Molasses market news annual summary ...

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Material Information

Title:
Molasses market news annual summary ...
Series Title:
1964-<1970>: C & MS ;
Physical Description:
v. : ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Consumer and Marketing Service
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
Publisher:
The Service
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
1965
Frequency:
annual
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Molasses -- Statistics -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Marketing Service.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
1961-
Issuing Body:
Vols. for 1961-1963 issued by U.S. Agricultural Marketing Service; 1964-<1970> issued by U.S. Consumer and Marketing Service.
General Note:
Title from cover.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004704023
oclc - 29657322
System ID:
AA00008483:00002

Related Items

Preceded by:
Molasses, feed and industrial annual market summary
Succeeded by:
Molasses market news. Market summary

Full Text

0 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT


AGRICULTURE


1^-


WASHINGTON, D.C.


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CONTENTS


Page


Molasses


price


trends


at New Orleans,


1960-65


(chart)


Blackstrap


molasses


prices


by months,


f.o.b.


tank


car,


1961-6


New Orleans,


Houston-B


eaumont,


Corpus


Christi,


El Paso


Phoenix,


Mobile,


Florida,


S avannah-Wilmington,


Baltimore -Norfolk


Philadelphia,


York,


Boston,


Albany


Buffalo,


Toledo,


Cincinnati,


Minneapolis,


Chicago


St. Louis,
Denver, Lc


Kansas


>s Angeles,


ty, Omaha,
Richmond,


Memphis .
Stockton,


Portland-Seattle


* S S S S S S S
* S5**4*** S *m*


Beet


molas


ses


prices


by months,


f.o.b.


tank car,


1961-65:


Denver,


Colorado,


Wjo mi ng,


Montana,


Oregon,


Utah,


Idaho


Citrus


and hydrol


Florida,


Price


Chicago,


comparisons


molasses
Kansas

betweenn


prices
City ..

molasses


by months,


and No


f.o.b.


yellow


tank car,


corn at


1961-65


New York,


Chicago


Kansas


City,


1956-65


Molasses


principal


Molasses


production,


supply


supply


exports


areas,


by major


1919-65

sources,


shipments


1956-65


the United


States


from


(chart)


molasses


production,


inshipments,


imports


and exports,


1954-65


molasses


U. S. molasses


imports

imports


country

customs


of origin,

districts,


1961


1961-65


U. S. molasses


imports


country


of origin


customs


districts,


1965..


22-25


U. S


molasses


exports


country


of destination,


1961


S. molasses


exports


customs


districts,


1961-65


U. S


molasses


utilization,


1954-65


Grain Division


Consumer


and Marketing Service


March 1966






MOLASSES


MARKET


NEWS


- ANNUAL


SUMMARY


HIGHLIGHTS OF


1965


Molasses


general level


were
The


prices


was


followed


somewhat


lower in relation


million


the United State


the supply


imports


came


gallons of
s was 4-1/


from


domestic


a larger percentage
of foreign molasses


previous year.


Exports


a fairly


below that


corn


prices


molasses


a


percent s
sources


steady


trend


of the previous


than


vailab
mailer


of the total


reached


of molasses


during


year


at any time
le for feed


than in


Mainland pr
supply than


million


from


1965


their


Molasses


in the past
and industry


1964.


oduction


Nearly
once


ag


ces


10 years.
al use in
0 percent of
ain com-


imported molasses.


;allons
United


-- a little


States


were


more


than


relatively


small and
ran about


sharply


below


million


a year


gallons


earlier.


less


than in


Feed
196


and industrial


use of mola


sses


PRICES


Cane Molasses


Prices


markets


during


cane
1965.


molasse
Howev


held relatively


the general


at most


level


of prices


of the principal
averaged 2-3/h to


4-1/3
a half


cents
years


er gallon
or longer


below


19664.


It also


at many terminals


was at the lowes


Abundant


supplies


point


were


in five


a major


price-depres


sing


influence.


Weakness


was


more


pronounc


in the E


and Midwest


than


in the Gulf


area


on the West


Coast.


Comp


petition


was


very


keen


in the East.


