Civil Engineers needed for challenging Peace Corps assignments in five developing nations

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Title:
Civil Engineers needed for challenging Peace Corps assignments in five developing nations
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Peace Corps
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Engineers in government   ( lcsh )
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federal government publication   ( marcgt )
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General Note:
"This is a summer '65 program description."

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University of Florida
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aleph - 004939785
oclc - 82219515
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Full Text
a ia 1< r4aitrlr~.%~


NOTE:
W~~ari


This is a summer '65 program
description. It is expected
that these programs will be
continued during summer '66.


CIVIL ENGINEERS NEEDED FOR1tTLE&GING
PEACE CORPS ASSIGNMENTS IN FIVE DEVELOPING NA


Five developing nations Pakistan, Colombia, Brazil, Venezuela, arrn -
Ethiopia have asked the Peace Corps for more than 60 Volunteer civil
engineers. Volunteer civil engineers presently are working in Ecuador,
Malaysia, Pakistan, Peru and Tunisia.

The civil engineering/rural public works program in Pakistan is typical
of the responsibilities and challenges in a Peace Corps engineering
assignment. Volunteers assigned to the other programs will perform
similar tasks.


There are now 85 Peace Corps Vo
Programs of the Eastern and Wes
of these men are engineers with
recent civil engineering gradua
our own country and overseas.
ing assistants, which means the
struction work which is useful


supervision and organization


lunteers. working in the Rura
tern Provinces of Pakistan.
Varying degrees of experien
tes to men with long years o
The remaining two-thirds are
y have some substantial expe
in improving construction te


of rural


1 Public Works
About one-third
ce ranging from
f experience in
called engineer-
rience in con-
chniques and in


construction programs.


Rural Public


beginning
unteers in
valuable t
construct
to the suc


prob
Gove
The
(dra
cons
vert
area
firs
year
and
the


ilems f
rnment
record
ainage
tructe
s were
, for
t tran
* after
there
program


coincided
East Paki
technical a
on of slui
cess of th
aced were
of Pakist
Sof accomp
ditches) w
d, four da


i
si
sp
t
wa
in


stalled
years
noting
local
no los


Works Program was


with


the winter


conceived and


1961


stan. Some of these
assistance in planning
ce gates, small bridg


is
wat
an
lis
ere
ms


, a
the
of
wo
S o


t program in i
control and tra
0S


luat
nt i


clear
to prev
nd four
summer
the fal
rks pro


f


amon


initiated


arrival of the
Volunteers were
, designing and
es and drainage
ts first year.
nsvortation. T


*6


ion: "The Comi
s outstanding.
d, 14- miles of
ent sand erosio
large regulate
rice crop has
1 amon paddy ha
jects were done


lla


SS 121.


Thirty fo
embankment
f were bui
s set up.
een large
* also bee
there wa


transplantation.


0
u
U.
t
1


firs
abl
sup
sys
The
o qu


g
r
s
t


ly
n
s


cess


in 1961 and
t group of


e to prov
ervising
terns which
principal
ote the o


ram proved wo
Smiles of Kha
-cum-roads we
, twenty-six
In one consid
Drowned, and
drowned. The
a good rice c


ide
the
h le
1
ffic


d

ial


rkable.
ls
re
cul-
erable
the
first
rop


led to expansion of


throughout Pakistan.


valu
ame q
ealed


e of Peace Corps
quickly apparent.
that the great
nnn-^tl qntiriv't n


S
[f,


Volunteer
A carefu
t program


. this important
.rvey by the Gove
4d was for middle
gis-t <=rnrp isill us1


I 4 -


development e
rnment of Eas
-level skills
thsh~ s~nnnints


effort
t Pakistan
and that
9l stsvflPP


This


The
bee
rev
t-htz~


;
<
<
.


i



1


'Sc









Peace
effect
in the
partial
grains
instit
execut
provide
and (3
market


Corps p
ive int
ir econ
lly fin
in Pak
utions
ing and
ing job
) build


s


participation in this program


an excellent example of the


errelationship of Ut S. efforts to assist other c
omic development efforts. The Rural Public Works
danced by thtBprpceeds of the sale of P.L. 480 (Fo
istan. The objectives are: (1) to develop local
by making local bodies responsible for planning,
accounting for capital investment of the local l1
s for hundreds of thousands of people during the
ing up the necessary economic infrastructure, i.e


, irrigation ditches,


protective


embankments


countries
Program is
od for Peace)
government
deciding
evel, (2)
off season,


roads,


etc.


