Proposed code of fair competition for the aircraft manufacturing industry as submitted on August 31, 1933

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Material Information

Title:
Proposed code of fair competition for the aircraft manufacturing industry as submitted on August 31, 1933
Portion of title:
Aircraft manufacturing industry
Physical Description:
3 p. : ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Recovery Administration
Publisher:
U.S. Government Printing Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Aircraft industry -- Law and legislation -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
At head of title: National Recovery Administration.
General Note:
"Registry No. 1403-1-01."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004938032
oclc - 649394469
System ID:
AA00008136:00001

Full Text

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Registry No. 1401-1--01


NATIONAL RECOVERY ADMINISTRATION



PROPOSED CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION
FOR THE

AIRCRAFT MANUFACTURING

INDUSTRY
AS SUBMITTED ON AUGUST 31, 1933


The Code for the Aircraft Manufacturing Industry
in its present form merely reflects the proposal of the above-mentioned
industry, and none of the provisions contained therein are
to be regarded as having received the approval of
the National Recovery Administration
as applying to this industry



UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTINp OFFICE
WASHINGTON: 1933

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents. Washington, DJC. Price 5 cenla

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SUBMITTED BY

THE AERONAUTICAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF AMERICA., INC.


11111















PROPOSED CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR THE AIR-
CRAFT MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY

ARTICLE I

This Code is adopted pursuant to the National Industrial Recovery
Act. It is presented by the Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce
of America, Inc., the recognized trade association of the aircraft
manufacturing industry, and shall apply during the period in which
the N.I.R.A. is in effect. It has been approved and agreed to by the
Aircraft Manufacturing Section of said Chamber. Its purpose is
to effectuate the policy of the N.I.R.A. insofar as applicable to this
industry.
ARTICLE II

SECTION 1. The basic processes in the aircraft manufacturing
industry are of a continuous character and cannot be changed in this
respect without serious adverse effect on production and employ-
ment. Having this in mind, and with the exception of executives,
of those employed in technical work and other supervisory and/or
administrative positions, emergency and maintenance work, no mem-
ber of this Code shall employ any worker for more than an average
of forty (40) hours per week for fifty-two (52) weeks.
SEC. 2. No member of this Code shall knowingly employ any
person under sixteen (16) years of age.
SEC. 3. Pursuant to subsection (a) of Section 7 of N.I.R.A., and so
long as this Code shall be in effect, this Code shall be subject to the
following conditions:
(a) That employees shall have the right to organize and bargain
collectively through representatives of their own choosing, and shall
be free from the interference, restraint, or coercion of employers of
labor or their agents, in the designation of such representatives, or
in self-organization or in other concerted activities for the purpose
of collective bargaining or other mutual aid or protection;
(b) That no employee and no one seeking employment shall be
required as a condition of employment to join any company union
or to refrain from joining, organizing, or assisting a labor organiza-
tion of his own choosing; and
(c) That employers shall comply with the maximum hours of
labor, minimum rates of pay, and other conditions of employment,
approved or prescribed by the President.
SEC. 4. The plants of the industry are open to capable workmen,
without regard to their membership or non-membership in any
organization.
9944-33 11








ARTICLE III

SECION 1. Until changed by amendment of this Code, the mini-
mum rates of pay per hour which shall be paid for labor in this
industry by members of this Code shall be not less than forty (40)
cents per hour, unless the hourly rate for the same class of work on
July 15, 1929, was less than 40 cents per hour, in which latter case
they shall be not less than the hourly rate on July 15, 1929, and in no
event less than thirty (30) cents per hour. It is agreed that this
paragraph establishes a guaranteed minimum rate of pay.
SEC. 2. Members of this Code agree not to pay any of the follow-
ing classes of employees-accounting, clerical, banking, office, service,
or sales employees (except outside salesmen) in any office, depart-
ment, or establishment, or in any other place or manner-less than
$15 per week in any city over 500,000 population, or in the immediate
trade area of such city; nor less than $14.50 per week in any city
of between 250,000 and 500,000 population, or in the immediate trade
area of such city; nor less than $14 per week in any city of between
2,500 and 250,000 population, or in the immediate trade area of such
city; and in towns of less than 2.500 population to increase all wages
by not less than 20 percent, provided that this shall not require
wages in excess of $12 per week.
SEC. 3. Any attempt to evade the minimum rates of wages by im-
proper designation of employees as apprentices or semi-skilled work-
ers, or by other methods, shall be a violation of this Code.
ARTICLE IV
Where, prior to the effective date of this Code, any member of this
Code had contracted to purchase or supply articles, materials, and/or
services at a fixed price to be delivered during the period of this Code,
an appropriate adjustment of such fixed price will be made to equal
any increase in cost caused by the operation of the National Industrial
Recovery Act.
ARTICLE V
No member of this Code shall sell, offer to sell, or make aircraft,
aircraft engines, aircraft parts, and ..or accessories from another
member's design data, drawings, or copies thereof, whether patented
or not, in any competitive way prejudicial to the interests of the
original producers thereof unless directly and specifically licensed by
the owner thereof so to do; nor shall any such member sell a license
to make, have made, or sell any such aircraft, aircraft engines, air-
craft parts, and/or accessories to another without definite and separ-
ate agreement in writing providing equitable compensation to such
owner directly and specifically for such license.

ARTICLE VI
Failure to comply with any of these Articles shall be a violation of
this Code.








ARTICLE VII

The effective date of this Code shall be ten days after its approval
by the President of the United States.
The forty-hour week is necessary in the aircraft manufacturing
industry because:
(a) The aircraft manufacturing industry is a comparatively new
industry. It has, through experience, largely adopted the practice
of manufacturing only on advance order and will therefore probably
not be again confronted with the problem of overproduction;
(b) There exists no large amount of unemployment in the
industry;
(c) Aircraft fabrication is practically all skilled hand labor,
because production has not reached the stage of mass production
where machine labor can be employed;
(d) The number of workmen employed on a given aircraft is
limited in assembly and installation to those who can physically
work thereon;
(e) Since so much special engineering is necessary during con-
struction, skilled labor must be available constantly to facilitate
intricate technical installation, e. g. radio, instruments, armament.
special fuel tanks and leads, etc.
(f) Synchronization of fabricating labor with engineering in-
stallation is absolutely essential to the. finished production of air-
craft, because engineering must follow through actual fabrication
before it can proceed further.
(g) In any regulation of the aircraft manufacturing industry the
dominating consideration must be safety. Slipshod workmanship,
whether the cause lies with the capabilities of the individual work-
man or with an attempt. to have two men share the responsibility
of one, takes an exacting toll of death.
(h) Military and air mail and passenger aircraft take many
months to design and build even where factories have been working
more than fifty hours per week, and forty hours extends what is
already an unfortunate delay in striving to meet requirements;
(i) A working week averaging forty hours against an old week
exceeding, in many cases, fifty would give employment to virtually
all trained aircraft mechanics in the country if the Government
goes ahead with the military and naval aircraft construction recom-
mended by its aviation chiefs.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
3 1262 08584 3315III
3 1262 08584 3315