Sellers


in this


area
mola


were


sses


forced


to make


in order


price


compete


concessions


with


volume


on refiners


discounts


' blackstrap


and freight


and imported


equalization


rates


given on


southea


stern


and Florida


asses.


While
an average,
.the markets


most


the general level


the year
actually
midwest


prices


s closing prices


closed firm


terminal


for 196$


were


to about


Cane


was off


not down


a penny


molasses


around


nearly


higher


finished


3-1/


as much.


in the Gulf,


only


about


cents


In fact,
Southeas


a cent


gallon lower on


the West


Coast


in the Southwest.


In the East,


however,


prices


ran


to 2-1/


cents


below


1964's


closing


evels.


Molasses


1965.


They


prices
either


or six months


followed


held
year


a fairly uniform


firm or


There


strengthened


trend


at most markets


gradually


was a weaker undertone


during


during


the first


the market


five


for the


next


month


or two when demand


was seas


onally


low.


Then,


demand


improved


with


the advent of


the fall


season


declined


year.
showed


















LU


& i
o-zQ
2


U)


1.1. 'm
C0


-I


U


F...






sold


molasses


at one


price


throughout


year


regardless


of the trend


taken


by the
selling


New Orleans
on a contr


market.


act


basis


This


reflected


at Texas


Gulf


to a large
terminals.


extent the practice
As stated earlier,


of
price


trends
Florida


in the
than


East w
by what


*ere


dominated


happened


more


competition from


on the New Orleans


the Southeast and


market.


Beet Molasses


Prices


of beet molasses,


like


cane


mola


sses,


displayed


a generally


steady


trend t
1964.
Average
area, $


throughout
This was
prices f


1965.


However,


particularly true


1965


in the Denve


ne


during


were down $5.38 p
r area, and $3.05


ral level
the first


ton in


of trading wa
seven months


s below that
of the year.


the Colorado-Wyoming-Montana


in the Oregon-Utah-Idaho-Missoula,


Montana area.
cane molasses


Ready


were


availability


of b


eet mol


_asses


and the lower market


weakening influences.


While


the general level


of beet mola


sses


prices


was down


for the


year,


closing
Denver,
year bef


levels


were


not much


the ending price was
ore. Month-to-month


different


$2.00
price


per
chan


from a


year


ton above
ges were


earlier in most areas.


the
very


average
limited


of December


At
the


, reflecting the


wide


practice


selling


a large


share


of beet molasses


on seasonal


or yearly


contracts.


Citrus


Molasses


Citrus


firm
fina
per
off


.ed
1


up a
month


molass
little
of the


ton below the
about $10.00

Production o


certain amount
cane molasses,


distillers
annually,


of


es price
the nex
year.
previous
er ton.


f citrus
pressure


declined


five mo


Although
year,


molasses


adily


during


nths, and then
the closing le


1965's


almo


average


p


doubled


on the market and


particularly among


normally
producers


take about


had to


make


cattle


f


two-thirds


some


price


the first half


turned


vel
rice


downward


of prices
of citrus


in 1965,


ces.


feeding outlets.
of the citrus m
concessions in


of 1965,


again in


was only $4.75
molasses fell


and thi


exerted a


did competition from


Even


molasses
i order


though alcohol
produced


move


1965


large

Corn


output.

(Hydrol)


Molasses


Prices
molasses.


of corn molasses


Prices


principal markets,


year


before.


in the overall


showed


averaged $5.25
but closing 1


Month-to-month
stability of


I-


ri


to $6.0


evels
ce ch


same
0 per


ran


.anges


neral


trend


ton lower


as other types


for the


cents to $1.25


were


the market during


relatively minor


year at
ton above


as reflected


1965.


As in other recent


in relation


into


feed


to other


use


and more


years,


types


the comparatively


of mola


being taken


sses


resulted


by various


high c
in less


ost


manufacture


of corn molasses


corn molasses
ing outlets,


going
especially


the pharmaceutical


industry.







