Education for national progress: Guide for educational planning for the Commonwealth of the Bahamas for the period 1976-1981

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Education for national progress: Guide for educational planning for the Commonwealth of the Bahamas for the period 1976-1981
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Education for National Progress
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109 p. ; 28 cm.
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English
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Ministry of Education and Culture
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Ministry of Education
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Nassau, Bahamas
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Education and state -- Bahamas   ( lcsh )
Educational planning -- Bahamas   ( lcsh )

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This publication contains information about development plans in education.

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The College of The Bahamas
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::b.S,/J. GOVERNMENTOFTHECOMMONWEALTHOFTHEBAHAMASTHEMINISTRYOFEDUCATIONANDCULTUREEDUCATIONFORNATIONALPROGRESSGuide For Educational Planning For The CommonwealthOfThe Bahamas For The Period 1976-1981 June 1976

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GOVERNMENTOFTHE COMMONWEALTHOFTHE BAHAMAS THE MINISTRYOFEDUCATION AND CULTURE EDUCATIONFORNATIONAL PROGRESS GUIDEFOREDUCATIONAL PLANNINGFORTHE COMMONWEALTHOFTHE BAHAMASFORTHE PERIOD 1976-81 JUNE1976.

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PartI:Part II:CONTENTS MEMORANDUM OFTRANSMITTALPreliminary Considerations1. The Developmentofthe Plan 2. The National Scene 3. ObjectivesoftheDevelopmentPlaninEducation for1976-81.Priority Action Areas fortheCurrent Year1975-76.Part III:Programme Specifications fortheBahamas EducationSystemduring1976-81.I.Pre-school Education2.PrimaryEducation3.Secondary EducationA)JWliorSecondary EducationB)Senior Secondary Education4.Post-Secondary EducationA) The CollegeofThe Bahamas5.Continuing Education Part IV: ImplementationPartV:Recommendations2

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EDUCATION FORNATIONALPROGRESS,A DEVELOPMENT PLANINEDUCATION FOR THE COMMO WEALTHOFTHE BAHAJ\IAS FOR THE PERIOD 1976 -81MEMORANDUM OF TRANSMITTALTheEducationPlancontainedinthisdocumentisinsome ways unconventional. Development plansineducationare usuallyrepletewith detailsofenrollmentprojections, building schedules,numberofteachers and similardatawhich canmakeinteresting readingbutofteninhibitreal action.Wehave been principally concernedwithactionwhich canbebotheffective and productive.Ourearlierreport-Educational Development in an Archipelagic Nation(September1974)describedthestateofplayandcharted courses which might be followed intheattempttoreconstructtheeducational system as a system.Butinordertoensurethatthenecessary actiondidin fact ensue,itwas necessarytosetout,stepbysteP.theprocess whichhad.tobegonethrough.Wehavetriedtoindicate inthisEducationPlan specific actionsto be takeninordertoaccomplish an explicitsetofobjectives.Itis,therefore,anactionplan, a workingtool,flexible enoughtoaffordmanoeurability whichthosewhoimplementplansmusthave in a changing society.Itisworthrecordingthattheplan has evolved over aperiodofalmosttwoyears inconsultationwithmanyindividualsandgroups.Ithasnotbeenprepared in isolationandimposed fromoutsideonatakeitorleaveit basis.As consultantswe haveworkedclosely withtheprincipaleducatorsintheCommonwealthtoproduceguidelinesandstrategies which we believe are educationallysoundandfeasible.Wedoaccept,however,theresponsibility forsuchshortcomingsandinadequacies whichtheplan will revealunderclose professionalandpublic scrutiny. Plans succeedorfail largelyasa resultoftheeffortsofthosewhomustinterpretandimplementthem.Weareconfidentthatthequalityofeducationalleadership in thisCommonwealthensures a speedyandsuccessfulimplementationoftheEducationPlan proposed herein.Itshouldbenotedthatwe haveprepareda plantortheeducationaladvancementof mI. Bahamians irrespectiveoftheirplaceofresidence intheCommonwealth.Wehave madenoinvidious distinctions,therefore,between Nassau andtheFamily Islands.Educationfornationalprogress requiresunityofpurposeandactionthroughouttheentirecountry.Thismission wasmadepossiblebytheCommonwealthSecretariatthroughtheCommonwealthFundfor Technical Co-operation.WeknowthattheBahamasGovernmentisappreciativeofthesupportoftheSecretariatandwe shouldliketoaddour personal gratitude. Finally, we wouldliketoacknowledgetheco-operationoftheUniversityofTorontoandtheUniversityoftheSouthPacific in releasingusfromournormaldutiesatvarious times duringthepreparationofthisplan.3

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PART IPRELIMINARYCONSIDERATIONS4

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I.1FIVE-YEARDEVELOPMENT PLANINEDUCATION FOR THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 1976 -81THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE PLAN 1. A five-year developmentplanineducationcannotbea definitivestatementofpreciseconditionsandneeds andexactandmeasured responsestomeetthoseneeds. Numerou8and uncontrollable variables affectingTheCommonwealthofTheBahamas withincontemporary social, politicalandeconomicworldfennentforecloseonthepossibilityofpreparing a setofunqualified. prescriptions fortheimprovementoftheBahamian Educational system. 2. Moreover,theapplicationofparadigmatic modelsemployedinWestern industrialized countriestoexistingandemergent problemsinthisCommonwealthmayinthelongrunbecOWlterproductiveandharmful.Theuseofsuch models hasoftenaggravated,ratherthanameliorated problemsindeveloping countriesandis being avoidedinthis presentefforttoputtheBahamian educational systemona prosperous course.Commonsense is amuchunderratedcommodityinthepresent ageofscientific planning. This Development Plan inEducationwillattempttorestorecommonsenseandtheuseofcreativeandconstruc tive intelligenceandimaginationtotheplanning process. 3. This plan urges action immediateandsustained action in anumberofareas where consensusaboutthenatureoftheproblemalready exists.Intheabsenceofdeliberate and affirmativeaction,furtherpublicandprofessional controversyabouttheseproblems will leadonlytodeteriorationintheschool systembyunderminingthemorale and confidenceofteachersandcitizens alike. 4.Admittedly.theMinistryofEducationandCulturecannotdothewholejobofeducational reconstructionalone.butitmustbetheprime moving forcetowardstheaccomplishmentofclearly-defined and broadly-understood aims andobjectives fortheBahamian school system.TheMinistry must originatethefinal planofaction,orchestrateits activities,educateand energize theparticipantsandprovidethewillandconvictionto carry theplanthroughtoits conclusion. 5.Theteaching profession intheCommonwealth mustbecommendedfor itspasteffortsinattemptingtodischarge its responsibilities in lessthanoptimumcircumstances.Butmorewillbeexpectedofeachteacherandprincipal intheyears immediately ahead.ThoughTheCommonwealthofTheBahamas has achieved political independence,itisstill a long way from accomplishing culturalandeconomic independencebothofwhich are necessary as thisCommonwealthmoves forwardtotakeits placeproudlyas acontributingmemberoftheworldcommunity.Wherethereisno vision,thepeople perish. Bahamian teachersmustprovide a visionofwhatThe Bahamas will becomeintheyears ahead.Withouttheirbesteffortsbuilding abetterBahamas in onlyanemptyslogan, a betrayalofthehopesofgenerationsyettocome. 6.Educationisanintegralpartofthepolitical processofallcountriesandthroughtheschool systemnationalgoals are accomplished.TheMARAJREPORTpointedoutthe urgent necessityofrelating edu cational objectivestonationalgoals, so far as theseareenunciated.andtheeducational plan presented hereinattemptstobring educational objectivesintoa symbiotic relationshipwithpublicpolicyintheareasofsocialandeconomic development. 7. This plandoesnotpresumetobemorethana workingdocument,amatrixforthegenerationofotherplansanddecisions whichmustoccurinthedaytodayoperationofa complexinstitutiononwhich pres sures,subtleandotherwise. areconstantlybroughttobear withintheshiftingandvolatile arenaofopinionandcounter-opinion.Undoubtedly,theoperationalversionoftheproposed five-year plan will diverge from this writtenstatementindetail though hopefullynotinthebroad principlesuponwhichithasbeenconstructed.8. Finally,theproposedplanhadmanycontributorsthroughoutits preparation.TheMinisterofEduca5

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tionand his officers, principals and teachers,theofficersofotherMinistries, individuals and groupsofprivate citizens,theBahamas UnionofTeachers, public agencies and fraternal societiesallhelpedtoshape its ideas, conclusions and recommendations. In addition, ahostofreports and documents, includingtheMARAJ REPORT, were incalcuable aids in directingattentiontocentral issuesandpossible alternate resolutionstocomplex problems.Inthebrief spaceoftimeavailableforthecompletionofthepresent plandatawerenotalways readily available in a useful form and judgement as a basis for actionhadtobemadeonthestrengthofthebestevidenceandexpertopinion availabletotheplanners. Specialmentionmustbemadeofthecontributiontotheplan madebyMrs. VylmaB.Thompson, Assistant DirectorofEducation (Planning) intheMinistryofEducation. Her dedicationtotheproject wasofinestimable value.6