Corps


management and


organization and a


polished, normally lacking
from almost total reliance
be accomplished overnight.
villagers plan and success
sponsible. The growth in


conf


in the villa
on central
Volunteers
fully implem
capacity of


provide not only technical know how but a


idence that
ges of Pakis
authority to
ease this t
ent projects
local instit


sense of


something can be accom-
tan. The transformation
local democracy cannot
transition by helping the
for which they are re-
utions to plan and


administer this program during the past
and our Volunteers have helped.


three years


been


truly amazing


A major part of the Peace Corps Volunteers' contribution to the Rural Public
Works Program is found in the difficult to measure area of developing con-
fidence and skills in others and in their intangible influence on attitude
towards work, self-respect and self-government.


There have


also


been


concrete measurable accomplishments.


The program


West-Pakistan began
new program twenty-s
ning, design and/or
systems, 21 roads, 3
7 veterinary hospital
and assembly halls,
and considerable amo
or nearly completed
mote district of Der
fifty mile horse and


tion o
water
tion 1
of the
signs
mounta
able b
distri
a $20,
older


f a des
supplies
ibrary-


sea
and
in a
last
ct f
000
ones


re
est
rea
ing
or
hou


a boys


in the
ix Pea


cons
50 c
is,
2 wo
unt
and


hostel,


fall of
ce Corps


io


r projects. Two engineering teams in separate
in road and small damn projects requiring consider-
at Thana Bula Khan have responsibility in their
n of 3 medical dispensaires, 2 veterinary hospitals,
carpet-making center, 9 new schools and repair of
2 libraries, 1 bus station, apoultrydistribution


19
Vo


63.
Klunte
i3 sch
rigat
2 br
hops,


Most o


ned. Bi


an
a Ghazi Khan covers part
camel back treks. He ha
a program including seven


es, 1
proj
ggo"
300 b
respo
ten


a
6
IZ
3,


of a
he plan-
20 water
spensaries,
office


-. -- a -- - -


Peace


Volunteers


traction of 3
ulverts, 2 ir
4 small dams,
rkshops, 49 s
of earthwork.
more are plan


Despite the uncertainties
ers have participated in t
ools, 16 drainage systems,
ion projects, 7 medical di
idges, 33 local government


ert are


s, eleven
community


ibrari
these
1 "Slu
f his
full
roads,


other structures
cts are completed
aughley in the re-
70 mile area via


dispensaries, fi
center and a num


n and he


ve veterinary hosp
ber of small O40-st
is preparing number


under construct
inmates for othe
s are involved
. Another team
the construction
sing colony, a


nsibility for execu-
community drinking
itals, one combina-
udent schools. Most
ous preliminary de-


t
!*
k
I


*


*-


"-










almost


total lack of transportation facilities


is some areas and


shortage
this were


skilled


craftsmen hamper and delay


no real need for


Peace


Corps


construction


Volunteers


efforts.


would


exist.


