Molasses market news annual summary ...

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Material Information

Title:
Molasses market news annual summary ...
Series Title:
1964-<1970>: C & MS ;
Physical Description:
v. : ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Consumer and Marketing Service
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
Publisher:
The Service
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
1964
Frequency:
annual
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Molasses -- Statistics -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Marketing Service.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
1961-
Issuing Body:
Vols. for 1961-1963 issued by U.S. Agricultural Marketing Service; 1964-<1970> issued by U.S. Consumer and Marketing Service.
General Note:
Title from cover.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004704023
oclc - 29657322
System ID:
AA00008483:00001

Related Items

Preceded by:
Molasses, feed and industrial annual market summary
Succeeded by:
Molasses market news. Market summary

Full Text
UNITED STATES


DEPARTMENT


AGRICULTURE


WASHINGTON, D.C.


SU








CONTENTS


Page


Molasses


price


trends


at New Orleans,


1959-6k


(chart)


Blackstrap


molasses


prices


by months,


f. o.b.


tank


car,


1960-6L:


New Orleans,


Houston-Beaumont,


Corpus


Christi,


El Paso


Phoenix,


Mobile,


Florida,


Savannah-Wilmington,


Baltimore-Norfolk


Philadelphia,


York,


Boston,


Albany


Buffalo,


Toledo,


Cincinnati,


Minneapolis,


Chicago


St. Louis,


enver,


Kansas


Los Angele


City, Omaha,
s, Richmond,


Memphis
Stockton,


Portland-S


eattle


Beet


molasses


prices


by months,


f.o.b.


tank


car,


1960-64:


Denver,


Colorado,


4yoming,


Montana,


Oregon,


Utah,


Idaho,


Minneapolis


Citrus


and hydrol molasses


Florida,


Chicago,


Kansas


prices
City .


by months,


f.o .b'.


tank


car,


1960-64:


Price


comparisons


between molasses


and No


yellow


corn


at New


York,


Chica


and Kansas


City,


1955 -64r


Molasses pr
principal


oduction, expo
supply areas,


)r


ts and
1948-64


shipments


to the


Unit


States


from


Molasses


supply


by major


sources,


1956-6h


(chart)


U. S


molasses


production,


inshipments,


imports


exports,


molasses


S. molasses


imports

imports


country

customs


of origin,

districts,


1960-64

1960-64


a.. .. .. ...... ...a

.. .......S..S..*. a a....aa...


U. S


molasses


exports


country


of destination,


1960


U. S. molasses


exports


customs


districts,


1960-64


molasses


utilization,


1953-64


Grain Division


Consumer


and Marketing


rvice


March


1965


Earlier
Service
4n ,-. -C ^


editions o
as AMS-79.


*l t- l


,f this
The


a C C L- -a -


1?


publication were


name of
_ i -


issued


agency was
i at r *


the Agricultural Marketing


changed


to Consumer


and Market-






MOLASSES MARKET


NEWS


- ANNUAL SUMMARY


HIGHLIGHTS OF


1964


Feed and industrial molasses


prices


dropped


sharply in 1964.


Cane molasses


showed


the biggest drop.


With


the lower molasses


market,


the relationship


tween molasses
Almost 635 mil
were available
of the supply


molasses.
tries tha
frpm Puer
tinued to


The


corn prices


1


ion gallons
for feed an


came


from a


United


n it did in


to


Rico,


show a


favored
molasses


d industrial


record


States
1963.


incre
small


domestic


imported


molasses


the first


-- the third largest
use in the United St


production


a little


U. S. exports,


ased slightly.
but steady gal


Feed


.n and


less


cane,


molasses


time


supply


ates.


beet,


in four years.
on record --


More


than half


and hydrol


from foreign


while relatively small


and industrial


was


coun-


mainly


use of molasses


the second largest


con-


on record.


PRICES


Cane Molasses


Prices


losses wer
prices wer
northeast,
ain price
stood at o
the year s
lasses had


cane


sharpest


it down
Texas


molasses dropped arc
in the New Orleans,


10 cents or more.


Gulf


ports,


S-depressing influences.
Ir near their lowest poi


low price


sold


there


>und


to 13


Southeast,


Declines


ranged


West Coast markets


.nts


at New Orleans


in nearly


e year's
in about


-- 8


cents


cents per gallon
and Midwest area
from 6- to about


Large


closing prices


four
per


and a half
gallon --


during


1


s where
8 cents


964.

in


supplies were th
at many markets


years.


was


In fact,


the lowest mo-


14 years.


