National Fire Prevention Week

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Material Information

Title:
National Fire Prevention Week October 8-14, 1961, safeguard your home and farm from fire
Physical Description:
3 p. : ill. ; 26 cm
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture
National Fire Protection Association
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Fire prevention   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in cooperation with the National Fire Protection Association.
General Note:
Includes list of other U.S. Dept. of Agriculture publications.
General Note:
Issued August 1961.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004939619
oclc - 85220050
System ID:
AA00008482:00001

Full Text

















Trash


No Lightning Prote


V


Family training in fire hazard


Cigarettes


removal,


use of fire, and


to escape in case of fire,


can be most effectively started


during


tion
bors


United S


tale,


with the


National


Fire


Preven-


Join your neigh-


in promoting


fire safely.


Department of Agrieuhlure in cooperation


Fire Protection A


Lat ion




~>Thv ~



A A', g'UI


Farm fire losses in 1960 were estimated at $165 million by the U.S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture. This is 5 percent less than the loss in 1959, the highest
on record. The USDA estimate is based on actual loss rates of more than 200
representative farmers mutual fire insurance companies selected from more
than 1600 such firms.
Four-fifths of the losses were from fire and one-fifth from lightning damage.
Building losses account for about 65 percent of the total. Almost three-fourths
of the building losses were on dwellings and barns. Personal property losses
were about 35 percent of the total. Livestock losses cost more than any other
personal property item, and were mostly due to lightning.
Loss of life from farm fires was estimated at about 850 last year by the Na-
tional Safety Council.
A study by the National Fire Protection Association shows that in 1959
about half of the dwelling fires in which six or more lives were lost occurred
in rural homes.
Misused, overheated, and defective heating or cooking equipment, flues, and
chimneys caused 48 percent of these dwelling fires; smoking or matches, 15
percent; explosions, 11 percent; rubbish, incendiary (deliberate), and electrical
nearly 4 percent each; and undetermined 15 percent.
A similar study by this association for the year 1960 shows that of the 54
residential fires in which five or more lives were lost, 46 were dwelling fires.
National Fire Prevention Week is the best time to alert farm families to
stop such fires. November was the peak month for these fires and loss of life.
Four-fifths of the fires occurred and 84 percent of the lives were lost in the 6
months from October through March.
Nine-tenths of the fires and the deaths reported in these two studies occurred
between 8 p.m. and 8 a.m. Most of the residence fires causing five or more
deaths occurred between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. when people are asleep. Four
out of every five persons who died were under 15 years of age, and two of every
five were under four.
Most of these people were trapped by fire. Installation of a complete sys-
tem of approved fire detectors and alarms, along with fire safety training, can
save lives.
Farm families particularly must rely on their own fire safety training, fire
prevention checkups, and private fire protection measures to safeguard their
lives, income, and property.


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Install lightning surge arresters on load side of meter to
reduce interior damage to the home and to protect meter
service, siring, and electrical appliances.


When Building-
Build in fire-stops-barrier. of


wood or masonry be-


FRE SAFETY
Plan at least


TRAINING


two escape routes from e'ery room in the


Iouse, and go over pl
ily. Anticipate halls
'train everyone in use
children understand cl
tjtan to se garage and
io escape from upper
,: Know the phone nu
yur district; he sure
Irm.
5 Get everyone out ol


13 discover fire
'save valuables
Don't open ho
Sp them closed
6sed wooden d
bm for several


*


an` with eve
and stairs
of escape ro
early what tl
porch roofs,
floors.
mber of the
firemen kn


ry me
being
ute, u
o do.
, ladde


mber of the fainm-
blocked by fire.
ntil even younger
Keep exits clear.
rs, and even trees


fire department serving
ow how to reach your


f the house immediately the minute


or smoke.
Always


stop to dress


a flashlight


children


hand.


t doors. Feel doors first; if they're hot.
and get out another way or wait for help.
floors can keep fire and smoke out of a
minutes.


tween stu
channels
smoke an
Use wa
similar m
'ent flamI,
U[.e fir
cement, s
Have a
home or
pliance..
Install
originatin


ds, joints. rafter., or stringers and block off open
s-een from basement or attic to prevent spread of
d fire.
llboards made of gypsum, cement, asbestos, and
aterial-. as tell as plaster, to resist fire and pre-
e spread .
e resistant roofing or shingles of asphalt, asbestos


ie or
iualifl
hen
ad exl
good
in it


quate clearance


metal.
lied electr
you reinm
tension co
I heating
will not b
from ia


supply for combustion.


