Molasses market news annual summary ...

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Material Information

Title:
Molasses market news annual summary ...
Series Title:
1964-<1970>: C & MS ;
Physical Description:
v. : ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Consumer and Marketing Service
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
Publisher:
The Service
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
1966
Frequency:
annual
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Molasses -- Statistics -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Marketing Service.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
1961-
Issuing Body:
Vols. for 1961-1963 issued by U.S. Agricultural Marketing Service; 1964-<1970> issued by U.S. Consumer and Marketing Service.
General Note:
Title from cover.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004704023
oclc - 29657322
System ID:
AA00008483:00003

Related Items

Preceded by:
Molasses, feed and industrial annual market summary
Succeeded by:
Molasses market news. Market summary

Full Text

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USDA
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CnNSIIMFR AND MARFI(TIIN IFRVIFF


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CONTENTS


Page


Molasses


price


trends


at New Orleans,


1961-66


(chart)


Blackstrap mol
tank truck,
New Orleans,
Phoenix, Mot
Baltimore, N


.asses


prices


by months,


f.o.b.


tank car or


2-66:


Houston,


)ile,
rorfol


Corpus


Chri


South Florida, S
.k, Philadelphia,


sti,


El Paso


avannah,
New York


. ... ..*


Wilmington


* S S S S S S
* S SSSSSSSSa**t* St *
* S S S S S S S S S


Boston,


Albany,


Buffalo,


Toledo,


Cincinnati


Minneapolis,


Chicago,


St. Louis,


Kansas


City


Omaha,


Memphis,


Denver,


California


Ports,


Pacific


Northwe


st Ports


Beet molasses ;pripesq tby months,
Denver;, Cblorado>.Wyoming, Mc


f.o.b.
intana,


tank car or tank truck,


Oregon,


Utah


Idaho


Citrus


and hydrol


tank truck, 1962-
Florid., Chicago,


molasses


6: ",
Kansas


prices

City .


by months,


f.o.b.


tank


car or


ice cQmp"aia
Chicagkahnd


//
sons betyean molas
ta s i'3y, 1957


and No


yellow corn


at New York,


t~u


Molasses


supply


by major


sources


1957-66


(chart)


S. molasses


production,


inshipments,


imports


exports,


1950-66


Hawaiian and Puerto
and exports to ot


h


Rican production, shipments
,er countries, 1950-66 .....


mainland,


molasses

molasses


imports

imports


country

customs


of origin,

districts,


2-66

2 -66


S. .. S. S ......S...


molasses


imports


country


of origin and


customs


districts,


1966


22-25


molasses


molasses


exports


exports


country


customs


of destination,


district


1962-66


2-66


S. molasses


utilization,


1955-66


.. 27


Grain Division


Consumer


and Marketing Service


March 1967


Pr


6


1 ""\
r;





MOLASSES


MARKET


NEWS


- ANNUAL SUMMARY


HIGHLIGHTS


OF 1966


Molasses


prices


advance


sharply in 1966


closed out the year at


near their


highest


levels


in nearly


three


years.


The cost


of molasses


remained


lower in relation


prec


for
more


eding year.


feed


corn,


An estimated


industrial


than in 196$.


More


use


the difference was
61 million gallons


in the United


than half


States


of the supply


not as


great


of molasses
during 1966


came


as it


was


were available


-- about


from domestic


percent


sources,


while


314 million gallons


were


imported


from foreign


countries


Exports


mola


sses


from Puerto Rico


ran nearly


three times


as lar


as the year


before,


but mainland


an estimated


exports


dropp


11 percent,


The quantity
industrial


of molasses


use of molasses


livestock was


was


a little


less


than in 1


PRICES


Cane Molasses


Prices


year,
close


mola
mola


of
were


cane


and the highest


sses
sses


The
markets
averages
corn and
larly tr
was very
conscious


from the
were major

higher tr
from about
W. while m
most othe


u

s


mola


sses


8-1/2
they


advance


cents


been


livestock feeding


r p

end


rice


steadily


during


1966


gallon higher than


in nearly three years.
industry and the higher


By the


the previous


Good
cost


end of the
year's


demand


of imported


strengthening influences.


