Current industrial reports

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Material Information

Title:
Current industrial reports
Portion of title:
Manufacturers' shipments, inventories, and orders
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28-29 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census. -- Manufacturers' Shipments, Inventories, and Orders Branch
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, the Bureau of the Census :
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
March 1968
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly, with annual summary[1976-]
monthly[ former 1963-1975]
monthly
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Manufacturing industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Inventories -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
Additional Physical Form:
Some monthly issues also available via Internet from the Census Bureau website as: Highlights from the preliminary report on manufacturers' shipments, inventories, and orders. Address as of 12/17/03: http://www.census.gov/indicator/www/m3/prel/priorrel.htm; current access available via PURL.
Additional Physical Form:
Some annual summaries also available via Internet from the Census Bureau website. Address as of 12/8/2005: http://www.census.gov/prod/www/abs/m3-1.html; current access available via PURL.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 1963-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Some annual summaries issued in revised editions.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each annual summary cumulates previous issues for a period of prior years, i.e., annual summaries for <1976>-197 cumulate from 1958.
Issuing Body:
Prepared by: Bureau of the Census, Industry Division, Manufactures' Shipments, Inventories, and Orders Branch, 1963-1964; issued by: U.S. Department of Commerce, Economics and Statistics Administration, Bureau of the Census, <2000->
General Note:
Title from cover.
General Note:
Some issues not distributed to depository libraries in a tangible format.
General Note:
Paper copy no longer sold by Supt. of Docs., U.S.G.P.O.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: July 2002.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001320832
notis - AGH1708
oclc - 02548418
lccn - 74614399
issn - 0364-1880
Classification:
lcc - HD9724 .U52a
ddc - 380.1/0973
System ID:
AA00008477:00170

Related Items

Preceded by:
Industry survey
Preceded by:
Manufacturers' shipments, inventories, and orders

Full Text
c 3.158 :/13- 1 )77-5

CURRENT INDUSTRIAL REPORTS

Manufacturers, Shipments,

IV^ Inventories, and Orders

'*.* May 1977
U.S. Department of Commerce For Release June 30, 1977 2:00 P.M.
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS Series: M3-1(77)-5

All figures in text below are in seasonally adjusted current dollars.


Manufacturers' shipments in May were virtually unchanged at
$109.6 billion as a $0.5 billion decrease in shipments of nondur-
able goods offset a $0.4 billion increase in shipments of durable
goods, the Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census
reported today. Inventories held by both durable and nondur-
able goods producers showed the largest increases in over 2
years. The inventory rise, 1 percent or $2.1 billion to $172.8
billion for all manufacturing industries, was most pronounced in
finished goods ($1.1 billion or 2 percent) and materials and
supplies ($0.8 billion or 1 percent). New orders for manu-
facturered products, virtually unchanged from April at $111.6
billion, exceeded shipments by $2.1 billion and resulted in the
ninth consecutive increase in the backlog of orders.
Durable goods shipments rose by $0.4 billion or less than 1
percent to $57.1 billion as increases in steel mill shipments
($0.4 billion or 10 percent) and aircraft and parts ($0.4 billion
or 18 percent) offset declines in motor vehicles and parts ($0.2
billion or 2 percent) and fabricated metals ($0.1 billion or 2
percent). New orders for durable goods rose $0.7 billion or 1
percent to $59.4 billion (revised from $59.1 billion). Orders for
steel mill products rose $1.4 billion or 36 percent and offset
declines in aircraft and parts ($0.8 billion or 19 percent) and
motor vehicles ($0.4 billion or 4 percent). Virtually all of the
increase in the steel orders is due to seasonal adjustment, which
is based on the historical pattern of the industry. Both electrical
and nonelectrical machinery orders also rose in May.
Several industries contributed to the $1.0 billion or 1 percent
rise in durable goods inventories to $109.2 billion. Electrical
and nonelectrical machinery showed a $0.4 billion or 1 percent
rise to $39.6 billion with the increase being equally shared be-
tween materials and supplies and finished goods. Motor vehicle
and parts producers reported a $0.2 billion or 3 percent in-
crease, mostly in materials and supplies. Primary metals pro-
ducers recorded a $0.2 billion or 1 percent increase to $17.6
billion with over three-fourths of the increase in finished goods.
Nondurable goods shipments declined $0.5 billion or 1 per-
cent to $52.4 billion, the largest in 9 months. Although de-
creases occurred in several industries, the decline in foods ($0.6
billion or 4 percent) and in chemicals ($0.2 billion or 3 percent)
were the major contributors to the overall shipments decline.
Since shipments were used as an estimate of new orders in many
of the nondurable goods industries, the declines in shipments