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1.2THE NATIONAL SCENE1. As anindependentandsovereignnation,TheCommonwealth ofTheBahamasischartinga newandbold course foritsfuturedevelopmentatatimeof economicuncertaintythroughouttheworld community. Indeed, adverse economic conditions elsewhereaswellasathome compelthisnationtoface squarelytheharshrealities ofcontractingresources from outsideandexpandingexpectations from within.Thoughitis unwise ifnotaltogetherimpossible foranycountryto isolate itself completely fromothernations,thegoal ofgreaternationalself-sufficiency is assuredly aprudentone.TheBahamasis a smallcountryonlyinquantitativeterms.Thelargeness ofitspeoplesspiritandthequalityofitsleaders arethedeciding factorsinthenation'spresentefforts to be self-reliantandself-actualizing.2.TheBahamianisationpolicy ofthegovernment is alsoanessentialpartofthedevelopment ofthenation,bothintermsofstrengtheningitsownculturalidentityandofmakingeffective use ofitsownhumanandnaturalresources.IntheimmediatefutureBahamiansfrom all walks of life will be calledupontoexertthemselvesasnever beforeintheinterestofthenationalgood. Privateinterestwill havetotakesecond place tothepublicinterestas self-restrainttemperstheprevailing mood of ever-increasing expectations. UnlesstheaverageBahamianbelieves deeplyinhiscountryandcares intenselyaboutitsgrowthandprosperity, irrespective of how thesemaynow be defined,thecitizens ofthisCommonwealth will respond indifferently tothecalltoserveintheinterestofthenationandnotonly asthiscallrelatestotheservice of young people.3.Thetrustofitspeople is anation'sfirst-line of defence. National concernaboutthesecurity ofBahamiansandtheirresources isunderstandableinthelightofrecentinternationalincidents involvingthiscountry'swelfare.securitycannotbetakenforgrantednorcaneternalvigilance be relaxed.Thegrowing awareness ofthenecessity tosafeguardbothinternalandexternalaspects ofBahamianinterestsrequirestheinfusion of positiveattitudestocombatindifferenceandapathyontheonehandandto inspire concernandcommitmentontheother.Thevirtues ofpatriotismandloyalty neednotbe chauvinisticnorthelove of one'scountrya distorted passion.4.The dignity of labourandtheintrinsicsatisfaction derived from doing one's job well havebothbeen seriouslyunderminedduringthepasttwo decadesthroughouttheWestern world.Therestorationof a sense of vocation,inwhatever formitmight be, as a centralorganizing aspect of one's life is aparamountneedinall societies if personal,communityandnationalstabilityareto be realizedintheremainingquarterofthiscentury. Careless, carefree, Lotus-likeattitudestoward workandservice have been historicallythecorrosives of societiesandthebasic elementsinthedownfall of nations. Acraft,trade, skillorvocation,highorlow, makestheindividual completeandfitshimfor a responsible roleinhis community.Itis amonumentaltasktore-orientthesocial values of a nation,butnationalsurvival itselfmaynow beatstake.5.Finally, social justice is ademandingmaster. Broadeningthebase ofopportunityfor allBahamianswhenoptions are steadily diminishing is a problematic exercise. Yet, equalization of opportunityiswhatBahamiansaredemandinganda cornerstone ofthecountry'spolitical philosophy.Itis a noble goalanda worthy course on which to embark.6.Undergirdingtheentireeffortsineducationwill betheachievement of personal qualitiesinyoungBahamianssuchastheattributesof morality, self-disciplineandintegrityandsuch other attitudesandpersonal qualities centereduponsoundChristianprinciplesasenshrinedinTheConstitution.7.Thesemainconcerns ofthenation thequestforgreaterself-sufficiency,thepolicyofBahamianisation,thesecurity ofitspeople, resourcesandenvironment, restoring a sense ofdignitytolabour,thepursuitof social justice for all,nationalprideandloyalty, self-disciplineandintegrityandthedevelopment of personalattributesbasedonChristianprinciplesmustbe clearlyandunequivocally refelctedintheeducational objectives,programmeandpractices oftheschoolsystemofthiscountry.Therecommendationsintheeducationalplanfor 1976-81aredirectedtowardtheaforementionednationalconcerns.7

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I.3. OBJECTIVESOFTHE DEVELOPMENT PLAN IN EDUCATION,197681A.General Objectives 1.TheMARAJ REPORT (September,1974)provides a useful analogue for educational development duringtheproposed planning period197681.Inits needs assessmenttheReview Team identified six major areasofgeneral concern which becametheinfra-structureoftheReport.Those areasofconcern were as follows: (1)thedevelopmentofaneffective organization withintheMinistryofEducationand Culture; (2)thestabilizationoftheeducational systemthroughconsolidationandgradual reconstructionoftheschool programme; (3)theparticipationofkeyindividuals and groups intheformation,interpretation,delivery andimplementationofeducational policy; (4)thediffusionofdelegatedauthorityandresponsibilitythroughouttheCommonwealthtoen courage local initiative in respondingtolocal needsandproblems; (5)theequalizationofeducationalopportunityatall stagesandfor all ages; (6) public and professional awarenessoftheprimary importanceofpractical and vocational school ing (includingtheapplied sciences) intheyears immediately ahead.Fromthepositive reception accordedtotheMARAJ REPORTitmaybeassumedthatthereissubstantial agreementaboutthevalidityoftheReviewTeam'sassessmentofthemajor educational needsofTheBahamas. Accordingly,theDevelopment Plan inEducation(1976-81)will address itselftothetaskofmeetingthoseneeds. 2.Fortunately,actionstakenbytheMinister and his officers duringthecurrentyear,1975,have already accomplishedmanyimprovements intheMinistry itself and have provided a dynamicforfurtherdevelopment.TheDevelopment Plan willtakeadvantageofthosechanges,notablythereorganizationoftheMinistry, while refiningandextendingtherecommendations contained intheMARAJ REPORT.B.Specific Objectives 3.Thespecific educationaloutcomestobeaccomplishedbytheendoftheplanning period in1981are as follows: (1)anadequateand appropriate programmeofeducational studiesuptoand including Grade Eleventhroughouttheentire Commonwealth; (2)adequateandappropriate facilities andequipmenttoconducttheprogrammeofstudies intheschools; (3) functional literacy andnumeracy for all school age childrenbytheconclusionofthejuniorsecondary programmeexceptforthosechildrenwithsevere learning disabilities; (4)theacquisitionofa marketable skill,craft,trade,orvocationbyall pupilsbytheconclusionofthesecondary programme; (5) compulsory academicandvocational studiesatthejuniorand senior secondary school levels;8

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(6) a nationalandcomprehensivestudentevaluation procedure employing Bahamian devised standardized tests; (7)theawardofJuniorSecondary School Certificates and Senior Secondary School Certificates for high school graduates; (8) adequate and appropriate programmes and facilities for children with severe learning disabilities; (9)theproductionanduseofBahamian educational materials relatedtotheprogrammeofstudies; (10) a fully qualified teaching servicethroughoutThe Bahamas; (11) a comprehensive teacher training programmetofill allthestaff needsoftheBahamas school system; (12) adequateandappropriate programmes, courses and experiences for secondary school graduatesandmaturestudents wishingtopursue post-secondary studies leadingtorecognized professional certificates and diplomas as well as pre-universityandinitial university degree credits acceptabletorecognized colleges and universities; (13) an appropriate and accessible continuing education programme for all Bahamians; (14) a comprehensiveandresponsive in-service operation foralleducatorsthroughoutThe Common wealth; (15) an effective library and "learningresources" area intheschoolsofThe Commonwealth. 9

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PART II PRIORITY ACTION AREAS FOR THE YEAR 1975 7610

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II.1.PRIORITYACTION AREASFORTHE CURRENT YEAR,1975 761.Inadditiontothoseactions already initiatedbytheMinisterandhis officers in responsetotheMARAJ REPORT,furtheractionmustbetakenin anumberofimportantareas duringthecurrentschool year,1975 76,toprovideoptimumconditionsforthesuccessfulimplementationoftheDevelopment Plan in Education. 2. A preliminarydraftofthefollowingrecommendationswas presentedtothePermanentSecretaryandDirectorofEducationfortheiradvisement and consideration inSeptember1975.Theyare presentedonceagainforcontinuedaction. (1) CENTRAL TASK FORCE ON CURRICULUM 3.Theparamountneedoftheeducational systemofThe Bahamasisstabilitythroughconsolidationandstructure. This need canonlybemetbythedevelopmentofa comprehensive national curriculumforall school levelsappropriatetoBahamian childrenandyoungpeople. 4.TheDirector,DeputyDirector and all Assistant Directors shouldconstitutethemselves as a Central TaskForceonCurriculumtoreview progresstodateincurriculum development andtooverseeanddirecteffortsduringthenexttwoyears-1975-77.5. Muchtimeandeffortonthepreparationofcurricula have alreadybeenexpendedbycommitteesofteachers assistedbyMinistry officers, and,thoughthese activities are laudable, adeterminedeffortmustbemadetoensurethatthecurricula willbethemostappropriateones intermsofmeetingtheneedsofthepupilsandthelong range goalsofthecountry.6. Current activities in curriculumreformare beingconductedintheabsenceofan explicitsetofnational goals in education.Itisimperativethatnational goals ineducationbeavailabletoguidethosepreparing curriculainthevarious subject areas. 7.TheCentral Task ForceonCurriculummustbekeptfully informedaboutprogress in all curricular areasatall school levelsbyoneormore Ministry officersandbepreparedtofacilitatetheworkofthecommitteesin whatever formdeemedappropriatetoensure steady progressthrough1975-76.8.Itwould also be advantageousfortheCentral TaskForceonCurriculumtoconvene periodic meetings with chairmenofthesubjectcommitteestoappraisethedevelopmentofthetotalschool curriculum. (2) DEFINING THE RESPONSIBILITIESOFADE'S, SEO'S, ANDEO'S9.Therecentreorganizationofthe Ministur ofEducationnecessitates a clear definitionoftheresponsi bilitiesofeach AssistantDirectorofEducationandofthetypesofinter-relationshipsbetweendivisions whichmayberequiredtoconducttheoperationsoftheMinistry. This also appliestotheresponsibilitiesofSeniorEducationOfficers andEducationOfficers.10.TheDirectorandhisdeputyshould definetheareasofresponsibilityofeach AssistantDirectorofEducationand in consultationwiththeAssistant DirectorsofEducation,considerappropriatetypesofinteractionbetweenstaffmemebersofthedifferent divisions.Thedefinitionofresponsibilities doesnotnecessarily imply inflexibility as Assistant Directorsfromtimetotimemayhavetoassume responsibilitiesoutsidetheirimmediate jurisdiction.11.Regular meetingsoftheDirectorandhis assistants willbenecessarytodevelopthemostfunctionalpatternsofrelationships.11