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Table


--Price


comparisons


York,


between mola


Chicago


Kansas


sses


City,


No. 2 yellow corn at
1956-65 I/


New York Chicago : Kansas City
Year : Corn :Molasses:Differ-: Corn :Molasses:Differ-: Corn :Molasses:Differ-
bu. : 6 gal.: ence : bu. : 6- gal.: ence : bu. : 6 gal.: ence

--Cents--
1956 ..: 169.8 109.5 +60.3 145.2 130.0 +15.2 149.7 136. 4 +13.3
1957 ..: 1i56.8 163.7 -6.9 129.2 199.3 -70.1 130.4 204.2 -73.8
1958 ..: 156.3 115.0 +41.3 125.5 123.1 +2.4 120.0 127.4 -7.4
1959 ..: 150.6 103.0 +47.6 122.5 107.1 +15.4 117.3 111.0 +6.3
1960 ..: 143.8 89.0 +5.8 115$.6 92.9 +22.7 113.6 103.1 +10.5

1961 ..: 141.8 102.2 +39.6 113.1 112.7 +0.h 112.4 125.3 -12.9
1962 ..: 142.0 102.6 +39.9 112.8 117.8 -$.0 115.0 129.5 -1i.5
1963 ..:.15.0o 143.8 +11.2 126.0 170.8 -44.8 12$.4 177.7 -52.3
1964 ..: 151.3 104.3 +47.0 125.1 111.1 +14.0 127.5 113.9 +13.6
1965 ..: 151.5 81.2 +70.3 130.2 88.5 +41.7 130.4 91.4 +39.0







MOLASSES AND CORN PRICES


The relationship between the cost of corn and the cost of molasses favored
molasses more in 1965 than in 1964. 1/ In fact, molasses was in the best price
position in relation to corn that it has been in during the past 10 years.

The cost of 6-1/2 gallons of molasses dropped 23.1 cents in New York,
22.6 cents in Chicago, and 22.5 cents in Kansas City. Meanwhile, the cost of
a bushel of corn went up two-tenths of a cent in New York, 5.1 cents in
Chicago, and 2.9 cents in Kansas City.

Thus, 1965 molasses costs averaged about 70 cents below the cost of corn
in New York, nearly 42 cents less in Chicago, and 39 cents lower in Kansas City.


1/
lent


A "rule


of thumb"


in carbohydrate


the carbohydrate


value


measure


value


-- 6 1/2
one bushel


of molasses


gallons


corn.


corn
Thi


of molasses


are about


-- is widely used


S


measure is


based


equiva -
compare


on experi-





































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SUPPLIES


Molasse
United State
was some 28


year.


supplies
during 1


million


Production


available


965


were


gallons,


cane,


for feed


estimated


or about 4-1/2


beet,


and industrial


at nearly


percent,


and hydrol molasses


use in the Continental


million


less


than


dropped


off.


gallons.


This


previous
Output o


refiners'
production
production
centage of


blackstrap molasses


of citrus
was down,
the total


was


molasses


it compris
available


about


on a


almost doubled


for the third


supply


than


par wit
196h's


the year


outturn.


consecutive year


imported


before,


while


Although mainland


a larger


per-


molasses.


Domestic


supplies


Some


available


almost
Ions c
278 mi


million gallons


U. S. supply --
million gallons,


coming from domestic


lion gallons


of mola


was provided
or 8-1/2 pe


sources


sses


-- nearly
domestic


recent,


in 1964.


the 347 -million-gallo


perc


sources


below the
Mainland p
n domestic


ent of


in 1965.


record


roductio


supply.


the total


This


was


379 million gal-
n accounted for


The other 69


million


gallons


were


shipp


the mainland


from Hawaii


and Puerto


Rico


Production


at 86 million


cane


gallons.


mola
This


sses


by mainland


was nearly


sugar mills


percent


less


in 1965


than


was estimated


the record


million
acreage


gallons


harvested.


produced


Beet mol


previous


asses


year due


production was


mainly to


estimated


the smaller


sugarcane


at 112 million


gal-


ions


-- about


due largely to


about


totaled


same


10 percent


less


than


a reduction in acreage


as the


around h5


Production of


previous year.


million


citrus


gallons,


molasses


reached


year


because
Output


before.


sugar


beet


of refiners


only slightly
8.6 million


less


, too,
yield


the decline
per acre was


' blackstrap


than


gallons.


the year
This wa


was


molasses
before.


was almost


twice


as much


as in 1964,


~with


the increase


due to the larger


citrus


crop.


