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Feasibility of a state farmers' market in the Suwannee River valley of Florida
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00008175/00001
 Material Information
Title: Feasibility of a state farmers' market in the Suwannee River valley of Florida
Physical Description: 21 leaves : maps ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Rich, J. R ( Jimmy Ray ), 1950-
Lashley, T. H
Hodge, C
Publisher: IFAS Agricultural Research and Education Center
Place of Publication: Live Oak, Fla
Publication Date: 1986
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Farmers' markets -- Planning -- Suwannee River Valley (Ga. and Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Farm produce -- Marketing -- Suwannee River Valley (Ga. and Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (leaves 20-21).
Statement of Responsibility: prepared by J.R. Rich, T.H. Lashley, C. Hodge.
General Note: "Revised Draft March 14, 1986."
General Note: "In cooperation with: Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Florida Farm Bureau, Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce, Cooperative Extension Services (Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette, Madison, and Suwannee)."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 646068372
ocn646068372
Classification: lcc - S571 .R53 1986
System ID: AA00008175:00001

Full Text







FEASIBILITY OF A STATE FARMERS


MARKET IN THE SUWANNEE RIVER VALLEY OF FLORIDA



Prepared By:

J. R. Rich, T. H. Lashley, C. Hodge

IFAS Agricultural Research and Education Center
Live Oak, Florida






REVISED DRAFT MARCH 14, 1986
















In Cooperation With:

Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Florida Farm Bureau
Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce
Cooperative Extension Services
[Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette, Madison, and Suwannee]







FOREWORD


The economic survival of North Florida is dependent upon the

success of its agricultural industries. While the state as a

whole has experienced an economic boom in recent years, those

areas where agriculture is the economic base have suffered.

Agricultural finance experts estimate that between 1,500 and

2,000 farms in Florida will fail from January 1986 to June 1987,

with 80 to 90 percent of these in North Florida. The extent of

the crisis in North Florida reaches far beyond the farm family

itself, to affect the entire economy of the region. This is the

first in a series of studies into alternatives for small farmers

and indeed agriculture as a whole in North Florida.

The viable alternatives for North Florida would include the

addition of a strong vegetable production component to the

predominant mixed row crop and livestock systems. A prominent

problem in vegetable production has been inaccessiblity to

markets. As a result growers in the Suwannee River Valley area

of Florida have long sought a State Farmers' Market or a similar

facility for their emerging vegetable industry. Efforts from the

local Farm Bureaus and Chambers of Commerce of Suwannee,

Hamilton, Madison, Lafayette and Columbia counties have resulted

in feasibility studies in Columbia (1978), Lafayette (1983), and

Suwannee Counties (1984). Attempts at securing assistance over

the past 8 years, however, have not led to suitable conclusions.

An analysis of the situation indicates that the lack of a

consolidated, regional data base might have contributed to the








inability of this region to obtain the requested assistance.

This study, involving five counties in the area (Columbia,

Hamilton, Lafayette, Madison, and Suwannee), was conducted to

provide such a base from which appropriate decisions could be

made.



RESULTS SUMMARY



The five county area that this study centered upon includes

over 350,000 acres of cultivated land, with over 30,000 of those

acres under irrigation (Table 1) Sufficient quantities of

vegetables were shown to be produced to qualify for a major

State Farmers Market according to DACS guidelines (J. L. McMullen

report, watermelon shed report, North Florida feasibility study).

The 1985 DACS feasibility study of a State Farmers' Market in

North Central Florida states that a minimum of about 200 acres of

mixed vegetables are required to support a profitable grading,

packing, and shipping business and 600 acres are needed to

support a marketing facility. In the five county study area

alone growers produced at least 3,414 acres of mixed vegetables

(plus 9,000 acres of watermelons) for the fresh market in 1985

(Table 2). Also the profitability of several crops grown in the

area can be demonstrated (Tables 3-12). This acreage, then,

should provide a basis for a strong, viable, and competitive

state marketing facility. Most of the fresh vegetables grown in

the area go to the Thomasville, Ga. market; however, without a

major regional marketing or shipping/packing facility further

expansion of the vegetable industry is doubtful (Figure 1).