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(3)STAFFREQUIREMENTSFORTHE JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS SEPTEMBER,197612.TheAssistant DirectorofEducation(Secondary) should discussthematterofstaff requirements(1976-77)withtheJuniorSecondary School principalsattheearliest possibledate.Inparticular,staffrequirements for teachersofpractical subjectsoughttobedetermined well in advanceofSeptember,1976.13. Immediately followingthedeterminationofstaffrequirements, discussions betweentheMinistryofEducationandtheCollegeofTheBahamas shouldbeconvenedtoensure an adequate supplyofqualified teachers in all subject areasfortheperiod1976-79,thepeakenrolmentperiod inthejuniorsecondary schools. (4) THE ACCOMMODATION PROBLEM IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS 14. The Assistant DirectorofEducation(Secondary) should discusswiththeSecondary School principals ways and meansofamelioratingtheincreasing problemsofovercrowding inthesecondary schools, for example, employing a shift system, extendingtheschoolday,multipleentryandexithours,dayrelease, six-day cycle timetabling, etc., and make all necessary recommendationsaboutsecondary school organi zationtotheMinistry.15.Asovercrowding willcontinuetobea major problem for secondary schoolsthroughouttheplanning period,1976-81,andearly considerationofdifferent approachesisurgent. (5) THE SCHOOL SUPPLIES SYSTEM16.There has been a gradual improvement inthesystem whereby school supplies areorderedand deliveredbutprincipals considerthesupplies system a continuing sourceofdisruptiontotheschool programme.17.TheAssistant DirectorofEducation(Primary) andtheAssistant DirectorofEducation(Secondary) should investigatethesupplies situation in consultation withtheprincipals and deviseaneffective, efficientandequitable system for requisitioning and receiving school supplies in New Providence andtheFamily Islands.18.The actualreductionofschool budgets for supplies as a resultofinflationary costs is amatterofwidespread concern among principals and teachers. (6) TECHNICAL EDUCATION IN SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS19.TheAssistant DirectorofEducation(Secondary) shouldmeetwiththeprincipalsofthesenior second ary schoolstorationalizethedevelopmentoftechnical and vocational education intheirschools.Inpartic ular, areasofspecialization within each school shouldsoonbeconsidered as well astheimplicationsofspecialization intermsofenrolmentpolicy, facilities, staffing,equipment,etc. Early decisionsin these matters during1975-76would assist greatly intheformulationofthedevelopment plan in education. 20. ConsultationwiththeChairmenofBusiness and Adminstrative Studies, Technical Education, Applied ScienceandTeacherEducationDivisionsoftheCollegeoftheBahamas wouldbeadvantageous priortoorinconjunctionwiththeconferenceofsenior secondary school principals. 21.Theadditional possibilityofconducting continuing education activities using high school facilities andequipmentshouldbediscussedatthesame time. (7) SUPERVISIONOFSCHOOLS AND TEACHERS 22.Therole and activitiesoftheAssistant DirectorofEducation(Supervisory Services) andtheofficersof12

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his division should be spelledout clearly inthenextfew weeks sothatsupervisory service could beginattheearliest possible date. 23. The Assistant DirectorofEducation (Supervisory Services) shouldmeetwith all head teachersandprincipals, individuallyorin small groups,todiscussthemodus operandioftheinspecting system duringtheforthcoming year. 24. Themethodofreporting schoolandclassroom visits shouldbeexplainedtoprincipals and teachers. (8) PRE-SCHOOL EDUCATION 25. The Assistant DirectorofEducation (Support Services) andtheAssistant DirectorofEducation (Primary) shouldmeetwiththeExecutive OfficersofthePre-School Associationtodiscuss and develop in-service activities for pre-school operators and their assistants during1975-76inordertoupgradethequalityofeducational experiencesofchildren in pre-school centres. The membersofthePre-School Association are especially interested intheproductionofinexpensive instructional materials. 26. A representative fromtheMinistryofHealth andotherappropriate Ministries should be invitedtoattendas welltodiscussthehealth care factor in day care and pre-school centres. 27. The MinistryofEducation in co-operation withtheCollegeoftheBahamas (Teacher Education) shouldmountamodestresearchanddevelopment project in pre-school education.Datagathered fromthestudywould be useful in planning future pre-school activities includingtheprofessional educationofpre-school teachersbytheCollege. (9) PROFESSIONAL LEADERSHIP 28. The Assistant DirectorofEducation (Primary) andtheAssistant DirectorofEducation (Secondary) should be encouragedtoconvene bi-monthly meetingsofprincipalstodiscuss professional matters affectingtheschools.Anagenda shouldbeprepared and distributedinadvanceofthemeetings. (10) IN-SERVICE TRAINING PROJECT IN THE FAMILY ISLANDS 29. The Assistant DirectorofEducation(SupportServices) andtheeducation officer in chargeofin-service education should initiate a pilot project inoneormoreoftheFamily Islandsattheearliest possibletimein1975-76butafterfull consultation withtherespective District Education Officers and principals concerning specific areas ofassistance required. A carefully devisedandthoroughly applied evaluation scheme moni toringthepilotproject would assist in planning a continuing education programme for teachers intheFamily Islands. 30. The pilot project(s) would constitutetheinitial stageofpreparing a comprehensive programmeofscheduled in-service training activitiesforall teachers intheFamily Islandsconductedin Teacher Centres. (11) RATIONALIZING READING MATERIALS IN THE PRIMARY SCHOOLS 31.TheAssistant DirectorofEducation (Primary) andtheofficer responsible for language arts should discussthecurrenteffortsoftheExecutiveofthePrincipals Associationtorationalizethediverse (andoftencounterproductive) approachestoprimary school reading in termsofmethods,textbooksand materialsandencouragetheAssociation throughtheirExecutivetopursuetheirobjective vigorously. 32. A reading programme using basal readersandgrouping pupilsofcomparable reading performances might be abetterapproach for instruction in The Bahamasthantheunstructured language experience approach.13

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(12) TRAINING PROGRAMMEFORUNQUALIFIED TEACHERS 33. The Assistant DirectorofEducation(SupportServices)andtheofficerinchargeofin-serviceeducationshould discussthedevelopmentofa training programme for unqualified teacherswiththeCollegeofTheBahamas (TeacherEducationDivision).TheMinistryandtheCollegeofTheBahamas should clarifytheirrespective rolesandactivities in thisprojectandco-ordinatetheirefforts and resourcestoaccomplishtheobjective setoutintheMinister's Communication. 34. The possibilityofestablishing Teacher Centres intheFamily Island inordertofacilitate thisprojectmight alsobeconsideredatthis time. (13) UPGRADING THE ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONSOFPRIMARY TEACHERS 35. The Assistant DirectorofEducation(Primary) andtheAssistantDirector(SupportServices)andrepresentativesoftheCollegeofTheBahamas should investigate waysandmeansofstrengtheningtheacademicandprofessional qualificationsofall primary school teachersthrougha planned year-by-year programmeoflearning experiences. 36. Thistaskisurgenttoimprovethequalityofprimaryeducationduringtheplanning period,1976-81,and in subsequent years. (14) PRODUCTIONOFBAHAMIAN INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS 37. The almosttotalrelianceonnon-Bahamian school materialsthroughouttheCommonwealthvitiatestheBahamianisation processandhinders learning for countlessnumbersof children. 38. The developmentofamodest,yeteffective,productionunitforthepurposeofproducinglowcostinstructional materials, Bahamian incontentandcontext,is indispensabletothefulfilmentofa school programme which meetsthesocialandeducational needsofthecountry.(15) COMMUNICATION SKILLS PROGRAMMEFORADULTS 39. The MinistryofEducationandtheCollegeofTheBahamas (Humanities Division) should discussthepossibilityofundertakinga co-operativeprojectintheareaofcommunicationskills (including developmental reading) for adults usingappropriateinstructional materialsandinstructors.Thesenior high schools would be useful centres for this activity, particularly if school libraries were made availabletothepublic. 40. The major objectiveofthisprojectwouldbetoraisetheliteracy levelofentirefamilies asanaidtotheschool progressofthechildren. 41. Appropriate radioandTV programming mightbeusedtodevelop acommunicationskills programme for adults. (16) SCHOOL LIBRARIES 42. The AssistantDirectorofEducation(SupportServices)andassistants shouldconductaninvestigation intothedevelopmentofadequatelibrariesfortheschools. A newconceptoflibrary services suitedtotheneedsofBahamian childrenandadultsmight evolve asthecurrentsituationis appraised. 43. A planned programmeofschool library developmentforthenext5-10years has implications forthetrainingofeffective librarians, and,therefore,discussionswiththeCollegeofTheBahamas wouldbeuseful.14

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(17) READINESSOFPHYSICAL PLANTFORSCHOOL OPENING 44.Itisofutmostimportancethatalltheschools intheCommonwealth are in a stateofphysical readinessforschool opening in September.Ifcurrentarrangements respectingthepreparationofphysicalplantfor school opening arenotsatisfactory,thentheMinistryofEducation should strongly urgethatotherarrangementsbemade. (18) NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON EDUCATION 45.Tobroadenthebaseofparticipation in education deliberation and policy formulation inTheBahamas,theMinistryofEducation in co-operation withtheCollegeofThe Bahamas,thePrincipals' Associations,andtheBahamas UnionofTeachers, might considertheadvisability and feasabilityofmounting an annual conference which would focusattentiononimportanteducational issuesinThe Bahamas. 46. The Conference mightbetimedtocoincide withtheopeningofa special weekofschool activities which would be availabletothepublic. 47. The Conference should be self-supporting and should have representatives from many constituencies intheprofessional, social, business and religious sectorsofthecountry.15

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PARTIIIPROGRAMME SPECIFICATIONSFORTHE BAHAMAS EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM DURING1976-8116

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Programme SpecificationsfortheBahamas Educational SystemIII.1.RATIONALE PRE-SCHOOL EDUCATION1.Research findingsdemonstrateconclusivelythattheearly yearsofchildhood arethemostcritical years in developing learningpotentialandestablishing learningpatternsforeach individual.Thoughevery child can benefit from plannedandpurposeful learning activities during early childhood, children whosehomeandcommunityenvironments arenotadequately supportiveoftheirfuturelearningpotentialandperformancemustbeprovidedwithplanned educational experiencestooffsettheenvironmental disad vantages. 2.Onthebasisofinformedopinionbyparentsandeducatorsthereisevery reasontobelievethatmanyBahamian childrenenteringtheprimary schools have personalandsocial characteristics whichretardmaterially school progress. Severe deficiencies in language facility and negative schoolattitudesare impedimentstolearning which undermine seriouslytheprimary school programme. 3. Unless affirmative actionistakentoredresstheproblemasoutlined,theprevailing opinionisthatschoolingformanyBahamian children willbeseriously impaired. PRESENT STATUSOFPRE-SCHOOL EDUCATION 4.In the DirectoryofSchools(1975)fifty-seven nursery schools are listed fortheNew Providence area.TheChild's CareandPre-School Association estimatesthattheremaybeasmanyas150daycare centresandnursery schools in and around Nassau,withthisnumberincreasing annually.Othersuch facilities exist elsewherethroughouttheBahamas,notablyinFreeport.5.These centres provide a varietyofservices from simple custodial careofinfantsthroughorganized learning experiencesforthreeandfour year olds. Mostofthese centres providedaycare only.Operatorsofpre-school facilities arenotrequiredtoregistertheir"schools"withtheMinistryofEducation&Culture. No systemofhealth inspection existsnoraretheeducational programmes (where such exist) supervised. The Child's Care and Pre-School Association as a voluntary organizationattemptstoprovideleadership fortheoperatorsofpre-school anddaycare centresandacts in a liaison capacity withtheMinistryofEducation.6.Undoubtedly,thereisan urgent need fordaycare whichisbothinexpensiveandwholesomebutlittleofthistypeofdaycareispresently available. WithmodestGovernment assistancedaycare co-oper atives in strategically-placedcommunitycentres could provide wholesome and inexpensive child services forneedyfamilies. 7. A fewofthenursery schools which areattemptingtoprovide planned learning experiences are wellequippedandmoderately well-staffed.But,unfortunately,toomanyofthese centres are a hazardtothehealthandeducational well-beingofthechildrenofthisnation.8.TheChild's CareandPre-School Association hasonlya few membersatpresentandthoughconcernedabouttheinsalubriousconditionsofmanydaycare centresisunabletoeffectuateanyfavourable change.9.Inconclusion, unsupervised developmentinthissectorduringtheplanningperiod,1976-81,will have a deleteriouseffectofgraveproportionsonmanyBahamian children intermsoftheirsubsequentschool progress. OBJECTIVESFORPRE-SCHOOL EDUCATION10.LongTermObjectives17

