961 17.88 17.22 16.52 15.82 17.38
Good Mar. 17," 1962 16.75 16.42 16.25 14.75 15.90
Mar. 18, 1961 16.45 16.55 16.02 15.55 16.62


EWES: (Wooled) 9o-150#
Good Mar. 17, 1962 5.75 5.92
Gd. & Ch. Mar. 18, 1961 7.50 6.68
Utility Mar. 17, 1962 6.00 5.927
Cull & Util.Mar. 18, 1961 6.75 6.00

Cull Mar. 17, 1962 5.50 4.50


5.55
5.00
5.30
5.00


-- T oTtW -
Ogden : Port-
: land

17.75 -
18.00 -
I770o I7.88 -
17.00 17.00
167.2 17.o
15.75 16.00


7.58 7.25 5.75 5.50
-- 6.88 5.50 5.75*


6.75 6.625
7.25* 5.50


5.00 5.25
4.00 4.00*


4.75 -- 5.62 4.50 4.00


FEEDER IAMBS:
Fancy
Choice
Good & Ch.


TWooed") 60-8 -
Mar. 17, 1962 16.50
Mar. 17, 1962 16.00
Mar. 18, 1961 16.75


Good Mar. 17, 1962 -- 14.25
-- 5 a asis. ---- ------


- -- 16.75 --
- 15.00 16.08 15.75
- 14.55 17.00 16.00
-- 13.50 15.02 14.75


15.00
14.50
13.25


-------------m





4o0 COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS CF MEATS AND LARD, FEBRUARY 28, 1962

The net in-movement of red meat stocks during February totaled 16 million pounds, 8
million less than a year earlier and 12 million less than average. Warehouse holdings
of red meats on March 1 were 498 million pounds, the third smallest quantity recorded in
storage for the date. Beef stocks, at 168 million pounds on March 1, were reduced 16
million pounds during February. However, they were 17 percent above March 1, 1961, and
2 percent above average. A 29-million pound net increase in total pork stocks brought
March 1 holdings to 258 million pounds. This compares with a 54 million pound gain dur-
ing February 1961 and the 5-year average gain of 58 million. Frozen pork rose 28 million
pounds to total 200 million pounds on March 1 and cooler pork increased 1 million to 58
million pounds. Other meats, at 92 million pounds on March 1, were up 5 million pounds
from February 1.



UNITED STATES STORAGE HOLDINGS OF MEATS AND LARD, FEB. 28, 1962, WITH COMPARISONS
(Includes holdings in public, private and semi-private
cold storage houses and meat packing plants)


Commodity February
:1odty 957-61 av. ;
1,000 lb.


Beef:
Frozen . .
In cure and cured .
Total ...
Pork, frozen:
Picnics . .
Hams . .
Bellies . .
Loins .
Jowls . .
Butts . .
Spareribs . ..
Trimmings . ..
Other pork . .
Total . .


Pork in cooler:
Dry salt bellies .
Other dry salt pork
Other pork cuts .
Total .


Total pork .
Other meats and meat products:
Veal, frozen . .
Lamb and mutton, frozen .
Canned meats in cooler:
Hams . .
Other meats . .
Total all meats .


152,957
11,616


February January t February
1961 1962 1962
1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.


154,859
9,049


175,509 158,495
10,875 9,912


164,573 143,888 184,182 168,407

9,519 7,695 5,010 4,804
58,756 51,998 50,049 41,545
81,264 58,880 44,445 62,119
I/ 7,484 7,366 7,010
7,661 5,828 6,022
5,757 2,705 5,172
8,655 10,186 10,954
15,767 11,509 15,547
88,219 57,077 54,979 49,015
257,608 196,954 172,077 199,986

10,549 6,154 7,750 7,618
7,394 4,949 4,722 5,160
35,537 26,924 24,521 25,208
55,280 58,027 356,993 57,986
290,888 254,981 209,070 257,972

12,129 12,870 9,588 8,274
9,678 11,767 16,547 15,866

(66,529 40,601 56,246 42,586
'( 25,041 26,319 24,906

5435,797 469,148 481,552 498,011


Lard, rendered and refined 5/ 116,096 112,400 101,600 4/
GOVERNMENT HOLDINGS 5/ -
Park .. ... 5,014 2,150 2,298 1,854
Beef . 6,920 2,519 2,452 1,828
I/ No historical data available. 2/ Includes other canned meats. 3/ In dry and
cold storage as reported by Bureaiuof Census. 4/ Not available. 57 Government
holdings are included in the totals and consist-of reported stocks-held by
U. S. D. A., the Armed Services and other Government Agencies.