FIRE PROTECTION


Install


only labeled (I U


install i
Use e
properly.
and loc
escape.
nrid ceiling


can and inspect



Sautomnatic fir


wiring in your new
electrical fuses, ap-


it so that a fire
that it has ade-
and ample air
it regularly.



e detection and


ever leave children alone in your home. Instruct lour
sitter in your escape plans: see that she knows how to
in touch with fire department, parents, doctor, and


alarm units in accordance with maximum spacing rules.
Complete coverage of the house i- essential for reliable
protection.


'Beware of reentering burning house: even the smallest.
zeat harmless-looking fire can give off deadly smoke and
SWe gases.


FIRE PREVENTION
Keep your home
inspections.
SAvoid carelessness
Do not allow trash


free of


all fire hazards


with smoking or matches.
or oily rags to accumulate


regular


in homes


or farm buildings. A clean house seldom burns. Keep at-
tiems, lofts, cellars, and other storage places clear of trash
and accessible for firefighting.
. Remove grass, weeds, and dry vegetation from around
hbildings and along fence rows.
SBurn trash regularly, in small quantities, in a safe place,


amA ml ~ ..,f ,i;~. o nno f-n-n L.. :1 ~: --. ..~C..a.LI.. : i.nnrI


Install a telephone on your yard
from ani building) and poit the nu
department on it.
Have labeled (IUL or FM) pum
guisher, for paper, wood, and sirr
chemical or carbon dioxide unit i
grease, or electrical fires.
Attach water pump electrical co,
pole on the line :ide of main swilt
case of fire.
Have at least a 50-foot length of
hose connected for ready uLe inside
Install a 3.000-eallon tank (cistern


unless you
pond, streak
be reached
V& ak a^ .'t a. c'


. U -


'3


ve water
or hydra
the fire
A., r. I


n jI


pole (a safe distance
mber of the local fire


p tank (water) extin-
milar fires, and a dry
For flammable liquid,

nnection to your yard
rh to assure power in


gar
the
) in


ir fire fighting
Make sure t
gine suction hb
ain ,,. In- ,n Of ll


den or larger size
homne.
a central location,
available from a
hat this water can
ose.
ah 9 fIn rpaa Irk oh.


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
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____ 3 1262 08851 7395


DON'T


GIVE


... but


FIRE
CASE


PLACE


TO


FIRE


NFP A


Every person living on a farm should know what to do.


The most important steps are:


* Get everyone out of and away from the building on fire.


* Call for help from nearest telephone-or make sure someone goes for help.
* Try to keep the fire from spreading if you can do so without risk to your life.
tect other buildings, livestock, and property.


* Help the fire department to get water and move equipment


as directed.


* Take steps to protect property against weather damage after the fire is out.


HELP YOUR RURAL FIRE DEPARTMENT


Ask your rural fire department to make a pre-fire survey of your property to:


* Give it a definite address or location number.


* Know the general floor plan of your house, including escape routes.
* Know room locations of your family, especially of invalids and children.


* Know locations of all your livestock buildings.


* Know location and types of your farm buildings and access for firefighting.
* Know location and amount of water ready for firefighting on or near your property.


* Know location of flammable or toxic liquids,
* Know location of electrical master switches.


gases,


or chemicals.


* Anticipate possible traffic control problems in event of fire.


This information carried in a file on the rural fire apparatus can save lives and property.


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