Current industrial reports

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Current industrial reports
Portion of title:
Manufacturers' shipments, inventories, and orders
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28-29 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census. -- Manufacturers' Shipments, Inventories, and Orders Branch
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, the Bureau of the Census :
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
March 1968
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly, with annual summary[1976-]
monthly[ former 1963-1975]
monthly
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Manufacturing industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Inventories -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
Additional Physical Form:
Some monthly issues also available via Internet from the Census Bureau website as: Highlights from the preliminary report on manufacturers' shipments, inventories, and orders. Address as of 12/17/03: http://www.census.gov/indicator/www/m3/prel/priorrel.htm; current access available via PURL.
Additional Physical Form:
Some annual summaries also available via Internet from the Census Bureau website. Address as of 12/8/2005: http://www.census.gov/prod/www/abs/m3-1.html; current access available via PURL.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 1963-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Some annual summaries issued in revised editions.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each annual summary cumulates previous issues for a period of prior years, i.e., annual summaries for <1976>-197 cumulate from 1958.
Issuing Body:
Prepared by: Bureau of the Census, Industry Division, Manufactures' Shipments, Inventories, and Orders Branch, 1963-1964; issued by: U.S. Department of Commerce, Economics and Statistics Administration, Bureau of the Census, <2000->
General Note:
Title from cover.
General Note:
Some issues not distributed to depository libraries in a tangible format.
General Note:
Paper copy no longer sold by Supt. of Docs., U.S.G.P.O.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: July 2002.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001320832
notis - AGH1708
oclc - 02548418
lccn - 74614399
issn - 0364-1880
Classification:
lcc - HD9724 .U52a
ddc - 380.1/0973
System ID:
AA00008477:00210

Related Items

Preceded by:
Industry survey
Preceded by:
Manufacturers' shipments, inventories, and orders

Full Text
. 3. 15S: 3 1 (7- -
CURRENT INDUSTRIAL REPORTS

Manufacturers' Shipments,

.'Y Inventories, and Orders



^"t j..CH 1978
U.S. Department of Commerce For Release 10:3EDNEY 3, 1978
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS M3-1(78)-3


Ili-.JUN
REVISION TO SERIES V, .% ,
.. a
The historical series in this publication have been revised to reflect benchmarking ahd rec onal adjustment
factors. These revisions, described in the benchmark report M3-1.7, "Manufacturers' Shipments, res, and Orders: 1958-
1977 (Revised)" released April 7, can be summarized as follows:
An updating of benchmarks used in developing shipments and inventory estimates each month. The revised data are based
on figures from the Bureau's 1974-1976 Annual Surveys of Manufactures.
Recalculation of estimated new orders, which are derived from the estimates of unfilled orders and shipments.
Revision of seasonally adjusted data based on new seasonal adjustment factors.
Complete tables showing the effects of the revisions on annual and monthly estimates of shipments, inventories and orders
from 1958 through 1977 are included in the benchmark report.
Revisions to the seasonally adjusted inventories for the defense and nondefense portion of the supplementary series are in-
cluded in the appendices of this report. Also included are stage of fabrication inventories for instruments and related products
and new orders for nondurable goods without unfilled orders.
Single copies of the report, Manufacturers' Shipments, Inventories, and Orders: 1958-1977 (Revised) are available for $2.45
from the Subscribers Services Section, Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233 or from U.S. Department of Commerce
District Offices.
If you wish to receive a copy of the computer tape of the M3-1.7 which contains the revised monthly shipments, inventories,
and orders for 1958-1977, please send your request to Data Users Service, Customer Service Branch, Bureau of the Census,
Washington, D.C. 20233. You should include your name, address, and a check or money order for $80 payable to Commerce-
Census.


New orders for manufactured products in March were
$125.9 billion an increase of 2.5 percent or $3.1 billion above
February the Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census
reported today. New orders for durable goods increased $2.2
billion or 3.3 percent to $69.0 billion, and new orders for non-
durables rose by $0.9 billion or 1.6 percent to $56.9 billion.
Shipments of manufactured products were $121.1 billion, $2.0
billion or 1.6 percent above February. Shipments of durable
goods increased $1.3 billion or 2.1 percent to $64.4 billion, and
shipments of nondurable goods increased $0.6 billion or 1.1
percent to $56.7 billion. Inventories held by manufacturers rose
from $182.4 billion in February to $183.8 billion in March, for
an increase of $1.4 billion or 0.8 percent. Inventories held by
producers of durable goods rose $1.0 billion to $118.6 billion,
while inventories of nondurable goods producers rose $0.3
billion to $65.2 billion.
New orders for transportation equipment rose $1.7 billion or
10.5 percent to $18.3 billion. Over three-fourts of the increase
was due to a substantial gain in defense orders for shipbuilding


