Manpower developments and outlook in the computing and accounting machines industry

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Title:
Manpower developments and outlook in the computing and accounting machines industry
Series Title:
United States. Bureau of Employment Security, Industry manpower surveys
Physical Description:
13 p. : ;
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Employment Security
Publisher:
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Computers   ( lcsh )
Labor supply -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Updates earlier survey no. 98.
General Note:
"Reprinted from Area trends in employment and unemployment, April 1968".

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004969154
oclc - 81228292
System ID:
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Full Text

INDUSTRY


MANPOWER


SURVEYS/ Number


UNEMPLOYT


Reprinted


AREA


TRENDS


PLOY


SApril


1968


fl.OTh
~ *~


RECe/


~96a


and B s Oomic
Uriv eiess ,Researc
niersihF ofFrid


anpo


Developments


and


Outlook


DUSTRY


CO


PUTI


CCOU


CHI


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
MANPOWER ADMINISTRATION


p
a
a.














































U.S.


W


DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
il lard Wirtz, Secretary


MANPOWER ADMINISTRATION


Stanley H.


Ruttenberg, Administrator


BUREAU OF EMPLOYMENT SECURITY
Robert C. Goodwin, Administrator
U. S. EMPLOYMENT SERVICE
--aL-t-. U fJsil fl.jn .a


k3"










IN

HIGHLIGHAtS


DEVELOP


PUTTING 6


ENTS


ACCOUNTING


OUTLOOK


MACHINES


INDUSTRYr


Greater needs for gathering, storing, and retrieving data
rapid growth of employment in the computing and accounting
In 1967, this industry's workforce totaled 182,200 reflec
over the 1966 total, and about double the figure of 10ye
industry shipments increased almost 400 percent over the


have resulted in
g machines industry.
ting a'sizable rise
ars ago. Value of
last decade.


A major
shortage
cipating
Service
recruit
than one
shortage
workers,
of unfil


problem facing the
of qualified manpo
in a November 1967
and its affiliated
ng needed workers.
-quarter of total s
s were impeding pro
and electronics as


led


industry


jobs


computing and
wer. More th
survey condu
State and loc
Twenty-five
surveyed employ
duction to so:
semblers were


were


reported


accounting
an half of
cted by th
al offices
establish
yment--ind
me degree.
most in d
in the Los


g machines industry is a
the establishments parti-
e United States Employment
reported difficulty in
ents--accounting for more
icated that manpower
Engineers, clerical
emand. The largest number


Angeles


-Long Beach and


Minneapolis-St.


Paul areas.


In order to
power needs


offer various
that provided
apprenticeship
establishments
held by men.
are generally
duction worker
manufacturing


allevia
in the


kinds
under
Strain
have
Altho
well


ea


te shortages of product
future, the majority of
of training programs.
the Manpower Developmen
ning programs are utiliz
increased overtime and
ugh wages in the computi
above the average for al
rings did not keep pace


on workers,


and prepare


for man-


finnrms participating in the survey
On-the-job training--including
t and Training Act (MDTA)--and
ed frequently. In addition, many
hired women for jobs traditionally
ng and accounting machines industry
1 manufacturing industries, pro-


with


the increase


for all


in 1967.


I/ By Alan L. Moss and
Market Information


this ar
cash re
industry
machine
and coi
upon 10
local o
of Empl
of 100,
National


ticle i
gisters
y produ
s, cash
n- and
'2 indiv
offices
oyment


s desi
, 1957
cts in
regis
current
idual
of the
Securi


represent o
. employment


Norma
nd Eco
gnated
Stand
clude
ters,
cy-han


Ausm'us,


Labor Economists, Division of


nomic Analysis, USES. The ind
as computing and accounting m
ard Industrial Classification
adding, calculating, bookkeepi
punched card and coded media,
dling machines. This analysis
ishment reports gathered in No


e employment
These establ
)percent of
were obtain


servi
ishmen
total
d from


ces
ts,
emp
th


affilia
having
loyment
e Bureau


te
a
in
o


ustry co
machines,
Code 357
ng and a
electron
is base
vember 1
d with t
minimum
the ind
f Labor


Job
ered by
including
. Chief
counting
c computers
largely
67 by
e Bureau


employment
ustry.
Statistics.