Production


of hydrol molasses


stood


at nearly


million


gallons,


or about


percent


less than a year


earlier.


Hawaii


produced


a record-breaking


million


gallons


of molasses


in 1965.


This was
flected


some


600,000


the all-time


gallons
high su


larger


sugarcane


than


the previous year's


production in Hawaii.


record


Shipments


and
from


Hawaii


to the mainland


totaled


just


under


million gallons


-- almo


780,000


less


than in


1964.


No Hawaiian


molasses


was exported


to foreign countries


the sixth
estimated


less
land


than


consecutive


at about
in 1964.


year.
million


Mola


sses


gallons


production in


-- some


Puerto


million


Rico


gallons,


in 1965


was


or 11 percent,
to the main-
f 6.8 million


re-


m


o


u






Table


--Feed


and industrial molasses:


imports,


Main


and exports,


land production,
1954-65


inshipments,


Year


Cane


Beet
1/


Mainland
:Refiners
: black-
: strap


production


: Citrus:


: Offshore shipments to
the mainland


Hydrol
2/


Total


: Hawaii


Puerto


Rico


: Total
*


--1,000 gallons


1954
1955
1956
1957
1958


.: 46,050
.: 49,187
38,067
42,532
.: 40,300


8,804
8,422
7,878
10,474
6,328


17,873
15,502
16,851
16,249
20,336


1959.
1960.
1961.
1962.
1963.


0,075
5,274
9,876


76,920
79,079
98,211
96,643
124,602


40,333
40,686
45,812
47,132
47,605


,494
,324
,153
,595
,939


189,242
194,930
233,200
242,225
295,418


,477
,981
,271
,382
,153


1964
1965


..: 103,287 Y125,000
..:3/86,000 3/L12,000


45,402
45,111


4,469
8,564


08,150
78,415


52,653
51,861


18,190
17,000


70,843
68,861


: U. S. imports : Mainland: Available
Year : : Dominican : : : exports :
Cuba Republic Mexico Other Total : supplies

--1,000 gallons--

1954..: 202,940 23,516 37,810 76,142 340,408 4,843 576,567
1955..: 232,696 34,573 43,277 67,266 377,812 4,863 625,720
1956..: 232,329 31,652 29,820 58,288 352,089 879 590,391
1957..: 117,471 21,789 40,059 52,217 231,536 2,545 475,366
1958..: 188,428 24,761 46,539 74,580 334,308 2,166 577,027

1959..: 90,497 47,426 61,651 82,563 282,137 2,372 553,484
1960..: 228,643 62,281 75,635 83,087 449,646 3,032 721,525
1961..: 12,417 53,834 70,807 123,437 260,495 2,220 580,746
1962..: 3 51,705 63,987 148,368 264,063 2,265 586,405
1963..: 42,926 93,175 134,322 270,423 5,475 628,519

1964..: 32,591 86,404 147,426 266,421 4,339 3/641,075
1965..: 41,329 95,564 131,123 268,016 2,536 3/612,756


1/ Year
2/ Prio


harvested


r to


by a constant,
3/ Estimated
!/ Do not ir


1955
assu
I.


basis.
estimated by multiplying total dome
ming 2.58 gallons of hydrol per 100


include exports


stic dextrose


pounds of


sales and


exports


dextrose


from Hawaii and Puerto Rico.


source:


Statistical Reporting


Service,


Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation


C' 0 # I -I S I A..S


n


1 1 I~


tT II n





molasses


also


accounted


for better


than


a third


of the total molasses


imported


into


this


country


during


196$.


lasses to the United States
Dominican Republic amounted


The Dominican Republic


in 1965


more


than
than


also


year before.
million gallons


shipped
Imports
-- some


more
from
8 mi


mo-
the


Ilion


gallons,


or almost


percent,


greater


than in 1964.