and military tanks. New orders for instruments and related
products rose $0.3 billion or 13.9 percent to $2.8 billion. New
orders for the electrical machinery industries declined $0.3 bil-
lion or 3.2 percent to $8.2 billion. When the basic industry cate-
gories are regrouped into the capital goods categories, new
orders for the nondefense capital goods declined $0.4 billion or
2.3 percent, and orders for the defense capital goods increased
$1.7 billion or 60 percent. The 1.6 percent increase in new
orders for nondurable goods was reflected in virtually all in-
dustries except apparel which declined by $0.2 billion.
Several industries contributed to the $2.0 billion increase in
shipments of manufactured products. Within the durable goods
industries, shipments of transportation equipment increased
$0.6 billion or 4.2 percent due to a $0.5 billion rise in shipments
of motor vehicles and parts. Shipments of electrical machinery,
nonelectrical machinery, and instruments and related products
each increased $0.2 billion. Shipments of primary metals fell
$0.4 billion or 3.8 percent to $9.2 billion, with steel showing a
decline of $0.3 billion or 5.1 percent. Contributing to the $0.6


Address inquiries concerning these figures to U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Industry Division, Washington, D.C. 20233, or call
Ruth Runyan or Kathleen Swindell, (301) 763-2502.
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233, or any U.S. Department of Commerce district
office. Postage stamps not acceptable; currency submitted at sender's risk. Remittances from foreign countries must be by international money order or
by a draft on a U.S. bank. Price 30 cents per copy, $3.60 per year.






billion increase in the shipments of the nondurable goods in-
dustries were increased shipments of foods ($0.3 billion) and
petroleum and coal products ($0.2 billion).

Half of the $4.8 billion increase in the backlog of unfilled
orders for all manufactured products resulted from the $2.4
billion or 3.9 percent increase in backlog for transportation
equipment. The backlog of orders for primary metals rose $0.9
billion or 4.5 percent to $20.8 billion primarily due to a $0.7
billion or 5.3 percent increase in backlog of orders for steel.
The backlog of orders for the nonelectrical machinery industries
rose $0.6 billion or 1.2 percent to $49.0 billion.
The $1.0 billion increase in inventories held by durable goods
producers included increases in transportation equipment ($0.4
billion or 1.9 percent), nonelectrical machinery ($0.4 billion or
1.6 percent), fabricated metals ($0.3 billion or 1.8 percent) and
electrical machinery ($0.2 billion or 1.2 percent). Inventories
held by producers in the primary metals industries declined $0.4
billion or 2.2 percent to $16.8 billion. Virtually all of the de-
crease was in inventories held by steel producers which declined
$0.4 billion to $8.7 billion. This is the eighth consecutive
monthly decline in steel inventories and represents a 16 percent
decline since July 1977 when inventories for producers of steel
were $10.4 billion. Within the nondurable goods industries in-
creases in inventories held by producers in the foods industries
($0.4 billion or 2.3 percent) and chemical industries ($0.2 billion


or 1.7 percent) more than offset a decrease in the stocks held by
producers of petroleum and coal products ($0.4 billion or 6.3
percent).
Based on the preliminary figures in this report, shipments of
manufactured products in the first quarter of 1978 were $354.5
billion, $8.1 billion or 2.3 percent above the $346.4 billion in
shipments in the fourth quarter of 1977. Durable shipments in-
creased in the first quarter by $4.7 billion or 2.6 percent and
nondurable shipments increased by $3.4 billion or 2.1 percent.
New orders for durable goods received during the first quarter
were 3.5 percent above orders in the fourth quarter of 1977.
Inventories for all manufacturing industries at the end of the
first quarter were 2.3 percent above the fourth quarter.


SCHEDULE RELEASE DATES


The figures on the durable goods industries in this report
supersede those issued earlier in the advance report on durable
goods. The present report is based on more complete reporting,
but the estimates are also considered preliminary. Final figures
will appear as historical data in the report to be published for
next month. The advance report on durable goods for April
is scheduled for release on May 19, 1978 and the full report
is scheduled for release on May 31, 1978.







































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1







Table 6.--MANUFACTURERS' SHIPMENTS, INVENTORIES, AND ORDERS MONTH-TO-MONTH AND LONG TERM PERCENT CHANGES

(Based on seasonally adjusted data)


Item and industry group





Shipments:
All manufacturing industries ..........

Durable goods industries, total.........
Nondurable goods industries, total......

Total inventories:
All manufacturing industries ..........

New orders:
All manufacturing industries..........
Durable goods industries, total.........
Nondurable goods industries, total......

Unfilled orders:
Durable goods industries, total.........


