Current industrial reports

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Current industrial reports
Portion of title:
Manufacturers' shipments, inventories, and orders
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28-29 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census. -- Manufacturers' Shipments, Inventories, and Orders Branch
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, the Bureau of the Census :
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
March 1968
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly, with annual summary[1976-]
monthly[ former 1963-1975]
monthly
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Manufacturing industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Inventories -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
Additional Physical Form:
Some monthly issues also available via Internet from the Census Bureau website as: Highlights from the preliminary report on manufacturers' shipments, inventories, and orders. Address as of 12/17/03: http://www.census.gov/indicator/www/m3/prel/priorrel.htm; current access available via PURL.
Additional Physical Form:
Some annual summaries also available via Internet from the Census Bureau website. Address as of 12/8/2005: http://www.census.gov/prod/www/abs/m3-1.html; current access available via PURL.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 1963-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Some annual summaries issued in revised editions.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each annual summary cumulates previous issues for a period of prior years, i.e., annual summaries for <1976>-197 cumulate from 1958.
Issuing Body:
Prepared by: Bureau of the Census, Industry Division, Manufactures' Shipments, Inventories, and Orders Branch, 1963-1964; issued by: U.S. Department of Commerce, Economics and Statistics Administration, Bureau of the Census, <2000->
General Note:
Title from cover.
General Note:
Some issues not distributed to depository libraries in a tangible format.
General Note:
Paper copy no longer sold by Supt. of Docs., U.S.G.P.O.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: July 2002.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001320832
notis - AGH1708
oclc - 02548418
lccn - 74614399
issn - 0364-1880
Classification:
lcc - HD9724 .U52a
ddc - 380.1/0973
System ID:
AA00008477:00204

Related Items

Preceded by:
Industry survey
Preceded by:
Manufacturers' shipments, inventories, and orders

Full Text
3..sT15j:nf3^--1iC


Manufacturers' Shipments,
Inventories, and Orders


December 1976


CURRENT INDUSTRIAL REPORTS


FOR RELEASE: February 1, 1977 2:00 P.M.
William Menth
(301) 763-2502
(All figures in text below are in seasonally adjusted current


New orders of $106.2 billion were received by
manufacturers' during December, a rise of 4.5 percent
or $4.6 billion from the November figure of $101.6
billion, the Department of Commerce, Bureau of the
Census reported today. This rise was heavily influenced
by a rise in shipments of motor vehicles and parts,
where new orders are essentially equal to shipments.
This industry reported an 8.6 percent decline in ship-
ments in December prior to seasonal adjustment. This
is much less than the normal decline which has aver-
aged about 22.5 percent over the last five years. This
unusually small decline resulted in an increase in the
seasonally adjusted shipments from $8.0 billion in
November to $10.1 billion in December. This seasonally
adjusted increase accounted for more than 40 percent
of the total increase in new orders and more than half
of the increase in shipments.
New orders for durable goods rose 7.7 percent (re-
vised from the 6.6 percent previously reported) or
$4.0 billion to $56.7 billion. The December increase in
durable goods is the largest increase recorded during
1976 and is the fourth largest increase since 1970.
Larger increases were recorded in December 1970
(12.5 percent), May 1974 (7.9 percent), and July 1975
(7.8 percent). New orders for nondurable goods rose
1.1 percent or $0.6 billion to $49.6 billion.
When the transportation industries are excluded
from the durable goods total, new orders showed an
increase of 3.6 percent or $1.4 billion. Increases were
recorded in many industries including electrical ma-
chinery (6.9 percent or $0.4 billion), nonelectrical
machinery (2.7 percent or $0.3 billion), and fabricated
metals (5.1 percent or $0.3 billion). When the basic
industries are regrouped into the supplemental cate-
gories, nondefense capital goods industries showed
a 6.3 percent or $0.8 billion increase to $13.7 billion
and defense capital goods showed a 9.9 percent or $0.3
billion increase to $3.7 billion.
As in November, manufacturing shipments in
December showed the largest increases during the