had a significant impact on the new orders for all manufacturing
industries.
Virtually all of the nondurable industries contributed to the
$1.0 billion or 1 percent inventory rise to $63.6 billion. Inven-
tories held by food producers were $16.9 billion, $0.3 billion or
2 percent above April and inventories held by petroleum pro-
ducers rose $0.3 billion or 5 percent to $5.5 billion. Both in-
creases were predominantly in finished goods. The inventories
of chemical producers increased $0.2 billion or 1 percent to
$13.2 billion wit mately equal increases in all in-
ventory compo Sl v.
New orda ined $0.2 billion or 1 per-
cent to $1 b tlfon. Orders f o. fense capital goods were
unchanged April at $14.9 b while orders for defense
capital g declined $0.2 billion percent to $3.4 billion.
Shipmen 3 the capital goods ind s rose $0.3 billion or 2
percent, os ly in defense, and t ilcklog of capital goods
orders ro $1. billion or 1 perce 113.0 billion.

eSE DATES

The figures on t le goods industries in this report
supersede those issued earlier in the advance report on durable
goods. The present report is based on more complete reporting,
but the estimates are also considered preliminary. Final figures
will appear as historical data in the report to be published for
next month. The advance report on durable goods for May is
scheduled for release on July 22, 1977 and the full report is
scheduled for release on August 2, 1977.
This report contains data on an unadjusted and seasonally
adjusted basis. However, the data are not adjusted for price
changes. For an explanation of terms used in this report see
appendix following table 5.

NOTICE

A supplemental table is included at the end of this report
that shows the distribution of inventory accounting methods
used for reporting in this survey. A description of the survey
used to collect this information is provided in the text pre-
ceeding the table.


Address inquiries concerning these figures to U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Industry Division, Washington, D.C. 20233, or
call William Month, (301) 763-2502.
For sale by the Subscriber Services Section (Publications), Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233, or any U.S. Department of Commerce
district office. Postage stamps not acceptable; currency submitted at sender's risk. Remittances from foreign countries must be by international money
order or by a draft on a U.S. bank. Price 30 cents per copy, $3.60 per year.










Tabl 1.--VALUE OF MANUFACTURERS' SHIPMENTS, INVENTORIES, AND ORDERS, BY INDUSTRY GROUP

'Millions of dollars)


ent


Industry group





All "manufacturing Ind-
tries:
Total. ..........
Total, excluding tri-
p'it ation... ... .. j
I..al for industrels-
with imfilled ordesi'.,

Durable goods industries I l.

Durable g is vith urn1fli-
orders; ........... ..... ....

Stone, clay, and glas produ t,.




r ar et tot 1.... .....

t rie.1 c 1 pro :
t ...... ....
etal rels, and
dru ..........

"'achnery, x ei cti .il,
tot l. ....... ... .. ,,,
Englnes l .bl-o ........

St-,ouct r r,.
m tertal h. 9 C quirt t i
'etu ork "A hner .
Gines 1 L *aahinry v

Electrical 1- tervn, to
EleCtrical t .nami.slon ,
dlitribiio ',qu ipment e indhrstrlal ;;ppratuj ...... .
Hou o p lG ..... .
dIf In TV ...... ..
fomr I or 1 nt it....

Transportation ;e, tt
Aot r t ell t. .....
pa
Shlpblldi 5g aid mlIt.y
ta. veh 1 ..... ...

In t rur Snts and < ', d i
pra ts, total. ...........
t lent, f'i and esg 5n'ari at .
Pootosr'^ hlc ooo ... .. .....

All ot-er lodurable I
industry ..... .......

Nondurble god1 1 ndus riew,
total ......... ... ............

Nondureole good th .t it t'
orders. ............. ........

Fosd and k r ,I p x
Sa ...... ... .........




lest le mill p t .......

r nd allid al prli t
ttl..... ..............
PuIp, paper, etc............
Srb0,.ard on nrI ....
A1ll ..tr paper eo, ntain

tl{iomai. nd allimed produ
otal.... .... ... ........
idustritai chemaclsl, ec,s p,
piga nt ..... ... ........
Druog,, soap, .. tai l~trra.|

P atroleua and al prtdu-ts..
Rubber and plastt 1c tdwta,

Ail er nondurabl0, g. dn
ind tries ......... ..
See footnote. Pt rnd of ts Il,


Shipm

,00 oil lv aite


109,.4/

9*,021

56,671

') 094


44,995

2, 54

8,427
4,368

3,175


7,2 6

656


10,161
828
934


1,867
546
877

'578


1,'07
827
492
1,713

13,452
9,139

2,930
51


An C
1977




109,553

98,286

56,156

56,677


44,386

2,842

7,987
3,95

3,177


7,J70

629


10,120
932
66 j

1,771
5t5
823

b,635


1,283
S05
a442
1,773

13,267
9,338

2,484




2,323
1,357
777


52,37 52,876


116,,6 1.770


15,16-

1 ,5 9

710




*,657
2,05
1,086
1, 1.