Month-to-month


Average monthly rates of change


Oct. 1977-
Jan. 1978


3 months


July-
Oct. 1977


Apr.-
July 1977


12 months


Mar. 1977-
Mar. 1978


+1.3


Average, 1973-1977


Average
rise


+1.6


Average
decline


Table 7.--RATIO OF MANUFACTURERS' INVENTORIES TO SHIPMENTS AND UNFILLED ORDERS TO SHIPMENTS, BY INDUSTRY GROUP

(Based on seasonally adjusted data)

Inventories--shipments ratio Unfilled orders--shipments ratio1
(months' backlog)
Industry group
Mar. Feb. Jan. Dec. Mar. Feb. Jan. Dec.
1978p 1978r 1978r 1977 1978' 1978r 1978 1977


All manufacturing industries, total...................... 1.52 1.53 1.58 1.52 3.25 3.23 3.33 3.15

Durable goods industries, total.............................. 1.84 1.86 1.94 1.86 3.85 3.83 3.97 3.75

Stone, clay, and glass products........................... 1.33 1.35 1.41 1.32 0.93 0.91 0.96 0.91
Primary metals ............................................ 1.83 1.79 2.00 1.94 2.26 2.08 2.23 2.02
Fabricated metals ......................................... 2.00 2.01 2.12 1.99 3.49 3.57 3.80 3.45
Machinery, except electrical............................... 2.49 2.50 2.66 2.47 4.85 4.92 5.16 4.82
Electrical machinery....................................... 2.01 2.04 1.98 2.02 3.47 3,52 3.38 3.38
Transportation equipment................................... 1.41 1.44 1.49 1.43 8.29 8.27 8.56 8.23
Instruments and related products................................ 2.29 2.44 2.43 2.30 1.62 1.69 1.71 1.61


Nondurable goods industries, total.......................... 1.15 1.16 1.19 1.15 0.75 0.74 0.77 0.73

Food and kindred products ................................ 0.91 0.90 0.98 0.92 (X) (X) (X) (X)
Tobacco products .......................................... 3.77 4.07 4.10 3.99 (X) (X) (X) (X)
Textile mill products........................................ 1.59 1.52 1.54 1.47 (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA)
Paper and allied products................................. 1.20 1.23 1.26 1.23 (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA)
Chemicals and allied products............................... 1.41 1.40 1.39 1.40 (X) (X) (X) (X)
Petroleum and coal products................................ 0.69 0.75 0.74 0.72 (X) (X) (X) (X)
Rubber and plastics products, n.e.c ....................... 1.35 1.37 1.41 1.31 (X) (X) (X) (X)

(NA) Not available. PPreliminary. rRevised. (X) Not applicable.
'Excludes the following industries with no unfilled orders: Wood and lumber products; glass containers; metal cans, barrels and drums;
farm machinery and equipment; motor vehicle assembly operation; other transportation equipment; foods and related products; tobacco;
apparel and related products; building paper; die-cut paper and board; chemicals; petroleum and coal products; and rubber and plastics
products, n.e.c.







The following is a description of the survey and definitions
used. These are provided to clarify the meaning of the items
involved and do not represent any revisions from those
definitions previously employed.


DESCRIPTION OF SURVEY

The Manufacturers' Shipments, Inventories, and Orders Survey
(M3-1) provides monthly figures that are comparable to the
annual totals published each year in the Annual Survey of
Manufactures (ASM). The ASM is a probability sample of
approximately 70,000 manufacturing establishments drawn
from the most recent 5-year census universe of about 312,000
establishments. In the ASM, each manufacturing establishment
provides data on employment, payrolls, shipments, cost of
materials, capital expenditures, and inventories as well as other
selected items. Until 1976, the ASM did not compile inform-
ation on unfilled orders or new orders. Since the ASM is
establishment based, it provides data for each of the 425
manufacturing industries in the Standard Industrial Classifi-
cation (SIC) system and area data for industry groups.
The estimates presented in the M3 report are based on a
sample panel of approximately 5,000 reporting units, consisting
of virtually all manufacturing companies with 1,000 or more
employees and additional medium-sized companies that
strengthen the sample coverage in individual industry cells. The
reporting unit for many medium- or single-line companies
comprises all operations of the company. Many of the larger
diversified companies file separate divisional reports for their
operations in different industries, although this divisional
reporting is not followed by all large companies.
Each reporting unit in the monthly panel is classified into
one of 79 industry classifications for tabulation. Many of the
reporting units included mixed industry activity even within the
broad industry categories of the monthly survey. However, the
survey estimating procedure assumes that the month-to-month
changes of the reporting units classified in each industry
category effectively represent the month-to-month movements
of the establishments in the SIC industries which make up the
category. This ratio estimating procedure is used for all items
compiled in the survey except for new orders which is discussed
separately below.
The M3 series is periodically benchmarked to the ASM for
shipments and inventories. The most recent benchmark was for
1974 through 1976 and issued in the report M3-1.7 released in
March 1978. In the absence of benchmark data for unfilled
orders, levels were set in August 1962 based upon the ratio of
unfilled orders to sales for companies reporting in the M3. These
levels were reset as of December 1973 in the M3-1.6 benchmark
publication released in December 1976.
The M3 data are subject to some limitations primarily
resulting from the relatively small sample used to develop the
estimates and the use of divisional and company reports to
extrapolate establishment based data. Precise measurement of
these limitations based on estimates of the sampling errors is
not available. In addition to the general limitations of M3 survey
data, the estimated levels of unfilled orders are subject to
further limitations due to the assumptions made in developing
these levels, the definition of unfilled orders, and response
difficulties. These limitations are discussed in greater detail on