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EARLY IAMB CROP MARCH 1, 1962
SHEEP AND IAMBS ON FEED IN 7 STATES: Sheep and lambs on feed for market in 7 major feeding States
totaled 1,491,000 head on March 1, 1962--11 percent below the number on feed in these States a
year earlier, according to the Crop Reporting Board. This was 39 percent below the 2,454,000
head on feed in these States January 1, 1962. Last year number on feed declined 37 percent be-
tween January 1 and March 1. Number on feed on March 1 in Kansas and California were up 25 per-
cent and 25 percent respectively over March 1, 1961. Decreases from a year earlier were 25 per-
cent in Iowa; 20 percent in Texas; 16 percent in South Dakota; 12 percent in Nebraska; and 11 per-
cent in Colorado. The number on feed in Texas does not reflect the total number of yearlings that
will be marketed during the next few months as some yearlings were not "on feed" on March 1.
Of the total on feed in the 7 States, 532,000 were placed on feed during January and Febru-
ary--4 percent more than the number placed during the corresponding period a year earlier. Mar-
ketings of fed sheep and lambs during January and February totaled 1,495,000 head for these
States-1 percent above the same period in 1961. Marketings were the same or greater in all
States except California. Fewer sheep and lambs were marketed from California feed lots. How-
ever, shipments into the State for immediate slaughter were considerably higher during January
and February, which accounts for the increase in the number slaughtered.
In the 7 States the classification of sheep and lambs on feed March 1, by weight groups,
was as follows Under 60 pounds, 34,000 head compared with 22,000 last year; 60 79 pounds,
228,000 compared with 205,000 a year earlier; 80 99 pounds, 891,000 compared with 980,000 last
year; and 538,000 were over 100 pounds compared with 461,000 the previous year.
Sheep and lambs on feed March 1, 1961, January 1, 1962
and March 1, 1962 with comparisons
State : March 1, : Jan. 1, : March 1, : March 1, 1962
: 1961 : 1962 : 1962 : as % of
March 1, 1961
: 1,000 1,000 1,000
: head head head Percent
Iowa : 400 MT 30T -77-
South Dakota 172 229 145 84
Nebraska : 275 577 241 88
Kansas : 109 314 156 125
Texas. ... : 220 218 176 80
Colorado .. : 550 540 510 89
California 142 302 175 125

Total 7 States 1,668 2,454 1,491 89

EARLY LAMB CROP 1962: The number of early lambs in the principal early lamb producing States is
about the same as a year earlier. The number of breeding ewes in these States on January 1, 1962,
was 3 percent less than a year earlier, but the proportion of ewes lambing early was above a year
earlier. Kansas showed an increase in the number of breeding ewes on farms and ranches -January 1,
while 10 States (Texas, Idaho, Washington, Oregon, California, Missouri, Virginia, Kentucky, Ten-
nessee, and Arizona) showed decreases.
The number of early lambs in three States (California, Texas, and Kansas) totaled
2,559,000 head for 1962--7 percent above the 2,207,000 head in 1961. This increase is due large-
ly to a higher proportion of ewes lambing early.
Statistical Reporting Service Crop Reporting Board.

RETAIL SALIS VALUE COMPARISONS OF 600-POUND CHOICE GRADI BUY CARCASSES*
February 1962
High Intermediate Low
Percentage of caroases weight in retail cuts 78.9% 74.3% 69.7%
Retail sales value per cvt. of carcass $67.18 $63.69 $60.21
*These values reflect differences in the percentage of retail outs from carcasses
within the Choice grade. The high and low groups do not represent extremes, but
rather are intended to represent carceasse typical of the upper and lower third.
of the total range in retail cut yields encountered in 600-pound Choice grade
carcasses. Values are calculated from prices furnished to the Marketing 2oonomice
Division of the Economic Research Service by a large number of selected retailers
throughout the country.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


U. S. Department of Agriculture 3 1262 08500 5840
Washington 25, D. C.

OFFICIAL BUSINESS

Form AMS-3/20/62
Permit. 1001.





University of Florida
Documents Librarian
11-4-59 The University Libraries
LS-CLS Gainesville, Fla.





THE LIVESTOCK AND MEAT SITUATION

Approved by the Outlook and Situation Board, February 26, 1962

SUMMARY
Price outlook for livestock up to mid-year is favorable. Cattle prices are expected to
hold relatively stable throughout the first half of 1962 with some additional price strength
probable in the early spring period. Hog prices are expected to hold relatively stable through
mid-spring, and then start moving up to the summer seasonal peak. Prices for old crop lambs
likely will continue to edge up through early April, and early spring lambs are expected to com-
mand a price considerably above year-earlier levels. Cattle, sheep, and lamb prices are expected
to be substantially above year-earlier levels by June but hog prices likely will remain below.
More uncertainty surrounds the price picture for the last half of 1962; but in general,
prices are expected to average lower than for the first half of the year. Cattle prices likely
will decrease through the summer and fall and likely will drop below year-earlier prices during
the late summer and fall. Hog prices are expected to decrease seasonally to a fall or early
winter low and will continue under year-earlier prices. Lamb prices are expected to decrease
to a seasonal low in the fall but will continue above year-earlier levels.
Total red meat production will set a record in 1962 of approximately 29 billion pounds.
The red meat supply will include more beef, veal, and pork but less lamb and mutton. The in-
crease in red meat production is about equal to the rate of population growth but decreased im-
ports of processing beef the latter part of 1962 is expected to result in a per capital consump-
tion slightly below the 161.2 pounds consumed in 1961. Per capital consumption of beef and lamb
and mutton likely will be less than the 87.8 and 5.1 pounds consumed per person last year. Veal
consumption per person may increase slightly and pork consumption is expected to increase by
almost a pound from the 1961 per capital consumption of 62.6 pounds.
The January 1 inventory of cattle and calves on farms rose by 2 percent to 99.5 million
head from 97.5 million head a year ago. Beef cow numbers were up by 1.1 million head and an ad-
ditional 1 million beef calves were included in the inventory. Beef heifers were increased
slightly in number but the number of steers 1 year old and older was the same as a year earlier.
Dairy cow numbers declined for the eighth consecutive year. However, the decrease this year was
small. The number of cattle and calves on feed was 5 percent above 1961.
The number of hogs on farms rose by 3 percent this January. The number of sows and gilts
six months old and older was up 3 percent, reflecting producers' intentions as of the first of
December to farrow 3 percent more sows in this year's spring pig crop.
A sharp reduction occurred in lamb and sheep numbers last year. The January 1 inventory
of 31.4 million head was down 5 percent from the 33.0 million head on hand a year ago. Ewes
1 year old and over were reduced by 4 percent, ewe stock lambs were down 10 percent and the num-
ber of lambs on feed was down 6 percent.
Economic Research Service.