In addition to the adequate agricultural resources, a

marketing facility would benefit from two major advantages

inherent to the Suwannee River Valley the name Suwannee and

the crossing of major interstates 1-10 and 1-75 (Figure 2). For

example, the area near 1-10 and 1-75 has been suggested to be an

ideal location for a facility to mix vegetable -oads from other

areas of Florida. Additionally, as one looks to the future,

statewide population increases have created pressure for the

urbanization of agricultural lands. Many of the traditional

Florida vegetable producing areas have felt this urban

encroachment and, if population projections are realized, will be

affected even more in the next ten years. The Suwannee River

Valley has large yet unused agricultural acreages and resources,

and has not been affected as greatly as have the agricultural

areas of south and central Florida. The increasing population

coupled with increasing per capital consumption of fruits and

vegetables can greatly enhance the market for Suwannee River

Valley produce.

Data in this report suggest that the area has most of the

positive aspects that would support operation of a large facility

nearly year-round. Such a facility would require a strong

cooperative effort between IFAS, DACS, and the Florida Farm

Bureau to assure not only success, but continued economic

expansion in North Florida.










LIST OF FIGURES


Figure 1. The Florida State Farmers' Markets: Small

Vegetable Markets are those that have limited vegetable

handling facilities, or that handle low volumes of

vegetables. Major Vegetable Markets are those that have

full vegetable handling facilities and move a variety of

vegetables.



Figure 2. The Suwannee River Valley of North Florida.



























S SUWANNEE VALLEY AREA

* SMALL VEGETABLE MARKETS

O MAJOR VEGETABLE MARKETS

* POTENTIAL NEW MARKET SITE


0 WAUCHULA


TKA


PLANT
CITY


FORT


&C I C?
,vc3,o.






























LIVE
OAK









Table 1. Total cropland and irrigated land in five counties of

the Suwannee River Valley in 1982.a


Acres of

Cornt-v Cultivated Land


Acres of

Trriaated Land


Columbia



Hamilton



Lafayette



Madison



Suwannee


62,948


40,597


4,036


3,572


35,761


5,250


85,251


5,584


126,832


13,001


Totl 1


31,443A


Source of data: 1982 Census of Agriculture.



The Cooperative Extension Services in these counties estimate

that about 38-45% of that irrigated land was idle in 1985.


R1.-IRQ


~__~


--


---~- 1"-'~V-










Table 2. Acreages of vegetables and watermelons grown for market

in five counties of the Suwannee River Valley, 1985.



County VegetablesA Watermelonsb



Columbiac 107 2100

Hamilton 705 300

Lafayette 1000 3000

Madison 490 900

Suwanneed 1112 2700



Total 3414 9000


aSource: Values for Columbia and Lafayette counties are based on

estimates from the Cooperative Extension Service, while the other

values are based on actual grower contacts.


Source: Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services,

Division of Marketing.


cColumbia County also reported 72 acres U-pic and 75 acres grown

on contract.


In addition there were 26 acres U-pic and 880 acres grown on

contract in Suwannee County.









Table 3. Vegetables (fresh) that were rated high in both

profitability (50% of score) and the ability of growers to

produce (50% of score)*.


Vegetable

Bell Pepper

Collards

Eggplant

Mustard

SOkra

Peppers (mixed)

Rutabagas

Southern peas

Turnips


Relative

Score

23

20

21

16

28

23

20

17

16


Comments

Good prospects

Experience in the area

Good for small acreages

Experience, collard companion

High value, small acreage

Small acreage, bell pepper comp.

Good competitive potential

Experience in the area

Experience, collard companion


*Scoring systems based on 0-30, with 30 indicating a very high

relative profitability and relative ease of production with farm

resources now in place. Profitibility ratings were determined by

anticipated income (season long average price/bushel, and

bushels/acre) less cost of production based on production and

handling budgets. The ability of growers to produce was

determined by six criteria (farm infrastructure, biophysical

environment, financial risks, required management, handling or

packing, and whether demand is continuous or short lived).