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(1)toincreasetheavailabilityoflow-cost pre-school education; (2)tocreate public awarenessofthecritical importanceofearly childhood for school progress; (3)togain systematic knowledgeaboutthecharacteristicsofBahamian children, in particulartheirlinguistic behaviour, andtoexaminetheeffectsofthehomeenvironment andthesocial structureontheirschool progress. 11.ShortTerm Objectives (4)toensure satisfactory health standards in day careandpre-school centres; (5)toensure appropriate learning experiences in these facilities; (6)todevelop a corpsofearly childhood educators; (7)tostrengthentheworkoftheChild's Care and Pre-School Association. PROJECTS AND STRATEGIES OBJECTIVE ONE: TO INCREASE THE AVAILABILITYOFLOW-COST PRE-SCHOOL EDUCA TION.12.Duringtheplanning period1976-81co-operation betweenthepublicandprivate sectors in conducting pre-school education is advised,ratherthantheMinistryofEducation assuming this additional responsibility entirelyonits own. However, duringthefive-year periodoftheplan a consortiumofMinistries should investigatethepracticalityofworking with citizens groups, church groups, fraternal societies, business and professional organizations andtheBahamas UnionofTeacherstoassist intheorganizationofcommunityco-operativesbywhich low-cost day care and pre-school services might be provided alongsideothercommunityactivities. 13. To accomplish this objective a nationalcommitteecomprising professional, businessandlay repre sentativesunderthechairmanshipofan interestedandprominentcitizen with a backgroundincommunitydevelopment shouldbeestablished. The National CommitteeonCommunityConcern would investigate such matters as possible sites, available space (church buildings, unused stores,communityhalls, etc.), equipment,volunteers, fundsandotherformsofpublicsupportfortheestablishmentofcommunityco-operatives specializinginday care and pre-school education. 14. Bythetimecommunityco-operatives are in operation a corpsofspecialists in early childhood education would beavailabletoprovide professional leadership and assistancetovolunteers staffingthefacilities. 15. This project would represent a large undertaking in which many Bahamians, young and old, might find meanstoservetheircountryin a constructiveandmeaningful way. OBJECTIVE TWO: TO CREATE PUBLIC AWARENESSOFTHE CRITICAL IMPORTANCEOFEARLY CHILDHOODFORSCHOOL PROGRESS16.Ithas been suggested elsewhere in this development planthatan annual National ConferenceonEducationbe organizedunderthesponsorshipoftheMinistryofEducation&Cultureandin co-operationwithotherinterested groups.Ifsuch a conference were inaugurated inthe1976-77school year,thenearly childhood education mightbeconsideredasa possible conference theme.Throughouttheyear communi cation throughthemedia, schools, churches, etc. could begin a massiveefforttoeducatethepublic respect ing early childhood education -athome,in day-careandpre-school centresandintheprimary school.18

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17.ItisrecommendedalsothattheNationalCommitteeonCommunityConcern, suggested above, initiate its activitiesconcurrentwiththepublic awareness campaign during1976-77.OBJECTIVETHREE:TO ACQUIRE SYSTEMATIC KNOWLEDGE ABOUTTHECHARACTERIS TICSOFBAHAMIAN CHILDREN, INPARTICULARTHEIRLINGUISTIC BEHAVIOUR AND TO EXAMINE THEEFFECTSOFTHE HOME ENVI RONMENT AND THE SOCIALSTRUCTUREONTHEIRSCHOOL PRO GRESS18.ThecorrelationbetweenthespeechpatternofmostBahamian children andtheirprogress in schools(orlackofschool progress)oughttobeinvestigatedthoroughlytodetermineanappropriatelinguisticapproachtoteachingandlearning intheschoolsofthisCommonwealth.TheTeacherEducationDivisionoftheCollegeoftheBahamasmightplanandconducta majorstudyinthisarea andmakeits findingsknowntotheMinistryofEducation&Culture. Similarly,thelongtermeffectsofthehomeenvironmentandthesocialstructuremight also be investigatedwitha viewtoprovidingcompensatorylearningopportunities.OBJECTIVEFOUR:TOENSURE SATISFACTORY HEALTH STANDARDS IN DAY CARE AND PRE-SCHOOL CENTRE19.Manydaycarecentresoperatewithoutfacilitiesforpersonal cleanliness, physicalcomfortorrefectoryservices.Inaddition,overcrowdingiscommonwithoutadequatesafeguardforthepersonal safetyofthechildren. 20.TheMinistryofEducation&Culture in co-operationwiththeMinistryofHealth should establish a codeofhealthstandardsfordaycareandpre-school facilities and enforcethecodethroughannualinspec tions. Toeffectthisrecommendationalldaycare and pre-schoolcentresshouldberequiredtoregister withtheMinistryofEducation(orsomeotherGovernmentagency) andpaya nominal registration feeonanannualbasis. 21. Regulations respectinghealthstandardsinthesefacilities arenotmeanttobepunitivenoraretheyintendedtocurtailthe ofsuchcentresastheneedarises. However,afteranappropriatetimefor compliance expires,substandardfacilities shouldnotbepermittedtoregistertheir"schools"nortooffertheirservicestothepublic. OBJECTIVEFIVE:TO ENSURE APPROPRIATE LEARNING EXPERIENCES IN PRE-SCHOOL CENTRES 22. To provide knowledgeable leadership inthefuture,thedevelopmentofBahamian specialists in early childhoodeducationis imperative.The EducationDivisionoftheCollegeoftheBahamas should design andimplementa programmeofstudies leadingtoa certificate in earlychildhoodeducation.23.Intheinitial stagesthecertificateprogrammemightbereservedforoutstandingexperienced teachersandconductedona part-timestudybasis using eveningsandvacation periods. Apracticumcomponentshould bepartoftheprogramme.24. Ultimately, specialists in earlychildhoodeducationcould serve asitinerantteacher-consultantstopre-schoolcentresthroughouttheBahamas as well as providing remedial assistance intheprimaryschools themselves. OBJECTIVE SIX: TOSTRENGTHENTHE WORKOFTHE CHILD'S CARE AND PRE-SCHOOL ASSOCIATION19

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25. The Pre-School Association is making a constructive contributiontoearly childhood education in The Bahamasandmustbe commended fortheuseful roleithas assumed in this neglected areaofeducation. Its relationshiptotheMinistryofEducation throughtheDivisionofSupportServicesisalready in working order.Butthis relationship mightbeformalizedbyatleast oneortwomembers from appropriate divisionsoftheMinistry named as adviserstotheAssociationandco-ordinator(s)ofMinistry activities in pre-school education.20

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, ANDTARGETDATES PRE-SCHOOL EDUCATION-1976-81OBJECTIVE PROJECT RESPONSIBILITY TARGET DATENo.11.Developmentofa National Committee ConsortiumofMinistries1976onCommunityConcernwitha special ( continuing) interest in family care and pre-school educationNo.22.Inaugurationofa National Conference MinistryofEducation1976-77onEducationwithaninitial focusonin co-operationwith(school year) early childhood education B.U.T., Principals' AssociationetalNo.23. Public awareness campaignonMinistryofEducation in1976THE CRITICAL YEARS co-operationwiththe( continuing) Pre-School Association andtheB.U.T. ..... No.34. Researchprojectonspeech andotherThe CollegeofTheBahamas1976behavioural characteristicsof( continuing) Bahamian childrenNo.45. Developmentofa codeofhealth MinistryofHealth1976standards fordaycare and pre-school MinistryofEducation( continuing) centres and implementationofcodethroughperiodic inspectionsNo.46. Registration procedures fordaycare and MinistryofEducation1976pre-school centres and implementation ( continuing)ofprocedures including compilation and publicationoflistofsuch centresNo.57. Preparationofprogramme guidelines for MinistryofEducation1976pre-school educationandsuggestions for Primary Division helpful learning activities in day care CollegeoftheBahamas centres Pre-School Association

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, AND TARGET DATES PRE-SCHOOL EDUCATION-1976-81OBJECTIVE PROJECT RESPONSIBILITY TARGET DATENo.68. AssignmentofoneortwoEducation MinistryofEducation immediately Officers as named adviserstothePre-School AssociationNo.69.Developmentofin-service training MinistryofEducation1976activities for day careandpre-school MinistryofHealth ( continuing) workersNo.510.Preparationofa programmeofstudies Ministry of Education1976-77forcertificated teachers leadingtoa CollegeoftheBahamas certificate in early childhood education Teacher Education DivisionNo.511.Announcementofa programme in Early CollegeofThe Bahamas1977Childhood Education and firststudent in-take No.512. Allocationof2or3 specialists in early MinistryofEducation1979childhood educationtoanumberofprecentresasa pilot projectNo.513. Expansionofthenumberofspecialists MinistryofEducation1981topre-school centres accordingtoanappropriate ratio 14. Major reviewofall aspectsofpre-school Ministry ofEducation1981education