Additional


information


was obtained


from


various


government agencies







Due to the large number o
the industry in research
account for only one-half
quarters for all manufact
the computing and account
over the past decade, to
quarter of the industry's
industries.


f professional and technical personnel employed by
and development activities, production workers
of total employment (as compared with about three-
uring industries). The number of women employed in
ing machines industry has increased about 2 1/2 times
49,000 in 1967. They now constitute more than one-
workforce, about average for all manufacturing


Employment
of total
east, and
in three
(24,900).
Los Angel
in each,


t in the 102 surveyed est
industry employment--is 1
Western regions. Over h
States--New York (36,140)
Major industry employme
es-Long Beach areas with
and New York City with 9,


ablishments--representing over 90 percent
ocated mainly in the North Central, North-
alf of the surveyed employment was located
, California (34,700), and Minnesota
nt centers are the Minneapolis-St. Paul an
industry employment of approximately 20,00
000.


According to
employment w
The Business
15 percent r
at capacity


pro
ill
and
ise
and


sections
increase
Defense
in value
many new


made by participating establishments, total
about 4 percent between November 1967 and Ma
Services Administration (BDSA) recently proj
of shipments during 1968. Plants have been
facilities are under construction.


industry
y 1968.
ected a
operating


Enmolovment and Shipments Rise


EBployment
the Nation'
record keep
around the
planning, a
high of 182
the previous
(See table


changes in
s growing e
ing and inf
clock--now
nd coordina
,200 in 196
s year's to


the computing
economy, and it
ormation proce
control manufa
te distribution
7, employment


tal.


nEmployment


and accounting machines
s increased need for sys
sses. In addition, comp
cturing operations, assi
n centers. Reaching an
in this industry gained


has more


than doubled


industry reflect
tematizsing the
uters--running
st engineering
all-time annual
9 percent over


since


1958.


figure


Behind this surge in employment
for the industry's products.
percent from the previous year
as great as the 1958 total. F
gain in value of exports of $1
the rise, the industry enjoyed
million.


it has been a
In 1967, valu
to $5.3 bill
foreign demand
47 million. 2
Sits largest


strong domestic and foreign de
e of shipments rose more than
ion. I/ This is almost five t
was evidenced by an over the
/ Although imports also were
trade surplus in history--485


mand
10
times
year
on


Since-research and development is vital to progress in this
workforce includes many highly technical people--scientists,


industry, its
engineers, and


i/ U.S.
2/ Ibid.


Department of


Commerce,


Business


and Defense Services Administration.


d
0




II


Si


try
Blue
2ye
those
of a
refl
from


Production workers


employment compared to three-quarter
collar workers have a wide range of
ars of formal electronics training a
e with no specialized education who
diagram. Total production worker e
acting an 8 percent gain over the 19
1958.


account


for only one-half


s for all manufacture
skills--from those
nd do final testing
connect wires to a p
employment was 101,60
66 total and a 78 pe


indus-


ing industries
who have comply
of computers,
anel with the
0 in 1967,
recent increase


.
eted
to
use


Employment of women in the
increased, both in number a
the years. Contributing to
industry-an .increase of al
a. number of factors. There
accompanied by difficulty
addition, some of the work
such requirements as a high


computing and accounting machines
nd as a share of total industry e
the rise in the employment of wo
most 150 percent between 1958 and
has been an overall expansion of
in recruiting qualified male pers
has been particularly suitable fo
degree of finger dexterity, and


industry has


employment, o
men in this
1967--have
employment
onnel. In
r women due
the need for


ver

been


to


patience to


work at


tasks of


a somewhat


tedious and


detailed nature.


The industry outlook is for continued growth in both employment and shipments.
An expanding workforce was projected by the surveyed establishments. They
foresaw a 4 percent gain by mid-1968. The Business and Defense Services
Administration projected 1968 value of shipments to be $6.1 billion, a 15
percent increase over 1967. Value of exports in 1968, also projected by BDSA,
is anticipated to be 25 percent above the 1967 level.


Table


1 -Annual
in the


Value of Shipments and Annual Average Employment
Computing and Accounting Machines Industry


Annual Annual average employment Production
value of (in thousands) workers as
shipments Production a percent
Year (millions) Total Women workers of total

1958 $1,104 90.4 19.9 57.1 63.2
1959 1,302 93.9 21.6 60.2 64.1
1960 1,556 101.4 23.2 63.5 62.6
1961 1,677 107.7 24.2 64.7 60.1
1962 1,833 115.0 26.7 68.0 59.1
1963 2,020 119.9 27.7 68.3 57.0
1964 3,011 129.8 30.8 72.6 55.9
1965 3,353 146.7 36.5 82.7 56.4
1966 4,833 167.5 44.2 94.2 56.2
1967 5,325 1/ 182.2 49.2 101.6 55.8

I/ Estimated.