Table 4. Harvest months and availability of selected vegetables grown in the Suwannee
River Valley Area of Florida.


CROPS

BELL PEPPER

COLLARDS

EGGPLANTS

MUSTARD

OKRA

RUTABAGAS

SOUTHERN PEAS

TURNIPS


JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT.

XX XXXX XX XXXX


XX XX


XXX XXXX


XX XXXX XXXX XXXX XXXX


XX XX


XXX XXXX


XXXX XXXX


XXXX XXXX


XXXX XXXX XXXX

XXXX XXXX XXXX XXXX XXXX


YY YY


YYY VVVY


OCT.

XXXX

X

XXXX

XXX

XXX



XXX

YYYY


NOV.

XX

XXXX



XXXX

X

XX

X

YyYY


CIRCULAR 473 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

PORTFOLIO 11-6M-84 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

(X) indicates quantity expected to be available due to growing season conditions
(e.g., a freeze) or to time of year. Four X's indicate full production expected in
any one month.


DEC


XX



XXXX



XXXX



YYYY


DEC.


i


^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^^







PROFITABILITY DATA


Staff at the IFAS AREC, Live Oak, have studied over 50

vegetable crops that could be or are presently grown in the

Suwannee Valley area of Florida. Studies were predominately

based upon crop profitability as determined through published

production, shipping and handling charges. Seasonal average

prices for the 1984 and 1985 seasons at the Thomasville, GA

market were utilized to determine relative gross income from the

vegetable crops. Where data were not available, information from

Other universities or private concerns was gathered. These data

should be utilized as a guide, not as a definitive of either

production costs or profitability of crops. Listed on the

following pages are some crops that show promise for

profitability in the Suwannee Valley area of Florida and are

currently grown in varying amounts throughout the area.








Table 5. Estimated production costs and income
mixed peppers in the Suwannee Valley.


for bell peppers or


ITEM UNIT QUANTITY PRICE AMOUNT

PRE-HARVEST VARIABLE COSTSa
PLANTS/SEED 1,000 14.0 9.50 133.00
LIME Ton 0.4 24.00 10.00
FERTILIZER 15-20-20 Cwt. 8.0 8.00 -64.00
SIDEDRESSING 15-0-31 Cwt, 4.0 6.90 27.60
INSECTICIDE Est. 30.00
FUNGICIDE Applic. 5.0 9.30 46.50
NEMATICIDE Est. 50.00
HERBICIDE Est. 16.00
MACHINERY Hourly 6.0 4.00 24.00
LABOR Hourly 8,0 3.50 28.00
IRRIGATION Applic. 5.0 10.00 50.00
INTEREST ON
OPER. CAP. (479.10) Annually 0.5 .12 28.75
TOTAL PRE-HARVEST VARIABLE COSTS 507.85

PRE-HARVEST FIXED COSTS


MACHINERY Hourly 6.0 6.00 36.00
IRRIGATION Acre 1.0 35.00 35.00


LAND
TOTAL PRE-HARVEST FIXED COSTS


25.00
96.00


TOTAL PRE-HARVEST COSTS

HARVEST AND MARKETING COSTS
PICKING AND HAULING
GRADING AND PACKING
SrnTANTMP


603.85


Each
Each


MARKETING Each_
TOTAL HARVEST AND MARKETING COSTS


1.00
1.00
i nn


f;nn


1 lnn


rnn--------- --1- _-


TOTAL ESTIMATED PRODUCTION COSTS PER ACRE (5.01/carton)


600.00
600.00

__6mLOL
2,400.00


3,.003.85


ESTIMATED GROS 9INCQiMEZACREb I2/.74 2aronl ______44iAA


ESTIMATED NET INCOME/ACRE


1,040.15


production costs were adapted for the Suwannee Valley Area from
Circular 473 "Growing Quality Vegetables in Florida," University of
Florida and "1985 Vegetable Enterprise Cost Analysis," University of
Georgia.