Cane molass
bight months of
age of storage f
concessions in o:
offerings of mol
petitionin from
latively mild, p
eed grains were


?rice ba
ts at
ola s es


sed


es prices
the year.
facilities


rder
asses


other


asturage


declined
Several


steadily
factors


in producing area


move


to catt


the large
le feeders


feedstuffs.


in most


plentiful.


on the quotation


the time
market


of delivery
in general.


Also,
at a
had a


at all markets
contributed to
s forced many s


supply o
and the


Cattle


parts


prices


molasses.
mixed feed


were


low,


of the country was


the purchasing


specified


Gulf


Ln unsettling


during the


this tr
ellers
At th


first


end.


to make
e same


industry met


short-


price
time,
stiffer


the weather was


ample


of offshore


market


supplies


molasses


at a


or a combination


and weakening influence


mar-


on the


[ o Prices fo
Jiur months of
t oast markets.
strengthened a


allowed
1964.


two distinctly diff


They


Elsewhere,


little


m December under


held


steady i


however,


in October,


pressure


from


erent
n Texa


prices


trends
,s Gulf


areas


ports,


during


Northeast,


dhe final
and West


declined further in September,


and then started


new


downward


again


in November


crop.


unusual


of the normal


rleans
prices


by the


development


price


market and
at Texas G
New Orleans


in the molasses


relationship which h


the Texas


ulf


ports


market.


Gulf


ports


and Northeast


This was


not the


market during
ad existed Dr


.


1964


was


eviously


and Northeast markets.


markets


case


closely
in 1964,


the upset-


between t
Prior to


followed
however.


the trend
Price


le


I
>


[


!


q


":


w


















LU


O ^
a)
co,

LU 'm
v CI
tnu


-I


U-


U-






ports an
This was


and Northeast areas


particularly


enjoyed a


true in


demand


comparatively good de
the drouth-ridden Northeast.


for molasses.


Imported molasses


the major


source


of molasses


both


areas


-- brought


higher


prices


than


domes -


tic molasses


throughout


the year


as world


competition for


supplies


supported


prices


of foreign molasses.


As a result of


these


factors


selling


on a con-


tract
great
year


basis,


price


as the dr
from large


drop


declines


in the Texas


Gulf


at New Orleans where prices
ocks of locally-produced mo


ports
were


and Northeast


under


were


selling pressure


lasses.


Beet Molasses


Prices


areas during
$8.00 per ton


of beet molasses


196h.


also


At the close


dropped


of the


in the Oregon-Utah-Idaho-Mi


sharply in


year,
issoula


the three


beet molasses


Montana area


principal


prices


$12.00


market


Slot
in the


Colorado-Wyoming-Montana area,


and $13.00


in the Denver


area.


Major weakening


influences
molasses.


were


lower


cane


molasses


prices


and a continued


rge supply


of beet


Prices


with


held


the previous


ton in March.


steady


us year'
It held


during
s closing
steady d


the first


levels.


during April,


two months


of 1964


were on a


.e market dropped $2.00 to
weakened gradually through


e on a par
to $.oo00 p


July,


broke


sharply in August,


and then held


steady


again for


the balance


of the


year.


Citrus Molasses


Citrus


half


of 1964.


molasses


prices


The market


fluctuated within


turned


upward in


July


a narrow range
and August as


during th
supplies


the first


were


but exhaust
about $8.50


the close
earlier.


Prices were


per ton when


of the year,


large


new-crop


prices


ely nominal
supplies


stood


the next


came


around $5


three


months


on the market
to $10.00 per


dropped


in December.
ton below a


At
year


Demand for citrus


alcohol


distillers.


tion in Florida


was


molasses


Supplies,
the light


was


good


however,
ist it had


throughout t
were limited.


been in recent


year,
Citrus
years.


particularly


molasses
This was


from


produc-


the
good


smaller citrus
percentage o


crop


of their


following


small


freezes


supply


of the two


contracted


previous


to alcohol


years.


distillers,


With


citrus


processors had


good


prices.


little
While c


difficulty


cane


molasses


disposing
provided


of remaining


some


stocks


competition in


at relatively
the mixed feed


trade,
lasses


citrus
back to


molasses
dried c


producers


citrus


pulp


enjoyed
which


the option of


was


in good


adding
and


demand


any surplus
selling at


mo-
fairly


high prices.
molasses.