15,778
3, 904
1,574

728
3,591


Mar.
1977




111,443

97,030

57,459

59,051


45,92E

2,989

8,534
4,266

3,387


7,707

707


10,110
913
256

1, '9
559
942

6,643


1,282
850
-67
1, 26

14,407
10,126

2,731

64.


2,344
1,367
'85


6,317


52,392


11,536


15, 5
3.80


738
.11,


9, *o' 7,716 1 7 61


I


5,737 45,449

2,986 2,90

8,66(i 8,552
4, 4,282

i-) .358


,391 j 7 .496

06 625


1,891
-



562
397




1,336

-.01
1,722

1-.,261
9,780

2,925

606


2, 306
1,391



6,282


10, 8
911



560
83-

6,601


1,J308
849
379
1,824

13,806
9,681

2,519

,14


2,271
1,365
730


47,163

2,943

8,847
4,539

3,390


10,910
1,060
1,087

6.0
642


6,813


1,3,6
917
447
1,856

14,773
10,360

2,792

639


2,372
1,402
769


52,004 53,071 53,651


11,510 !1,682 11,677


14.939 15,429 15,797
,940 3,806 3,798
1,514 1,570 ,<0

,72 69I 7,14
3,53 1,5,.3 3,b59


-:311
2,065
1,094
l,472




1.223

1,991



1,081

7,-52|


4,683
2,072
1,090
1,521


10,069

3,3-3
2.228


3,140


s Total inventories


Seasonally adj


May Apr.
1977P 1977




172,809 170, 747

152,940 151,153


without seasonal


Apr- Mar.
1977 1977




110,726 111,27 114,39

96,465 97,621 99,566

5 ,247 7,1,31 58,840

5,722 38 35 60,688


113,355


tLusted


Mar.
197




169, .79



112.75-4


109,22t 108,190 107,(>85


100,138 99,030 98,591

4,257 4,193 4,142

17,567 17,332 17,323
10,434 10,266 10,232

6,152 6.,S8 6,101


11 408 13,132 13,.it5

1,273 1,305 1,275


24,505 I 24,476 24,417
2,'09 2,073 2,005
2,355 2,321 9 .299


.,'i37 1,611 !, <9





3,044 2,996 2,978
1,760 1,710 1,59
7931 05
4,06 4 ,

19,869 19,59 1.9,428
6,603 6,476 6.548

10,511 10,333 10, 1i

1,373 1,2.2 1,218


,,761, 4,721 <,728
2,Q78 2.961 2,958
1,317 1,280 ,273


9,770 9,801 9,735


3,5 83 62,557


14,429 14,325


la,d7 !6,530
1,399 2 1,36
2.158 2.08,

1,171 3.549



3.532 i,439
2,100 2,002
1,-66 1,446


13, 01


3,8036

1.915

3.252

4.01


t
:.00-a




1, 42


t,552
10,2b9


1.1
1.,308 V1:8
1,995 2 ,i 1;
3 ,484 1 3 .1.'

5,368 5,.


5,352 5.v82
2,097 8 ,119
1.407 l, i7
1,898 ;,98(


*2,962

J.752I
3,800

5,15o

1,0? |

9,163


3,030 3,00
1,715 1,623
805 782
4,495 -.98

19,601 1630
6,438 587

10.386 10,2

1,27 1.2. 8


4,757 21

1.298I 1,262


9,837 I 9,773


*.(>;' 16,085

2,1v3| .l.l









,'.638 .o 21
*,50 2,453


0.4108 ..0
2.093) [ ;.>71
1.45O I) .,.03
1,925 ;.<'6


:.l. !38 | 13,204

3,822 l.?98
3,942 1,853

i,198 5.012



9.316J 9.141


Without seasonal
adjustment'1

May Ape, ,ar.,
1977 1977r a977




173,274 171,886 170, l18

153,634 152,285 151,188

11 5,476 14,366 113,593

1'0,02 10, 28 108,726


100,807 99,925 99,398

,35b -.341 .260

7 598 | ,455 17,4!4
'.72 | 0,215 10,191
Si 6.209 ,, 92



13,o26 3,530

,72 1,383 1, 53


2 3 -4,B16 -,74--
2.138 2,Ot5 2,012
2.0 2,409 ,-26

5.397 5.530 .02
1 2 1,


1 .5,9 l4,8. 47,s


114,567











Table 1.-VALUE OF MANlUFACTURERS' SHIPMENTS, INVENTORIES, AND ORDERS, BY INDUSTRY GROUP--Continu d

Millions of dollars)