Estimated income is based on the Thomasville, Ga. Market average
for 1984 and 1985.


- _iAdid--M--__ --- ----- ------- _______


600
600
cnn








Table 6. Estimated production costs
Suwannee Valley.


and income for collards in the


ITEM UNIT QUANTITY PRICE AMOUNT

PRE-HARVEST VARIABLE COSTSa
PLANTS/ SEED ___lb. 40 2.95 11.80
LIME Ton 0.4 24.00 10.00
FERTILIZER 15-20-20 __ Ct. 7.3 8.00 58.64
SIDEDRESSING 26-0-13 Cwt. 2.3 7.70 17.86
INSECTICIDE Est. 24.00
FUNGICIDE Applic. 3,0 9.30 27.90
NEMATICIDE Q---_________________________0
HERBICIDE Est. 10__,
MACHINERY Hourly 3.0 4.00 12.00
LABOR Hourly 3.5 3.50 12.25
IRRIGATION Appli c. 3.0 10.00 30.00
INTEREST ON
OPER. CAP. (214.45) Annually 0.5 .12 12.87
TOTAL PRE-HARVEST VARIABLE COSTS 227.32

PRE-HARVEST FIXED COSTS
MACHINERY Hourly 3.0 6.00 18.00
IRRIGATION Acre 1.0 35.00 35.00
LAND 25.00
TOTAL PRE-HARVEST FIXED COSTS 78.00

TOTAL PRE-HARVEST COSTS 305.32

HARVEST AND MARKETING COSTS
PICKING AND HAULING Dozen 500 .50 250.00
GRADING AND PACKING (Ice) Dozen 500 1.00 500.00
CONTAINER Dozen 500 2.00 1,000.00
MARKETING Dozen 500 1.00 500.00
TOTAL HARVEST AND MARKETING COSTS 2,250.00


TOTAL ESTIMATED PRODUCTION COSTS PER ACRE (5.11/carton) 2,555.32


ESTIMATED GROSS INOEAC l 6.82/carton)


3,410.00


ESTIMATED NET INCOME/ACRE


854.68


production costs were adapted for the Suwannee Valley Area from
Circular 473 "Growing Quality Vegetables in Florida," University of
Florida and "1985 Vegetable Enterprise Cost Analysis," University of
Georgia.
Estimated income is based on the Thomasville, Ga. Market average
for 1984 and 1985.








Table 7. Estimated production costs and income
Suwannee Valley.


TTRM


IINTT


PRE-HARVEST VARIABLE COSTS
PLANTS/SEED
LIME
FERTILIZER 15-20-20
SIDEDRESSING 15-0-31


lb.
Ton
Cwt
rwwt


OIANPTTTV


for eggplant in the


PRTCR


AMOUNT


92.00
10.00
64.00
27.60


4.0
0.4
8.0
A n


INSECTICIDE Est. 24.00
FUNGICIDE Applic. 4.0 9.30 37.20
NEMATICIDE Est. 50.00
HERBICIDE Est. 16.00
MACHINERY Hourly 6.0 4.00 24.00
LABQR Hourly 8.0 3.50 28.00
IRRIGATION _Applic. 4.0 10.00 40.00
INTEREST ON
OPER. CAP. (412.00) Annually 0.5 .12 24.77
TOTAL PRE-HARVEST VARIABLE COSTS 436.77

PRE-HARVEST FIXED COSTS
MACHINERY Hourly 6.0 6.00 36.00
IRRIGATION Acre 1.0 35.00 35.00


LAND
TOTAL PRE-HARVEST FIXED COSTS


25.00
96.00


TOTAL PRE-HARVEST COSTS


HARVEST AND MARKETING COSTS
PICKING AND HAULING Each
GRADING AND PACKING Each
CONTAINER Each
MARKETING Each
TOTAL HARVEST AND MARKETING COSTS


700

700
700
'7n n


_ 50
.50
1.00
1.00


350.00
350.00
700.00
700.00
2,100.00


TOTAL ESTIMATED PRODUCTION COSTS PER ACRE (3.76/carton)


2,632.77


ESTIMATED GROSS INCOME/AC Eb (4.96/carton)


ESTIMATED NET INCOME/ACRE


3.472.00


839.23


production costs were adapted for the Suwannee Valley Area from
Circular 473 "Growing Quality Vegetables in Florida," University of
Florida and "1985 Vegetable Enterprise Cost Analysis," University of
Georgia.