13
pages i-iv in the introductory chapter of the latest benchmark
publication mentioned above. Generally, the limitations to the
unfilled orders data primarily apply to the absolute level of
unfilled orders and, to a much lesser extent, to the month-to-
month change in unfilled orders. Since this month-to-month
change in unfilled orders is used to develop the monthly
estimates of new orders, the estimates of new orders are subject
to fewer limitations than the unfilled orders estimates.
To remedy the deficiencies of the presently published levels
of unfilled orders, an independent benchmark survey of unfilled
orders was initiated in 1977. Results from this survey should be
available in the latter part of 1978.


EXPLANATION OF TERMS

Value of Shipments-Shipments in the monthly survey are
equivalent to value of shipments as reported in the ASM which
are received or receivable net selling values, f.o.b. plant, after
discounts and allowances and excluding freight charges and
excise taxes. Included in shipments are the value of all products
sold, transferred to other plants of the same company, or
shipped on consignment.
Shipments also include receipts of establishments in the
industry for contract work performed for other, resales, receipts
for miscellaneous activities such as the sale of scrap and refuse;
value of installation and repair work performed by employees of
the plant; and value of research and development performed at
the plant. In the ship building industry the value of work done
in a given year varies considerably from the value of shipments
because of the long lead time between the input of the materials
and labor and the shipments of the completed ship. In the
annual survey, therefore, the value of work done during the year
is requested rather than the value of shipments. Value of work
done is also reported by aircraft and missile producers working
on cost-plus contracts.
The value of shipments figures developed from the ASM
contain duplication at the all manufacturing and industry group
levels since the products of some industries are used as materials
by other industries within the industry group. With the
exception of motor vehicles, it is not significant at the 4-digit
SIC group level. Since the M3-1 industry categories typically are
groupings of industries, this duplication is significant for all the
manufacturing, durable goods and nondurable goods categories
and the various market groups. The significance of the dupli-
cation within the specific M3-1 industry groups varies depending
on the 4-digit industry composition of these groups. It is most
pronounced in a few highly integrated industry areas such as
primary metals and motor vehicles and parts.
Since most monthly reports are for the entire company or
major divisions rather than establishments, the companies are
requested to report net sales, i.e., total company billings after
discounts and allowances. Companies which file divisional
reports are requested to treat transfers from the division of the
company to another as if they were net sales to outside
customers. Although this definition of shipments in the
monthly reports differs from that used in the annual establish-
ment reports, it is assumed that the month-to-month changes in
company sales in the industry are representative of the
month-to-month shipments of the establishments in the indus-
try.







Inventories-End-of-month inventories in the monthly survey
are identical in definition to the end-of-year inventories in the
ASM. In the ASM, respondents are asked to report inventories
of individual establishments at approximate current cost if
feasible; otherwise, "at book values." Since different methods
of inventory valuation are used (LJFO, FIFO, etc.), the
definition of the aggregate inventories for establishments in an
industry is not precise. The figures on the change in inventories
from one period to the next are of greater significance than the
actual aggregates.
Inventories are reported by stage of fabrication: (a) finished
goods; (b) work in process; and (c) materials, supplies, fuel, and
other inventories. In using inventories by stage of fabrication at
the all manufacturing and 2-digit industry levels as well as for
the durable and nondurable goods sectors, it should be noted
that a finished product of one industry may be a raw material
for another industry at the next stage of fabrication. Insofar as
the durable and nondurable goods sectors and also the 2-digit
industry groups contain industries with successive stages of
processing, the same type of commodity may be included under
different inventory categories in the aggregate statistics.

New Orders and Unfilled Orders-The unfilled orders shown
in this publication represent the net sales value of goods on
order which have not been shipped. They are net of cancell-
ations and include all adjustments resulting from contract


change documents. Only those orders supported by binding
legal documents such as signed contracts or letter contracts are
included. Some large defense contracts are authorized and
funded in several stages. Only the funded portion of such
contracts are included in these figures.
New orders are not calculated according to the standard ratio
estimate procedure, even though they are collected as a separate
item. The reason for this is that not all companies report new
orders, and some that do limit their reporting to specific
products for which long lead times are required in the
production cycle. These companies, in effect, exclude new
orders received for products that are shipped from inventory.
To take advantage of the higher response rate for shipments
data and to include orders filled from inventory, new orders are
computed by adding the change in the backlog of unfilled
orders to the current month's shipments. Thus, the estimate of
new orders includes orders that are received and filled in the
same month as well as orders that have not yet been filled. The
estimate also includes the effects of cancellations and modifica-
tions of previously existing contracts.
Seasonally adjusted new orders are similarly derived from the
monthly change in the seasonally adjusted backlog of unfilled
orders and seasonally adjusted shipments. Many nondurable
goods industries and some durable goods industries have no
backlog of unfilled orders. Shipments are used as the estimate of
new orders in these industries.