The opportunity to
is present and the


contribute
Volunteers


to an


are


important


economic and


taking good advantage


social


program


of it


REPORTS FROM VOIU1'EER ENGINEERS


THE RURAL PUBLIC WORKS


PROGRAM


IN EAST PAKISTAN


Peace


Corps


Volunteer


Engineer


Robert


Burns


In the areas


rural
was t


around


public works


o use


Comilla,


was


recently


the farmers


East Pakistan,


completed.


the landless


an experimental


idea


laborers


behind


who are


idle


program in
the experiment


during the


dry winter


season


the available


land


as a work-force


in East


Pakistan


to uplift


the monsoon


is famed,


lies


economy.
fallow half


year for


lack


of water;


during the


other half,


a severe monsoon


can destroy


rne crops.
leadership


success


can help


solve


of the


Corn illa


flood and


leadership can mobilize manpower and
unemployment.


program


irrigation
technical


proved not
problems,
resources


only that


but also


offset


local


that


seas


such
onal


On the basis of the


Comilla


pilot project,


the Government of


East Pakistan


has decided


to expand rural


public


works


throughout


the province


within


the next
Comilla


three


years


techniques.


. Fifty-four


separate areas


Finding qualified


technical


will


people


try to duplicate


to plan,


design


supervise


a program of this


scope


is difficult


in Pakistan.


Consequently,


Pakistan has


requested


the Pea


Corps


supply


engineers


construction


personnel


who would work with government


offi


cers


in the


rural areas


and give


necess


ary technical


assistance.


The Rural Public


Works


Program in


its beginning


stages


poses


a human


engineering problem.


In the


first


year


the problem


is to organize


project
requires


committees


villagers.


civil administration,


this


program


the engineers,


be a


success


the villagers


to form


a partnership


that will


work as


one


body.


In Comilla,


during


both


first and second years


of the


program,


majority of projects


were


classified


as earthwork projects.


biggest problem facing the


cultivator


in the Thana


(District)


recurring floods.


In parts


of the


Thana,


cultivators


have


not had a


crop


. -


- 4- L~. a nn n 4- J~u -; -~ e- ..an A -.i 1 t%~hfl an a 4. a a On .~ i n Ma


n1L~ ,Tn~ -


*
-k -^ r a-- -W


m









the water-carrying
rises and overflows


capa
the


city of the c
canal banks,


anal s. Therefore
causing a flood.


the water


level


Last


year


there


was a canal


which,


because


it was


choked with


such


encro
moved
flowe
level
done
The t
in ma


achments,
Sthe encr
d through
Remained
by village
technical
king a pr


they assisted


was constant
oachments and
the unobstru
nonnal. Thi
e labor under
staff of the


e-work
in spot


survey


ly flooding a
deepened it.
cted canal at
s canal is abo
the supervisi
Thana Council
Sto determine


checking,


ten square mile area.
When the monsoon came
a much faster rate and
ut 34 miles long. The
on of two project camm
worked with the project
the amount of earth to


they also assisted


We re-
water
the water
work was
ttees.
Sconmmittees
be removed,


in establishing side


slopes


and grades.


The bas
a large
which c
supervi
vators


ic assumption behind
percentage of flood
an be implemented by
sion. These small p
from recurring flood


the
ing
vil
roje
and


whole Rural Public Works Program is
can be controlled by small local proj
lage labor with a minimum of technical
cts when completed will protect the c
thereby increase agricultural produce


that
ects
1
ulti-
tion.


Although the major aim
irrigation and communi
be advising officials
case of earthwork, the;
and canals. They will
supervise construction


of t
atio
n th
'wil
also
and


he Rural Public Works Program is f
n, the Peace Corps Volunteer will
e soundness and feasibility of pla
.1 draw up specifications for roads
, together with the Thana Council
verify excavation measurements.


blood control,
in most cases
ns. In the
, embankments,
Overseer,


Masonry work will


Council
gineers
vision.
concrete
12 to 1
and Armn
vent an
are ver


office
will p
The b
slab.
feet.
o pipe
. are a


consist mainly


s, and
repare
ridges
They
The c
The
combine


similar


water ci
all des
usually
vary in
ulverts
average
action o


in design


ntro
gns
are
span
are
size
'bri
the


of bridges,
1 regulators


. est
ck p
acm 8
there
' box
and


culver


im


ates


culverts,


sluice-gates, Union
Corps Volunteer en-


plus doing the


field super-


iers and abutments with a reinforced
to 50 feet and have roadways from
e types: box, precast RCC pipe,
culverts is 6 feet by 5 feet, single
RCC. The sluice gates and regulators
ts, the main difference being that


they are


fitted


with


vertical


lift


or flap gates.