Estimated income is based on the Thomasville, Ga. Market average
for 1984 and 1985.


532.77


''~'' ""' ""~~"~


--


I -- _


I vv


- --- --


`r ~-~----


23.00
24.00
8.00
A_ on








Table 8. Estimated production costs and income
Suwannee Valley.


for mustard in the


ITEM UNIT QUANTITY PRICE AMOUNT

PRE-HARVEST VARIABLE COSTSa
PLANTS/SEED lb. 4.0 2.95 11.80
LIME Ton 0.4 24.00 10.00
FERTILIZER 15-20-20 Cwt. 7.0 8.00 56.00
SIDEDRESSING 26-0-13 Cwt. 1.2 7.70 8.93
INSECTICIDE Est. 24.00
FUNGICIDE Applic. 3.0 9.30 27.90
NEMATICIDE 0.00
HERBICIDE Est. 10.00
MACHINERY Hourly 3.0 4.00 12.00
LA___ Hourly _3.5 3.50 12.25
IRRIGATION Applic. 3.0 10.00 30.00
INTEREST ON
OPER. CAP. (202.88) Annually 0.5 0.12 12.17
TOTAL PRE-HARVEST VARIABLE COSTS 215.05

PRE-HARVEST FIXED COSTS
MACHINERY Hourly 3.0 6.00 18.00
IRRIGATION Acre 1.0 35.00 35.00
LAND 25.00
TOTAL PRE-HARVEST FIXED COSTS 78.00

TOTAL PRE-HARVEST COSTS 293.05

HARVEST AND MARKETING COSTS
PICKING AND HAULING Dozen 300 0.50 150.00
GRADING AND PACKING (Ice) Dozen 300 1.00 300.00
CONTAINER Dozen 300 2.00 600.00
MARKETING Dozen 300 1.00 300.00
TOTAL HARVEST AND MARKETING COSTS 1,350.00


TOTAL ESTIMATED PRODUCTION COSTS PER ACRE (5.48/carton) 1,643.05


ESTIMATED GROSS INOEA b(6.82/carton)


ESTIMATED NET INCOME/ACRE


2.046.00


402.95


production costs were adapted for the Suwannee Valley Area from
Circular 473 "Growing Quality Vegetables in Florida," University of
Florida and "1985 Vegetable Enterprise Cost Analysis," University of
Georgia.

Estimated income is based on the Thomasville, Ga. Market average
for 1984 and 1985.


'-~--~ --`r-~~-~~~ -~------








Table 9. Estimated production costs and income for okra in the
Suwannee Valley.


T]NTT


OHiANTTTV


PRTCR


AMAnNT


PRE-HARVEST VARIABLE COSTSa
PLANTS/SEED lb.
LIME Ton
FERTILIZER 15-20-20 Cwt.
SIDEDRESSING 26-0-13 Cwt.
INSECTICIDE
FUNGICIDE
NEMATICIDE
HERBICIDE
MACHINERY Hourly
LABOR _Hourly
IRRIGATION Applic.
INTEREST ON
OPER. CAP. (286.36) Annually


0.4


6.0
12.0
' n


2.40
24.00
8.00
7 70


4.00
3.50
in nn


19.20
10.00
56.00
17.86
Est. 12.00
Est. 9.30
Est. 50.00
Est. 16.00
24.00
42.00
30 00


TOTAL PRE-HARVEST VARIABLE COSTS 303.54

PRE-HARVEST FIXED COSTS
MACHINERY Hourly 6.0 6.00 36.00
IRRIGATION Acre 1.0 35.00 35.00
LAND 25.00
TOTAL PRE-HARVEST FIXED COSTS 96.00