raised


1-3/
classes


r


e early in
favorable
feeders,


btituting molasses


corn prices


n


Although molasses
much more sensiti

Advances in
Southeast, and Mi


some


e


Discounts
for the s

Cane


steadily


and Midw
for the
as they
molasses
outside


basic


the
5-1/2


prices
feed i


1966 when


for molasses


ranchers,
for corn


*arrowe
lost
ve to


molasses
dwest th


extent, conti
in the East


eason

mola


s sa


sses


-I


a


year


s average


cents pe
were well


ingredients


ratio
Demand


and feed
nd other


d as the


some


changes


prices


,an in
keen


nued


prices


r gallon above


above
were


between


year


higher,
the cost


for molasses


manufacturers


year wore


price


.n the

during


cor

g 1


the East,
competition


the rather


*


les in

prices


from month to
est markets cl
year, prices d
did in other a
was fair to g
of one or two


mo


was


could


grains. me g
on and molasses


advantage
n market,

966 were


Southwest,
n and sale


common


the Southwest and


followed


nth


a uniform


throughout


osely paralleled
id not advance a


areas


ood most


months


Except


fo


of the;


early in


the
those


s much
r the


practice
West.


later i


of molasses


at principal


the preceding year


before,


too.
of


This
corn a


prices
was o


articu-


nd molasses


strong then as


save


money


cost
sub-


between molasses


prices
n the


demand held


more


pronounc


and West.


advanced.


year


and became


up fairly well.

ed in the Gulf,
This reflected.


-stimulating volume


of advance


trend at most
year. Upturns
at New Orleans


in the East,


seasonal


summer


price


contracting


markets --
at Gulf, So
. Although
southwest, a
lull, dema


advancing
utheast,
well uo


nd West


nd


year. Supplies were generally adequate
the year when distributors were hard

















um
LU


_U
amz


ru
LU
CO
U)


U.,,


I v
t-


t+






price relationships,


other terminals were


not as


or differentials,


much above


New Orleans


between New Orleans


in 1966 as


they were


most
the


previous year.


cent


to one


In fact,


cent


at the end of December there was


gallon differential


between


price


only about a half
at New Orleans a


prices


at Houston,


Corpus


Christi,


Mobile,


Savannah,


Norfolk,


Baltimore,


Philadelphia,


New York,


the West Coast


spread


ran


between 1


and 1-1/


cents
3-1/2
where


at El Paso,
and 6 cents


the Dec


ember


Wilmington,


Boston,


at most other market


closing price


and Albany.
s. The maj


was a half


was generally


ior exception was


between


in Florida


cent under the New Orleans


price


Beet Molasses


Prices


of beet mola


sses


like


cane


mola


sses


advanced


in 1966


general


trend


five months


was somewhat different,


of the year,


due partly to


however.


Prices held


competition from cane


steady the
molasses


first


because
in June


of yearly c
as supplies


ontractual


became


arrangements.


scarce


Beet molasses


and dry weather in


started


the West create


advancing
ed an ex-


cellent demand.


The market advanced further in July,


held


steady in August,


went


up again in September and October,


and remained


steady the


last


two months


of the year


as new-crop


production


and contracting


under way.


By the end
previous year's


of December,


close


prices


at Denver and


stood


around $9.50


per ton higher than


in the Colorado-Wyoming-Montana area and


about $h.50


average


higher in


prices


the Oregon-Utah-Idaho -Missoula,


were up about $5


ton in


Montana


the two former


area
areas


Tne year
and around


$1.30


higher in


the latter


area


Citrus Molasses


The market


markets


for other


rus molasses was


citrus


types
about


mola


of mola
50 cents


sses
sses


was not nearly
In fact, the


per ton


below the


as strong in 1966


year


s average


preceding year.


as were


price of
However,


cit-


prices


at the end of December were about $2.00 per ton higher than a


year


Prices declined


production of


citrus


the next six months,


steadily
molasses
influence


during the
provided a


good


first quarter


n ample
demand,


supply.
lighter


of 1966 as
The trend
supplies,


increased


inched


upward


and strength


in cane


molasses.


production got


Prices


held


under way with


steady the


remainder


the beginning of


of the


picking


year
proc


as new-crop


essing


record


Corn (


citrus


Hydrol)


crop


in Florida


Molasses


Prices o
beet molasses


were


f corn molasses


in 1966.


around $6.00


December


While


followed


year


per ton above


stood about $13.00


to $14.0


same


s average


previous
0 higher


yea
tha


generall up
prices a
r, prices


n


ward


trend


t principal


as cane
markets


at the end of


the preceding December.