SERIES: M3-l(76)-12


year while inventori li? ved the small ~ cases
during the year. Thl mber and D ...... il,.. i1.,
in shipments and ii ries diverge from the t rn
of inventory incre 2Pexceeding the shipmn n-
creases which prI.. .1 ril- most of 1976. ./
Shipments of all wi ctured produ' r 3.6
percent or S3.6 billion, i nts of
durable goods rose 6.8 P) on while
shipments of nondurable goo 49.3 billion,
virtually unchanged from the S49.1 billion reported
for November.
Based on the preliminary December data in this
report, annual shipments for 1976 for all manufactur-
ing industries were S1,183.4 billion or 13.0 percent
above the 1975 shipments of S 1.047.6 billion. Durable
goods shipments for the year totaled to S605.8 billion,
14.9 percent above 1975 shipments of $527.5 billion
and nondurable goods shipments were $577.6 billion
or 11.1 percent above the 1975 shipments of $520.1
billion.
Inventories held by manufacturers' were $167.2
billion virtually unchanged from the $167.1 billion
reported at the end of November. Inventories held
by durable goods manufacturers' rose $0.2 billion or
0.2 percent to $106.4 billion while inventories held
by nondurable goods manufacturers' declined by $0.2
billion or 0.3 percent. During 1976, inventories held by
all manufacturers' rose 7.4 percent or $11.5 billion
from the $155.7 billion reported at the end of 1975.
The backlog of unfilled orders for manufactured
products rose $2.0 billion or 1.2 percent from Novem-
ber to S175.6 billion. A rise of S1 .5 billion or 4.8 per-
cent in the defense capital goods industries accounted
for most of the increases.

SCHEDULED RELEASE DATES
The advance report on durable goods for January
is scheduled for release on February 22. 1977 and the
full report is scheduled for release on March 3, 1977.


U.S. Department of Commerce BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

Inquiries concerning these figures should be addressed to the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the
Census, Industry Division, Washington, D.C. 20233. For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publica-
tions), Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233 or any Department of Commerce District Office.
Price: 30 cents per copy, $3.60 per year.


1' -~






.41 \..... -











I I i: 11 ANU 1FA TT REKS' HIPEN~1 N VET NS, I ND N IDE, I I f li, B 1 DUSTIRY GN1 iOUIP

Millions nl dl.rs7

1]1.717[ot l tr1V7,7.1nt


Ind1711 try gN 1ouj



-~~ ~ ~ -. -- ----- ---

All m.uifcttiring 1


T't.l, xcl ding i ,:,-
T ,I t I. .. ... ...... rj

intbl. 1 ods i uslti i s, I ot l1. ,

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1L t a yl p d t 1 I 111 I I










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] nhna reav hinll 1y pd f-quipTti t }
l ton l t
i I lT k J l i..I I t l. .... I ,C




LEt h i a pt h ,ry tot i .

Eninst l I b ;',i s ....... 1,

n -IrT tlIon, nullxug,


1r 1,7771 it....

l,011 t mI hi.rt y, I,1 1... -,Q





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Ih hhl a' pl 1a t I. ......
RI., .an TV ................




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] t r v hli(los t I( p rt .... 1 ,)







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ill, 1117t li 2




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.. ....... ... .
t t ..... .......... ....... I T

i l + 1t ...............






11 0 1
.u t a I........................








ill 1, I + 1 p 1

ye!b :i l lis + ++

si ll' *f; + ': ++ "+I + ++. .


1 17 1 ly t, '


Nov. Oct


I ,28





,714

2,751


lilt I houit Ii 7t71


l i -I 1 lb<.
1i7 i 7 Ii


,1 l






47


550 I 58 589 a | 1
SO7 77 Q 8h0 77S





1,151 1,1 71777 1,17
- 7 f ,' o3 1 6 1
70 j ) 8 M2 7 t5
4 t, 45 5 484 S-52t
1 17581 1 711 l7, i5




, 10 2 ,4 TI | ',44 1 2, 0








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714 t(' 8 5 7S,


1..