If the price


of pulp went down,


they


could


sell


the molasses


Corn (Hydrol)


Molasses


Prices


of corn molasses


the trend in cane


molasses


declined


markets.


* steadily throughout
By the end of 1964,


year,


corn mola


55e


paralleling
es prices


were $16.00
downturn, t


to $17.00


per ton


below the
'n molasses


previous


year's


close


Despite


the
resulted


stoc~ts












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Table


--Price


comparisons


York,


Chicago


between molasses


and Kansas


Cit


and No. 2 yellow
y, 1955-64 1/


corn


: New York : Chicago Kansas City
Year Corn :Molasses:Differ-: Corn :Molasses:Differ-: Corn,:Molasses:Differ-
: bu. : 6 gal.: ence : bu. : 6 gal.: ence : bu. : 6- gal.: ence

--Cents--
1955... 161.2 81.1 +80.1 1l1.4 98.5 +42.9 148.2 116.1 +32.1
1956...: 169.8 109.5 +60.3 145.2 130.0 +15.2 149.7 136.4 +13.3
1957...: 156.8 163.7 -6.9 129.2 199.3 -70.1 130.4 204.2 -73.8
1958...: 156.3 115.0 +41.3 125.5 123.1 +2.4 .120.0 127.4 -7.4
1959...: 150.6 103.0 +47.6 122.5 107.1 +15.4 117.3 111.0 +6.3

1960...: 143.8 89.0 +54.8 115.6 92.9 +22.7 113.6 103.1 +10.5
1961...: 141.8 102.2 +39.6 113.1 112.7 +0.4 112.4 125.3 -12.9
1962...: 142.0 102.6 +39.i 112.8 117.8 -5.0 115.0 129.5 -14.5
1963...: 155.0 143.8 +11.2 126.0 170.8 -44.8 125.4 177.7 -52.3
1964...: 151.3 104.3 +47.0 125.1 111.1 +14.0 127.5 113.9 +13.6






MOLASSES AND CORN PRICES


The cost relationship between corn and molasses was more favorable for
molasses in 1964 than in 1963. In fact, this was the first time since 1960
that molasses occupied a better price position than corn. 1

The cost of 6-1/2 gallons of molasses dropped 63.8 cents in Kansas City,
59.7 cents in Chicago, and 39.5 cents in New York during 1961. At the same
time, the cost of a bushel of corn declined 3.7 cents in New York and nine-
tenths of a cent in Chicago but edged up 2.1 cents in Kansas City.

As a result, molasses costs ran 47 cents below corn in New York, 14 cents
lower in Chicago, and 13.6 cents under corn in Kansas City.


1/
lent


A "rule


of thumb"


in carbohydrate


measure


value


-- 6


gallons


one bushel


corn


of molasses


are about


-- is widely used


equiva -
compare


the carbohydrate


value


of molasses


corn.


This


measure


is based


on experi-


. .




















































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SUPPLIES


An estimated


industrial
1 million


use in th
gallons,


exceeded


million


only


gallons


e


million


gallons


Continental


or about
by the r
available


of molasses


United


percent,


record


States
more t


were available


during 1964.


han


722-million-gallon


in 1953.


Cane


previous
supply i


and hydrol molasses


for fe


This was
,s year's
n 1960 a


ed and
nearly


supply.
nd the


production


stood at record


1963's
total


outturn.


levels, a
Mainland


supply than imports


nd output
production


for the


of beet molasses
n comprised a la


second


was


about


on a


rger percentage


par with
of the


consecutive year.