The comparatively high


cost


of corn molasses


in relation to


other types


molasses
mWi nmsffoc;


was largely responsible


hPd nucr ns1 n


for a


Sf II It IIJ II rZ f


further d


decrease


Aq i n nthy


in the quantity of


rrpnnnn


Wn, -wt.%


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Table


--Price


comparisons
York. Chic


between


ago


molasses


and Kansas


and No.


City,


1957


yellow corn
' 1/


York


Chicago


Kansas


City


Year


: Corn


:Molasses
: 6 gl.


:Differ-
: ence


: Corn
: bu.


:Molasses:Differ-
: 6 gal.: ence


: Corn
: bu.


:Molasses
: 64 gal.


:Differ-


ence


--Cents--


1957
1958
1959
1960
1961


...: 156
...: 156
...: 150
...: 143
...: 1341


125.5
122.5
115.6
113.1


199.3
123.1
107.1


70.1
+2.4


112.7


130.4
120.0
117.3
113.6
112.4


127.4
111.0


-73.8
-7.4
+6.3
+10.5
-12.9


1962
1963
1964
1965
1966


...: 142.0
...: 155.0
...: 151.3
...: 151.5
...: 158.4


102.6
143.8
104.3
81.2
94.2


+39.4
+11.2


112.8
126.0


130.2
136.8


117.8
170.8


+14.0
+41.7
+17.1


115.0
125.4
127.5
130.4
136.3


MOLASSES AND CORN PRICES


The relationship


between


the cost


of corn and


cost


of molasses


con-


tinued


to favor molasses


in 1966.


Although


molasses


as it


the relationship


was


in 1965,


for the


there


were


year
times


as a whole


during


was


as favorable


the early months


of 1966


when


the ratio


between


cost


corn


and molasses


strongly favored molasses.


The cost


cents


of 6


at Chicago,


-1/2 gallons
and 33.3 cen


t


of molasses
s at Kansas


advanced 13 c
City in 1966.


ents


At


at New Y
the same


ork, 3
time,


the cost of


Chicago,


a bushel


and 5


cents


corn went
at Kansas


cents


at New


York,


6.6 cents


City.


As a result,


cents


below the


the cost
cost of


of 6-1/2
a bushel


gallons


of molasses


of corn in New


York,


in 1966 averaged


cents


less


about
in


Chicago,


and nearly


cents less


in Kansas


City.


A "rule


of thumb"


measure


-- 6-1/2


gallons


of molasses


are about


equiva-


lent


in carbohydrate


the carbohydrate


value


value


one bushel


of molasses


corn


corn.


-- is widely used


measure


is based


o compare
on experi-


m~nts~


~nnnllthie..n


thP penptrrv nrnrincerl fm.nm one


bushel..


of corn and


I


+0.4


tn P'I~~111~~P













































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c,'JcJ'


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C\J CM


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5' rc' C


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Hr-4Hr


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Hr-


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oj CoJ C
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0-4~
HN-r
C' -v


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cM N-CO


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crns\
I. Ca
H"I J\
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cOa\D-SH


Hl cc cc Cd C
HHHHH-D\

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cd lc
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i-S C' *C
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cued




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C t
Cd

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Table


--Molas


u. s


ses:


Hawaiian


mainland,


and Puerto


and exports


Rican


to other


production,
countries,


shipments
1950-66


to the


Hawaii


Puerto


Rico


Year


:Production


Shipments
to U. S.
mainland


: Exports


: to


other


:Production


: countries


Shipments
to U. S.
mainland


: Exports
: to other
: countries


--1,000


gallons


1950
1951
1952
1953
195


,076
,572


. C C


49,522
60,300
69,800
59,856
61.600


,224
,951
,252
,651
,558


6,658
1,528
4,021
13,258
7,923


1955
1956
1957
1958


0,413
9,401
h,1ho
3,974
i0,239


. a


1960
1961
1962
1963
1964


,817
,423
,372
,373
.688


4,642
7,771


,692
,653
,911
,563
,638


6,246
6,899
2,600
6.800


,755


,232
,726
,439
,611
,238

,289
,618
,471
,590
,190


58,474
62,372
56,200
61,548
64,563


6,033
6,765
19,402
10,157
19,239

15,162
8,224
13,014
15,923
20,144


1965
1966


58,38
59,77


51,861
60,271


57,140
1/60,700


21,104
9,500


6,848
18,653


/ Estimated.