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III. 2 RATIONALE PRIMARY EDUCATION 1. Primaryeducationis well-understood asanessentialpartoftheformative yearsofchild growth and development and as suchisthefoundationoftheentire school edifice.Throughoutthe60'sandearly70'sprimary school educators were challengedtorespondtoanumberofinnovations in educationandmanydidso with enthusiasm and good intentions. Someofthese innovations have proven themselvestobe unworkable,othersundesirable, and a few have become accepted practices intheschools.Itwastherateofchange, however,ratherthanthesubstanceofchange which created serious dislocation and disequilibrium inmanyschool systems directly influencedbyAmerican educational activities.2.ThecurrentandfutureprospectsofTheBahamascannotbe fulfilled unlesstheentire educational programmeisdesignedtorespond affirmativelytotheneeds, interests and characteristicsofBahamian children themselves andtothesociety in whichtheywill spendtheiradultlives. The children arenottobeblamed fortheirlackofprogress intheschools.Thealien system whichisstill being imposeduponthemisattherootoftheproblem.Itis ironicthatchildren shouldbemadetofeel inferior in a school system whichissupposedtobefunctioning intheirbest interests.Fortunately,aneducational system, Bahamian inmodeandcontent,isevolving. Actionstakenduringthe1976-81periodoughttocontinuethis Ihha mianisation process. 3. This Development Plan inEducationdoesnotadvocate an educational policyofretrenchmentorretrogression for primary educationbutrathera policyofreflection and realismtowardeducational progress. Consolidationoftheprimary school programmethroughimproved structural organization would stabilizetheschool system asitmovestowarda newsetofnational goals. PRESENT STATUSOFPRIMARY EDUCATION 4. Some150schools intheCommonwealth, exclusiveofindependentschools, are providing primary education for approximately27,000pupils. In1966itbecamethepolicyoftheMinistryofEducationtoencouragetheschoolstopursue individualized programmes incontrasttotheuniformand standardized programmes and practices priorto1966. In New Providenceopenspace schools andteamteaching werethemajor educational innovations inthelate60'sand early70's.5. UnderthesupervisionoftheMinistryofEducationcommitteesofteachers representingbothgovernmentandindependentschools have prepared coursesofstudyformostoftheprimary school subjects and thisimportantwork continues. By September,1976,thenew programmeofstudies for all primary schools intheCommonwealth istobein place. 6.Inmanyschool districts DistrictEducationOfficers are encouraging headteacherstoorganize assoc iations for co-operative and shared activities amongtheschoolsoftheirdistrict. Associationsofprincipals are beginningtoprovide constructive educational leadership.TheBahamas UnionofTeachers is also play ing a useful role inmanyareasofeducation including curriculum development.The BUT may wishtoconsider sponsoring a PROFESSIONAL AWARENESS YEAR coincidentwiththeinitial developmentoftheprojects recommended in this Education Plan. 7. Children progress annually irrespectiveoftheamountofprogress achieved duringtheyear. Thereisnosystem-wide processofevaluation in termsofachievement andaptitudetesting.In1974theCommon Entrance Examination system was terminated.8.Conditions foroptimumteaching and learning intheschools vary considerably. School supplies, textbooksandequipmentand librarybooksoftheappropriatesortare generally inshortsupply. By1980all primary teachers aretobe fullcertificated. Also, in-service activities aretobeaugmentedthroughthe DivisionofSupportServicesoftheMinistryaswellasdivisionsoftheCollegeoftheBahamas, and made23

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more accessibletoall partsoftheCommonwealth.Theschool system is movingtowarda1:30teacherpupil ratio in primary schools. 9.Attheprimary levelthreemajor problems arecommonlyreported,viz., 1. lackofachievement incommunicationskillsbymany childrenattheend of theprimary school programme; 2. a negative self-concept and a defeatistattitudeexemplifiedbymanychildren; 3. a highrateofabsenteeism. 10. Finally, duringtheperiod1976-81enrolmentintheprimary school sector willcontinuetogrow steadilybutwith a smaller annual increase.24

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OBJECTIVESFORPRIMARY EDUCATION11. Term Objectives1.toachieveappropriateliteracy levelsintheprimary schools 2.todevelop inthepupils a constructiveattitudetowardself,towardlearning andtowardtheircountry3.toprovide a varietyofschool learning materialswrittenandproducedintheBahamas 4.toprovide a validandreliable mechanismforsystem-wide measurementandevaluation 5.toupgradetheprofessionalandtheacademicbackgroundofteachers 12.ShortTermObjectives 6.toprovide a primary school programmewitha definable six-year scopeandsequence framework 7.todevelop a pupilperformancerecord system 8.toestablish a workable systemofschool supervision 9.toorganise a developmental in-serving training programme for principals, teachersandofficersoftheMinistry10.todevelop low-cost learning resources areasforpupils in eachprimaryschool11.toensureaneffectiveteachertraining programmeandanadequatesupplyofteachers12.todevelop a programmeofhealth, physicaleducationandrecreation intheschools13.toprovide fortheidentificationandremediationofchildrenwithextraordinarylearning disabili ties25

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OBJECTIVE ONE: PROJECTS AND STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE APPROPRIATE LITERACY LEVELS IN THE SCHOOLS 13. What is literacy withintheBahamiancontext?What level(s)ofliteracy should be achieved after six yearsofschool? The professional staffoftheMinistrymustattempttodefine literacy in Bahamian terms andtoestablish reasonable literacy standards for graduatesatdifferent stagesoftheschool programme. 14.Itwould be a profitable exercisetosample literacy performanceofcurrent Grade Six pupilsattheconclusionofthe1975/76school year as a basis for comparison in subsequent years. The present lackofa factual knowledge baseabouttheperformance characteristicsofprimary school pupilsatentryandgrad uation leaves educational planningatthecapriceofhearsay and guesswork. OBJECTIVE TWO: TO DEVELOP IN THE PUPILS A CONSTRUCTIVE ATTITUDE TOWARD SELF, TOWARD LEARNING AND TOWARD THEIR COUNTRY 15. The affective environment in whichthepupil learns isofgreater consequencetohis learningthanthemethods andcontentusedbytheteacher.Theemotionaltoneoftheschool isthecontrolling factor in all effortstoteach children andisreflected directly intheattitudeand performanceofthechildren themselves. Pupil self-worth isnotpromotedbyindulgenceontheonehandorharshnessontheother.The mangementofchildrenatschoolmustbe basedonreasonable expectationsofperformance, insistencethatthoseexpec tations be accomplished and recognitionofthepupil's accomplishment. 16. Teacherswhohavetheattitudethatunderthecircumstances childrencannotlearn very much create a negative learning climate which has lifelong consequences fortheindividual and society. Teachersmustprovide a daily environment in which pupilsdoaccomplish something worthwhilebydintoftheirown effort. With respecttotheirpupils all teachersmustaffirmthebelief YES, THEY CAN!ratherthanNO, THEY CAN'T! 17.Itistheresponsibilityoftheprincipals, and supervisory officersoftheMinistrytoensurethatpositive constructiveattitudestowardthechildren pervadetheentire school system. Moreover,theinculcationofa senseofpride in The Bahamas itself willbemorereadily accomplished where respect foroneanotheris also encouraged in word and action. OBJECTIVE THREE: TO PROVIDE A VARIETYOFSCHOOL LEARNING MATERIALS WRIT TEN AND PRODUCED IN THE BAHAMAS 18. Simple, inexpensive materials, especially forthereading programme,oughttobe produced for children, particularly intheprimary grades. Initial formal learning ismorereadily accomplishedbyyoung children whentheycan identify withthecontentofthematerials from whichtheyare learning. A small effective productionunitinvolving acompetenteditorand aproductionmanager couldproducea varietyofmaterials which emphasizetheBahamian experience. Theproductionunitshould havethecapacity for designing, printing and bindingthematerials (as required). OBJECTIVE FOUR: TO PROVIDE A VALID AND RELIABLE MECHANISMFORSYSTEM WIDE MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION 19. Thetyrannyofschool testsiswell-known as 'teachingforthetest'has been acommonpractice for many years. However, measurement and evaluation are considered indispensable elementsofsound teaching and effective learning. Indeed, testingisapartnerofteachinganda guardianoflearning. 20.Itisoftheutmostimportancethatsuitable tests be preparedtomeasuretheaptitudeand achievementofpupilsatvarious stagesintheir progress throughtheschool The useofa varietyofBahamian testing instruments andtheavailabilityofBahamian normsby1981would greatly advancethedevelop-26

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mentofanationalsystemofeducation. 21.Inadditiontothedevelopmentofnational standardized teststhepreparationofdiagnostic tests would help teachers pinpointproblems sothattheycould provide remedial assistancemoreeffectively. 22. In-service training should provide teachersthroughouttheCommonwealthwithan improved under standingofandtheprerequisite skills for classroom and school testing activities relatedtotheirteaching assignments. OBJECTIVE FIVE: TO UPGRADE THE PROFESSIONAL AND ACADEMIC BACKGROUNDOFPRIMARYSCHOOLTEACHERS23. By1980all teachers intheCommonwealthmustbecertificated.TheDivisionofSupportServices, MinistryofEducationin co-operationwiththeTeacherEducationDivisionoftheCollegeofThe Bahamas has already begun offering in-service coursestowardthis end. 24.Theupgradingoftheacademic backgroundofprimary school teachers also merits considerationatthistime.Oneofthekeystosuccessful teachingisthepossessionofknowledgebeyondwhatoneiscalledupontoteach. Many primary school teachersthroughouttheCommonwealth have onlymodestacademic accomplishments whichhinderthemfrom developingintocreativeandinspirational teachers. 25.ThroughtheCollegeofTheBahamas challenging academic courses, relevanttotheneedsandinterestsofprimary school teachers shouldbemadeavailableattheearliest possibleopportunity.Coursesinsoci ology, environmental studies, Bahamian studies, linguistics,introductorystatistics, inter-personal relationsandEnglish wouldbeparticularly useful. 26. Primary school teachers whose present academic backgroundisinsubstantial shouldberequiredtoobtaina specifiednumberofacademic creditsby1981.27.Similarly,by1981candidates for ateacher'scertificate inprimaryeducationshouldobtaina predeterminednumberofpost-secondary academicand/orvocational coursesata satisfactorystandardofachievement, particularly in EnglishandBahamian studies. OBJECTIVE SIX: TO PROVIDE A PRIMARY SCHOOL PROGRAMME WITHIN A DEFINABLE SIX-YEAR SCOPE AND SEQUENCE FRAMEWORK28.Thenewprogrammeofstudies whichistobeauthorizedfor useintheschools, beginningSeptember,1976,shouldbemanageablebybothteachersandpupils, testableandrealistic intermsofpresentandprojectedconditionsintheschools. 29. A full rangeofskillsandunderstandingstobetaughtandlearned from Grade 1toGrade 6mustbespelledoutspecificallyandarranged sequentiallythroughoutthesix grades. Oncethecontentis organized clearlythentheteachers canbeencouragedtouse creativeandimaginative approachestoteachingandlearningappropriatetotheageandgrade levelofthepupils.Iftheskillsandunderstandings are clearlystated,thena testing programme canbedevised which relates directlytotheprogrammeofstudies and pupil progresscanbemeasuredwithsome confidence. Reporting usefulinformationofachievementtosucceeding "teachers andtoparentscanalso be accomplishedmorereadily when a pupil's progress profileispresented intermsofthingsthatthepupil knows and cando.30.Toaidthepreparationofnew coursesofstudyattheprimarylevel consideration should be giventoreducingthenumberofsubjectstobasic learning areas, for example, (1) COMMUNICATION 27 language artsdramaticarts, music