Imports


changes


of molasses


in 1965


from


Such regular


other


foreign


suppliers


countries


as Jamaica,


showed
Mauritiu


several
s, Peru,


significant
and the


Philippines
did in 1964.


shipped


Imports


considerably


from Haiti,


less


molasses


Trinidad


to the


and Tobago,


United


France,


States


than


they


the Republic


south Africa,


greater
shipped
several


quantity


and Australia


of molasses


a substantial


years.


Mozambique,


amount


Imports f
Nicaragua


also


dropped


was imported
of molasses


rom British
registered


measurably.


from Ecuador


to this


Guiana,
moderate


On the other


and Taiwan.


country


British Honduras,


gains,


hand,


the first


a much


Indonesia


time in


Guatemala,


too.


Three
nearly 60


1965


customs d
percent of


Although impo


quantity imported into


and 3 million
of the other


before
tricts
Diego,


More


gallons,


large
molas


districts -
the total
rts into N


- New Orleans,


molasses
ew Orleans


the New York
respectively.


importing districts


ses


than in 1964, but
and San Francisco


was imported


less


Galveston,


imported
went uo


and Galveston


Molasses
-- were


into


molasses


into
some


and New York


the United Stat


22 million


districts


imports


went


into


not much different


the Buffalo,


came


into


Mobile,


the Connecticut,


-- got
es during


gallons, t
down about


Angeles
it from


-- one
the year


Virginia
Maryland,


dis-
San


districts.


Almost


two-thirds


of the molasses


imported


from Mexico


came


into


United States
New Orleans.


through
Nearly a


three


third


country through New Orleans, and
'York, Philadelphia, and Mobile.


and New


York.


Most


customs


districts


-- Galveston,


of the Dominican Republic's


about
Most


of the molasses


half


of the total


Jamaican molasses


imported


from


Angeles,


shipments


was imported


came


Caribbean,


entered


into


this
New


to New Orleans
Central American,


and South American


Some
went


molasses


to New York


countries


from Barbados,


customs


entered
British


districts.


the United States


Guiana,


and Trinidad


Another major


exception


through


Gulf


and Tobago,


Coast


ports.


however,


was Nicaraguan


molasses.


the molasses


Australia
divided r


of it


shipped


and Taiwan


ather


evenly


was imported


from
came


into


West


the Philippines.


into


between


Gulf
Gulf


ports,
Coast,


Coast
Most


while sh
New York,


customs


districts.


of the molasses


lipments f
and West


was


imported


rom Indonesia


Coast


from
were


customs


districts.





Table 7.--Molasses, inedible: U.


S. imports by country of origin, 1961-65


Country of origin : 1965 196 1963 : 1962 : 1961
--1,000 gallons--


Australia
Austria .
Barbados


,,,,*


7,629


5,577


9,932
700
4,926


1,767


4,398


5,532


2,331


Belgium & Luxembourg
Brazil ........ .


British Guiana .
British Honduras


Canada


.


..a:*


.... ..a.S*
*
....a.s ..: *
...a ....a.:


4,466
3,113
1,986


3,333
819
1,642


1,833
3,570
390
2,256


7,501


3,045
214


Colombia


Cuba


Denmark


......: 2,439 -

......: 2,164


12,417


Dominican Republic
Ecuador ... ........
El Salvador ......


France


French West Indies


Greenland
Guatemala


Haiti


Honduras


* S S
*
*.....:
*


*
*.as...... .....:
*
. *. #. *.:

....a ..ta. a .* .: *


41,329
9,863
1,648
9,617
3,399


3,439
4,264
1,650


32,591
2,270
953
10,524
3,813


1,268
5,375
1,624


42,926
6,813
1,286
9,390
6,511


3,530


51,705
4,010

9,319
8,053


53,834
1,232

23,927
8,805


4,176


5,394


India


1,426


4,518


Indonesia


Iran


Jamaica
Japan .
Kenya .
Leeward


*
* S a S a a a a *


7,772


17,536


1,833
24,132
502
2,594


17,317


21,753


& Windward Is.


Malagasy Republic


Mauritius


Mexico


Mozambique
Netherlands
Nicaragua
Pakistan ..