71*
A57
1, 1+


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.7,
.7 1,


+ tI I y ....


i


110, I7l7






I I il


7,114








I .1 O7

,l ,4.


1.7,$

I ,I h/





I .1
0", 1)


_ 1-- 1 75


t+,7,h51




107,15




i 7 7 s


1,11 1, 8 1, 1. 1


S 2 '7 ]4
71 1, + 1 i7,1

57 7,*('717 ++
7(T,









:0, ,1

2S+ '+,)+ 08"


I,%/ 1 .> i;
1, '( 1,.




1'77 t I,' ++I

i7,0 77* ,.0


TT I ,.
] 111 I I ,1,>it, I ,.+ I :















III


Ilt a. ................ LI.,..
1,







1 /1ait turn.i -t'rl l mll J 82'-
Ot1 12




F a iaI t I I I .. t 7I .
\1a ch tn '-pt a l. tri, a alI


n t i i. ,lId t i I I. ... .. -, 1


ania, lanIdo taaal- l tna.d 70


E al-tri al aaI iin'r ta t l.. ("848





'Haallo VniV [ Il. ........... -2

--mun- t ion 2ipnunt..... 1,U5

Ian aportattala.an paaaralt


llat a I. mt I l aI' Ind
. : ... 3 97
tal t... .............. ..7.... 0,





IItndur lrn ls O nu l r tn 111 d 1,7
notal a I.... .. ....... 58


o d. rs. .. .. .... ...... ... .. 11,S





o . ........... .. ,7

R t s .r .t an.. P l. Prlimia, ry.


.. I a. ,a i N ,





10 ,619 99,702 w ; 100, 09



52,.11 51,018 A7 1 ,474 1,h J

,529 7 ,019 /,077 7 I

3,a 0 3,48 75, a 7

3,0.O 2,790 1,h31 .3,01I

8,803 2 a ,5, a,3'2 1


3,069

553


10,155


49,008



11 ,243

37.765


1,142 1 230
30 77 1
51 I '55
1,877 1,915


11,51


3, h24

702


10,242


48,b124



11,4724

37,200


12,718


3,381

728






47,354



11,172

30, 182


9,039

747

1,5I.5
711
735

6,221



1,114
823

1 462
1,09 (


12,b26


2,71

557


10,01 a


49,17h


11,571


, 9













S17



7.3

+,917


-' ( .
a 1, aS5 1

1 ,0 13

I0,00

,170.


17 17 2 1 17 17 70




1 9]h 1 I t), I )17 '19 7 1 1U)

I ,21 .. ], l 121 ,38I 1,20, 97 119,8


105 .711 I ah(7 1t,6,t 7 Ih5, ill 162,7

I 'i Il u4 1 5,7 a, 14,5

9. 9,h32 9,97 9,52 9,2V

2 a l 2 ,9 7 23, 170 1) 23,4

a,19 a, 7 23,170 a t.11 73,4


3.2 ,83 .914 43,0)75

la,292 l 1 920 T '>,35 1

.7 a3,0 Q 7 .,,319
2,937 .',09 2.,3 b 2,915


23,367 22,812 i22,t 78 23, 18'



0,015 5, 2 8, 21 3,977
295 abb 25
.84 524' 517 -ba
10,742 10,351 10, o20 10,7 10


52.773 51,717 51,043 53,017


34,089 33,25 1 13,0 7 34,958

10,230 9,967 10,06 10,057


.190 17 1 .171 90


I a l 12

ab, 3!
2>, a5 2
6.JM



2, a'




5,613
225
.95
al. 5


li,0 5 33,336

,925 9,739


,O. I 7,914


7b06 7.517



7,ht0a 7,517
61


'AdJusted f, r t .aling-day ani al'nda.