Source:


Bureau


of the Census,


S. Department


of Commerce;


Association


Sugar
ation.


Producers


of Puerto


Rico;


and Hawaiian Sugar


Planters Associ-


SUPJPMF~S


The supply of molasses
l1 United States for 19


was nearly
also was t


available for feed


66 was


43 million gallons,


second


larg


est s.


gallon supply available in 19
though down slightly from the


estimated


or 7 percent,


supply on record -
60. The domestic


year


before,


and industrial


use


in the Conti-


at some 661 million gallons.


more


than


- exceeded
portion o


exceeded


the preceding year.


only
f the


This
It


by the 721-million-
1966 supply, al-


the fourth


consecutive


year the


supply of


imported molasses.


nenta





Domestic


SuDplies


Almost


supply in


than


349 million gallons


1966,


caine


from


the preceding year as


of molasses,


domestic
the drop


sources.


or 53
This


in production


percent


of the


total


was 4 million gallons 1
of beet and hydrol more


U. S.


ess
than


offset


a slight


increase


cane


citrus molasses


supplies.


The supply of


cane molasses


totaled 204.8 million gallons


-- 2 million more


than


year


before.


.7 million gallons,


strap ran about
million gallons


1965
9.5


shipments.


million


smallest


Output


while


out


of 90.4 million gallons by m
turn of 44.7 million gallons


a half-million gallons


of molasses
Inshipments


ballons,


smaller.


to the mainland,


from Puerto


or 8


Rico,


or 11.6 million gallons


Hawaii


mainland mills
of refiners'


shipped


a record


.4 million gallons


on the


less


than


other
the


hand,
year b


more


was up
black-
60.3
than


dropped


beforee


and the


for any year on record.


Production of


molasses reached


a record-breaking


9.8 million gallons


Hawaii


60.7 million gallons


respectively,


from the


previous


in Puer
year.


to


Rico


-- up about


No Hawaiian molasses were


6 percent,
exported to


other


countries,


but nearly


18.7 million gallons


of Puerto


Rican molasses


were


exported


to foreign


countries.


Beet molasses


production was


estimated


at 111 million gallons


1966


4 million gallons
and production of


less
sugar


of sugar beets incre
9.8 million gallons,


third la
molasses


rgest


ran


ia


output


than


in 1965.


beets.


The decline


However,


sed slightly. Citrus mo
1.2 million gallons more
on record. Production o


.6 million gallons


smaller


than


was


outturn


lasses
than
f 23 m


due to reduced acreage


of beet molasses


supplies


climbed


the previous year
million gallons of


the year


before


per ton
to almost
and the
hydrol


and the smallest


since 1959.


ImDorts


imports


million gallons
largest for any


of molasses


from foreign


-- 46 million gallons,
year since 1960.


countries


or 17 percent,


in 1966


more


tha


totaled a
n in 1965


bout
and


Almost


half


of the total


imports


came


from two


countries


-- Mexico and


Dominican Republic.


A record-breaking 99.


million gallons


of molasses


were


imported
ing year.
Mexico as


from Mexico.
It also ac


Unit


Dominican Republic


gallons
than th


of molasses


year


ed


This was


counted
States'


-- our
to the


nearly


for almost


4 million gallons
a third of the t


largest foreign supplier


second


largest


United States


supplier
in 1966,


more


otal


than the preced-
imports and kept


of molasses.


-- shipped 47.5


The
million


or 6.2 million gallons more


before.


Molasses


Some
much
almost


imports


from ot;


22 million gallons were


as in 1965.


t


five


and Poland,


times
which


Peru shipped


as much


were


her foreign countries sh
imported from Australia,


24.7 million gallons


as the previous


only moderate


year.
year b


low two notable c
or nearly three


changes.
times


to the United States,


Imports


before ,


from


the United Kingdom


increased substantially


* I


w






also increased,


Guyana
off.
first


Haiti,


while
Jamaica


shipments
, Nicaragu


Venezuela and India


time


in several


from such regular s
a, the Philippines,


shipped some molasses


years,


while


imports


Suppliers
Taiwan,


as Barbados,


to the United St


from Indonesia,


France,


Trinidad dropped
ates for the


which were


substantial


in 1965,


were


sharply reduced in 1966.