New orders Unfilled orders

Seasonally adjusted out seasonal Seasonally adjustedthut asonal
Industry group adjustment I adjustment'

May Apr. Mar. May Apr. Mar. Mav Apr. Mar. May Apr. Iar.
1977p 1977r 1977 1977' 1977r 1977 1977r 1977 1977p 1977r 1977

All manufacturing indus-
tries:
Total..................... 111,589 111,625 111,927 110,909 113,402 114,951 182,285 180,168 178,105 180,539 180,356 178,392
Total, excluding trans-
portation .............. 97,352 96,571 97,323 96,897 98,483 100,456 126,980 125,651 125,376 126,919 126,486 125,624
Total for industries
with unfilled orders... 58,787 58,228 57,943 57,430 59,106 59,452 -

Durable goods industries, total. 59,432 58,730 59,299 59,092 60,172 60,978 174,027 171,690 169,642 171,997 171,627 169,823

Durable goods with unfilled
orders.......................... 47,333 46,439 46,171 46,107 47,265 47,453 -

Primary metals, total......... 9,198 7,755 8,615 8,697 8,591 9,211 17,661 16,890 17,122 17,853 17,822 17,782

Blast furnaces, steel mills. 5,210 3,831 4,304 4,492 4,433 4,797 11,693 10,851 10,977 11,634 11,523 11,372
Nonferrous and other
primary metal products..... 3,058 3,028 3,438 3,236 3,192 3,494 4,797 4,914 5,063 5,051 5,155 5,321

Fabricated metal products..... 7,337 7,363 7,832 7,437 7,471 7,827 23,583 23,494 23,501 23,339 23,292 23,318

Machinery, except electrical,
total......................... 10,180 10,060 9,991 10,306 10,645 10,925 44,254 44,236 44,299 44,364 44,393 44,234

Engines and turbines........ 801 819 737 686 954 925 16,086 16,113 16,227 16,189 16,355 16,313
Construction, mining, and
material handling equipment. 1,825 1,643 1,820 1,931 1,714 2,038 6,323 6,366 6,494 6,349 6,308 6,481
Metalworking machinery ...... 653 602 547 660 623 672 3,075 2,968 2,931 3,069 2,971 2,908
General industrial machinery. 826 900 837 812 938 869 6,558 6,609 6,532 6,577 6,662 6,558

Electrical machinery, total... 7,188 6,973 6,338 6,931 6,852 6,557 24,382 23,772 23,437 23,970 23,531 23,280

Electrical transmission and
distribution equipment and
industrial apparatus ....... 1,301 1,296 1,321 1,313 1,346 1,370 6,021 6,027 6,015 5,991 6,014 5,975
Household appliances........ 838 848 836 855 854 914 336 325 313 329 323 318
Radio and TV ................ 511 475 272 434 409 256 397 377 344 381 348 318
Communication equipment..... 2,216 2,102 1,634 2,020 2,002 1,706 11,525 11,022 10,693 11,157 10,859 10,682

Transportation equipment,
total ........................ 14,237 15,054 14,604 14,012 14,919 14,495 55,305 54,517 52,729 53,620 53,870 52,768

Aircraft, missiles, and
parts...................... 3,366 4,178 2,887 2,671 3,642 2,618 36,824 36,387 34,692 35,571 35,824 34,701
Shipbuilding and military
tank vehicles.............. 679 400 459 415 402 482 9,338 9,229 9,430 9,188 9,380 9,592

All other durable goods
industries..................... 11,292 11,525 11,919 11,709 11,694 11,963 8,842 8,781 8,554 8,851 8,719 8,441

Nondurable goods industries,
total........................... 52,157 52,895 52,628 51,817 53,230 53,973 8,258 8,478 8,463 8,542 8,729 8,569

Industries with unfilled
orders....................... 11,454 11,789 11,772 11,323 11,841 11,999 8,258 8,478 8,463 8,542 8,729 8,569
Industries without unfilled
orders....................... 40,703 41,106 40,856 40,494 41,389 41,974 -

Represents zero. Preliminary. Revised.
'Adjusted for trading-day and calendar-month variations.
2The inventory data for the categories "All manufacturing industries with unfilled orders" and the "Durable goods industries with
unfilled orders" include the automotive assembly data while the respective shipments and new orders figures for these categories omit the
automotive assembly data. Separate inventory data are not complied for the automotive assembly and automotive parts since many companies
are only able to provide data on a combined basis. Based on figures from the 1974 Annual Survey of Manufactures, the automotive assembly
industry (SIC codes 3711, 3713 and 3715) represents 3.7 percent of the "durable goods with unfilled orders" category and 3.2 percent of
the "total for industries with unfilled orders" category.