APPENDIX A.--MANUFACTURERS INVENTORIES, BY MARKET CATEGORIES AND MONTH: 1968 TO 1977


YEAR JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC

NON-DEFENSE CAPITAL GOODS INDUSTRIES-- TOTAL INVENTORIES
(MILLIONS OF DOLLARS SEASONALLY ADJUSTED)


1968.. 17882 18286 18494 18639 18830 18968 19112 19180 19376 19507 19686 19820
1969.. 20150 20246 20362 20725 21131 21203 21415 21616 21787 22187 22427 22670
1970.. 22538 22980 23195 23489 23651 23925 24232 24311 24499 24669 24749 24631
1971.. 24757 24846 24734 24743 24782 24601 24735 24677 24565 24492 24404 24233
1972.. 24164 24216 24167 24200 24331 24443 24482 24602 24875 24963 25233 25520
1973.. 25926 26165 26488 26461 26730 27155 27617 28100 28564 29143 29453 30003
1974.. 30445 31069 31655 32331 33014 33550 34244 34954 35543 36267 36960 37476
1975.. 38054 38415 38241 38477 38318 38019 37947 37568 37368 37177 36836 36436
1976.. 36177 36045 36029 35929 35895 36122 36050 36169 36257 36290 36371 36720
1977.. 36928 37334 37675 37945 38303 38348 38522 38851 39231 39389 39663 40294

DEFENSE CAPITAL GOODS INDUSTRIES TOTAL INVENTORIES
(MILLIONS OF DOLLARS SEASONALLY ADJUSTED)


1968.. 6761 6745 6674 6838 6855 7092 6812 6996 7098 7072 7072 7212
1969.. 7365 7501 7631 7438 7433 7579 7793 7762 7753 7728 7654 7548
1970.. 7371 6979 6852 6638 b457 6237 6142 5917 5639 5269 5105 4856
1971.. 4630 4499 4442 4478 4371 3916 3832 3658 3770 3817 3854 3981
1972., 3936 3950 4004 3960 3948 3969 3956 4004 4022 4069 4076 4038
1973.. 4021 4036 4044 4329 4233 4273 4233 4257 4275 4245 4241 4297
1974.. 4365 4452 4531 4571 4631 4693 4789 4888 4924 4974 5000 5065
1975.. 5150 5228 5285 5388 5470 5620 5751 5782 5909 6002 6069 6131
1976.. 6095 6123 6276 6323 6355 6441 6459 6425 6440 6471 6557 6336
1977.. 6460 6423 6251 6226 6243 6317 6317 6350 6313 6157 6263 6383








APPENDIX B.--MANUFACTURERS' INVENTORIES, BY INDUSTRY GROUP AND STAGE OF FABRICATION:
END OF MONTH, 1958 TO 1977


YEAR JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC

INSTRU"ECTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS, TOTAL MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES
(MILLIONS OF DOLLARS WITHOUT SEASONAL ADJUSTMENT


1958.. 275 272 289 288 296 295 297 305 308 319 320 327
1959.. 322 324 327 334 339 342 342 346 331 337 340 347
1960.. 341 352 357 356 360 349 355 358 356 363 348 342
1961.. 337 336 330 330 332 329 332 333 327 332 345 370
1962.. 380 374 379 379 386 387 383 378 410 380 381 302
1963.. 366 365 368 369 374 383 385 385 375 388 386 379
1964.. 372. 372 375 374 374 377 374 371 368 376 380 389
1965.. 397 401 406 412 413 419 432 440 428 419 422 436
1966.. 427 442 451 461 478 512 524 553 554 569 572 599
1967.. 594 605 611 617 614 621 619 613 612 613 614 637
1968.. 633 643 638 632 645 640 652 653 653 658 684 689
1969.. 708 716 730 757 756 763 760 784 778 758 741 740
1970.. 742 759 794 792 815 804 815 825 817 808 799 830
1971.. 811 804 806 813 823 834 857 847 836 830 817 813
1972.. 820 846 866 889 912 907 955 959 942 943 954 967
1973.. 939 939 984 987 983 1018 1082 1105 1110 1123 1181 118o
1974.. 1261 1296 1321 1392 1433 1483 1579 1535 1586 1617 1605 1631
1975.. 1558 1552 1557 1582 1589 1572 1570 1606 1584 1586 1574 1606
1976.. 1630 1585 1592 1615 1629 1663 1671 1697 1681 1665 1654 1703
1977.. 1758 1644 1713 1745 1803 1753 1794 1802 1802 1803 1792 1759

INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS, TOTAL MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES
(MILLIONS OF DOLLARS SEASONALLY ADJUSTED)

1958.. 279 273 289 288 293 293 296 301 312 319 320 325
1959.. 326 325 327 333 33o 339 341 343 335 337 339 345
1960.. 345 353 356 356 356 346 352 354 3o0 363 347 341
1961.. 341 337 329 330 329 327 330 329 331 332 345 368
1962.. 384 376 378 379 384 383 379 373 413 380 381 362
1963.. 370 367 367 369 373 379 380 380 377 388 387 379
1964.. 376 373 375 374 373 373 368 366 370 377 383 389
1965.. 402 402 406 412 412 415 425 434 429 420 426 435
1966.. 432 443 452 461 477 508 514 545 554 572 580 598
1967.. 601 608 614 616 613 617 607 o03 610 617 624 636
1968.. 641 646 641 630 643 637 639 642 650 6o4 694 688
1969.. 717 720 734 754 753 760 743 771 774 766 752 739
1970.. 751 766 800 788 812 802 796 811 811 815 809 829
1971.. 821 815 814 809 821 833 837 832 831 835 824 810
1972.. 830 860 876 886 910 906 934 941 937 946 961 963
1973.. 948 954 997 986 982 1016 1060 1083 1104 1124 1189 1180
1974.. 1271 1321 1342 1391 1433 1481 1551 1503 1574 1615 1614 1621
1975.. 1568 1586 1587 1582 1590 1571 1545 1574 1569 1581 1580 1595
1976.. 1638 1620 1625 1617 1629 1662 1648 1661 1661 1658 1662 1694
1977.. 1765 1683 1751 1749 1800 1752 1773 1764 1780 1794 1805 1749





APPENDIX B.--MANUFACTURERSI INVENTORIES, BY INDUSTRY GROUP AND STAGE OF FABRICATION:
END OF MONTH, 1958 TO 1977--CONTINUED


YEAR JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC

INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS, TOTAL WORK-IN-PROCESS
(MILLIONS OF DOLLARS WITHOUT SEASONAL ADJUSTMENT


1958.. 53o 538 563 574 580 593 610 618 618 629 641 636
1959.. 645 653 650 662 657 658 649 654 660 662 677 697
1960.. 735 741 746 771 762 766 774 781 783 770 770 751
1961.. 774 769 778 779 778 787 776 771 772 775 767 730
1962.. 696 707 703 700 694 672 661 658 615 632 621 577
1963.. 594 607 608 614 623 614 620 626 628 625 622 614
1964.. 630 626 646 669 681 682 662 657 664 667 656 638
1965.. 030 661 673 681 704 711 698 714 718 721 728 732
1966.. 757 781 808 834 853 886 891 904 924 952 963 940
1967.. 946 959 980 992 1000 996 997 1013 1005 1030 1016 999
1968.. 954 979 988 1002 1010 1035 1034 1027 1019 1045 1027 1029
1969.. 10o6 1083 1085 1103 1114 1133 1146 1108 1095 1130 1104 1100
1970.. 1084 1127 1153 1238 1249 1255 1244 1233 1225 1197 1174 1147
1971.. 1151 1135 1138 1145 1148 1138 1119 1135 1134 1156 117o 1150
1972.. 1194 1189 1203 1228 1231 1212 1231 1247 1253 1263 1267 1257
1973.. 1259 1309 1338 1378 1405 1439 1412 1445 1450 1481 1503 1560
1974.. 1572 1598 1659 1683 1736 1786 1785 1793 1847 1855 1906 1915
1975.. 2013 2031 2034 2014 2013 2015 1949 1958 1859 1874 1879 1851
1976.. 1917 1946 1954 1953 1976 2022 2037 2050 2072 2126 2210 2147
1977.. 2158 2289 2291 2296 2273 2302 2374 2418 2457 2487 2511 2525

INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS, TOTAL WORK-IN-PROCESS
(MILLIONS OF DOLLARS SEASONALLY ADJUSTED)