TOTAL PRE-HARVEST COSTS 399.54

HARVEST AND MARKETING COSTS
PICKING AND HAULING Bushel 300 3.00 900.00
GRADING AND PACKING Bushel 300 1.00 300.00
CONTAINER Bushel 300 1.00 300.00
MARKETING Bushel 300 1.00 300.00
TOTAL HARVEST AND MARKETING COSTS 1,800.00


TOTAL ESTIMATED PRODUCTION COSTS PER ACRE (7.33/cartonl 2.199.54


ESTIMATED GROSS INCOME/ACREb (12.45/carton)


1.73 s n


ESTIMATED NET INCOME/ACRE


1,535.46


Production costs were adapted for the Suwannee Valley Area from
Circular 473 "Growing Quality Vegetables in Florida," University of
Florida and "1985 Vegetable Enterprise Cost Analysis," University of
Georgia.

Estimated income is based on the Thomasville, Ga. Market average
for 1984 and 1985.


ITEM


_ ___ __


Z


, ,

0 5 0 12 17 18


~'" '" ""


_ ~








Table 10. Estimated production costs and income
the Suwannee Valley.


for rutabagas in


ITEM UNIT QUANTITY PRICE AMOUNT

PRE-HARVEST VARIABLE COSTSa
PLANTS/SEED lb. 4.0 2.95 11.80
LIME Ton 0.4 24.00 10.00
FERTILIZER 15-20-20 Cwt. 7.0 8.00 56.00
SIDEDRESSING 26-0-13 Cwt. 1.2 7.70 8.93
INSECTICIDE Est. 24.00
FUNGICIDE Applic. 3.0 9.30 27.90
NEMATICIDE 0.00
HERBICIDE Est. 10.00
MACHINERY Hourly 3.0 4.00 12.00
LABQR_ Hourly 3.5 3.50 12.25
IRRIGATION Applic. 3.0 10.00 30.00
INTEREST ON
OPER. CAP. (202.88) Annually 0.5 .12 12.17
TOTAL PRE-HARVEST VARIABLE COSTS 215.05

PRE-HARVEST FIXED COSTS
MACHINERY Hourly 3.0 6.00 18.00
IRRIGATION Acre 1.0 35.00 35.00
LAND 25.00
TOTAL PRE-HARVEST FIXED COSTS 78.00

TOTAL PRE-HARVEST COSTS 293.05

HARVEST AND MARKETING COSTS
PICKING AND HAULING Bushel 400 .50 200.00
GRADING AND PACKING (Wax) Bushel 400 1.00 400.00
CONTAINER Bushel 400 1.00 400.00
MARKETING Bushel 400 1.00 400.00
TOTAL HARVEST AND MARKETING COSTS 1,400.00


TOTAL ESTIMATED PRODUCTION COSTS PER ACRE (4.23/carton) 1.693.05


ESTIMATED GROSS INCOME/ACREb (6.20/carton)


2. n nn


ESTIMATED NET INCOME/ACRE


786.95


production costs were adapted for the Suwannee Valley Area from
Circular 473 "Growing Quality Vegetables in Florida," University of
Florida and "1985 Vegetable Enterprise Cost Analysis," University of
Georgia.
Estimated income is based on the Thomasville, Ga. Market average
for 1984 and 1985.


- ---------








Table 11. Estimated production costs and income for southern peas
in the Suwannee Valley.