Table 2.--VALUE OF MANUFACTURERS' SHIPMENTS, INVENTORIES, AND ORDERS, FOR MARKET CATEGORIES AND SUPPLEMENTARY SERIES
(Millions of dollars)

Seasonally adjusted Witadjout seasonal Seasonally adjusted Without seasonal
Industry group
May Apr. Mar. May Apr. Mar. May Apr. Mar. May Apr. Mar.
1977P 1977r 1977 1977P 1977r 1977 1977P 1977r' 1977 1977P 1977r 1977


All manufacturing industries, total..

Durable goods industries, total.............
Nondurable goods industries, total.........

Industry groups arranged by market
categories:
Home goods and apparel ...................
Consumer staples .........................
Equipment and defense products, except
automotive....... .......................
Automotive equipment .....................
Construction materials, supplies, and
intermediate products ...................
Other materials and supplies and
intermediate prodvcts.............. .....

Supplementary series-2
Household durable go ds industries .......
Capital goods Industr...s .................
Nondefense .............................
Defense ................................


Shipments


L09,553

56,677
52,876



8,294
19,521

14,797
11,293

9,483

46,165


3,373
16,792
14,321
2,471


[11,443

59,051
52,392



8,398
19,323

14,970
12,142

9,795

46,815


3,542
17,049
14,373
2,676


110,726

58,722
52,004



8,084
18,446

15,355
11,715

9,965

47,161


3,368
17,233
14,625
2,608


111,427 114,339

58,356 60,688
53,071 53,651



8,187 8,752
19,162 19,615

15,219 15,743
11,761 12,378

9,789 9,662

47,309 48,189


3,323 3,650
17,069 17,825
14,583 15,174
2,486 2,651


Total inventories


172,809

109,226
63,583



14,753
24,171

39,800
8,854

14,608

70,623


7,492
44,709
38,030
6,679


L70,747

108,190
62,557



14,608
23,928

39,638
8,691

14,523

69,359


7,407
44,335
37,733
6,602


169,379

107,685
61,694



14,296
23,531

39,393
8,728

14,560

68,871


7,275
43,992
37,475
6,517


173,274 171,886

110.002 109,218
63.272 62,668



15 168 14,678
23:652 23,730

40,107 40,095
8,732 8,686

14,711 14,728

70,904 69,969


7,691 7,467
45,004 44,889
38,369 38,259
6,635 6,630


New orders Unfilled orders


All manufacturing industries total.. 111,589 111,625 111,927 110,909 113,402 114,951 182,2851


Durable goods industries, total.............
Nondurable goods industries, total.........

Industry groups arranged by market
categories:
Home goods and apparel...... ............
Consumer staples..........................
Equipment and defense products, except
automotive ..............................
Automotive equipment.....................
Construction materials, supplies, and
intermediate products ...................
Other materials and supply and
intermediate products ...................

Supplementary series:2
Household durable goods industries .......
Capital goods industries........ .........
Nondefense..................... ........
Defense ...................... ..........

.During 1968 manufacturers in ordnance,


59,432 58,730 59,299 59,092 60,172 60,978 174,027
52,157 52,895 52,628 51,817 53,230 53,973 8,258


8,377
19,514

16,396
11,627

9,545

46,166


3,443
18,503
14,932
3,571


8,273
19,316

14,649
12,413

9,706

47,570


3,425
16,946
14,667
2,279


8,255
18,425

15,271
11,815

10,083

47,060


3,531
17,131
14,740
2,391


8,313
19,127

16,414
11,947

9,845

47,756


3,401
18,396
15,338
3,058


8,656
19,586

15,350
12,517

9,722

49,120


3,549
17,470
15,344
2,126


3,533


104,079


18,224

56,449


2,858
113,000
80,768
32,232


180,168 178,105

171.690 169,642
8,478 8,463




3,445 3,370


102,991 101,057


18,102 18,040

55,630 55,638


2,761 2,692
111,767 110,058
80,255 79,647
31,512 30,411


170,818

108,726
62,092



14,309
23,551

39,925
8,848

14,760

69,425


7,285
44,428
37,840
6,588


180,539 180,356 178,392

171,997 171,627 169,823
8,542 8,729 8,569




3,486[ 3,338 3,247


102,2781102,262 100,896


18,161 18,043

56,614 56,713


2,809 2,648
111,197 111.296
80,261 80,142
30,936 31,154


17,987

56,262


2,569
109,971
79,389
30.582


communications, aircraft and aircraft parts, and shipbuilding industries began to provide agre-


gate figures on shipments, orders, intd total inventories of work perf armed for the Department of Defense. The results if these reports are
Included in the defense series. PPreliminary. rRevised. IShipments and neo orders adjusted for trading-day and calendar-mnth
variations; unfillled orderss ,ad inventories as of end of month. 'The supplementary series are regroupongs of the separate industry
categories a follows:

Household durablee good. idlus tr s Household furniture; kitchen articles and pottery; cutlery, handtools, and itrd are: hiusl i Ad
applia.l;cs; ophthalre g.r" watches, and clocks, watchcases ; and miscellaneous personal goods.
Capital goods Industries The capi til goods industries series is comparable to th, previous Producers Capi-al G i ds and the Df tense
Products old series iat gories.
Nondefense industries Machinery, except electrical (excluding farm machinery and equipment and machine shops), electrical
machinery (excluding household appliances and electronic components), railroad equipment and the nondefense portions of ship-
building and military tank vehicles, communication equipment, aircraft, aircraft parts and ordnance.
Defense products (new series) Based on separate reports on defense work filed by large defense contractors in the following
industries ordnance, communications, complete aircraft, aircraft parts, and shipbuilding and military tank vehicles. t-.
data are comparable to those published annually in the MA-175, Shipments of Defense-Oriented Industries, for the specified
industries.


109,473

57,094
52,379



8,546
18,783

15,131
10,963

9,415

46,635


3,433
17,065
14,419
2,646


8,641
18,774

16,087
11,096

9,538

47,453


3,528
18,300
14,935
3,365










Table 3.--MANUFACTURERS' SHIPMENTS, INVENTORIES, AND ORDERS MONTII-TO-MONTH AND LONG TERM PIERTNT (I HA.1NGE


Item and Industry group


Shipments:
All manufacturing industries.........

Durable goods industries, total ........
Nondurable goods industries, total.....

Total inventories:
All manufacturing industries.........

New orders:
All manufacturing industries .........
Durable goods industries, total........
Nondurable goods industries, total .....

Unfilled orders:
Durable goods industries, total........


(Based on seasonally adjusted data)

Month-to-month Average


Apr.-
May
1977


+1.4


Mar. Febh. -
Apr. Mar.
1977 1977




-1.7 +5.0

-4.0 +7.9
-0.9 +1.9


+0.1


3 months


Feb. Nov.
May 1977 Feb.


1976- Aug.-
1977 Nov. 1976



+2,0 +0.4


lange

12 month,

May 1976-
Mav 1977


Av,.t, P, 1971-1976


+1.0




+1.8


+1.2


Av rage





-1.1






-0.4


-1.7
-2.1
-1.1


-2.7


Table --VALUE OF


MANUFACTURERS' INVENTORIES, BY STAGE OF FABRICATION, BY INDUSTRY GROUP

(Millions of dollars


Industry group


All manufacturing industries, total..
Durable goods industries, total ............

Stone, clay, and glass products ..........
Primary metals ...........................
Machinery (electrical and nonelectrical'.
Transportation equipment ..................
All other durable goods industries.......

Nondurable goods industries, Total.........

Chemicals and allied products ............
Petroleum and coal products ..............
Rubber and plastics products, n.e.c......
All other nondurable goods industries....



All manufacturing industries, total..
Durable goods industries, total ............

Stone, clay, and glass products ..........
Primary metals...........................
Machinery (electrical and nonelectrical'.
Transportation equipment.................
All other durable goods industries.......
Nondurable goods industries, total .........

Chemicals and allied products............
'Petroleum and coal products.............
Rubber and plastics products, n.e.c......
All other nondurable goods industries....