Almost


two-thirds


of the molasses


imported


into


the United


States


in 1966


caine


in through


three


customs


districts


-- New Orleans,


York,


and Houston.


While


New Orleans with 102


gallons registered substantial
largest molasses-importing cus
replaced Galveston as the their


million gallons


increases


toms


and New


and remained


districts,


d largest.


York with


54.3


the largest and


million


second


Houston with 40.7 million gallons


Los Angeles remained fourth


even


though


the 22.1 million gallons


imported


through


this


district ran about


million gallons


smaller


than the


year


before.


Imports through San Francisco,


Mobile,


and Buffalo dropp


into the Arizona,


El Paso,


considerably, but su
Georgia, and Maryland


bstantially more molasses


districts


than


came


the preceding


year.


Imports


into other


districts were not


too much different


from a


year


earlier.


Most


of the


Los Angeles,


molasses


Houston,


import


and El


ed from Mexico


Paso customs


came


districts.


in through th
Nearly half


New \Orleans,
of the im-


ports
went
most


from the


to New Orleans


Dominican Republic


went


and moderate amounts


Peruvian molasses were


Florida,


Georgia,


Maryland,


imported


into


came


through


and Philadelphia


York


to East
the Gulf,
customs d


but a substantial


Coast
some


districts.
also went


districts .


quantity


While
to the


Houston got


about


a third


of the molasses


imported from Australia.


The balance was


fairly


evenly


divided


between Los


Angeles,


Maryland,


Mobile,


New Orleans,


New >York,


Philadelphia.


Molasses


imports


from Central America


were


largely made


through Gulfbports.


Caribbean and South American molasses were


imported mainly through Gulf' and


Atlantic


Coast


c


through Atlantic


customs
Coast


districts,


ports.


More


while most


than half


imports


from Europe


of the molasses


were M~de


imported from Asia


entered the


United States


at Pacific


Coast


customs


districts,


with


the balance


coming
came in


went


to


into Gulf ports. I
through Atlantic p
Gulf Coast customs


imports
ort te


from Morocco and


rminals,


while


the Republic


of South Africa


those from Angola and Mauritius


districts.


ExTDorts


The United States exported 20


million gallons


of molasses


in 1966


more


the t
ports


than
otal


twice


as much


as the


prece


molasses exports were


from the mainland


overseas


ding year.


exported


destinations


Nearly


direct


18.7 million gallons


from Puerto Rico.


amounted


to only


1.6 million


gallons


-- about


a million gallons


less


than


year


before


the least


any year since
and Washington
and India.


1956.
customs


Most


of this was


districts


and was


exported


through


destined for


the Ne


Canada,


w York, Miami,
the Netherlands,


*,






Table 7.--Molasses, inedible: U.


S. imports by country of origin, 1962-66


Country of origin 1966 1965 1964 1963 1962
--1,000 gallons--


Angola ...
Australia
Austria ..
Bahamas ..
Barbados


Belgium & Luxembourg
Brazil .......... .


British Honduras


Canada .
Colombia


*. .bat....
a.. a....


22,117


2,390


7,629


5,577


9,932
700


4,926


Lllltlllla


S
* aa****ts C *5 S C S S
S
* S S Sb *a a set..
C
* S C S a*a*5***a** C


1,267
1,274
6,271


3,113
1,986
2,439


819
1,642


1,767


4,398

1,833
390
2,256


5,532


Cuba


Denmark


Dominican Republic
Ecuador ..........


El Salvador


France


French West Indies


..............: 2 3


a
*. ...as.......:
*

*........a.....:
*.at.......a...:
a
a aa C *C *SC *


Greenland


Guatemala .............
Guyana (British Guiana)


Haiti


Honduras


India


Sa. .....:


...a *. .. *.. a.a. ..a. .......S
*
a...a...* Ca......,..S ..:b
..S ........... a..........a:*


Indonesia


Iran


Jamaica ..


Japan . .. .
Kenya . .. .
Leeward & Windward Islands


47,533
10,888
1,210
6,076
3,526

5,292
1,837
4,056
2,327
3,278
3,278

16,508


41,329
9,863
1,648
9,617
3,399
49
3,439
4,466
4,264
1,650


32,591
2,270
953
10,524
3,813

1,268
3,333
5,375
1,624


42,926
6,813
1,286
9,390
6,511


3,570
3,530

1,426


51,705
4,010

9,319
8,053


7,501
4,176

4,518


7,772


17,536


1,833
24,132
502
2,594


17,317


21,753


....a


Malagasy Republic
Mauritius .....