Source:


Bureau of Labor
Administration.


Statistics and Business and Defense Services


supporting personnel.




Figure 1.

Employment and Shipments

COMPUTING AND ACCOUNTING MACHINES INDUSTRY


1958-1967


Thousands of workers


Millions of dollars


225




200





175





150





125





100





75





50





25





0


* ft~ Zt*~~*'.. I






~J. ,. WI. g. 9 F
.
U. a.~. C -





J~ -... 4~lFt 'I

~ 4.






-. p. *1
i I *?- .:tr~


5,500




5,000





4,500





4,000





3,500





3,000





2,500





2,000





1,500





1,000


- a


-. -


- -


- am


A flWE n en a a a a a a a ncr n a a a a a cr = a n r C! S flC rr


r


A


A m A


IE dl





4


Table


2--Employment and Labor Requirements in Surveyed Establishments


and Accounting Machines


Industry ty Region, State,

November 1966 to May 1968


in the Computing


and Selected Areas


"" Pc \___..Total employment _Pre change
May November 1966 November 1967
Regions adif selected States November 1968 1/ to to
and areas_ 1967 1966 b projected November 1967 May 1968 I/


Total


NORTH CENTRAL


172.076


57,840


Wisconsin
Minnesota


Minneapolis -St.
Other 2/'
Ohio, Michigan,


24,879
20,844


Paul


156,695

51,546

1,810
17,563


178,450

58,950


1,300
25,650
21,450


+ 9.8


+12.2


-36.0


+13.5
+ 3.1


+31.4


Illinois


(combined)


NORTHEAST


31,803

57,375

8,269


Massachusetts


32,173

54,294

8,978


Boston


Connecticut


New York
New York City
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia
New Jersey


36,140
9,065


2,713

44,968


California


Los Angeles-Long Beach
San Francisco-Oakland


Anaheim-Santa Ana-Garden Grove
San Diego
Other 2/


34,702
19,588
3,759


33,616
7,704
7,038
6,993
3,039

41,815

30,162
20,835


+ 0.5


60,050


8,600
5,200
2,000
37,150
9,800
9,400
9,100
2,900


47,050

36,550
17,500
3,800
3,300


1,192


+4.7


+ 4.0


-30.6
+10.8


+17.7
+20.1
+18.0
-10.7


+7.


- 6.0
+8.8
+20.6
+47.9


+11.1
+ 2.8
+ 8.4
+11.6
+10.1
+6.4


+ 4.7


-10.7
+ 1.4
+4.6
+ 8.1


Arizona,


Colorado, and


Washington (combined)


10,266

11,893


11,653


9,040


10.500


-11.9


12,400


North Carolina


3,131
3,618


Florida


2.902


3,300
3,600


+464.1
+24.7


Other


Virginia, South Carolina,


Oklahoma. and Arkansas


(combined)


5C1L1L


5A~5O~Q


- 7.9


+Z~2


1/ Based on anticipated manpower needs of establishments surveyed in November 1967. Percen-
tage change data for November 1967 to May 1968 based on unrounded data.
2/ Individual State figures withheld to avoid disclosure of data for individual firms.


Source:


Employer reports compiled by State Employment Security


Agencies.


+ 3.7







Areas


Affected bv Industry's Growth


According to


the November


1967


survey of


the computing and accounting machines


industry


conducted


ment Service,


the No
fourth
in the
1967,
still
the So
1967.


abou


by the


t


rth Central and
in the West, a
North Central
while gains in
small compared
uth showed the
All four regio


Federal


iwo-thirds of
SNortheaster


,nd the
States
the We
with o
great
ns exo


remain
rose
st and
their m
st per
ected


-State network of the United States Employ-
the industry's employment is concentrated in
n Regions of the Nation., with about one-
nrider in the South.(See table 2.) Employment
12 percent between November 1966 and November
Northeast were about half as much. While
ajor regions in terms of industry employment,
centage gain in the year ending November
further increases in industry payrolls


between November


1967


and May 1968.