I Wlhout seasonal
Seasonally adjusted Wit ssenal
adjustment

May Apr. Mar. May Apr. Mar.
1977P 1977r 1977 1977P 1977r 1977

Total


172,809

109,226

4,257
17,567
39,595
19,869
27,938

63.583

13,201
5,508
4,096
40,778



53,365
43,957

662
5,784
17.025
12,443
8,043

9,408
2,237
1,165
699
5,307


170,747

108,190
4,193
17,332
39,217
19,594
27,854
62,557
13,038
5,252
4,016
40,251



53,184
43,805

643
5,651
17,003
12,364
8,144

9,379
2,188
1,135
685
5,371


169,379

107,685

4,142
17,323
39,064
19,428
27,728
61,694
12,962
5,156
4,079
39,497

Work in

52,699

43,343

645
5,743
16,660
12,188
8,107

9,356

2,195
1,120
700
5,341


173,274

110.002

4,356
17,598
40,132
19,640
28,276

63.272

13.165
5,486
S.120
40,501

process

53,668

44,211

690
5,869
17.133
12,359
8,160

9,457
2,260
1,.195
700
5.,302


171,886

109,218
4,341
17,455
39,697
19,601
28,124
62,668
13,138
5,198
4,102
40,230




53,539
44,181
700
5,832
17,068
12,388
8,193

9,358
2,225
1,128
706
5,299


170,818

108,726

4,260
17,414
39,470
19,630
27,952
62,092
13,204
5,012
4,126
39,750



53,189
43,875

697
5,873
16,792
12,313
8,200

9,314

2.,248
1,082
718
5,266


Seasonally adjusted Wit u A nal
ad jus tme nt

May Apr. Mar. May Apr, Mar.
1977) 1977r 1977 1977P 1977r 1977

Materials atd supplies,


63.386

36,209

1.492
8,250
11,009
4,988
10,470
27,177

5,384
1.923
1,511
18,359



56,058

29,060

2,103
3,533
11.561
2.438
9,425

26,998

5,580
2,420
1,886
17,112


62,568

35,758

1,485
8,300
10,865
4,801
10,307
26,810
5,323
1,895
1,472
18,120



54,995
28, 27

2,065
3,381
11,349
2,429
9.403

26,368

5,527
2,222
1,859
16.760


62,203

35,798

1,471
8,354
10,985
4,81 ,
10, 173
26,405
5,261
1,947
1,503
17,694


62,689

35,82'

1,497
8. lWI
11,068
4.825
10.277

26,862

5,3318
1,975
1,521
18,028


F finished goor

5Z,477 56,917

28,544 29.964

2,026 2,169
3,226 3,589
11,419 11,911
.,425 2,456
9,448 9,839

25,933 26,953

5,506 5,567
2,089 2,316
1,876 1,899
16,462 17.171


62.472

35,571
1,498
8,140
10,972
4,757
10,204
2u.901
5,307
1,929
1, 501
18,164


55,875
29,46 i

2.143
3,483
11,657
2,456
9,727

26,409

5,6006
2.141
1,895
16.767


62,259

35,534
1,483
8,131
11,014
4,855
10,051
26,725
5,299
1,899
1,516
18,011



55,370

29,317

2,080
3,410
11,664
2,462
9,701

26,053

5,657
2,031
1.892
16,473


PPrel iminary.
rRevised.


t1


monthly r.t-.s c


Aver,0:*
no


'"`"---











.--IC\AIi O1 'I NTI fAC'I TER 1R ENIORIES TI) SH PMENTS AND 1NFIILED 1' DERS TO SHIPMENTS, BY INDUSTRY GROUP

1:. A I, *. S l v ti st d doai


Inventories hipmcnts ratio Unfilled


May Apr. Mar. Feb. May
S1977l 1977r" 1977 1977 1977P


1.58 1.36 1.52 1.59 3.22

1.91 1.91 1.82 1.96 3.87


t1 ........... ............... .. ..........

l n rv .... ... ..... .......................
ii i ..................................


S duratl. i ndusI t rl ':-, t t ....... ..... .. .

S i ndr -d pr.l- ct ......... ..... ......... ...... .
l' p -an tl .........................I.......... ......
Sr ut . . . .. .

rh ,r d pro t ...... du. .. . . .
P -Chel" l ,o)! 11* d pri'd u ts . . .
t tr, 'lo w, d ( pr wducts............................ .
Hubif f ,- pla t n s f Pr dicn I n-. ....... ............. .

NA N t *,1 lahl-. PPI'olin :iry. X'Hli sl.
Excludes the following inILustres with no unlilled orders
Taolor vhi cls issemblv operations ; foods and related product
products; .ind rubbr and plastics products, n.e.c.


orders shipments ratio'
months' backlog

Apr. Mar. Feb.
1977r 1977 1977

3.21 3.47 3.29

3.87 3.69 3.96

0.95 0.88 0.92
2.11 2.01 2.25
3.49 3.36 3.64
4.78 4.81 4.98
3.58 3.53 3.63
8.81 7.91 8.71
1.68 1,64 1.63


1.21 1.18 1.18 1.19 0.71 0.72 0.73 0.73
1.11 1.05 1.04 1.05 (X) (X) (X) (X)
5 .3 4,8 4.72 5.00 (X) (X) (X) (X)
1 55 1.51 1.53 1.60 (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA)
1 19 1.16 1. 17 1.19 (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA)
1.43 1.38 1.34 1.42 (X) (X) (X) (X)
0,68 0.67 0,67 0.65 (X) (X) (X) (X)
1.34 1.34 1. 31 1.32 (X) (X) (X) (X)

Not applicable.
Wood and lumber products; glass containers; metal cans, barrels and drums;
; tobacco; apparel and related products, chemicals; petroleum and coal


tPr'T'ir'- vi t

1,bicE i f i


ull t .11 )" 1 d -l j ', t A ..................