Mexico
Morocco


* a *


.* ..


.s........aa......
S C~S~ *S *sa *


6,219
99,312
2,119


Mozambique
Netherlands


Netherlands Antill


Nicaragua
Pakistan ...


Panama


Peru .......
Philippines
Poland


1,424
3,438


.. ..a....a*.....5tS C s ..
St........a..........S:
S
*
0, DS
S a* C S aa C .


Republic of South Africa
Switzerland ..........


Taiwan (Formosa)
Trinidad & Tobago
UAR (Egypt)
United Kingdom ..
Venezuela .......


S.......:
a


*

*
* a. C........... S


830
24,665
4,246
6,817
3,152
1,377
3,811
5,992
-
5,960
3,647


3,301
95,564

3,629
3,629


11, 919
86,404


2,203


1,613
13,353
63,987


2,008


2,211


3,737


4,897
9,427
1,116
518


8,985
6,756
1,804
1,705


1,920
1,886
2,353
12,934
19,343
4,109
4,109


2,893
8,708


4,517
a-

21,243
11,858

15,886


9,188


3,172
1,774

19,228
15,625
5,350
5,350


719
10,988
8,533


Total


314,157


268,016


266,421


270,423


264,063


Source: Bureau of the Census


7,567
93,175





Table 8.--Molasses, inedible: U.


S. imports by customs districts, 1962-66


Customs districts : 1966 1965 : 196 : 1963 1962


--1,000 gallons--


Arizona
Buffalo
Chicago


........ae ......: 4


5,037
3,047


2,599
5,218


3,473
2,712


3,381
3,493


3,751
4,100


. .. : 9


Connecticut


Dakota


******** C S
C *a*aa*** S *S


1,500
111


2,654
285


6,402
817


3,779
7


Duluth & Superior
El Paso .........
Florida .......


Galveston


Georgia


......: 208


8,539
2,378
3,395
5,677


6,768
1,484
37,354
2,293


7,390
723
39,977
3,073


7,173
3,423
35,863
3,365


7,165
3,804
35,140


Housto n
Laredo


...: 40,717
... 685


Los Angeles .......
Maine & New Hampshire
Maryland ......... ..


Massachusetts
Michigan ....
Mobile ......


S
.. ... ..:
.. .. .. .a


22,139
134
15,106


26,055
213
9,353


2,137


9,404


12,115


Montana & Idaho


New Orleans


New York


North Carolin


Ohio


Philadelphia
Pittsburgh .


Sabine ...
San Diego
San Franci:


Vermont


Virginia .
Washington


1( 11111111a


* C S CCC CQCCS.
a S.C. 5555C
S
* CS*****t a *
S
* ** a a ** a a a


SCO .
........a.. ....:
.a.a.. .. .... .:
.............


102,906


54,329
3,904
1,876
12,584


2,479
4,130
8,313
802
3,715


79,186


42,483
3,567
2,559
11,552


1,410
2,859
12,820
719
4,620


1/24,724
345
12,513


4,154
19
1/ 5,053


57,099


52,231
4,313

11,811
1,285


2,071
5,996
1/20,495
838
3,178


18,936
406
19,361


2,617


9,193


70,885


43,045
3,460
5,493
10,316


1,582
6,624
8,919
466
4,897


18,632
133
14,659


3,474


8,4o5
10
70,3h4


54,680
2,749
3,410
7,658


2,168
4,655
11,579
45
3,408


Total ................:


314,157


268,016


266,421


270,423


264,063


Source: Bureau pf the Census


I/ Revised.


... ....aa....:a






Table 9..--Molasses, inedible: U. S. imports by country of origin
and customs districts, 1966


Country


"Arizona "Buffalo


Conn.


: Dakota "El Paso Florida


S-1 SYIII~CCYI-I lll~ L


--1,000 gallons--


Angola ...
Australia


Ba......*........


Bahamas .. .... ....... :
Barbados ................:


British Honduras


Canada .... ...
Colombia .......
Dominican Republic
Ecuador .........
El Salvador ...


1,350


a
C.S.C.S :
.......