ITEM UNIT QUANTITY PRICE AMOUNT

PRE-HARVEST VARIABLE COSTSa
PLANTS/SEED lb. 20.0 1.20 24.00
LIME Ton 0.4 24.00 10.00
FERTILIZER 15-20-20 Cwt. 4.0 8.00 32.00
SIDEDRESSING 15-0-31 Cwt. 1.0 6.90 6.90
INSECTICIDE Applic. 6.0 8.50 51.00
FUNGICIDE Applic. 1.0 9.30 9.30
NEMATICIDE Est. 25.00
HERBICIDE Est. 10.00
MACHINERY Hourly 6.0 4.00 24.00
LABOQR Hourly 8.0 3.50 28.00
IRRIGATION Applic. 5.0 10.00 50.00
INTEREST ON
OPER. CAP. (270.02) Annually 0.5 0.12 16.21
TOTAL PRE-HARVEST VARIABLE COSTS 286.23

PRE-HARVEST FIXED COSTS
MACHINERY Hourly 6.0 6.00 36.00
IRRIGATION Acre 1.0 35.00 35.00
LAND 25.00
TOTAL PRE-HARVEST FIXED COSTS 96.00

TOTAL PRE-HARVEST COSTS 382.23

HARVEST AND MARKETING COSTS
PICKING AND HAULING Each 200 1.50 300.00
GRADING AND PACKING Each 200 .50 100.00
CONTAINER Each 200 1.00 200.00
MARKETING Each 200 1.00 200.00
TOTAL HARVEST AND MARKETING COSTS 800.00


TOTAL ESTIMATED PRODUCTION COSTS PER ACRE (5.91/carton) 1.182.23


ESTIMATED GROSS INCOME/ACREb (7.68/carton)


ESTIMATED NET INCOME/ACRE


1,536.00


353.77


-a
production costs were adapted for the Suwannee Valley Area from
Circular 473 "Growing Quality Vegetables in Florida," University of
Florida and "1985 Vegetable Enterprise Cost Analysis," University of
Georgia.

Estimated income is based on the Thomasville, Ga. Market average
for 1984 and 1985.


--








Table 12. Estimated production costs and income
Suwannee Valley.


for turnips in the


ITEM UNIT QUANTITY PRICE AMOUNT

PRE-HARVEST VARIABLE COSTSa
PLANTS/SEED lb. 4.0 2.95 11.80
LIME Ton 0.4 24.00 10.00
FERTILIZER 15-20-20 Cwt. 7.0 8.00 56.00
SIDEDRESSING 26-0-13 Cwt. 1.2 7.70 8.93
INSECTICIDE Est. 24.00
FUNGICIDE Appli. 3.0 9.30 27.90
NEMATICIDE 0.00
HERBICIDE Est. 10.00
MACHINERY Hourly 3.0 4.00 12.00
LABOR Hourly 3.5 3.50 12.25
IRRIGATION Appli. 3.0 10.00 30.00
INTEREST ON
OPER. CAP. (202.88) Annually 0.5 .12 12.17
TOTAL PRE-HARVEST VARIABLE COSTS 215.05

PRE-HARVEST FIXED COSTS
MACHINERY Hourly 3.0 6.00 18.00
IRRIGATION Acre 1.0 35.00 35.00
LAND 25.00
TOTAL PRE-HARVEST FIXED COSTS 78.00

TOTAL PRE-HARVEST COSTS 293.05

HARVEST AND MARKETING COSTS
PICKING AND HAULING Dozen 300 .50 150.00
GRADING AND PACKING Dozen 300 1.00 300.00
CONTAINER Dozen 300 2.00 600.00
MARKETING Dozen 300 1.00 300.00
TOTAL HARVEST AND MARKETING COSTS 1,350.00


TOTAL ESTIMATED PRODUCTION COSTS PER ACRE (5.48/carton) 1,643.05


ESTIMATED GROSS INCOME/ACREb (6.82/carton)


9 -nA n


ESTIMATED NET INCOME/ACRE


402.95


production costs were adapted for the Suwannee Valley Area from
Circular 473 "Growing Quality Vegetables in Florida," University of
Florida and "1985 Vegetable Enterprise Cost Analysis," University of
Georgia.

Estimated income is based on the Thomasville, Ga. Market average
for 1984 and 1985.


-- ----- ----







SOURCES OF INFORMATION

Annon. 1984. Regional farmer's market survey. Suwannee County
Chamber of Commerce Agribusiness Committee, Live Oak.