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(2) MATHEMATICS STUDIES (3) SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (4) PRACTICAL ARTS arithmetic, mathematics history, geography science, health, religion -craft,gardening, physical education A multiciplityofsubjectsisbothunnecessaryandundesirableatthebeginning stagesoflearning. 31. Also,toexpeditethepreparationofcoursesofstudysmall committeesofoutstanding experienced teachers, assistedbya subject specialist, aremoreusefulthanlarge representative committees. Subjects committeesof5to6 members for eachofthefourlearning areas outlined above, each subjectcommitteeresponsiblefortwograde levels, shouldbeabletoprepare courseofstudyafter2030hoursofwork. The formatofeach course should consistof:(1) rationale (2) objectives (3) skills and understandings (4) suggestions for use 32.Theimplementation phaseofinstallingthenew programme intheschool is a critical period. Threetofive years are requiredtoinstall a new programme including adjustmentstotheprogrammeonceitisbeing used intheschools.Theproductionofsupportmaterials, including tests, canbeuseful in establishing a new programme. OBJECTIVE SEVEN: TO DEVELOP A PUPIL PERFORMANCE RECORD SYSTEM 33. Althoughletterornumerical gradeswithcommentsaboutpupil progress are sometimes useful,thereisan urgent needforthesystematic collection and reportingofspecificinformationaboutschool progress, particularly in literacy andnumeracy skills. As well,theform shouldbeeasily interpretedbyparent,teacher and pupil.Attheendofeachterman inventoryofskillsandunderstandings acqUIred shouldbemade for each pupilonchecklists which parallelthecourses inthenew programmeofstudies (1976). 34. The performance profileofpupils might vary considerablybuttheparent,pupil andteacherwill all be fully informedaboutwherethepupil is relativetothetermand grade expectations. Continuous assessmentofthissort wouldbeofconsiderable use when graduatesoftheprimary schoolenterjuniorhigh. OBJECTIVE EIGHT: TO ESTABLISH A WORKABLE SYSTEMOFSCHOOL SUPERVISION 35.Theschool inspectorofthepast servedtheuseful purposeofmonitoringtheworkofschoolsandteach ers. Rising professionalism among teachersendedschool inspection andanalternate formofsupervision arose which was putatively more democratic inmodeofoperation.Thewindsofeducational change trans formedtheinspectorintoa consultant.Itisunlikelythattheinspectorateofformer years will everberestored.Itisjustas likely, however,thattheinspectorquaconsultantwill also fade away as a new profes sional role emerges which falls somewhere between mere inspector and mere consultant. 36.Theinspecting system referredtointheCommunicationoftheMinisterofEducation(June.1975)28

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will havetoblendthemonitoringandconsultative aspectsoftheformerschool inspectorifthenewroleistomakea positivecontributiontothedevelopmentofeducationinTheBahamas.Thenewinspecting system which will become operative duringtheplanning periodmusthave clear objectivesandproceduresfortheevaluationofschoolsandtheirwork. Principals, teachers,andDistrictEducationOfficersmustunderstandhowtheinspecting system willoperate.37. Duringtheinitial phaseoftheplanning period, Ministry policy respectingtheinspecting system should be explained fullytotheteachers andthenewmodeofoperationtestedinpilotschoolstodetermineits suitability. 38.Thenumberofeducationofficers requiredtomountan effective inspecting system shouldonlybedecidedaftertheinspecting system hasbeenoperationalfortwoyears. By1979theinspecting system shouldbefully operationalattheprimary school levelandby1981atthesecondary school level as well.Educationofficers involved intheinspecting system shouldbeappointedtotheposition for a five-year period only. Consideration shouldbegiventoarranging exchangesbetweenstaffmembersoftheTeacherEducationDivision, CollegeoftheBahamas, and membersoftheinspecting system. 39.Tomountan efficientandeffective inspecting systemthefull personnel resourcesoftheMinistryofEducationshouldbeavailablefromtimetotimetoconductspecific projects intheschools.TheAssistantDirectorofEducationin chargeofsupervisory services should co-ordinate such projects, schedulingthemin co-operationwithhis colleaguesandothereducationofficers. OBJECTIVE NINE: TO ORGANIZE A DEVELOPMENTAL IN-SERVICE TRAINING PRO GRAMMEFORPRINCIPALS AND TEACHERS 40. Two approachestoin-service training are requiredtosupporttheon-going school programme. First, a developmentalapproachwhereby long-term Ministry plans and activities are accomplished.Forexample, fn-servicetraIiiing activities designedtosupporttheinstallationofthenew programmeofstudiesforprimary schoolsandthefull certificationofall teachersby1980.Secondly, an lid hocapproachbywhich emergent needsofteachers aremetfromtimetotime.Thoughbothapproaches are essential, a carefully-planned developmental programme which relates directlytosubstantive changes in primaryeducationduringtheplanning period shouldtakeprecedence. 41. Duringthecurrentyear(1975/76)a comprehensive developmental plan shouldbepreparedundertheleadershipoftheADE(SupportServices) in co-operationwithcolleagues inotherdivisionsoftheMinistry.Theplan should describetheprojectsandtheproposed scheduleofactivities duringthe1976-81.42.Themasterplanofdevelopmental in-service training shouldberelated directlytothecollateraleffortsintheMinistrytobringtheeducational systemintoalignmentwithnationalgoals. OBJECTIVE TEN: TO DEVELOP LOW-COST LEARNING RESOURCES AREASFORPUPILS IN EACH PRIMARY SCHOOL 43. Learning resources areas for usebythepupUs arenowcommonlyregardedbyeducatorsasanessentialpartoftheschool's programmeandfacilities.Itistheplace wheretheapplicationoflearning encourages independenceonthepartofpupils.Thoughbooksremainthecorecomponent,othermedia areaddedtoprovide a multi-facetedapproachtolearningandteaching. Many formsofuseful materialscanbeproducedatlow costandare preferredtoexpensive commercially-prepared materials. Also for primary school, pictures, slides,threedimensional objects, collections, etc. aremoreusefulthanexpensiveequipment.44. As primary school facilities comeunderless pressurewiththeadventofstabilizingandeven decliningenrolmentsinthenextfivetotenyears, learning resources areas in each schoolmaybecomemore feasible. Duringtheperiod(1976/81)areas shouldbeestablished in a few schools whereteacherinterestandfacilitiesmakeitpossible. Experience gained inthepilot schools should guide expansion asthenumberofareas29

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increases.Thetrainingofteachers for learning resources areas wouldbea challenge fortheCollegeoftheBahamasasa new role is required unlikethelibrariansofpast years. OBJECTIVE ELEVEN: TO PROVIDE AN EFFECTIVE TEACHER TRAINING PROGRAMMEFORPRIMARY SCHOOLTEACHERS 45. Oneoftheperennial problemsofteachertrainingisits remoteness fromtherealitiesoftheschool system in whose interests training colleges havebeenestablished. There mustbea direct and eontinuous relationship betweenteachertraining andtheschools sothatteachereducators are working partners with classroom teachers. 46. The TeacherEducationDivisionofThe CollegeofTheBahamas should participate fully inthepro duction and implementationofthenew primary programme. Courses and experiences inthepre-service programme should be alignedwiththeworkoftheprimary schools. Theremustbecongruence inthephilosophy, objectives,contentand practices inthetraining pfogrammes andtheschools sothatstudentteachers willbeabletorecognizethe"fit"between their training experience andtheiron-the-job teaching assignment. 47.ItisessentialthatmembersoftheCollegeofTheBahamasstaffberepresentedonthecurriculum committees preparingtheprimary course outlines. 48. IntheREPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEEFORTEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMMES: COL LEGEOFTHE BAHAMAS (1974) alternate programmes forthetrainingofprimary teachers are proposed. The Committee recommendsthatfrom1976allteachereducation programmesbethreeyears induration.Thisisa reasonable proposal which shouldbegiven serious considerationbytheCollege andtheMinistryofEducation.Theproposed programme contained intheReportalso merits closeattention.49. The government subventiontostudentteachers shouldbereviewedtodeterminewhatmodifications are necessary inthelightofchanging conditions inthecountry.OBJECTIVE TWELVE: TO DEVELOP A PROGRAMMEOFHEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION IN THE SCHOOLS 50. Physical education buildsmuchmorethansound bodies. Manyimportanttraits physical, mental and emotional arebestdevelopedthroughorganized physical andsportactivities. No school programmeiscompleteifphysical education and recreational sports are absentorneglected. 51. Duringtheplanning period1976-81anadequate programmeofphysical education for all pupils should be established.TheBahamasisanidealcountryforthegrowth and developmentofrecreational sports. OBJECTIVE THIRTEEN: TO PROVIDEFORTHE IDENTIFICATION AND REMEDIATIONOFCHILDREN WITH EXTRAORDINARY LEARNING DISABILITIES 52.ThecurrentlevelofeffortbytheMinistryofEducationwithrespecttotheeducationofchildrenwithsevere learning disabilitiesmustberaised considerably duringtheperiod1976-81.The DivisionofSupportServices should investigate this problem,documentthespecific areasofneed andthemagnitudeofneed in each categoryofspecial educationandformulate an action plan which includestherecruitmentand/orpreparationofteachers, programme descriptions andtheprovisionoffacilitiestoconducttheprogrammes. 53.TheCollegeofTheBahamas shouldbeinvolved in a concertedefforttoprovide Bahamian-trained teacherstoworkwithlearning disabled children. 301