7

1975 INVENTORY VALUATION

The Bureau of the Census has conducted an annual survey to determine the accounting methods used to value the inventories reported
in the monthly manufacturers' shipments, inventories, and orders survey. Using inventories reported in the December 1,7'5. report as
the point of reference, companies valuing inventories on a cost basis were asked to report the percentage of inventories valued by (1)
first-in, first-out (FIFO); (2) specific or actual cost; (3) last-in, last-out (LIFO); (4) standard cost; (5) average cost; and (6) other
methods. Companies valuing inventories on a market value basis were asked to report the percentage of total inventories according to:
(1) market used for valuation because market lower than cost; (2) market always used for valuation; and (3) other meth ods. Com-
panies declaring their basis for valuation to be the lower of cost or market were asked to distribute all of their inventories among the
six cost and three market categories.
The estimates shown below were developed by allocating the reported total inventory figure for December 1975 to the nine
valuation categories based on the reported percentages for individual respondents. These allocated values were then used to estimate
the 78 industry categories which were further aggregated to 2-digit SIC totals and then converted again to percentages. No ad ustments
have been made for changes in valuation methods after December 1975. The classification of reporting units into industries swas based
on the 1967 Standard Industrial Classification (SIC). There are some significant differences between the 1967 SIC and the 972 SIC
(which is currently used for the monthly publiishs estimates of shipments, inventories, and orders). The rel.tion between the 19 -
SIC and the 1972 SIC is shown in the Appendix tables of the M3-1.6 benchmark publication released December 111 '6
This survey was designed and conducted to provide the distribution of valuation methods used for reporting in this survey. The
distribution in the f blowing table may differ significantly from a 1. Iributi-.r-, based on financial reporting since the repcr' ig in the
monthly survey is often based on interim accounting methods. For example, a company whose public financial statemit i-re based
on LIFO may use standard cost or FIFO for interim accounting and convert the interim figures to LIFO only at the ec.ii )f the fisr c
period. In such cases, the interim valuation method would be reported in this survey. This .Jutri.,.ror.n of valuation mern, is may also
differ significantly from the distribution of valuation methods used at the establishment level for reporting in the census )f manu-
factures and the annual survey of manufactures.
A survey relating to inventories reported in December 1976 is currently being conducted. The results of this survey, which will be
based on the 1972 SIC will be published later this iear. In the publication of the 1976 data, the results of the 1975 survey will be
shown on the 1972 SIC.





PERCENTAGE DISTRIIBI7ION OF INVEN STORY VALUATION METHOD :ED IN THFE ,IANLTnACT[ l.S' SHIPMENTS
INVINTORIESL AD ORIER Sf L: DECEMBER 1975


Old (1917) SIC I
industry croup F!F0 L A -g, ct co I S st a ar(Iar Otlher
hart cost

All manufact uring .... ......... ........ ....- 7 9 -

Durable ............................... ................ .2 21 -
Stone, clay and glass ................. ......... 2 21
Primary metals...... .......... ............ ...... 12 1 13
Fabricated metal product xi ..... .1..... ....... 8 I 7 1 -
Machinery, except electrical ...... ... ...... 22 2 I
Electrical machinery........... .............. 33 1 1
Transportation equipment .... ... ... ..... .2 5 38 20 5 I 1
Instruments and related products' ............. 4
All other durable' ............... ...... ... ...... 33 2

Nondurable...... .............. ...... .. .......... 29 I
Food and kindred products ... ...... ........... 17 g 8 2 1
Tobacco manufactures ........... .. .... ..... 5 -
Textile mill products................................. 28 I 1 2*
Paper and allied producets......................... .3 2 |
Chemicals ...nondurble .............................. 5 1...... ..............
Petroleum and coal products. 1 -61 3
Rubber and plastic products ....... 2, 17
All other nondurable ....... 1 4 L

Represents zero.
'Estimates made for non-response accounts for more than 50 percent of the estimates in these industries.






U.S. Department
of Commerce
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Washington, D.C. 20233
Official Business


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