France ... ... .. .... ..
French West Indies ....
Guatemala ....... ...:
Guyana (British Guiana) .
Haiti ....... .......


Honduras .. .. .
India a... .. .....


Indonesia


Jamaica


Leeward & Windward Is


Mauritius ..
Mexico ...
Morocco ...
Netherlands


,,S


.... .... ....:


.
. ..a ... .. *
S


Netherlands Antilles


Nicaragua ..
Panama ....
Peru .......
Philippines
Poland ...


1,028


.* a..S...S. S..*
.
a. a. .. a.. *..a.aa. ..a


Rep. of South Africa
Switzerland ....
Taiwan (Formosa) .
Trinidad & Tobago ..
United Kingdom ...
Venezuela ........


......*
. .a .a : *
. ...S*:
a


2,529


f n),7


TPntnl a ~ f2


5,037


8,539


n37


~ 130


r, 37R





Table 9.--Molasses, inedible:


U. S. imports by country of origin


and customs districts, 1966


Galveston Georgia
S


Houston


Laredo


Los
: Angeles


Maine


: & N. H.


Maryland"
:


Mass.


--1,000 gallons


7,537


3,364


1,918


2,28


1,035


1,829


3,587


1,000


3,278


6, 2Kg


8,836


17,808


1,387
l,944


1,137


3,36


1,736
4o5
3,728


2,330


1,106


1,280


3,395


t.6n


40,717


22,l33


134 15,106 2,137


^ .


i, 106





Table 9.--Molasses, inedible: U. S. imports by country of origin
and customs districts, 1966 (Continued)


Country


"Michigan Mobile :ra
: : :Orleans


: New
: York


North :
:Carolina:


Ohio


--1,000 gallons--


Angola ..
Australia
Bahamas .
Barbados


. .. .. 942


1,645


2,197


1,167


1,897


British Honduras


...: 639


Canada


Colombia


Dominican Republic
Ecuador .........


10,323
4,144


2,319


22,154
200


El Salvador


.......: 1,210


France


6,076


French West Indies ......:


Guatemala


Guyana (British Guiana) .


3,526
3,373
703


Haiti


Honduras


..: 1,816


... ... .. ... .:


India


1,332


2,187


Indonesia


Jamaica


... ... ... ... .:


6,076


3,711


Leeward & Windward Is


a C V
a


Mauritius .......


Mexico
Morocco


2,925


* .


6,219
37,605


3,941
175


2,007


1,876


Netherlands


Netherlands Antilles


.. .:
a a S


1,424


Nicaragua
Panama ..


...............:


1,702


Peru


12,828


Philippines
Poland ....


h4,87


Rep. of South Africa


....: 3,152


Switzerland


Taiwan (Formosa)
Trinidad & Tobago
United Kingdom
Venezuela .......


. ..a* .a *
........:


2,559


1,377


5,951


m -,I .'I- I '-


r~I


-% ) -' a I n


AJ


............: 2,380


.......: 1,2~1





Table 9.--Molasses, inedible:


U. S. imports by country of origin


and customs districts, 1966 (Continued)


Phila-


delphia:


Sabine


Diego


:Francisco:


Vermont


Virginia"


Wash.


Total


--1,000 gallons--


2,392


22,117
94
2,390
1,267


2,226
4,970


1,274
6,271
47,533
10,888
1,210


1,91


1,93


1,339


3,278
3,278
16,508
406


3,049


2,137


2,479


1,32


6,219
99,312
2,119
578
1,424

3,438
830
24,665
4,246
6,817


3,974


3,152
1,377
3,811
5,992
5,960
3,647


1,431


l?,58h


hi?) -


8,313


3,715


314,157





Table 10. --Molasses, inedible: U.


S. exports by country of destination,
>2-66 1/


Country of Destination


1966


1965


1964


1963


1962


--1,000 gallons--


Belgium & Luxembourg
British Honduras ...


2,411


Canada
Denmark
France
Ghana ..
Iceland
India ..
Ireland


3,883


1,916


9,189


3,726


2,182


............. ...: 16


11 11111111 111a


m aui *i 0 ... ..: i-i


Israel .................:
Italy ..................:
Jamaica ........ .. :


Japan ..


Libya
Mexico


............m.... : 401


a
. .a. mS.... m a a
.


Netherlands


11mm 0**10**.


11,462


2,303


7,316


2,384


7,489


Netherlands Antilles
Rep. of South Africa
Saudi Arabia .......