The su
last y
indust
percent
Angele
due to
other
Novemb


rvey


revealed a


ear between cert
ry employment.
t over the year
s-Long Beach are
the opening of
hand, industry e
er 1967--gained


more than
in the Bo


somewhat i
ain States
While Cali
to 34,700
a dropped
new plants
employment
18 percent


36,000--increased
ton, Mass., area


by o
dropp


regular pattern of


and t
fornia
in Nov
to 19,
in Ca
in the
, while
nly 8
ed by


heir
's em
ember
600,
lifor
New


const
ploym
1967
a dec
nia's
York


industry


ituent ma
ent incre
, employm
line of 6
more rur
City area


e employment in
percent from a


over


employment growth


jor areas
ased more
ent in the
percent.
al areas.
--over 9,0


the State a
year earlier


,000 during the year,


S


of
than
Los
Iflv


0
a


Tils was
On the
0 in
whole--
Employment


while


decline


in the State as


a whole


was


only


one-third


as great


Emnlovment Gains Most


in West Durinr Past


Decade


Accompanying the rapid
machines industry over
graphic distribution o
ment has expanded in a
trend has been toward
in the Northeast and N
in the West and South.


expansion o
the past de
the indust
1 regions o
decline in
rth Central


employment i
ade has been
y's workforce
the Nation,
the proportion
States and an


S
g
n


the computing and accounting
marked shift in the geo-
Although industry employ-
rowth has been uneven. The
of the industry's workforce
increase in the share located


For example,


in March


(unemployment insurance
accounted for 37 percent
workers in computing an
sharp drop from the 50 ]
these regions in March
the West and South, the
the workers in industry
1967 compared with only


Lthe


latest month


overage reco
nd the North
accounting ma
cent and 38
8. Reflect
st employed
tablishments
percent and


rds--ar
SCentra
chines
percent
ng the
25 perc
cover
2 perc


for which such da
e available_/ the
1 Region for 32 p
establishments.
shares of indust
faster growth of
ent and the South
d under State UI
ent respectively


ta--based
Northeast


erc


on UI


ent of all
s was a
employment
industry i
percent of
as in March
March 1958.


Over
1967


half
were


Next were


the nearly 1
three States


California


with


,000 UI covered workers
New York continued to


33,500 and Minnesota


1
le


with


n the industry
ad with 44,500
22,500. (See


in March
jobs.
table 3.)








In the years since
unemployment insura
stantially. During
California (25,300)
were relatively sma


1958, in all but
nce coverage data
this period the
, Minnesota (17,0
ll and occurred i


two
may
larg
00),
n Mi


of the nine Sta
be disclosed,
est numbers of
and Massachuse
chigan (1,600)


tes for which
employment r
workers were
tts (9,600).
and Connecti


h individual
ose sub-
added in
Losses
cut (100).


Skill Shortages Im.ede Production


Some of the
obsolesence
of markets
However, on
accounting I
manpower.


growing
of comp
or-used
of the
machines


pains exp
uter model
computers
most pers
industry


erienced
s, lack
, and na
intent p
has been


by the indus
f standards
ionalization
oblems confr
difficulty i


try have been the rapid
in programming, development
of foreign computer firms..
onting the computing and
n recruiting qualified


Of
tha
pro
For
mad
tha
sho


the 102 e
t they we
duction w
example,
e it impo
t its res
rtage of


stable
re en
'as be
one
ssibl
earch
elect


ishment
counter
ing res
large f
e to me
and de
ronics


s which par
ing shortage
tricted due
irm stated
et several
velopment a
engineers.


ticipated in the
es of personnel.
to labor short
that a shortage
contract dates o
activities have b


g
0
n
e


USES survey,
Indications
es in half of
f electronics
time. Anoth
en slowed due


54 s
were
the
ass
er s
to


stated
that
se firms.
emblers
stated
the


Some 1400 openings were reported in shortage occupations. The workers most
demand include engineers (mechanical, electronic, and electrical), clerical
workers (secretaries, clerk-typists, and stenographers), electronics
assemblers, programmers, and electronics technicians.(See table 4.)


Regionally, some 40 percent of the unmet demand was located in the Northeast,
33 percent in the West, and 22 percent in the North Central States. The
greatest number of serious manpower shortages, i.e., those impeding production
to some degree, were reported in the West and Northeast.(See table 5.)