RURAL WORKS PROGRAM
IN HYDERABAD DISTRICT (WEST PAKIAN)


R. Seymour,


Peace


Corps


Volunteer


Who Proposes


and Sanctions Rural


Works


Schemes?


All schemes originate at the union council or town committee level.







How are


the Schemes


Financed?


Works


Program


is financed from


sources.


They are


P.L.


480O funds,


and
the
P.L.


the community or 1
District Council c
480 share amounts


ocal share.
ontributes
to three f


In the


case


the "local sha


courtss


of the


of District
-- -


re.


total


Council schemes,


- -3-


I most
cost and


cases


the community


share amounts


to one


fourth.


In addition,


the local


council must


bear the


expenses


of maintenance.


How are Projects


Implemented?


The program aims
utilizing local


at having most of
labor to a maximum.


its proje


proj


ts done locally,
ects are administ


(departmentally)


ered


by a


pro-


ject


committee.


This


committee


usually


includes


the chainnrman


of the


local


council and


two other


council members.


Their main responsibilities


determine


how the


projects


will


be implemented,


locally or


by contractor,


keep records
construction.


and accounts


of the


projects,


to supervise and


inspect


In many


cases


labor available


local


for the


community


did not


construction


have


of their proj


sufficient


ects.


skilled
In these


or unskilled


cases


projects were


project


given


canmittee.


to a -contractor under the


Contractors


were


instructed


supervision of the


use as much


local


local
labor


as possible.


What


is the Role


of the


Technical Staff


in Implementing Projects?


No project


under the


Rural


Works


Program


could


be uniformly and successfully


carried


out without


the assistance and guidance


of the


District


Engineer and


staff.


councils,
efficient


Approximately 256
4d to be planned,


coordination at


projects,


designed and


every


leve l.


both


of District


guided.


Such


The District was


Council and


u-zlion


a large task needed
supplied with American


Peace


Corps


Volunteer


Engineers who are


lending their


ass


instance


to the


District
jects. :
on union


Engineer.
'or such a


council


They worked almost exclusively with


large


projects


program additional staff was


under the


guidance


union


required,


of the Peace


Corps


council


some


pro-


to work


Engineers,


others


to work on District


Council Projects


under


Supervision of District


Engineer;


this


first


complete


but all
year's


within


working in
experience
.e expected


coordination and


been a


time,


notable


despite


conjunction.


success


with


The
the


result o
program


heavy wind and rainstorm


that


the District.


What are


the Specific


Duties


of the


Engineers


their


Staff?


The duties
identical:


of the


District


Engineer and


the Peace


Corps


Engineers


To give


technical scrutiny to all


proposed schemes


and approve


them on the


basis of their technical soundness.


are


are










Another duty of


the Engineering Staff


is to develop


clear,


well


defined and


standard


operational


the proper functioning of the


organizational methods


program.


They help


the local


essential for
councillors


understand
technical


the methods


items


of construction,


concerning the work.


execution of projects


From


time


and all


to time directives


other


and new


methods
booklet


of construction were


in the


local language,


sent out from Tue Engineering headquarters


Sindhi,


was


written


by the


District


Engineer.