25

26

19

54

90

93


S i 1. --\ll, I IM 1'S/ \ i '[I 'j FL *' i P', l N I IN 1VN'h HI ,


M M N, ., 1`I1 [111 li P I


iiiii l i il


onith va rations.











T.l',1 2.-- U1V E IF M N MANI iA't li.I SllH I PMII'NIS, INVI:N ITIl 1. AN OI DEM iS. I-IM MARKI A 'A TXOK IES AND i IPLIENIAlitY S:RII:S






Sv. I>., l e ) ec. N v. I ,. ( I *d





-nu clun' iK n iri t Lt t,,t.... 104 ,190 100,567 97,653 97,301 100,678 87,124 1 7, 153 l7,11, 166,7. 17,6 7.51 1bb,528 155,825

S d tr t .......... 5.,902 51,4.27 9,27 50,0b6 51, 0 -3,213 10 ,30 1056,12i 105,59 1,1 l3 105 193 91,85



Slivi ur an ri by 01.irl


ii,,, -,r and ,Ilpl l ... ..............
,a ts t, 1 .... .. ..........

,l lf l i ... .. .. .. ... ... ...

li pr/ont.....................
{ ,1 l t~ l l r ialls, .lppl i, ,. ilnd
i n t tI'- 3 Itl -t p p I. .


n f -1t ot pr dtct ...... .. .......


8,4791 8,431 ,: 111a 7,37'9
18,209 18,268 18,27( 18,1031

14,245 14.004 13,,80 14,051
11,7441 9,6 035 8,01. 9,50.,

8,929 8,505 B.431 8,01 ,

42,584 | 41,75 40.,958 40,451


8,712
18,6121

13,540
10, 168

8,34

41.294


6,898 1-,101
17.132 23,0521

12,79' 19,049
9,860jl ,99)

6,9701 14,0t,4

3t,528 t17,891 7


14-, 143. 1 ,377
23,367 23 4o),

38,94- 38,875
8,993: 8,92

13,983 I 13,884

o7,685 67.-J80.


13,859 13,7b3
23,94 .'3, 838

38,961 3 ,75.
9,055 ,'05

13,944 13 ,7093

68,338 (7,405


12,774
22,13,

)8,262
7,929

1 .198

1. 27


3,311 3,263 3,202 3,055 3, 2 ,8 '99 7,001 6,996 7,059 ,933 6.9.45 6,509
*............. 15,901 15,639 15.09 15,795 15,402 14,296 -3,353 43,124 42,942 43,27B .3,039 .42077
1 13,691 13,350 13,320 13,504 13,198 12,1 9 36,418 36,277 3 ,095 16,315j I6,133 15,672
2210 2,2899 2,,2891 29 2,291 2,204 2,107 6,935 ,8.47 ,8L,47 ,L 9t 6-.405
INv ,, r I I 11
i .. .. 1 .. .. -- T -1 l I1 1 .. .. .


All ..nul. in.. I I. 1 tg l .. 106,223 101,619 99,702 98,828 00,809 85,857 175,639 173,605 172.553 17 ,404 17 2,917

Duratle >d w i. .trx .. t, t 1 ... ...... 52,1 11 51,07 [ 51,474 51.,33 42,02t', 17,551 165,791 1l4,607 11,6 687 165 511
N m urilil nd1istr.. t .* 1 .. ..... 49,008 48,024 47,354i 49,1760 433,831 8,088 7,814 7.9411 ,717 7,006



Ind p.irel ...... ...... 8,436 8,433 8,289 7,217 8,615 6,813
S .il ........... .......... 18,207 18,24.5 18,248 18,108 18,613 17,13 5,2 7 3,303 3,32-. ,01 0 .243

.. ...... 15, 600 14 ,27 15 40 15 236 13 2 11,779 101,.0, 99,984., 01,s 100,052
A t. .. ,.. l| ....... .. ......... I 011,809 9,928 8,03, 9,4 81,6 10,224 7 .000 0

lilt ll. Ir dl s .............. ..... 9,123 8,721 8,435 8,138 8,342 ,899 18,030 17,836 17,620 17 ,79 17.75E

n > l t p, l u ......... ... ..... 43,0,8 .2,319 41,288 40,61 41,787 3 ,224 52 94 52 ,482 51,20 s52,0 5. 1,8tf