- Although


and e
indus
Los A
ment
work
nation
indus


lec
try
nge
for
rs
n.


the need


tronic
emplo
les-Lo
the y
qualify
The 1


trial a


technicians
clerical per
there were a
assemblers,
In the New Y
programmers,


for certain occupations--engineers,


s technicians-appear
yment, other unmet d
ngC Roa r*V are-oa des aTi


A A~ Ad to I-~ '-0 J.-*-


ear
ied
4


1


nd ele
and me
sonnel
ilso re
engine


ork


Ci


ng


in spec
ants in
ctronic
chanics
appear
quireme
ers--me
ty and


clerical


s
em
+e


November 19
ific short
that area
s engineers
, and produ
ed greatest
nts for add
chanical, e
Philadelphi


workers,


to
and
it
67,
ce


0


'-S


are
, el
ctio
in
itio
lect
a ar


'e common to
appear mor
6 percent
reported a
occupations
recruiting
ectronics a
n machine o
the Minneap
nal electro


rical
eas,


all
e lo
decl
grea
than
for
ssem
pera
olis
nics


electronics


area


cal
ine
ter
. any
subs
bler
tors
-St.


n


tech


electronic


s with
n natu
n indu
eed fo
other
antial
, elec
Unme
Paul a
nician
c--and


the strongest demand


assemblers,
large
re. The
stry employ-
r additional
area in the
numbers of
tronics
t demand for
rea, where
s and
draftsmen.


was for


and engineers.


1
(


I


9






Table


3--Employment
Covered by S


Trends in Computing and Accounting Machines Establishments
Zate Unemployment Insurance Laws by Region and State


March


1958 to March 1967


March


1967


knlovmeint


Number


establish-


Region and


State


ments


Total


Percent
distri-
bution


March 1958


&nalc


Number


estab]ish-


ments


Total


Percent
change in


fyment employment
Percent March 1958
distri- to


button


March


Total


86,929


181,822

67,966


NORTHEAST


43,41+0


+109


+ 56.4


Massachusetts
Connecticut


New York


Pennsylvania
Other 1/
Rhode Island and


+1,068.


10,490
1,543
44,460
8,113


1.611


+17.9
+409.0


New Jersey
(combined)


NORTH CENTRAL


Illinois
Michigan
Minnesota
Other I/


3,360


+107.0


+73.3


33,048

1,877
10,634


3,817
9,010
22,506


+103.4
-15.3
+307.6


Ohio,


Indiana,


Wisconsin,
Missouri,
and Kansas
(combined)


Nebraska,


21,936


15,016

1,596


+46.1

640.0


Maryland, D
of Columbia


district
, Virginia,


North Carolina,


Carolina,
Florida,
Alabama,
Oklahoma,
(combined


South


Georgia,
Kentucky,
Arkansas,
and Texas


11,811

44.776


+640,0


8,845


10.2


+406


Colorado


California
Other 1/


4,338
33,483


8,179


+309.4


Wyoming,
Utah, an


Arizona,
id Washington


(combined)


I/ Separate State data withheld


to avoid disclosure of data for


individual firms.


Source:


First quarter 1958 and


1967 Unemployment Insurance data.


State Employment


+944.3


=







Table


4--Selected


Shortages


Reported


Surveyed


Computing


and Accounting Machines


November


Firms


1967


Establishments reporting Workers required in
Shortage occupation shortages shortage occupations


Total


Engineers
Mechanical
Electronic
Electrical
Industrial


Not specified

Clerical workers


Secretary
Clerk-Typist
Stenographer

Electronics assembler

Programmer


Electronics


technician


Draftsman


Production machine

Electronics mechani

Machinist


operator

C


Other occupations


Note:


Establishments


do not add to totaJ


since


many


firms


reported


shortages


in more


than


one occupation.


Source:


Employer


reports


*1
competed


State


Emp2 oyment


Security


Agencies.






Table 5--Surveyed Establishments and
Computing and Accounting Machines In


Establishments Reporting Job Shortages in
dusty by Region, State, and Selected Areas


November


Establish-


Regions and


selected States


and areas


Surveyed
establish-
ments


ments


re-


porting job
shortages


Workers


required in
shortage
occupations


Establish-
ments re-
porting job
shortages
impeding
production


Total

NOIRTHEAST


Massachus


etts


Boston
Connecticut


York


New York City
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia
New Jersey
iWEST

California


Los Angele
San Franci


s-Long Beach
sco-Oakland


Anaheim-Santa Ana-Garden Grove
San Diego
Other I/


Arizona,
Washingto


Colorado, a
n (combined


NORTH CENTRAL


Wisconsin
Minnesota


Minneapoli
Other 1/


s-St.


Paul


Ohio, Michigan, and
Illinois (combined)


SOUTH

North Carolina
Florida
Other I/


Virginia,
Okalahoma


South Carolina,


and Arkansas


(combined)


I/ Individual State figures withheld to avoid disclosure of


data for individual firms.