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS,ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, ANDTARGETDATES PRIMARY EDUCATION-1976-81 e:"., OBJECTIVENo.1 No.1No.2No.3No.4PROJECT1.Preparationofareportconcerningtheliteracy levelsofGrade Six pupilsattheconclusionofschool year using a sampling technique. 2. Definitionofliteracy intheBahamiancontextandastatementofexpected standardsaftersix yearsofschool.3.Presentationofworkshops and seminars for principalsontheaffective dimensionofschools.4.EstablishmentofaunitfortheproductionofBahamian learning materials 5. DevelopmentofBahamian standardizedaptitudeand achievementtestsfor national useatGrade Three and Grade Six levels. RESPONSIBILITY MinistryofEducation Primary Division MinistryofEducation MinistryofEducationSupportServices Primary Division MinistryofEducation Learning Resources Unit MinistryofEducationTARGETDATE June,19761975-761976-7719771976( continuing)

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SCHEDULE FOR PROJECTS,ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, AND TARGET DATES PRIMARY EDUCATION-1976-81 OBJECTIVENo.4 No.4No.5No.5PROJECT 6. Developmentofdiagnostic tests for reading and arithmeticateach grade level. 7. Presentationofworkshops for principalsontestdesign and interpretationoftestresults. 8. Development and presentationofprofessional courses for non-certified teachers qualifying for certificationby19809. Developmentofacademic coursesforcertified teachers. Presentationofacademic courses for certified teachers. RESPONSIBILITY MinistryofEducationSupportService MinistryofEducationSupportServices Headteachers Association MinistryofEducationSupportServices CollegeofThe Bahamas Teacher Education Division CollegeofTheBahamas TARGET DATE19761976/771976-7777continuing

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTSOFRESPONSIBILITIES, AND TARGET DATES PRIMARY EDUCATION-1976-81 CA:lCA:l OBJECTIVENo.6No.6 No.6 No.6PROJECT 10. Preparationofprimary programmeofstudies in basic school areas: communication, mathematics studies, social and environmental studies andthepractical arts 11. Installationofnew programme in communicationandmathematics studies 12. Installationofnew programme in social and environmental studiesandpractical arts.13.Reviewofprogressofimplantationofnew programmeofstudies in communication and mathematics studies RESPONSIBILITY MinistryofEducationPrimary Division MinistryofEducation Primary DivisionSupportServices Supervisory Services MinistryofEducation Primary Division Services Supervisory Services MinistryofEducationPrimary Division Planning Division TARGET DATE1975-761976-78 1977-79 Fall Term1979

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTSOFRESPONSIBILITIES, ANDTARGETDATES PRIMARY EDUCATION-1976-81 C.:lH:>OBJECTIVENo.6No.7No.8No.8PROJECT 14. Reviewofprogressofimplantationofnew programmes in social and environmental studiesandpracticalarts.15. Prepare pupil performance records for continuous assessment16.Prepare a rationale fortheinspecting system outlining objectives, procedures,modeofreporting findings andtestoutsystem in selected schools. 17. Determinestaffrequirements for Supervisory Services and graduallyexpandstaff. RESPONSIBILITY MinistryofEducationPrimary Division Planning Division MinistryofEducationPrimary DivisionSupportServices MinistryofEducationDirectorofEducationSupervisory Services MinistryofEducationDirectorofEducationSupervisory Services TARGET DATE FallTerm19801976-771976(Spring)1976(Spring) .IIIIiiMiIiI

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SCHEDULE FOR PROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, AND TARGET DATES PRIMAR Y EDUCATION -1976-81 0:>C11 OBJECTIVENo.9No.10No.10No.11PROJECT18.Prepare a comprehensive developmental planofin-service activities directly relatedtonew programmeofstudies.19.Designtheprototypeofschool learning resources centre for Bahamian schools and setupatleastthreecentres for testing their usefulness 20. Expand numberofcentresthroughoutschool system 21. Devise a three-year programmeofteacher training for primary teachers RESPONSIBILITY MinistryofEducationSupportServices Learning Resources Unit Primary Division MinistryofEducationSupportServices Learning Resources Unit Learning Resources Unit Primary Division CollegeofTheBahamas Teacher Education Division MinistryofEducation Primary Division TARGET1976(Fall)1977-781978-81 1976-77

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, ANDTARGETDATES PRIMARY EDUCATION-1976-81 (j') OBJECTIVENo.nNo.nNo.12No.13No.13PROJECT 22.Introducenewteachertraining programme 23. Review financial Awards system for teachers-in-training 24. Review statusofphysicaleducationandsports activitiesattheprimary school level with a viewtoencouraging activities in this area 25.Documentspecific needswithrespecttotheeducationofchildrenwithlearning disabilities.26.Prepare action plans fortherecruitmentand/ortrainingofteachersandthespecificationofprogrammes and facilities for childrenwithlearning disabilities. RESPONSIBILITY CollegeofTheBahamas Teacher Education Division MinistryofEducationMinistryofEducation MinistryofEducationSupportServices MinistryofEducationSupportServices CollegeofTheBahamas TARGET DATE1977-78 1976-77 1976-77 1976-78 1978-79

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, AND TARGET DATES PRIMARY EDUCATION-1976-81 e",-J OBJECTIVE No.13No.13PROJECT 27. Initiate teacher training programmeforspecial education 28. Implement Ministry action planoneducatingthelearning disabled child. RESPONSIBILITY CollegeofThe Bahamas MinistryofEducationSupportServices TARGET DATE1979-801980-81

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III. 3 SECONDARY EDUCATION1Assumption ConcerningSecondaryEducation1.Before outliningthefive-yeareducationalplanforeachofthejuniorandseniorsecondaryschoolpanels, astatementofassumptionsaboutsecondaryeducationperse intheBahamiansituationwill serve as a frameworkwithinwhichtherecommendationswill evolve: (1)thatfive years willconstitutethenormallengthofthesecondaryschoolprogramme;(2)thatthemajorityofBahamianstudentswillcompletethefive-yearprogramme;(3)thatsomestudentswillproceedtoafurtherperiodofacademicorvocationalsecondaryedu cation; (4)thatvocational studies will haveparitywithacademic studies; (5)thatsecondary school graduatesshouldacquire amarketableskill duringthefive-yearprogramme;(6)thathigher level skills willtakeplace intheCollegeofTheBahamaswithjurisdictions clearlydefinedbetweentheworkofthesecondary schoolsandtheworkoftheCollege; (7)thatapplied sciencesrelatedtotheagricultural, fishing and energy industries willbestudied inthesecondaryschools; (8)thatnationalcertificates will be awardedtograduatesattheendofbothjuniorand senior high schools(9and11);(9)thattheBJCandtheBSC willbeawardedonthebasisofexaminationsrelatedtothenew secondaryschoolprogrammetobegin in1977;(10)thatthejuniorsecondaryschool programme willbecommontoallstudents;(11)thatsomeoptionalstudies willbeavailableatthesenior high school level;(12)thatsome specializationamongthesenior high schools willbenecessaryforreasonsofeconomy;(13)thatsecondaryeducationwill have linkageswitha varietyoffurthereducationalopportunitiesandnotonlytheCollegeofTheBahamas.38

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A. RATIONALEJUNIORSECONDARY EDUCATION 2. TheJuniorhigh school was an American invention proposed originally as an economic expediencythenlater justifiedoneducational grounds.Itis usually described as anattempttomeetthespecific needsofpre-andearly adolescentsbygivingthemanopportunitytoexplore a varietyofsubjects before spe cializingatthesenior high school level.IntheUnited Statesthe6-3-3patternofschool organization isnowalmost universalthoughinthelate60'ssome school systems developed middle schools (grades 5to8) alteringtheschool organizationtoa 4-4-4pattern.3.Throughoutits historythejuniorhigh school has experienced only qualified success asmanyoftheinitial hoped-for advantagesofthejuniorhigh school didnotmaterialize.Ratherthanbridging primaryandsecondary school panels,itopenedupanothergap, splitting secondary school education whileatthesametimefailingtoaid inthearticulationofprimary and secondary school programmes.Ontheotherhandthebringingtogetherofyoung people with similar needs has madeitpossibletodevelop a unique programmeforjuniorhigh school students. 4. Thejuniorhigh school functionsatitsbestas an exploratoryunitwhen pupilsenterwith a masteryofthebasic skillsandwhere facilities existforstudies inbothacademic and non-academic subjects. Also, guidance counselling has been an essentialcomponentofjuniorhigh school education. Inthejuniorhigh school aneffortis madetoidentifystudentaptitude and interests andtodirectthestudentsbyproperguidance activitiestowardappropriate coursesandspecializationsbythetimetheyentersenior high school. 5. A fully-developedjuniorhigh school programme is expensivewithuncertain benefitstothepupils even whereabundantfacilities exist. Duringtheperiod1976-81ajuniorsecondary school programme more suitedtotheBahamian situationmustbedeveloped inordertoensure maximum benefitsatminimum costs. PRESENT STATUSOFJUNIOR SECONDARY EDUCATION 6. Some17juniorhigh units intheCommonwealth, exclusiveoftheindependent schools, are provid ing initial secondary educationforstudents.InNew Providencethejuniorhigh school consistsofgrades seventonine in separate facilites whereas combinedjuniorandsenior high schools arefoundintheFamily Islands.7.Theprogramme consistsofacademicandnon-academic courses for which course outlines have been prepared. These course outlines in conjunction withtheBJC syllabuses currently covertheworkofgrade 7through9.8.Studentsare transferredtothejuniorhigh school fromtheprimary school irrespectiveoflevelofattainmentachieved intheprimary school.Attheendofjuniorhigh school manystudentsare unabletoachieve passes intheBJC examinations and requireatleastoneadditionalyearinthesenior high schooltodoso.9.Throughout1974-75committeesofteachers assistedbyMinistryofEducationstaffprepared course outlines inmostofthesubjectstaughtinthejuniorhigh schools and this work continues duringthecurrentyearunderthedirect supervisionofprofessional officersoftheMinistry assistedbyaneducation officerwhoserves as co-ordinatorofthesecondary school curriculum development activities. Thoughtheinterim course outlines are admirable inmanyrespects, adjustments in almost allofthemare requiredtoaligntheobjectives andcontentwith national goals forthedevelopmentoftheCommonwealth.10.Thestaff/student ratio is inthe1:23rangethoughthereis a shortageofstaffin some subject areas, principally mathematics, science,andpractical subjects. Approximately 50%ofthestaffconsistsofexpatri ate teachers with approximatelythesame percentage holding first degreesattheuniversity level. A majority39