,u.'h duirbl i s, ts ...... 3,254 3,284 ,379 2,903 3,202 2,832 2,593 2, 50 .29 2 ,.4 2,577
.p l l ri........ ....... 17 .03 1, ,251 17,288 1 ,875 15,-49 | 12,704 110,399 08 95 10 283 110 105 10 .11.
.>n ,]... ........... ..... ... 13.695 1 2878 14,302 13,135 12,.41 10,79 77,931 '7.925 8. 7. 7 .17
......... .. 3708 ,37 2,986 3,740 2,855 2,02 -,.4,8 30,970 2 0. ,977
'1 9? t. 10


I ltl-, ... I r i I I In.-I III. r I I 11 '

I Ill .


lous ehid tlnrblc goalls lth s g.i-h ld fur1-- ,1 kit- t -It, -1,d


170,243


7,517




1 ,0.'.
'1 04





19,025


.2,.5.,


10S.271
29, IS _

20 -


All In


N nnUr: CI


Suppl ,easn irv ,
*l*tl 1.h1d utrlbl(, Voods Hid
(" itp al guefds lioolu ltrit ...













.,ble 3,---AiLM t NCI T it S' S11I'MiNl INV liN\ t !I AMI) ORiU .kS N) lit-H i-.tl) i %\NI [(i0M, I I lI't Rt \

it. ,, l II ind-tt I gr Iup,


Nov.- o 5t.- Sppt.- 1ntotht-]ih l,: 9h

1 175-
f1976 l 7b' !1 76 n Mar 7 h- 7 Dec. 1975
|I c. 1'176 Sept. 1)7b Jun 1976 Dec. 197h


Sh. +3.6 3.0
111 it i ti, ttu r: l ,ndu tin +3.6 +3.0


-1.1 +1.8 -0.1 +0.4 41.0

-1.6 + .1' -0. i +0.1 +1.4
-0.7 4 0.4 +) +0.6 +0.6


DT, rabl, d indu til s, t .l......
Nim bl rbtllt I >ls lt n l tritI t, til .....

Total 111% rl )lor + :

N I hnr u t~l tl rtttl .........


NI Itllaitlnr tfit itl duntl i .
Durable 114 d 11t1 -trxt tot+l
Nonfur.+ble go 1. I ruildustries, total .....

Dll t u aroKo d :xtolustr-w t..tal.... ....


+6.8 +4.4
+0.3 +1.6


0.0


+4.5
+7.7
+1.1


+1.1


+0.3


+1.9
+3.0
+0.8


+0.7


+1.0 i +0.4 +0.8 +0.8


+0.8 +2.4 -0.2 +0.3
+2.0 +4.2 -0.8 +0.1
-0.4 +0.5 +0.4 + + 0.6


+1.1 +1.0 -0.2 +0.


+0.6 +1.0 | -0.3


+1.2 +1.7 1 -1.7
+1.8 +2.4 -2.6
+0.7 +1.7 -1.0


+0.2 +1.6 -1.0


Ttbl, 1 1.--VA11E OF .ANUF TAC'I'RERSI' TNVEN'TI)RlI+ BY STAGE Oi FABRICATION, iHY INDUSITY ( ROUP

1Mill os *"f dol lars


Seasonallv .,liuted "IthOut .. onal


Dec. I Nov. Oct. Dec. Nov. Dec.
1976p 1976' 1976 1976p 1976" 1975

T tal


167,153 167,114

106,360 106,128


Stn, clay. 1d pr..dui t ...... I 4,122 4,130
Pr im ry metal .................... ..... 17,209 17,178
Machinery ele trin l and nnloncItrical 18,141 37,854
Tan 11orlat- n iuto' ntl.................. 1,949 20,046
Al1 other durable ("o-s ntl-t i- s....... 26,939 26,920
Nonduirablc 1 s industry tt l ...... ... 60,793 60,980