Domestic


Supplies


Domestic


1964
year
came


This


sources


was around


provided a record


million


gallons,


Of the 373-million-gallon domestic
from mainland production. Another


million


gallons


or 5, percent,


c supply,
71 million


more


almost


gallons were


of molasses


than


million


shipped


in
previous


gallons


to the


mainland from Hawaii

Production of c


~at a


record


reflected th
molasses pro
the previous


106 million


e increase
duction was


year's


and Puerto Rico.


ane molasses


gallons


by mainland


-- 18


in sugarcan
estimated


record


outturn


totaled around 45 million gallons,


e


sugar mills


percent more


production,


at 116 million
Production


or about


than


in 196
1963's


was


output


especially in Florida


gallons, o
of refiners


million gallon


r about


' blackstrap
ns less than


estimated
. This
. Beet


same


molasses
the


previous year.


molasses
molasses


about


dropped


With


the smaller


citrus


to about h4 million


production, on
million gallons


the other


more


gal


hand,


crop in Florida, pro
lons -- the smallest


rose


a record


30


duction
since
million


of citrus
1945. Hydrol
gallons, or


than in 1963.


Molasses p
million gallons


reduction in Hawaii


-- about


during


1964


2.3 million gallons


totaled a record


more


than


the year


-breaking 57.
before. Thi


reflected


the record


sugarcane


crop


in Hawaii.


Mola


sses


shipments


from Hawaii


to, the mainland


than 1963
molasses


amounted


shipments
o foreign


to 5


Hawaii


3 million gallons
for the fifth con


or about
secutive


1 million
year did


n gallons
not export


more
any


countries.


Production


-- the m


million gallons
million gallons
ilons to foreign


of molasses


in Puerto


.ost for any year sin
to the United States


larger


tha


countries


C


Rico re
e 1952.
mainland


ached
While
were


an estimate
shipments
only about


n the previous year, exports
ran about 4 million gallons


of
more


some
than


d 64i million
of around 18
one and a half


20 million gal-
a year earlier.


Imports


About


266 million


gallons


of molasses


were imported


into


the Continental


United
gallons


State
less


s from foreign
than in 1963.


countries


during


1964.


This was


about 4 million


Imports


of about


86 million


gallons


molasses. from Mexico


some


million


gallons


from


the Dominican Republic were


and 10 million gallons,


It was


gallons


* ,





Table 6.--Feed and industrial molasses:


imports,


and expor


Mainland production,
hts, 1953-64


inshipments,


* Mainland production


Offshore shipments to
:the mainland


Year


Cane


Beet
1/


:Refiners':


: black-
strap


Citrus:
* :
* S


Hydrol
2/


Total


Hawaii


Puerto
Rico


Total


--1,000 gallons


48,
2 *46,
49,
.': 38,
42,


,123
,836
,954
,303
,370


,382
,804
,422
,878
,474


,607
,914
,126
,054
,796


20,439


1958.
1959.
1960.
1961.
1962.


.: 40,300
.: 42,826
46,686
.: 60,075
.: 65,274


40,012
40,333
40,686
45,812
47,132


20,336
21,494
23,324
23,153
23,595


,611
,238
,289
,618
,471


: 89,
: 106.


//116,000
116.000


47,60
45,40o


286,816
301,863


4,469


16,590
18,000


68,153
70,653


: U. S. imports : Mainland : Available
Year : : Dominican o Other Total: : exports :
Y Cuba : Republic : Mexco ther Total : W supplies

--1,000 gallons--

1953..: 291,352 26,199 31,829 61,385 410,765 1,563 648,018
1954..: 202,940 23,516 37,810 76,142 340,408 4,843 576,567
1955..: 232,696 34,573 43,277 67,266 377,812 4,863 625,720
1956..: 232,329 31,652 29,820 58,288 352,089 879 590,391
1957..: 117,471 21,789 40,059 52,217 231,536 2,545 475,366

1958..: 188,428 24,761 46,539 74,580 334,308 2,166 577,027
1959..: 90,497 47,426 61,651 82,563 282,137 2,372 553,484
1960..: 228,643 62,281 75,635 83,087 449,646 3,032 721,525
1961..: 12,417 53,834 70,807 123,437 260,495 2,220 580,746
1962..: 3 51,705 63,987 148,368 264,063 2,265 586,405

1963..: 42,926 93,175 134,322 270,423 5,475 619,917
1964..: 32,591 86,404 147,426 266,421 4,339 634,598
6S


1/
2/
by a
3/
5/


Year


harvested basis.


Prior to
constant,


1955


estimated


assuming


by multiplying total domestic dextrose
gallons of hydrol per 100 pounds of de


sales and exports
xtrose.


estimated.


not include exports


from Hawaii and Puerto Rico.