Panama
Peru .


Philippines
Poland


... ... ... ..*


....a. ..a...a .*
a
......... *...: *
...... .....:
.. a.. ...... ... a


a

**


Rep. of South Africa
Rumania ............


Taiwan (Formosa)


Trinidad


& Tobago


UAR (Egypt) ..
United Kingdom
Venezuela ...


3,301
95,564
3,629


3,737


4,897
9,427
1,116


a
S a a S


*
S.. .a.a .aS
a
......:
* a.s..e.:


... ... .:


8,985
6,756
1,80o4
1,705


11,919
86,404
2,203


1,920
1,886
2,353
12,934
19,343

4,109


2,893
8,708


7,567
93,175
2,008
593
4,517


21,243
11,858

15,886


9,188


1,613
13,353
63,987


4,065


17,313


1,165
1,564
7,476
70,807


2,211
3,172
1,774


19,228
15,625


4,486
1,704


9,201
7,165


5,350


719
10,988
8,533


5,935
8,886
590
6,395
1,822


... ...: 872


Total ............


268 .016


266,421


270,423


264,063


260,495






Table 8.--Molasses, inedible: U.


S. imports by customs districts, 1961-65


Customs districts : 1965 : 1964 1963 : 1962 1961


Arizona
Buffalo


Chicago ...
Connecticut


Dakota


* S S S S S
* S C S S S S
a
* S S S S S S S
* S S S S S S S a a *
* S S S S S S S S *


2,599
5,218


1,500
111


--1,000 gallons--


3,473
2,712


2,654
285


3,381
3,493


6,402
817


3,751
4,100


3,779
7


3,660
2,045


14,683


Duluth & Superior


......: 208


El Paso
Florida


Galveston


* S S S S S S S S S S S S
S
* S *555*55eu*s*
S
* C S S S S S S S S S C S S


Lseorgia


6,768
1,484
37,354
2,293


7,390
723
39,977
3,073


7,173
3,423
35,863
3,365


7,165
3,804
35,140


6,479
7,401
26,743
1,264


Laredo


Los Angeles


* a S S S *
S
* S S S S S


Maine & New Hampshire
Maryland ............
Massachusetts ......


26,055
213
9,353


25,221
345
12,513
4,154


18,936
4o6
19,361
2,617


102
18,632
133
14,659
3,474U


1,427
22,720
75
14, 260
2,309


Michigan
Mobile .


* S S *
* S S C S *


307
12,115


5,503


9,193


8,405


5,580


Montana & Idaho


S
a S *S.s.a*


New Orleans
New York .


North Carolina


Ohio


Philadelphia
Pittsburg .


Sabine ..

San Diego


* S S 5


San Francisco


Vermont
Virginia


* a S S S S
a a S S S


S
* S S 55.
r
* S S S S *


IIIIIIIIa


* S S S S S S S
S
* S S S S S S S S S S


* S.C..... S

S
* S.. SCSS**.
S
* a S 5555555.
S
* S S S a a *
S
* S S S S S S S S S S


79,186
42,483


3,567
2,559
11,552


1,410

2,859
12,820
719
4,620


57,099
52,231


4,313

11,811
1,285
2,071

5,996
19,998
838
3,178


70,885
43,o45


3,460
5,493
10,316


1,582

6,624
8,919
466
4,897


70,344
54,680


54,895
66,606


2,749
3,410
7,658


4,716
6,260
5,539


2,168

4,655
11,579


1,951


7,852


3,408


4,030


Total


268,016


266,421


270,423


264,063


260,495


Source: Bureau of the Census.





Table


--Molasses, inedible: U.