This


booklet


necessary


described


in a


to implement


precise,
schemes.


simple


way the methods


of construction


4. The Engineering Staff
regular intervals to check on
in the field.


is also required


progress


and keep


to visit all


projects


in touch with the


problems


AN EVALUATION


OF THE PROGRAM


S. Johnson,


Peace


Corps


Engineer


Since


latt


er part


of February


1964,


other American Peace


Corps


Volunteers


P.L. 4
about
Projec


80 BRural


I have
Works


35% of all
t Director)


privilege


Program of the


construction was


was


pleasure


Hyderabad District


completed.


particularly interested at


of working with


In February only
Commissioner (The
e in accelerating


The Deputy


that


tim


the progress o
the program (1
by finding and


f the program.
) by lending o
assisting in


He requested


that


ur technical skills


unplugging


we assist
wherever


bottle necks


that w


in the work of
needed and (2)
ere slowing the


progress


of the


schemes.


Significant


Impressions


of the


Program of this


District


There


have


being most
would like


been


several features


significant
to mention


in creating


two of


these


of this program that


have


impressed


a successful development program.
features which we, as Peace Corps


us as
We
Vol-


unteers,


feel are


particularly significant:


Number


is the unusual amount of


enthusiasm and


interest


in the


program on


part


of all individuals


and groups


in the District.


Number
this V


we feel


program


that


is the fact


probably the most


that


significant


over 90% of these


schemes


feature


were


of
proposed


and implemented at


local


or union


council level


- with every


local


community


contributing a


share


of the


cost for each


of its


schemes.
attitude


This


single


of these


feature may well account


people


concerning their


for the


enthusiastic


schemes


Some


Problems


Encountered


]









or assistance (other than monetary) there were of course many problems
and bottlenecks. Some are still with us. Much was learned from these
problems and from our attempts to solve them. The difficulties most
frequently experienced by the union councils are discussed below:


1. Remote locations
As could be expected,
reach areas as a rule experien
their projects than those more
for building better link roads
getting skilled labor and mate
high cartage rates were typical


those


ccamunities


ced many more
favorably lo
) Difficult
rials to the
1 problems.


diffi
cated.
ies in
site,
These


in remote or hard-to-
culties in implementing
(This is a good case
Communication, in
and in having to pay
difficulties naturally


had th
people


ir effect
involved.


on the progress


of the


schemes


the morale


of the


Materials


or Funds


not Readily


Available


Through
always a problem.
prohibitive carta
built. Third and
released from the
right down to the
a great deal this


ut the district
In many cases
ge cost was a p
fourth quarter
Provincial Gov
union council
spring.


, as everywhere,
the availability
problem. As a resin
allocations of P
ernment on time.
level and slowed


supply of cement was
bricks without a
many new kilns were
480 funds were not
.s delay was felt
progress of schemes


3. Problems Experience
Chairmen
Projects suffered i
not taking enough interest i
chairmen and/or the project
putting forth enough initiate
cause the project committee
council and the union council
any other man as chairman of


by Project


n cases in wh
n the work.
committee cha
ive. In othe
chairman was
1 chairman wo
the project


Committees


ich the
In some
irmen w
r cases
sick or
uld not
committi


pro
cas
ere
the
liv
or
ee.


Union


ject c
es the
at fau
work
ed out
could


Council


committees were
union council
lIt for not
suffered be-
side his union
not appoint


Of course, there were the cases
spent." Many times contractors
charging. Many schemes were not
by the project committee or by a
and estimates and by increasing
ministrative and technical staff
significantly.


in which f
were doing
adequately 1
n overseer
the inspec
, we hope


unds were leaking or not "we
substandard work and over-
y inspected or watched over
. By improving our drawings
tion of projects by our ad-
to reduce this problem


mad
the
uni


4. Technical Problems
Some of the schemes
e for them. The standard
union councils in remote
on councils had these pro


did not have standard drawings
estimates did not allow enough
areas having higher cartage ra
blems to contend with along wit


marg
tes.
h the


estimates
in for
The
variety
* -


ll




- -


5. Shortage of Overseers
As elsewhere, this Di
technical people to work on th
in particularly short supply.
four overseers in the District
being trained for the position
underpaid (if he is honest), a
knowledge concerning his work.
is constantly under temptation
activities in connection with


strict


i~as


e Rural W
It is a
at prese
. The ov
nd often
With hi
and pres
his work.