Source:
Florida


Agricultural Stabilization and


Citrus Processors Association,


Conservation Service,


Hawaiian Sugar Planter


Bureau of the Census,


s Association,


and Price-


Waterho lls and


Comnanv-






93 million


gallons.


These


two countries


provided about


percent


our


total


imports


and remained


the United States' largest


suppliers


of foreign molas


ses.


Imports


pattern
Ecuador,
Trinidad
in 1963.


from


from
those


the French


Tobago


Imports


and Venezuela and


other


foreign


of other rec


West


Indies


shipped


from more


such


countries


ent years.
, Nicaragua,


less molasses


rec


regular


ent suppliers
suppliers as


in 1964


Such


showed


a somewhat


normally heavy


the Republic


different


suppliers


of South Africa,


to the United States


such as


Brazil,


the Netherlands


than


El S
and B


as
and


they


alvador, India,
ritish Guiana


also declined.
Brazil, India,


In fact,


no molasses


The Netherlands,


were


shipped


and Venezuela


to the United


States


from


in 1964.


On the other


Barbado s,


France,


hand,
Haiti,


imports


Jamaica,


from such regular molasses


Mauritius,


suppliers


and the Philippines


increased


substantially in 1964.


States


for the


country in 1964.
Iran, Japan, Ken


first


And,


Australia


time in 1963


Austria,


sya,


shipped


supplied molasses
considerably more


Belgium and Luxembourg,


and Panama


Denmark,


supplied molasses


to the


United


molasses t
Guatemala,


United


States


this


Honduras,
for the


first


time in


at least


five years.


1964


About
came


Galveston.


56 percent
in through


of the molasses


three


While imports


customs
through


imported


districts


York and


into


-- New


the United


York,


Galveston


States


New Orleans,


during
and


increased about


and 11


percent,


respectively,


the quantity


molasses


imported


through


New Orleans
increases,
Angeles imp


custom
however,


distri
were


orted about


ct was down
in the Los


a third


more


Angeles
molasses


cent in 1964. The
and San Francisco


S


in 1964


than


most


noticeable


districts.


in 1963


while


Los
more


than


twice


as much


came


in through


San Francisco.


More


mola


sses


also


came


into


country through


districts
Maryland,
imported
imported


the Massachusetts,


considerably


Georgia,


through
through


and Mobile


less


Philadelphia,


was imported


customs


the Pittsburg district
that district.


through


districts.


This


was


Over


North


Carolina,


the Connecticut,


a million


the first


and Sabine


Buffalo,


were


gallons


time mola


sses


were


Exports


Some


during


24 million


1964,


or about


gallons


of molasses


3 million gallons


part of this 24 million gallons
usual directly from Puerto Rico


were


shipped


overseas


from


-- over
Only


the mainland.


were


more


exported
than the


from


year


20 million gallons


United States


before.
-- was


larg


export


t little more than 4 million gallons
Most of this was exported from


Florida


and Washington


previous year,






Table 7.--Molasses, inedible: U.


S. imports by country of origin, 1960-64


Country of origin 1964 : 1963 : 1962 : 1961 1960
--1,000 gallons--


Australia
Austria .


* ft


Barbados ........... .:
Belgium & Luxembourg ...


9,932
700
4,926


1,767


4,398


5,532


2,331


4,523


Brazil ...... .
British Guiana ...
British Honduras .


Canada
Cuba ..
Denmark


St C


'a.....
* a a ft a a
* teatte


3,333
819
1,642


1,833
3,570
390
2,256


7,501
391
549


.- 3
*. .... 2,164 -


3,045
214
722
12,417


1,534
228,643


Dominican Republic
Ecuador ........


El Salvador


......:
......:


France


French West Indies


Guatemala ..


Haiti


Honduras


a *.. ..... ..


* C aft *Ca a C *
.... ... ... ...
*..........t ..* ..:


32,591
2,270
953
10,524
3,813
1,268
5,375
1,624


42,926
6,813
1,286
9,390
6,511


3,530


51,705
4,010


9,319
8,053


4,176


53,834
1,232


23,927
8,805


5,394


62,281
2,106


5,2&L
4,568


2,942


India


4,518


Indonesia


I(IIII~Lttla


4,065


2,276


Iran


Jamaica


Japan ... ... .
Kenya .. ... ..
Leeward & Windward Is


1,833
2L,132
502
2,594


17,317


21,753


a *


Malagasy Republic ...