ChtIlau ls ind ai ll prdii ts ............ 13,011 13,088
Pet ulr-ulsi it and c ,l pr du1 t i............. 5,154 5,053
Rubber and pla.st c-a products, n .e..<...... 3,887 3,855
All nther n-ndural,- gods 3ndustri-s .... 38,741 38,990


166,674

105,589
4,092
17,113
37,846
19,823
26,715
61,085

13,040
5,058
3,763
39,224


167,851

106,153
4.043
17,373
38,014
20,068
26,655
61,698
13.205
5.147
3,935
19,411


166,528 155,825
105,193 99,853

3,944 3,776
17,002 15,652
37,489 36,177
20,261 19,024
26,497 25,224
61,335 55,972

12.962 11,876
5,143 4,518
3,79b 3,689
39,434 35,889


Work in proe


All nanufaturng industries, total.. 1 52,357
Durable goods induutrilst ttl ........... 43,123

Sttn,, clay. .lnd glis products.......... 610
Pr imary r tals.......................... 5,864
Mi 1iry el< Tr1.il and nn'lectrical 16,343
ranspr t t .on .equ ipm.nt ................. 12,200
All <11h r durable It Industrl es. ..... 8,106

Nndurable 91ods n1 ustries, total ........ 9,234

Chemicals and allied products .......... 2,124
P.tr loum and c- al pr, "iucts .............. 1,167
Rubber -nd plast cs products. n.c.c...... 681
All other n-niurable gods ies... 5,262


lRo%,1s od.


52,176

43,005
640
5,967
16,112
12,160


9,171
2,169
1,158
706
5,138


51,900
42,742

573
5,779
16,257
12,165
7,968

9,158
2,114
1,160
687
5,197


52,047
42,854

588
5,74`1
16,121
12,290
8,106

9,193

2.137
1,156
695
5,205


49,021

40,898
489
5,145
15,603
11,903
7,753

8,123
1,872
1,024
574
4,653


Seasoal I 11d i'ted


.11 II ii J1


Dec. Nov. Oct. Ic. Nov. Dec.
1976p 1976r 1' 7 197' 19761 1975

1tati-Il 1s Ii iutpl I


60,768

34,790
1,361
8,006
10,573
5,0092
9,758
25,978
5,374
1,847
1,621
17,136



54.,028
28,447

2,151
3,339
11,225
2,657
9,075

25,581
5,5131
2,140
1,585
16,343


61,163 61,927 61,912

35,320 35,047 35,368
1,360 1,358i 1,367
7,864 7,907 8,229
11,013 10,872 10.618
5,264. 5.164 5,267
4,819 9,74,6 9,887
25,843| 26,880 26,544

5,256 5,083 5,364
1,808 1,756 1,795
1,32' 1,597 1,642
17,147 18,444 17,743



53,775 53,59 T54039-
27,803 27,915!28,043
2,130 2,097: 2,103
3,347 3,3781 3,165
10,729 11,045|11,139
2,622 2,4961 2,636
8,975 8,899 8,800

25,972 25,681 25,996
5,663 5,805! 5.727
2,087 2,198 2,192
1,517 1,462 1,606
16,705 16,216 16,471


61,168

35,323
1,343
8,008
10,788

9,816

25,845

5,205
1,774
1,607
17,259



53,.313
27,016
2,013
3,245
10,580
2,i603
8,575

26,297

5,620
2,213
1,494
16,970


57,105

33,614
1,371
7,418
10,662
4,907
9,256
23,491
4,965
1,320
1,340
15,866



49,698

25,339

1,916
3,089
9,911
2,208
8,215

24,359
5,039
2,174
1,775
15,371


Ai. I 1970-1975



II I[


inldust ry gr up






All l rl.' ulattur iit stl tot .
Durable g -ds indu- tv s, totil .............