S. imports by country of origin


and customs districts, 1965


: : : Connect-: : :
Country Arizona Buffalo t. Dakota El Paso Florida
~~~ ~~* LjUl *


--1,000 gallons--


Australia ......
Barbados ..........:
British Guiana ..
British Honduras
Canada .. .


Colombia


Dominican Republic :
Ecuador .. ......
El Salvador .......:
France .. .

French West Indies ;


1,500


1,484


Greenland
Guatemala
Haiti .
Honduras

Indonesia
Jamaica ..
Kenya ....
Mauritius


. a a a*.
a
a.*..:




..a... s ..:
a
*e** *


Mexico ....


.. .. .:


2,599


6,768


Mozambique
Nicaragua
Peru
Philippine:
Poland ...


3 ... .....
a
..a ...a....:


Rep. of So. Africa :
Taiwan (Formosa)
Trinidad & Tobago
UAR (Egypt) ....
United Kingdom ...


2,599


5,218


1,500


6,768


1,484


Source: Bureau of the Census


3,071


1,217


T otal






Table


- -rJlta-f -,


inedible:


U. S. imports


country


of origin


and customs


Q '1 tracts


1965


Galves- .: : : Los : Maine & :
ton a Georgia Laredo Maryland Michigan
ton : Angeles N.H.


--1,000


gallons--


1,790


6,858
609


2,29


1,980


3,439





801


10,36


22,618


3,357


1,093


3,106
3,711


37, 35h


2,293


26,055


9,353


(Continued


on next


page)






Table


--Molasses.


inedible: U.


and customs


a~ist+rio3t S


S. imports by court
. 1965 (Continued)


itry


of origin


Country


Mobile
:a


: Orleans : York


: North :
: Carolina:


Ohio


: Phila-
: delphia


--1,000 gallons--


Australia .......


Barbados


5,161


2,914


2,000


British Guiana ..
British Honduras


Canada


Colombia


Dominican Republic
Ecuador ..........


5,915


2,439
11,987
1,617


6,651


6,851


El Salvador


1,039


France


,617


French West Indies


Greenland
Guatemala


Haiti


Honduras


2,496


S. ..... : ,26
.. .. .. ...: 1,6 50


Indonesia ..
Jamaica ..


a......:


2,941
8,607


2,051
6,142


Kenya ....


.. .. ...


Mauritius
Mexico


*.a 0...*


3,301
28,937


8,122


3,567


1,841


4,141


S. a a a a *


Nicaragua ..
Peru .. ..
Philippines ..
Poland ....


Rep. of


2,231


1,540


1i, 116


So. Africa


Taiwan (Formosa)


2,707


Trinidad & Tobago
UAR (Egypt) ...
United Kingdom ....:


1,797
1,804
1,705


Total ... .. .....


12,115


79,186


42,483


3,567


2,559


11,552


Source: Bureau of the Census


Mozambique





Table


--Molasses,


inedible:


U. S


and customs districts,


imports by country of
1965 (Continued)


origin


i San San -
Sabine Diego Francisco: Vermont Virginia Total
: Diego :Fra ncisco


--1,000 gallons--


7,629
5,577
4,466
3,113
1,986


1,950
1,388


2,439
1,329
9,863
1,648
9,617


3,399
49
3,439
4,264
i,650


1,466


1,314


7,772
17,536
801


1,28


- 3
2 95


,301
,564


1,393


3,629
3,737
4,897
9,427
1.116


8,334


3,172


2,859


12,823


4,620


268,016


l,~lo


llclo





Table 10.--Molasses, inedible: U.


S. exports by country of destination,


1961-65 1/


Country of destination : 1965 : 1964 : 1963 : 1962 1961
--1,000 gallons--
Belgium & Luxembourg ...: 2,11 -
British Honduras ......: -
Canada 1,916 9,189 3,726 6,939 4,440
Denmark .. 8 -
France .. . .
Iceland ................: 16 122 149 170 30
India ............. ...: 165 203 118 1
Ireland ................: 4 760 3 4
Israel .......... .: 183
Jamaica1 .2
Japan ..................: 01 623 813 1 -
Mexico ..............: 6 42 4 48 28
Netherlands ........... 2,303 7,316 2,384 7,489
Netherlands Antilles ...: 6 -
Rep. of South Africa ...: 1 3 3 7
Saudi Arabia ...........: 6
United Kingdom .........: ,552 6,777 8,886 575 5,916
West Germany ...........: 10 2,102 -
Other .............: 9 11 7 15
Total ................: 9,384 24,482 21,398 15,279 10,4k4
1/ Includes exports from Hawaii and Puerto Rico.