m
10:

;n
re

-s
s
"S!


and is still
rks Program.
major problem.
t, and one new
rseer is gene
acks adequate
low pay scale
ure to engage


Private


firms


very short of
Overseers are
We have only
employee is
ally overworked,
experience and
, the overseer
in dishonest
or other govern-


ment
job


organizations
security.


offer


better working conditions, more pay,


better


To help overcome
the positions of
Works Program of
enough salaries t
training program
increase their kn
are also hiring c
overseers and tra
salary as oversee
is being initiate


this


problem,


our overseer
this Distric
o be compete
will be set
owledge and
carefully sel
ining them o
r and an att
d, along wit


District Engineer and


we are now i


s an
t.
tive
up f
effe
ecte
urse
ract
h a


the Peace


C


d other
Qualifi
with s


or a
ctiv
d me
lves
ive
close
orps


11
ene
n w
wi
sal


te
ed
imi
ove
ss
ho
th
ary


n the process
chnical perso
men will rece
lar positions
rseers in the
concerning th
are interest
the promise o
as a trainee


er supervision of
Engineering Team.


n
i


e
d
f
*


of upgrading
nel in the
ve attractive
elsewhere.
District to
ir work. We
in becoming
' a good futu


overseer


re

re


of this
s by the


6.

and admin
portation
assistance
of both t
those in


Shortage of Adequate Transportation
The lack of adequate transportation
istrative work is another major pros
Shas been detrimental in our attempt
e where and when it is requested.
technical and administrative staff t
more remote locations.


b
t
I
o


for
lem.
to
t ha
the


the Program's technical
This lack of trans-
provide technical
,s limited the touring
projects, especially


Ideally,


there


should


one jeep with


one overseer


in each


taluka


be used exclusive
only one jeep ava
Program exclusive
tour constantly,
entire district i
made in the near
to be used exclus


ly
ila
ly.
of
n t
fut
ive


for the


Rural


ble in the
This is
course, bu
his work.
ure enabli
ly for the


Works


entire
the Pea
tit is
It is
ng the
Rural


Program.


dist
ce Co
not
hoped
Distr
Works


At pre


sent


rict for the Ru
rps jeep. This
adequate for se
that arrangeme
'ict to purchase
Program.


there


1 Works
eep is on
ing the
s will be
transportation


THE PEACE CORPS ENGINEER'S FIELD PROBLEMS

by Volunteer William Hein
Engineering Advisor


h









in two areas:


equipment


the degree


that will


of accuracy and


be needed,


subsequently the


the utilization


type


survey date


in the office.


problems


of design are many and


will


vary widely with


the different


experiences of the


Volunteers.


common


to all,


however,


will


brick and masonry de


sign and


construction.


Volunteer engineers point


out that


the brick structures


in Paki


stan are


over-designed,


that


they are


generally much stronger than any minimum


specifications would


could


serve as models


call for,
in many


that


cases


structural designs now in use


for future


designs.


But since


brick


so cheap the drawbacks


of over-design are minimal.


There are


three


classes of brick in general use


in Paki


stan.


First


class


is hard-burnt


perfectly shaped;


second


class


brick have


same


quality as


first


class


are not


perfectly


shaped;


third


class


brick


are not hard-burnt.


All second


class


brick


can


be used


in structural


work
brick


since


could


it is the uniform strength


used for


structures


that


which is


do not


important.


require


Third


great


class


structural


strength,


such as


small


village


houses.


Volunteer engineers


acceptable


able is
gallons)


stored


agree


for aggregate


the kerosene


bag of


tin;


that


only first and


in mixing
one and


cement make a


through one monsoon


season


concrete. T
one-half kero
good mixture.
should not be


second


class brick are


he handiest measure


sene


tins (


Cement


used for


avail-


six imperial


that


been


structural


work


or aggregate.


Human Relationships


on the Job


Volunteers


will face


problems


in Paki


stan


which are


basi


cally the


same


as in the United States


or any other


country


- human relations.