I I I I ) I I 1 I I













*abl, 5.--oR11) OF MLiUFAC'I'REIS' INVENTORIES TPO SHIPMENTS ANID UNFILLED ORDERS mT SHI IIENS, Is INDUSTRY (FOUP
'B, crl -n so s,,sna Illy ad lust ,d daIla


I A ii, I l o I o n oIn t i ............

N ii I n t Iid i o I ......



N i i tr t ............. ..............

N e l* : a,,,id n l / .' ., ... .. ... .. . .



i i l i. Au t ......... ................. .. .
pr ul,.. ....... ......... .. ....
.... / ..h ............. Ii t2.... .. .. .. i 1 2.. .
t 1, "1 I' d 1, or ,dt ol pr flltk l ............. ................. .

11-eld 1 1 -1, 1 p.,. .t .......................... .....
] 1, : 1" i- o,,t3 I Il Jt "Al,f,d .....tc ........................ .. .
oodi ,I I "I i sii is ] 1. ... ..... .



N\ 1 al t.tbl o PPr y 1Itnn y, It n i I
Exchinles tinh follinnn industini .s innthi njo unt l Id orti It
motor ninclnIs i tnibly operationsn im.s and rit latn d prin tt
p ro tI aind rubber and plastics products, n.e.c.


1.23 1.24
1.07 1 ..O
4.56 5.67
l.i I 1.65
1.22 1.27
1.50 1.48
0.70 0.71
1.36 1.37


2,14

1.61
2.38
2.07
2.77
2.37
1.75
2.12

1.21
1.02
4.80
1.55
1. 17
1.46
0.73


Nt applio al- .
Wood and lunber pt ducts lass containers; metal cant, barrio l and druis
Stobacco, apparel andI related products; chemicals petroleu and ii al









Appendix


The following is a description of the survey and
definitions used. These are provided to clarify the
meaning of the items involved and do not represent
any revisions from those definitionspreviously employ-
ed.

DESCRIPTION OF SURVEY

The Manufacturers' Shipments. Inventories, and
Orders survey provides monthly fiire- that are com-
parable to the annual totals published each year in the
Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM). The ASM is
based on a sample of approximately 60,000 manu-
facturing establishments drawn from the 5-year census
universe of about 310,000 establishments. In the ASM,
each manufacturing establishment provides data on
employment, payrolls, shipments, cost of materials.
capital expenditures, and inventories as well as other
selected items. The establishments do not provide
information on unfilled orders or new orders. Since the
ASM is establishment based, it provides data for each
of the 425 manufacturing industries in the Standard
Industrial Classification System (SIC) and area data for
industry groups.

The monthly survey M3-1 does not provide infor-
mation at the complete SIC industry detail because of
the smaller size of the reporting panel and the fact that
most companies cannot provide shipments, inventories,
and orders data monthly for individual establishments.

fhe monthly reporting panel consists of approxi-
mately 5,000 reporting units and includes virtually all
companies with 1,000 or more employees and a sample
of the smaller ones. The reporting unit typically
comprises the entire operations of a company although
many of the larger diversified companies file separate
divisional type reports for their operations in different
industries.


Most of the reporting units include mixed industry
activity even within the broad industry categories of
the monitrl', survey. The survey mit'ili,,.hl.:. assumes
that the month-to-month changes of the reporting
units classified in each industry category represent
effectively the month-to-month movements of the
establishments in the SIC industries which make up the
category. Thus, the monthly reports are used to update
thi ASM estimates by using a link relative of matched
companies in each industry.

EXPLANATION OF TERMS

Value of Shipments- Shipments in the monthly
survey are equivalent to value of shipments as reported


in the ASM which are received or receivable net selling
values, f.o.b. plant, after discounts and allowances and
excluding freight charges and excise taxes. Included in
shipments are the value of all products sold, transferred
to other plants of the same company, or shipped on
consignment.