Source: Bureau of the Census


Table 11.--Molasses, inedible: U. S. exports by customs districts, 1961-65
Customs districts : 1965 : 1964 : 1963 : 1962 : 1961
--1,000 gallons--
Buffalo ................: 85 12 79
Dakota ..... ...... ..... : 65 3 -
Florida ................: 694 1,472 -
Laredo ... .. ...- 1 12 19
Massachusetts 1..........: 6 7 15 -
Michigan ..............: 92 95 99 168 232
Montana and Idaho ......: 7 7 48
New Orleans ............: 183 -
New York ...............: 185 221 169 222 58
Oregon 6
Philadelphia ...........: 9 -
Puerto Rico ............: 6,848 20,1i4 15,923 13,01 8,224
St. Lawrence ...........: 19 33
San Diego ..............: 405 348 3,1l0 36 3
San Francisco ..........: 15 326 188 1
Washington ..........: 1,011 1,466 1,729 1,798 1,740
Other .. .... ... ... 6 8
n I i r -. -4 -_ l l l




B


Estimated utilization,


United States, 1954-65


: Industrial :Mixed feeds,:
:Distilled: Yeast, : Pharmaceuti-:: :direct feed-: Total
Year spirits :citric acid: calls and edi-: Total : ing and : tili
: '/ :and vinegar: ble molasses : : silage 2/ : nation
--Million gallons--


195%
1955
1956
1957
1958


* .
*
. ..... *
*. .. .: S


8U.8
121.3
111.9

61.7


6U .0


S70.0
70. 0


10.0
12.0
14.0

15.0


157.8


195.9
143.2
146.7


418.8
427.4
394.5
332.2
430.3


576.6
625.7
590.4
475.4
577.o


1959
1960
1961
1962
1963


.. II II


. :


71.0
.-74.0
70.I


. C *
.:


15.0
37.0
47.1
38.7
40.0


121.3
18o0.0o
126.0


130.0


196 ..... .: 6.
1965 _/ ...: 15.
1/ Includes mola
to 1959. 2 Molas


9C0.0
i00.0


1


sses


SeS


47.0
50.0


165.1


used in making ethyl alcohol,


utili


641.1
612.8


butyl and acetone prior


zed in feeds is a residual item, calculated by


subtracting mo asses


used industrially from total mainland supplies without


considering changes in stocks.
prior to 1960. h,' Estimated.


3/ Pharmaceutical utilization not considered


UTILIZATION


Almost 613 million


Igaiions of molasses were estimated to be available for


feed and industrial use in
million gallons, or around I


the United States during 1965.


This was about 28


percent, less than in 1964.


Molasses used in the production of distilled spirits in the Continental


United States in i 96 totaled 15 million gallons
in 1i614 and the most for this purpose since 1960.


About 100 million gallons of molasses


before


-- more than twice as much as


-- 10 million more than the year


-- were estimated by the trade to have been used in the manufacture of


yeast, citric acid, and vinegar. Pharmaceutical and edible molasses manufactur-
ers used an estimated 50 million gallons, or about 3 million more than in 1964.


*Thus,


based on the foregoing utilization estimates and not considering ac-


tual changes in molasses stocks (which are unavailable), almost 448 million
gallons of molasses were available for direct feeding to livestock or in the


manufacture of


livestock feeds.


previous year and was


the least f


This was about 50 million gallons less than the
or any year since 1959. (Trade estimates in-


. -


---------------------------------------------------A


497.9
447.7


Table 12.--Molasses :


L i,, ... -7,-1-_ .. _-111.~ 11__-_1--1_ d_ ~~ ~ ..___ ~~I


;


II; L ~ i. L





UNITED STATES


C


consumer a
Gr
Federa
Hyattsvil


DEPARTMENT O
,nd Marketing
'ain Division
1 Center Bui
le, Maryland


Official


F AGRICULTURE


Service


Postage and Fees
U. S. Department of A


Iding
20782


Paid


agriculture


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

1 i i111 II I II 1| U I l l I
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Universit
Documents
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