The Vol


unteer will have


people


under


him,


but probably will not


have


power


to hire


and fire


personnel.


In all


personnel matters


Volunteer


should go


through


the chain of


command.


REPORT BY


JACOB FELDMAN,


Peace


Corps


Civil Engineer


Now that my two


years


in Tanzania,


East Africa,


as a civil


engineer with


the Peace


assesse


Corps


are


completed,


d realistically for what


I feel
it is


that


the Peace Corps
is not.


can now


was part


that
June


a contingent


constituted


1961,


of 3


first


and after two months


- civil


Corps


at Texas


engineers,


project.


surveyors and


We began


geologists


training in


Western in El Paso and one month


a
-, 'ri D. *. ~


fl-t n a .~


- .tn~ .n -V .Z 4 -t I- a


-4- LA





company with an African labor force
equipment was used. I worked with
African technical assistants repres
interest. The road was built for c
proposed plans were both rough and
to be made during the construction


of 500 men. Modern earth-moving
an English civil servant and two
enting the Tanzania1 government's
lose to $25,000 a mile. As the
inadequate there were many decisions
period.


Most


of my work was


concerned with


soil mechanics.


If a country


cannot


afford to surface
suitable gravels
and testing grave
particularly cha
surface and as a
economic conditi
laboratory equip
analysis, Atterb


e its roads with either
becomes critical. This
els for paving the 28 fo
llenging as the gravels
future base for support
ons and demand will just
ment available to carry


erg limit,


concrete


cess
wide
. to
;a b
Sthe
the


field density and


or bitumen the use of
tated my both locating
roadway. The job was
erve as a present running
tumenous surface when
cost. I has sufficient


Proctor compaction,


sieve


CBR tests.


The toughest


stretch along the 60 mile


route was


one mile


crossing


of the Wembere s
passable to traf
ten foot embankm
the road passed
talent in Tanzan
organic soil, wi
and a wet CBR of
and when dry, it
the embankments
the supplying of
hundred concrete
steel arch bridg
exhaustive soils


wamp which prior t
fic for six months


ent with 4 foot pipe cu
through areas of black


ila wnic
th a hi
zero;
's like
on the
adequa
-slab a
es were
survey


n is a neaaacn
gh clay contend
when wet, it h
rock. As no
job were built
te drainage be
nd corrugated
used along th
resulted in a


the road being built has
of the year. It was cros


lverts
cotton


e r
t,
as
oth
of
cam
ste
e r
sa


o road
high p
the co
er soi
Black
e part
el cul


ou
vi:


every 100 feet
soil, a type o


b
la
ns
is
C
:c
ic
ve


been im-
sed with a
. Most of
f soil prev-


builders. It is a black
sticity, 50% shrinkage
istency of toothpaste,
were available 50% of
otton. As a result,
ularly important. Two
rts, plus ten corrugated


The carrying out of an
of $180,000 in overhaul which


we were


able


use


in assuring adequate drainage.


In addition to my work as a soil mechanic I carried out realignment surveys
of the proposed route, quantity calculations for payment to the contractor,
and inspection of works generally trying to see that Tanzania got the
most road for its money.


Those


of us


served


in the Peace


Corps


feel


the Peace


Corps has


suffered


from too much
timental aspec
as it should c
what it isn't.
speeches for d
unrealistic to
to bring about


intention.


publicity which has emphasis
ts of working overseas. If
constantly be it should be as
I wasn't over in Tanzania
democracy. I did not shape t
expect a hand full of Peace
social or economic revoluti


But we had a


very real job to


ed the more
the Peace C
sessed for
standing on
he destiny
Corpsmen
ons. This
do in help


dramatic a
orps is to
what it is
soap boxes
of Tanzania
n a country
is not out


nd sen-
be evaluated
and not for
giving
. It is
of millions
iob or our


ng supply the need for


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

SI262 III517262
3 1262 08851 7262