1958.. 537 538 561 565 578 589 607 616 620 632 640 648
1959.. 648 655 648 651 654 653 047 o52 661 664 677 713
1960.. 738 743 744 760 750 758 770 778 783 769 771 770
1961.. 780 772 777 768 770 779 772 767 771 773 769 751
1962.. 704 711 702 692 685 663 657 653 o12 628 624 597
1963.. 603 612 608 607 612 604 616 622 624 620 625 636
1964.. 642 631 646 662 668 669 659 652 660 661 660 660
1965.. 643 667 673 674 691 696 694 709 715 714 733 756
1966.. 772 789 808 826 839 866 884 898 923 943 970 971
1967.. 965 969 982 982 984 972 989 1006 1005 1021 1023 1032
1968.. 972 988 990 989 992 1009 1026 1021 1022 1038 1033 1063
1969.. 1084 1094 1087 1088 1093 1106 1138 1104 1099 1125 1109 1135
1970.. 1099 1139 1155 1220 1224 1226 1237 1230 1230 1195 1181 1182
1971.. 1164 1147 1138 1128 1127 1112 1117 1133 1137 1158 1184 1182
1972.. 1203 1200 1200 1210 1210 1184 1230 1246 1258 1269 1277 1289
1973.. 1265 1314 1330 1361 1386 1407 1413 1445 1458 1493 1515 1596
1974.. 1576 1597 1647 1664 1720 1748 1787 1794 1858 1870 1923 1958
1975.. 2014 2024 2016 1995 2001 1975 1950 1964 1871 1887 1894 1891
1976.. 1918 1933 1934 1936 1908 1987 2035 2056 2084 2142 2226 2193
1977.. 2158 2272 2268 2279 2265 2267 2371 2425 2472 2508 2530 2578

INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS, TOTAL FINISHED GOODS
(MILLIONS OF DOLLARS WITHOUT SEASONAL ADJUSTMENT)


1958.. 256 266 278 292 301 306 292 288 282 285 289 300
1959.. 297 306 323 324 338 335 325 323 319 323 330 313
1960.. 307 316 329 336 350 358 354 348 347 342 343 356
1961.. 353 361 352 362 374 365 353 362 353 361 368 369
1962.. 372 382 379 386 391 408 400 396 374 379 381 386
1963.. 378 385 390 396 406 417 408 405 406 405 404 400
1964.. 401 415 415 419 430 427 422 419 416 414 425 424
1965.. 435 437 441 455 463 469 458 448 455 468 472 474
1966.. 598 501 508 526 545 548 553 5o2 569 574 582 577
1967.. 586 598 607 646 659 664 o02 651 646 648 655 636
1968.. 685 699 711 713 703 711 683 680 005 673 662 674
1969.. 673 710 739 745 746 780 757 75o 744 737 756 762
1970.. 792 813 849 859 890 903 895 870 8o3 871 851 838
1971.. 876 910 924 941 963 947 902 911 906 92o 935 955
1972.. 993 1035 1005 1010 1019 1002 967 938 925 949 917 883
1973.. 861 882 921 934 965 974 961 983 985 996 979 987
1974.. 1063 1114 1121 1176 1219 1246 1264 1243 1235 1228 1188 1234
1975.. 1297 1268 1249 1229 1237 1200 1190 1149 1254 1231 1227 1200
197o.. 1244 1250 1269 1319 1357 1321 1312 1296 1284 130o 1299 1333
1977.. 1339 1399 1391 1399 1468 1451 1411 1397 1365 1389 1367 1355

INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS, TOTAL FINISHED GOODS
(MILLIONS OF DOLLARS SEASONALLY ADJUSTED)


1958.. 264 270 275 287 288 293 289 288 288 290 295 303
1959.. 306 309 320 319 325 321 321 324 326 328 336 316
1960.. 315 319 327 331 336 343 349 348 354 348 348 361
1961.. 362 363 350 358 360 350 349 362 360 367 373 376
1962.. 381 384 377 382 377 391 395 395 380 384 387 396
1963.. 386 387 389 391 392 401 402 404 412 411 410 411
1964.. 408 416 414 413 416 410 416 418 422 420 432 437
1965.. 443 437 439 447 449 452 452 448 462 475 481 489
1966oo.. 505 501 505 514 528 529 555 5o3 579 584 595 598
1967.. 595 598 601 629 638 641 652 053 058 660 672 661
1968.. 695 697 700 o92 o79 087 673 o83 o80 686 680 703
1969.. 682 705 725 722 721 754 747 762 762 753 788 796
1970.. 8 80 806 831 833 859 874 884 877 883 888 876 876
1971.. 887 900 905 914 930 918 894 920 925 943 961 996
1972.. 1002 1024 988 983 985 972 960 347 943 964 943 920
1973.. 866 871 911 912 931 946 955 991 1002 1011 1006 1025
1974.. 1066 1103 1113 1151 1175 1212 1257 1254 1256 1247 1220 1279
1975.. 1297 1257 1245 1204 1193 1170 1183 1100 1276 1248 1257 1238
1976.. 1244 1240 1267 1297 1307 1289 1302 1306 1307 1323 1329 1378
1977.. 1338 1389 1391 1378 1411 1418 1399 1407 1390 1407 1399 1400









