Keep your guard up! Protective frames for tractors

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Material Information

Title:
Keep your guard up! Protective frames for tractors
Physical Description:
4 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture
National Safety Council
Publisher:
The Dept.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.?
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Farm tractors -- Safety measures   ( lcsh )
Tractors -- Equipment and supplies   ( lcsh )
Genre:
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture in Cooperation with the National Safety Council.
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
"April 1968."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004939703
oclc - 36304883
System ID:
AA00008464:00001

Full Text






PROTECTIVE


FRA


ES


FOR


TRACTORS


-A


* fl*






PROTECT


SA


Of the


1000 lives


IVE FRA

E 450 L

ost each year in trac-


tor accidents, 600 are due to overturns.
At least three-fourths of these might be
saved by protective frames and seat belts
or crush-resistant cabs.


A specially-designed


recommended


steel


for tractors


frame


probably


save the operator's life in case of overturn.
This steel frame, above and to each side


of the operator, wil


usually


imit a back-


ward


or sidewise


overturn


. (See


illustrations.)
A seat belt adds to the operator's pro-
tection by holding him firmly in the seat
while the framework of steel prevents him
from being crushed. With this protection,
an operator could emerge unhurt, or with
only minor injuries, from an accident that


might other
iured him. A


have ki


ed or severely in-


unshade may be added to


TRACTOR


FATALITY


FACTS


* Roughly one-third of fata


farm work


accidents involve tractors.
* Seven in ten of these accidents occur
on the farm property.
* Two-thirds of them happen on an in-


cline


, embankment, or ramp.


* Nearly eight out of ten tractor injuries


involve crushing.


* One-third


of the


victims are


unc


der,







FOR


TR


CT


RS


YEAR


protect the operator from
A crush-resistant cab


un and rain.


vill also give pro-


on in an overturn.


A cab


can also


provide the added safety and comfort fac-
tors of filtered and cooled or warmed air,
and protection from exhaust fumes.


Tractor


shown


tipping


how fast and


demonstrations
easily tractors


have
can


upset and how such overturns can fatally
crush operators unless they have protec-


tive frame


and seatbelts.


A tractor


upsetting


backward


throttle


is beyond


stopping


after


about


seven-tenth


of a second. This is less than


the average person'


reaction time. Unless


the operator is thrown or can jump clear


(difficult at


best,


after an


over-


is in progress)


crushed
Severe


beneath


injury,


, he wil
the tra


permanent


1c


probably be
:or. Result:


cripp


death.


Seventeen out of twenty of the fatal-


injured


were driving the trac-


Store.

Ninety-five percent of the operators


killed have had at


years


experience in tractor operation.

Nine out of ten die before medical
attention is obtained.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
3IIIil uID I1 li111111 111 liii 11111111111 1 1
3 1262 08851 7106


PROTECT


FRA


ES


ARE


SA


LIVES


In Sweden today, more than 50 percent


ble protective frames.


These are based on


of the tractors are equipped with


tive frames or cabs. From


35 upset
equipped


accidents


tractors


with


were


1959 to


frame


reported


protec-


1966,


or cab-
in de-


actual


overturns


companies
Equipment


major


conducted


Farm


member
industrial


institute.


manufacturers are


now


Only one operator was killed-he tried


signing and testing protective frames for


jump and


was fatally


injured


outside


their


most


popular


new


tractor


models.


the tractor cab.


person who re-


Protective frames for some models of trac-


mained inside the protective frame or cab


tors are already


on the


market.


Several


was killed. All tractors delivered


in Swe-


manufacturers expect to have satisfactory


after


June


1959,


have


been


protective


frames for their most


popular


equipped with approved protective frames.


Since


ptember


1965,


tractors


models


near


future.


frames for other mode


Protective
be available


on farms using hired labor have had to be


equipped with frames.


as soon as necessary tests, redesign, and
production permit.


Similar


requirements


based


on Swe-


Dealers wil


have


information as soon


den'


success


have


gone


effect


as frames for their tractors become availa-


Norway,
Britain,.


Denmark, and


Finland.


Great


new tractors to be sold or rented


after September


1970, must be fitted


COST


PROTECTION


with protective cabs or frames.


The cost of this protection is small


American


Society


Agricultural


comparison to the potential


savings


in life,


Engineers has


ssued standardized testing


injury,


medical


costs


property dam-


procedures and requirements for accepta-


SAFE


SORRY


V
C
qit.
--


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