,,,S


Spanish Africa
United Kingdom
West Germany ..
Other .
Total ......


*........ *.
*
a. ........m
.... ..:


2,312


4,552


6,777
10


8,886
2,102


20,239


9,384


24,482


21,398


15,279


1/ Includes exports from Puerto Rico.
Source: Bureau of the Census


Table 11.--Molasses, inedible: U.


S. exports by customs districts, 1962-66


Customs districts : 1966 : 1965 : 1961 : 1963 : 1962
--1,000 gallons--


Buffalo
Dakota
Florida
Laredo


..am ... ... .. .
.


................: 69


1,472


S. 1


Massachusetts


Miami
M.


Michigan ..
Montana and Idaho


..........: 16


S. : 7


New Orleans


New York


Oregon .....
Philadelphia
Puerto Rico
St. Lawrence
San Diego
San Francisc(


Washington


*.*...o. a...:

*.am.......a..:5

...m...m......:


18,653
34
25


6,848


20,144


... .......: 1


...........:*


1,011


1,466


15,923


3,140
188
1,729


13,014


1,798


6,939


-






Table


12 .--Molasses


utilization,


United States,


1955-66


Industrial


Year


:Distilled
: spirits
: 1/


Yeast,


:citric


:and


vin


acid:
egar:


: Pharmaceuti-


cals


ble mola


edi-: Total
sses :


:Mixed
:direct
ing
: silag


feeds,:


feed-
and
e 2/


: Total
: utili-
: nation


1955
1956
1957
1958
1959


S
. .. .* :*
a
S......*

*
* a* *... S
*. ... : S
*......:0


--Million gallons--
12.0 198.


59.2
61.7


70.0
70.0
70.0


427.4


195.9
143.2
146.7


590.4
475.4
577.0
553.5


1960
1961
1962
1963
1964


1965
1966 t


..
......S *
.... .:**S
*
....a ..a : *
......:


.:..:
* *S
a. 5*


69.0
8.5
5.7
5.0
6.2


15.1
9.4


74.0
70.4
79.8
85.0
90.0


100.0
100.0


37.0
47.1
38.7
i0.0


50.o
50.0


180.0
126.0


21.5
80.7
86.4
28.5
59.8


130.0


165.1
159.4


Includes


molas


ses


to 1959. 2/ Molasses
subtracting molasses


used


utili
used i


in making ethyl


zed in feeds


ndus


considering changes in stocks
prior to 1960. / Estimated.


trially


alcohol,


butyl and


is a residual item,
from total mainland


Pharmaceutical


utilization


acetone


calculated


supplies


prior
by


without


not considered


UTILIZATION


An estimated


,industrial


use


661 million


in the


United


gallons


States


of molasses
r 1966. Th


was


is was


available
about 43


feed


million gal-


Ions


more


than


the preceding year.


Molasses used in
r States during 1966 to


producing distilled


taled


9.4 million


spirits


gallons


in the Continental United


-- almost 6 million


gallons


less


than a


year


earlier


Other commercial


or industrial


uses


of mola


sses


were


not much different


from
the
and


the previous year.


manufacture


of yeast,


edible molasses


An estimated


citric


industries


aci


used


100 million


g


d, and vinegar,
an estimated 0O


allons
while


of molasses


went into


the pharmaceutical


million gallons


of mola


sses.


Based


on the foregoing utilization


estimates


without


considering


actual


changes


of molasses


in molasses


were


Formula feeds.
estimates indi


stocks


available
This was


.cate about


I ..J -


(which are


unavailable),


for livestock feed


about 48


million


percent o
A. .>


nearly


either in


gallons


f the molasses


~t2 .L 2 -


-, r.


more


million gallons


direct form
than in 1965


or in
(Trade


used in livestock feed


- a ~~~~.1


Estimated


IZ, hr? 3,.,, 1 \






UNITED STATES
Consumer


DEPARTMENT OF


AGRICULTURE


and Marketing Service


Grain Division


Postage


and Fees


S. Department


Paid


of Agriculture


Federal C
Hyattsville,


center


Building


Maryland


20782


Official Business


University
Documents
12-11-61
AMS-LIB


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

111UlI 111262 591111111 09 III III
3 1262 08591 0981


J4 -


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The U
Gaines


nix/er


tLbrari


Fla.