APPENDIX C.--MANUFACTURERS' NEW ORDERS, BY INDUSTRY GROUPS AND MONTHS; 1958 TO 1977


YEAR JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC

NON-DURABLE GOODS WITHOUT UNFILLED ORDERS-NEW ORDERS
WITHOUT SEASONAL ADJUSTMENT MILLIONS OF DOLLARS



1958 9774 10547 10282 10178 10180 10505 10166 10983 11166 11128 10708 10083
1959 10394 11165 11036 11083 10984 11073 10681 11341 11890 11780 11225 10608
1960 10926 11536 11453 11478 10900 11363 10871 11577 12166 12100 11376 10639
1961 10679 11705 11726 11383 11222 11507 11035 12014 12464 12591 11981 11212
1962 11465 12284 12287 12210 11907 12210 11666 12477 12926 12982 12606 11365
1963 11714 12852 12882 12767 12500 12877 12282 13016 13543 13471 12696 12384
1964 12534 13295 13328 13370 13265 13401 12837 13786 14258 14283 13503 12976
1965 13043 13854 14331 14330 14012 14311 13636 14474 14986 14909 14431 13760
1966 14097 15136 15502 15362 15068 15452 14534 15630 16111 15917 15181 14678
1967 14735 15951 16336 16174 15867 16184 15370 16373 16832 16812 16396 15523
1968 15466 16573 16808 16715 16798 17615 16640 17540 18121 18022 17293 16456
1969 16392 17551 17988 17861 17958 18697 17829 18671 19295 19354 18368 17444
1970 17677 18695 18989 18460 18377 19212 18022 19036 19558 19628 18471 17758
1971 18017 19569 19802 19745 19498 20506 19148 20131 20791 20651 20214 19344
1972 19623 20903 21505 21497 21326 22631 20781 22667 23680 23667 23579 22893
1973 22691 24851 25576 25032 24666 26023 24155 26165 26535 26812 26803 26536
1974 27391 29711 30853 30705 31123 32126 31172 33541 34456 34998 33510 30657
1975 30370 32563 32481 33258 32562 34426 33004 35622 36601 37025 35862 34209
1976 34634 37076 37844 38004 37264 38716 36366 38151 39777 39416 38717 37149
1977 37422 41018 42220 41482 40721 42317 39252 42217 43285 43266 42248 41441

NON-DURABLE GOODS WITHOUT UNFILLED ORDERS-NEW ORDERS
SEASONALLY ADJUSTED MILLIONS OF DOLLARS

"1958 10227 10237 10187 10178 10442 10462 10604 10708 10552 10545 10775 10755
1959 10876 10845 10916 11058 11262 11038 11157 11042 11236 11170 11291 11338
1960 11453 11216 11294 11438 11142 11305 11343 11282 11488 11478 11418 11318
1961 11202 11386 11547 11336 11460 11440 11522 11729 11783 11959 12011 11942
1962 12048 11980 12061 12126 12150 12141 12196 12197 12236 12351 12643 12081
1963 12336 12582 12616 12649 12714 12788 12832 12716 12824 12857 12751 13175
1964 13218 13066 13026 13258 13431 13276 13392 13490 13532 13691 13577 13785
1965 13765 13659 13983 14200 14137 14150 14212 14154 14237 14319 14531 14622
1966 14898 14965 15119 15219 15183 15210 15122 15303 15339 15329 15289 15566
1967 15559 15807 15945 16018 15968 15849 15946 16027 16045 16204 16501 16499
1968 16401 16468 16432 16598 16905 17168 17239 17193 17309 17405 17416 17481
1969 17377 17469 17601 17750 18038 18156 18442 18310 18456 18684 18463 18543
1970 18703 18601 18597 18338 18454 18611 18651 18668 18721 18967 18527 18865
1971 19129 19465 19389 19618 19613 19847 19858 19777 19941 19994 20244 20553
1972 20804 20749 21025 21313 21461 21935 21600 22219 22704 22864 23543 24291
1973 24097 24629 25036 24864 24825 25296 25156 25718 25482 25954 26772 27993
1974 29050 29373 30212 30395 31239 31292 32440 33049 33195 33996 33541 32251
1975 32201 32093 31729 32881 32652 33615 34349 35102 35259 25956 35885 36016
1976 36811 36609 37020 37520 37412 37838 37867 37559 38249 38262 38735 39067
1977 39752 40458 41332 40979 40895 41334 40845 41564 41586 42005 42271 43674













a new, expanded edition

of this important study


Social


Indicators


1976.


Eleven social areas are examined in
separate chapters of the report:


Population

The Family


Housing

Social Security
and Welfare
Health and
Nutrition
Public Safety


Education and
Training
Work
Income, Wealth,
and Expenditures

Culture, Leisure,
and Use of Time
Social Mobility
and Participation


In each area, the focus is on social indicators that
reflect the quality of our lives or our state of
well-being.
The introductory chapter provides an overview and
is illustrated with fifteen United States maps.


Each chapter features an introductory text, color-
ful charts, statistical tables and technical notes, with
references to further reading. Sources of all data are
clearly referenced to enable study in greater detail.
An index is provided at the end of the report.
(648 pp. at $7.00)

This report was written and compiled by the
Statistical Policy Division, Office of Management and
Budget, Executive Office of the President, and
prepared for publication by the Bureau of the Census,
U.S. Department of Commerce.


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