Shipments also include receipts of establishments in
the industry for contract work performed for others.
resales, receipts for miscellaneous activities such as the
sale of scrap and refuse; value of installation and repair
work performed by i,,l..'.,... of the plant and value
of research and development performed at the plant. In
the aircraft industry and lIil|'t-',ilhi.:. the value of
work done in a given year varies considerably from the
value of shipments because of the long lead time
between the input of the materials and labor and the
shipments of the completed aircraft or ship. In the
annual survey, l,,.'.if,.ri. the value of work done
during the year is requested rather than the value of
shipments.

The value of shipments figures developed from the
ASM contain duplication at the all manufacturing and
industry group levels since the products of some
industries are used as materials by other industries
within the industry group. With the exception of
motor vehicles, it is not significant at the 4-digit SIC
group level. Since the M3-1 industry categories
typically are groupings of industries, this duplication is
significant for the all manu facturing, durable goods and
nondurable goods categories and the various market
groups. The significance of the duplication within the
specific M3-1 industry groups varies depending on the
4-digit industry composition of these groups. It is most
pronounced in a few highly integrated industry areas
such as primary metals and motor vehicles and parts.

Since most monthly reports are for the entire
company or major divisions rather than establishments.
the companies are requested to report net sales, i.e ,
total company billings after discounts and allowances.
Companies which file divisional reports are requested
to treat transfers from one division of the company to
another as if they were net sales to outside customers.
Although this definition of shipments in the monthly
reports differs from that used in the annual establish-
ment reports, it is assumed that thie month-to-month
changes in company sales in the industry are represen-
tative of the month-to-month shipments of the estab-
lishments in the industry.

Inventories- End-of-month inventories in the
monthly survey are identical in definition to the
end-of-year inventories in the ASM. In the ASM,
respondents are asked to report inventories of indivi-
dual establishments at approximate current cost if







3 1262 08589 4896


feasible; otherwise, "at book values." Since different
methods of inventory valuation are used (LIFO, FIFO,
etc.), the definition of the ..i er'.,h. inventories for
establishments in an industry is not precise. The figures
on the change in inventories from one period to the
next are of greater significance than the actual aggre-
gates.

Inventories are reported by stage of fabrication: (a)
finished goods: (b) work in process; and (c) materials,
supplies, fuel, and other inventories. In using in-
ventories by stage of fabrication at the all manu-
facturing and 2-digit industry levels as well as for the
durable and nondurable goods sectors, it should be
noted that a finished product of one industry may be a
raw material for another industry at the next stage of
fabrication. Insofar as the durable and nondurable
goods sectors and also the 2-digit industry groups
contain industries with successive stages of processing,
the same type of commodity may be included under
different inventory categories in the aggregate sta-
tistics.


New Orders Received and Unfilled Orders-Orders
as reported in the monthly survey are net of cancella-
tions during the month. They include orders received
during the period and also filled during the period as
well as those orders received for future delivery. They


also include the net sales value of contract change
documents which increase or decrease the sales value of
the unfilled orders to which they relate. Orders include
only those supported by binding legal documents such
as signed contracts, or letter contracts. In case of letter
contracts the full amount of the sales value is included
if the parties are in substantial agreement on the
amount; 'tlihcr, e. only the funds specifically author-
ized to be expended are included. The respondent is
instructed to deduct the sales value of partial or
complete cancellation of existing orders.

Un'r,iled orders include orders as defined above that
have not yet passed through the sales account.
Generally, unfilled orders at the end of the reporting
period are equal to unfilled orders at the beginning of
the period plus net new orders received less net sales.

While both new orders and unfilled orders are used
in reviewing individual company reports for consis-
tency, only unfilled orders are estimated directly in the
tabulated totals. New orders are derived from the
shipments plus net change in unfilled orders for each
industry category. This procedure is followed for
seasonally adjusted data as well as for the unadjusted
data. Shipments and unfilled orders are seasonally
adjusted independently. Seasonally adjusted new
orders are derived from seasonally djdiuted shipments
and seasonally adjusted unfilled orders.