Mauritius


Mexico
Mozabar


a. .. ..I.: -


a *sa
.....
.I..


Netherlands
Nicaragua ..
Pakistan ...


Panama
Peru .


Philippines
Poland ....


* ** ***** ft St *
*

*..S.........Cat
*
*.aa.*. ...*.:
*
..... a.aa:
*.ea.*.. a. .:
*


11,919
86,404
2,203


1,920
1,886
2,353
12,934
19,3)43


7,567
93,175
2,008
593
4,517


21, 243
11,858


1,613
13,353
63,987


2,211
3,172
1,774


19,228
15,625


17,313


1,165
1,564
7,476
70,807


4,h86
1,704


9,201
7,165


22,335


75,635


2,360
2,075


5,629
6,4o6


S..: 978


Rep. of South Africa .
Rumania ..... ...... ..


Taiwan (Formosa)
Trinidad & Tobago
Turkey ..........


a
S C C C C
a
C


4,109


2,893
8,708


1/15,886


9,188


5,350


719
10,988


5,935
8,886
590
6,395


4,660
5,674
2,690
5,585


UAR (Egypt) .
United Kingdom
Venezuela .....


8,533


.
* S.
a


1,822


.........: 872


Total


.. .. .. .. .. .:


266,421


1/270,423


264,063


260,495


449,646


- S -


1,426






Table 8.--Molasses, inedible: U.


S. imports by customs districts, 1960-64


Customs districts 1964 : 1963 1962 : 1961 1960


--1,000 gallons--


Arizona
Buffalo


......
......


...........* *
..... ....a


3,473
2,712


3,381
3,493


3,751
4,100


3,660
2,045


5,567
6,204


Chicago ...
Connecticut


Dakota


.
* a aa ... *


2,654
285


6,402


3,779


14,683


12,582
155


Duluth & Superior


. ..: 208


El Paso .
Florida .
Qalveston
aedrgia .
Laredo ..


Sa a.... .
* *. a..a
.a at...
*.a..a.aa.a.
...*....


Los Angeles


......a~..
... ....a *
.a..... :*
a
.....a ..a *
*...a ...:*
.......:


7,390
723
39,977
3,073

25,221


7,173
3,423
1/35,863
I 3,365
79
18,936


7,165
3,804
35,140

102
18,632


6,479
7,401
26,743
1,264
1,427
22,720


6,817
7,172
33,211
3,180
2,272
26,553


Maine & New Hampshire


Maryland ...
Massachusetts


Michigan
Mobile .


* *.. .....
..... ....:


12,513
4,154


5,053


19,361
2,617


9,193


14,659
3,474


8,405


1L,260
2,309


5,580


15,813
4,788


16,204


Montana & Idaho


......: 10


New Orleans


. .. .:


New York


North Carolina


Ohio .
Oregon


... ... .:


57,099
52,231
4,313


* a a a S
I ..aa a
......


70,885
43,045
3,460
5,493


70,344
54,680
2,749
3,410


54,895
66,606
4,716
6,260


115,918
57,282
4,212
3,827


Philadelphia
Pittsburg ..
St. Lawrence


Sabine


a


San Diego ....... .....:
San Francisco ......


Vermont
Virginia


Total


a
..aa..*. .* .: *
.


... ... .. ... .:


11,811
1,285


2,071
5,996
19,998
838
3,178


266,421


10,316


1,582
6,624
8,919
466
4,897


1/270,423


7,658


2,168
4,655
11,579


3,408


264,063


5,539


1,951

7,852


4,030


260,495


111,702


549
1,841

10,360


3,359


449,646


I/ Revised.


Source: Bureau of the Census
.: i
\*i






Table 9.--Molasses, inedible: U.