Source:


Employer reports compiled by State Employment Security


Agencies.






Meeting Mannower Needs

Establishments were utilizing a variety of means to compensate for personnel
shortages. The most usual approach was increased overtime. This was reflected
in an increase in the industry's average overtime hours as indicated by
Bureau of Labor Statistics data.


The second most frequent means appeared


to be the utilization of


women


in jobs


tradition
taught rep
provided i
manpower s
component
machine to


lly held
air work
nformatio
hortage.
insertion
ols, and


by
to
n o
Th
ma
the


men. I
offset
n advan
e use o
chines,
applic


one large establishment,
shortage of repairmen.
es in technology which ar
automatic wire-wrapping
conveyorize'd flow solderi
tion of computers has red


S
*e

.n
Lu


women ass
several es
helping
and solde
g systems
ced skill


emblers were
tablishments
to ease the
ring devices,
, high speed
shortages


enabled badly needed
mechanization.


labor to


be transferred


to functions not adaptable


Another technique used in reducing effects of the manpower
restructuring. Instead of having machine operators set up
plants have turned this function over to setup men; women
as the machine operators. Others have added extra shifts
numbers of part-time employees.


Recruitment Efforts


squeeze was job
their machines,
then are employed
and hired additional


Intensified


Due to the industry's increa
fdr new employees and effort
significant. Recruitment of
ads, local public employment
hiring. Special recruitment
country to secure technical


ing production and expanding employment,
at their recruitment have become increa
workers has been carried out through new
offices, employees' recommendations, and
campaigns on college campuses throughout
personnel have become more frequent.


the need
singly
spaper
.gate
the


Hiring specifications have been lowered by some establishments in an effort
compensate for the manpower shortage. The dropping of high school diploma
a prerequsite for employment and the lowering of experience and physical
qualifications were reported by several establishments.


Some firms have copled their
commitment to find jobs for
veterans who are being treat
specifications in these case
workers from an opportunity


need for additional manpower with th
the hard-core unemployed. One firm i
ed at a veterans' hospital--lowering
s. Another intends to hire and train
center which is providing preliminary


Nation's
hiring
,iring
disadvantaged
training.


Wares and


Hours Remain


Ak~n


Manufacturing


Average


The gap between hourly earnings in all manufacturing and the computing and
accounting machines industry narrowed slightly during the 1958-67 period.
However, the industry's average hourly production worker earnings remained
44 cent above the manufacturing average. (See figure 2.)






Figure


Average Hourly Production Worker Earnings

COMPUTING AND ACCOUNTING MACHINES INDUSTRY
AND ALL MANUFACTURING
1958-1967


Hourly wage rate
$3.40


Computing and accounting machines


KA II manufacturing


3.20



3.00



2.80



2.60




2.40



2.20



2.00


1958


1959


1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965


1966


1967






Average hourly production worker earnings


machines
Earnings
this is
as a who
averaged


industry, whi
had increased
less than the
le during the
42.1 during 1


ch ro
almo
34 pe
same
967,


in the computing and


less than one percent during
30 percent between 1958 and
nt gain registered in manufa
iod. Weekly hours worked by
hours more than the average


1967
967.
'turi
prod
in a


accounting
, were $3.27.
However,
ng industries
action employees
ll manufacturing.


Job Training Offered


bv Most Establishments


Formalized job training programs
accounting machines firms. These
worker shortages and to help the
in the future.


have been instituted by most computing and
have been designed both to reduce current
industry prepare for expanding manpower needs


Most frequently reported was on-the-job training, offered to newly hired
electronics assemblers and production machine operators. Apprenticeship
training, also offered by a number of firms, has been limited generally to
tool and die makers.


Many programs


Training
the compu
graduates
draftsmen
Service h
and areass
courses t
allowance


sponsored


Act are for o
ting and acco


hired
and
s bee
unable
prov
when


by the
:lerica
Given
expect
de job
these


by funds


occupation
hunting ma
industry
1 workers
broad re
nation of
training
are provi


s


allocated
which have


under
been


chines industry
were reported
. Under this 1
sponsibilities
employment" in:
. In addition
ded under the 1


the
repo
The
be a
slat
dete
atio
payi
the


Manpower Development am
rted in short supply by
largest numbers of MDTA
ssemblers, mechanics,
ion, the Employment
rmining skill shortages
n to establishing
ng training subsistence
Employment Service


selects,


tests,


counsels,


eventually places MDTA


trainees with employers.




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