Brown, T. B., and R. W. Johnson. 1982. Important farmlands of
Florida and trends in their use. Proc. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc.
of Fla. Vol. 41, p. 18-24.

Census of Agriculture, 1982. U. S. Department of Commerce,
Bureau of the Census. Vol. 1, Part 9.

Degner, R. L. et al. 1985. Evaluation of a multi-vegetable
freezing facility for the North Central region. Univ. Fl., IFAS,
Gainesville and Quincy.

Federal-State Marketing News Service. 1983. California fresh
fruit and vegetable shipments. USDA-Ca. Dept. Food and Agric.,
Sacramento.

Federal-State Marketing News Service. 1984. Marketing Florida
Vegetables, Summary 1983-84. USDA-Fl. Dept. Agr. and Cons. Ser.,
Winter Park.

Federal-State Marketing News Service. 1984. Marketing
California vegetables. USDA-Ca. Dept. Food and Agric.,
Sacramento.

Florida Agriculture in the '80s: Special Issues Committee
Reports. 1983. Univ. of Fl.,IFAS, Gainesville.

Florida Agriculture in the '80s: Conference Report. 1983. Univ.
of Fl., IFAS, Gainesville.

Flrida Agriculture in the '80s: Support Commitees: Assessment
and Analysis. 1983. Univ. of Fl., IFAS, Gainesville.

Florida Crop and Livestock Reporting Service. 1985. Vegetable
Summary, 1984. Fl. Dept. Agri. and Cons. Ser., Orlando.

Good, J., .t al. 1980. 1979 Irrigation Survey: State of
Florida. Univ. of Fl. IFAS, Gainesville.

Luke, D. B., P. J. Rathwell, and W. P. Cook. 1985. South
Carolina small farm vegetable budgets. Clemson Univ., Clemson,
SC.

McMullen, J. L. 1980. McMullen Food Bank, Inc. A Prospectus.
Live Oak.

Olson, S. M. 1984. Management and cultural techniques for small
farm vegetable production. Univ. Fl., IFAS, Quincy.

Olson, S. M., and M. A. Eason. 1984. Selected vegetable budgets
- North Florida, 1984. Univ. Fl., IFAS, Quincy.








Perry, A. F. 1978. Columbia County watermelon shed feasibility
study. Fl. Dept. Agri. and Cons. Serv., Tallahassee.

Perry, A. F. 1979. The feasibility of locating a state farmer's
market in the Pensacola area. Fl. Dept. Agri. and Cons. Serv.,
Tallahassee.

Perry, A. F. 1983. Lafayette County marketing opportunities.
Fl. Dept. Agri. and Cons. Serv., Tallahassee.

Perry, A. F. 1985. Feasibility of a state farmer's market in
North Central Florida and the need for additional community
markets. Fl. DePt, Agri. and Cons. Serv., Tallahassee.

Perry, A. F. 1985. Determination of crops suitable for
production in Walton County. Fl. Dept. Agr. and Cons. Serv.,
Tallahassee.

Rathwell, J. P., and D. B. Luke. 1985. South Carolina vegetable
budgets for commercial producers 1985 and 1986. Clemson Univ.,
Clemson, SC.

Stephens, J. M. 1982. Know your minor vegetables. Univ. Fl.,
IFAS, Gainesville.

Taylor, T. G. 1984. Projected costs and returns for 1984-1985
production season. Univ. Fl., IFAS, Gainesville.

Thomasville State Farmers Market. 1984. Annual Report. Georgia
Dept. of Agri., Atlanta.

Thomasville State Farmers Market. 1985. Annual Report. Georgia
Dept. of Agri., Atlanta.

VanSickle, J. J. __ Computer aided marketing of produce a
concept no longer waiting for the future. Univ. Fl., IFAS,
Gainesville.

Westberry, G. 0., and W. O. Mizelle, Jr. 1984. 1985 Vegetable
enterprise costs analysis. Univ. Ga. Coop. Ext. Serv., Athens.

William, R. D. 1981. Growing quality vegetables in Florida.
Univ. Fl., IFAS, Gainesville.