S. exports by country of destination,


1960-64 I/


Country of destination : 1964 : 1963 : 1962 : 1961 : 1960
--1,000 gallons--
Belgium & Luxembourg ...: 2,11 -
Canada ........ .....: 9,189 3,726 6,939 L,440 3,050
France . : -
Iceland ................: 122 149 170 30 -
India ......... .......: 203 118 1
Ireland ................: 760 3 4 -
Israel ..... .. ........: 183 -
Japan ........... ...: 623 813 1 -
Mexico .................: 42 4 48 28 4
Netherlands ............: 7,316 2,384 7,489 3,411
Rep. of South Africa ...: 3 34 47 -
Saudi Arabia *......... 5 6 -
United Kingdom ......: 6,777 8,886 575 5,916 11,729
West Germany ...........: 10 2,102 -
Other ..... .. .... ...9 11 7 1 -

Total ................: 24,482 21,398 15,279 10,444 18,194

I/ Includes exports from Hawaii and Puerto Rico.
Source: Bureau of the Census




Table 10.--Molasses, inedible: U. S. exports by customs districts, 1960-64

Customs districts : 1964 : 1963 : 1962 1961 1960
--1,000 gallons--
Buffalo ................: 85 12 79 3
Dakota .. ... ....... 3 12
Florida ................: 1,472 561
Laredo .................- 1 12 19
Massachusetts ..........: 74 ihS -
Michigan ...............: 95 99 168 232 74
Montana and Idaho ......: 7 48 110
New Orleans ............: 183 -
New York ...............: 221 169 222 58
Philadelphia ...........: 9 -
Puerto Rico ............: 20,14 15,923 13,0li 8,224 15,162
St. Lawrence ...........: 19 33 7
San Diego .............: 348 3,140 36 3 4
San Francisco ..........: 326 188 1 -
Washington .............: 1,466 1,729 1,798 1,740 2,261
Other 6 8 -
Other .... ..... ..... ...: 6 8
A*





Table 11.--Molasses :


Estimated utilization, United States, 1953-6h


: Industrial :Mixed feeds,: Total
:Distilled: Yeast, : Pharmaceuti- : :direct feed-:
Year : spirits :citric acid: cals and edi-: Total : ing and : utili
: 1/ :and vinegar: ble molasses silage 2/ : nation
--Million gallons--
193 ...... 20 5. 8.0 271.4 376.6 668.0
195L ......: 87.8 60.0 10.0 157.8 1 ; 7o.c
1955 ......: 121.3 6c5. 12.0 1Q8.3 27 62 5.7
1956 ......: 111.9 70.0 14.0 195.9 39.5 5 90.
1957 ......: 59. 2 70.0 1 .0 1 3.2 332.2 75.

1958 1. ;O. 17 3 .
1959 ......: 35.3 71.0 0 121 3 2 55
1960 ......: 6QI. 7.0 3 37.0 180.0 5L1.5 721.5
1961 ......: 8.5 70.h 7.1 126.0 5. 7 580.7
1962 ......: 5 .7 79.8 3 8.7 12L.2 662.2 586.h

1963 ......: 5.0 I 85.0 LO.O 130.0 h' 9.- 61 .
196h .' ...: 6.2 90.0 7- 1. 3.2 h91. 63L.6

1/ Includes molasses used in mak-ing ethyl alcohol, butyl arid acetone prior
to 1959.


2/ Molasses utilized in feeds is


a residual item, calculated by subtractinl


molasses used industrially from total mainland supplies without considering
changes in stocks.
3/ Pharmaceutical utilization not considered prior to 1960.
U/ Revised.
5/ Estimated.


UTILIZATIO[I


An estimated 635 million gallons of molasses were
industrial use in the United States during 196L. This


available for feed and
iwas nearly 15 million


gallons more than the previous year and the second largest on record


Actual


usage was difficult to determine due to the lack of accurate stocks and utili-


zation data.


Consequently, industrial and feed usage figures in the above


table are based onr best estimates available and may vary from actual usage.

Molasses used in the production of distilled spirits in the Continental


United States during 196) totaled 6.2 million gallons
more than the quantity used for this purpose in 1963.


-- 1.2 million gallons


Trade


estimates indicate that about 90 million gallons of mol


asses,


or 5


percent more than in 1963, were used in the manufacture of yeast, citric acid,


and vinegar.


Manufacturers of pharmaceuticals and edible molasses used h7


million gallons, or 17 percent more than the year before.

Based on the foregoing utilization estimates and not taking into account
any changes in molasses stocks, about 191 million gallons of molasses were


available for use in mixed feeds and livestock feeding.


This was about 2 mil


I:






UNITED STATES
Consumer


Washi


DEPARTMENT OF
and Marketing
Grain Division
ngton, D. C.


AGRICULTURE
Service


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

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3 1262 08589 9044


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Librarian


12-11-61
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