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ofteachers inthejuniorhigh schools aretrainedteachersthoughnotnecessarily for this levelofeducation. 11. Someattemptismadetoprovide a diversified programmeinthejuniorhigh schools whichtakesintoaccountthediffering learningaptitudesofthestudents. 12. Schools require increased facilitiesandequipmentfortheteachingofpractical subjects and vocational subjects. Library facilities are generally inadequate forthepurposeofencouragingindependentstudy.13. Intheopinionofmanyjuniorhigheducatorsthefollowing problemsretardthesalutary developmentofjuniorsecondaryeducationthroughouttheCommonwealth: (1) lackofspecializedstafftraining forjuniorhigh school assignments (2) inadequacyoffacilitiesfornon-academic studies (3) shortagesofsupplies. 14.Anothermoreseriousprobleminjuniorhigh schools isthedevelopmentofprogrammes whichtakethestudentonfromthepointhe reached in his finalyearintheprimary school.15.Duringtheplanning period1976-81these problemsmustberesolvedifjuniorandsenior secondary education aretofulfiltheirpurpose withintheBahamianeducationsystem. OBJECTIVESFORJUNIORSECONDARY EDUCATION16.LongTermObjectives(1)(2) (3)(4)toencouragetheattitudesofco-operationandservice in alljuniorsecondary schoolstudentsas well as encouraging a senseofself-worthandnationalpridetoinitiate a systematicstudyconcerningthecharacteristics, needsandinterestsofpre-andearly adolescents intheBahamas.'todevelopaneffective vocationalinformationandguidance systemtodevelop waysandmeansofuniting schoolandcommunityexperiences aspartofthelearning process.17.ShortTermObjectives (5)toinstall a balanced programmeofgeneral studiesforallstudents(6)toinstall a developmental reading programmethroughoutthethreeyearsofjuniorsecondaryeducation(7)toevolveanorganizational framework which would achieve flexibilityintheprogramme (8)todevelopandimplementa comprehensive"lifeskills" programme (9)togainandmaintainparitybetweenacademicandnon-academic studies (10)todeviseandinstall acoherentandefficient testingandexaminations system(11)toprovide a qualified teachingstaffforjuniorsecondary schools including para-professionals40

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OBJECTIVE ONE: (12)todevise a useful cumulative record systemofeducational progress (13)todevelop continual linkage with primary schools (14)tooperationalizeaneffective inspecting system (15)toinstall a learning resources area inthejuniorhigh schools (16)toprovide in-service training forjuniorsecondary school teachers in selective areas. PROJECTS AND STRATEGIES TO ENCOURAGE THE ATTITUDESOFCO-OPERATION AND SERVICEINALLJUNIORSECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS AS WELL AS ENCOURAGING A SENSEOFSELF-WORTH AND NATIONAL PRIDE18.Theprosperityofall Bahamians depends innosmall measureonthecommitmentofyoungpeopletonational policies and national goals. ThE! school programme has a central role in shapingattitudesofyoung peoplethroughtheenlightened leadershipofprincipals and teachers.Theschool can provide op portunities for co-operative actionbystudentsona rangeofprojectsofinteresttothemselves andofvaluetothecommunity. School andcommunityprojects suitedtotheage and capacityofjuniorsecondarystudentsshouldbepartofthejuniorsecondary school programme. Such projects should include reasonable involvementofthestudentsthemselves in planning'and carryingoutactivitiesunderthesupervisionoftheschool staff. Hopefully, such activities will inspire servicetoothers as well as encouraging self-help fortheschools themselves. Academic studies intheclassroom can alsobeundertakeninpartona co-operative basisbybothteacher and students sharingtheirideas and efforts. 19. Co-operationratherthancompetition must becomethenormthroughouttheschool system, andtheidealofservicetoothersmustbecultivatedthroughtheschool programme and activities. Principals and teachersthroughoutthejuniorsecondary school panel should discuss ways and meansofaccomplishing thisimportantobjective and devise specific projects fortheperiod1976-81.OBJECTIVE TWO: TO INITIATE A SYSTEMATIC STUDY CONCERNING THE CHARAC TERISTICS, NEEDS AND INTERESTSOFTHEEARLYADOLESCENT IN THE BAHAMAS. 20.Indeveloping a sound educational programme forstudents,principals and teachersmusthave trustworthyinformationabouttheage grouptowardwhichtheirefforts are directed. Conventional ideasaboutBahamianjuniorhigh school studentsmaybeerroneous and misleading. Apart from a systematic andcontinuousstudyofthis age group school leaders areatthemercyofimpressionistic feelings which areofminimal assistance inthedevelopment and executionofeducational programmes forthisparticular age group. OBJECTIVE THREE: TO DEVELOP AN EFFECTIVE VOCATIONAL INFORMATION AND GUIDANCE SERVICEFORSTAFFAND STUDENTS 21.Theprincipals and teachingstaffofjuniorand senior secondary schools shouldbekeptinformedaboutexisting and emergent vocational needs andopportunitiesinTheBahamas sothattheycan shapetheirschool programmes along desirable lines.Juniorand senior high school principals should receive periodic briefing sessionsbyofficersoftheMinistryofEducation, in particulartheAssistant DirectorofEducationfor Planning,aboutmanpower needs. Also,thedisseminationofaccurateinformationin bulletin form wouldbeuseful in providing a flowofinformationtobe used for programme adjustments from timetotime astheneed arises.Atleastonesession each year shouldbearranged for a full discussionabouttheeducational implicationsofvocational trends intheCommonwealth. 41

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22. Thoughitisnottheprimarypurposeofthejuniorhigh schooltodeterminetheexactvocationforeachstudent,thegroundworkforpupil selection canbelaidbyalso keepingthepupilsinformedabouttheeconomic needsofthecountrythrougha carefully-planned courseonBahamian studies.Studentsshould be helpedtoset reasonable career goalsforthemselves in lightofthierowncapacityandthecapacityofthecountryitself.Juniorandsenior secondary schools should sharetheirpersonnelandinformationalservices relatingtocareerpreparationwiththesame individuals working inbothlevelstoensurecontinuityand perspective. 23. Planned vocational guidanceopportunitiesas extra-curricular activities aremostusefulwhenrepre sentative membersofthecommunityare invitedtotalkabouttheirjobs,notonlymembers fromthe"glamour"vocations which areoftenunobtainableformanystudents.OBJECTIVEFOUR:TO DEVELOP WAYS AND MEANSOFUNITING SCHOOL AND OUT OF-SCHOOL EXPERIENCES ASPARTOFTHE SCHOOL PROGRAMME 24.Thecommunityin itsmanydifferentexpressions commercial, religious, recreational, governmental, service agencies, etc. -oughttobea closepartneroftheschools. Asstudentsprogressthroughthejuniorhigh school, apartoftheirschool programme should involvetheminsome practical activitiesintheworka day worldofTheBahamas. Lessons learnedthereare as valuable asthoselearnedintheclassroom. Hope fully, voluntaryworkwouldbecontributedbyjuniorhigh schoolstudents,particularly intheirfinal year, which would benefit all concerned. Someolderstudentsmightevenbeinvolved in a work-study programme whereby some earnings accruetothem.This practicalpartoftheirschooling shouldberecognized as an integralpartoftheirtotalprogramme andnotsimply as extra-curricular. 25. A surveyofpossiblecommunityplacements shouldbeundertakenduring1976-77anda feasibility schemeworkedoutwitha viewtomountingapilotprojectinthefollowing year. A procedureforselect ing, placingandsupervisingthestudentscouldbedevisedwhentheplacementsurveyandfeasibility schemes are concluded. OBJECTIVE FIVE: TO INSTALL A BALANCED PROGRAMMEOFGENERALSTUDIESFORALL STUDENTS 26.Juniorsecondary schooleducatorsmustaccomplishtwotasks: (i) Provide a basic literacy skills programmeforallstudentsAn assessmentofeachstudent'sfacilitywithspokenandwrittenEnglish expression shouldbeundertakenduringtheinital weeksofschool openingateach gradelevel-7,8,9.Studentsshouldbegrouped accord ingtoperformanceandprovidedwitha suitable programme involving vocabularydevelopment,(including spelling), reading comprehension activities,andcomposing skills accordingtoa pre-determined scheme.Ifthisprocedurewere followed during eachyearofthefive-year plan, amajorityofjuniorsecondary school studentswhouldachieve functional literacyby1981.27. Basic literacy skills shouldbethepriorityin alljuniorsecondary schools. Alljuniorhigh school teachers, irrespectiveoftheirspecialization, shouldunderstandhowreadingisbesttaughtintheirsubject area. 28. Pre-service and in-service trainingforjuniorsecondary school teachersmustinclude this criticalcomponent.(ii)Develop a general studies programme whichroundsoutthestudent'spersonal, socialandvocationalneeds 29. Consolidationofthejuniorsecondary school programmebyreducingthenumberofjuniorsecondary42

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school subjects mightmaketheover-all programmemoremanageableduringtheplanning period.Thefollowing six subject areascouldrepresentthecommonprogrammeforeachstudenteach year: (a)CommunicationStudies vocabulary development, reading comprehension, literature, spelling, composing (b) Mathematic Studies -arithmetic,consumermathematics, geometry, algebra (c) Science Studies relatedtotheBahamian environmentandin particulartoagriculture, fisheries, energy sources (d) Applied Arts crafts, needlework,cookery,etc. (e) BahamianandSocial Studies relatedtotheBahamian experience includingbothreligiousandvocationalstudies (f) PhysicalandHealth Studies including family studiesAteach grade levelthecoursescouldbedividedintoanumberofunitsofstudysothatas eachunitiscompletedsatisfactorilythestudentwould receive a partial credit.Attheconclusionofthethreeyears eachstudentwould covermanytopicsandlearnmanyskills within aminimum18coursecreditprogramme (6 courses during eachofthe3 yearsofjuniorsecondary education). 30. By1977thenewjuniorsecondary school programmeistobein placeona trial basis in alljuniorsecondary schools. Asitusuallytakesthreetofouryearstoinstall a new porgramme,itmightbeprudenttointroducethenew programmeofstudies over a two-year period, Le.,introducein1977CommunicationStudies, Mathematics Studies,andScience Studies and in1978introduceApplied Arts, PhysicalandHealthEducation,andBahamian and Social Studies. OBJECTIVE SIX: TO INSTALL A DEVELOPMENTAL READING PROGRAMME THROUGH OUT THEJUNIORHIGH SCHOOL PROGRAMME 31.Thoughthismatterwastoucheduponbriefly in Objective Five,thecentralityofreading intheeducationofchildren and young people necessitates additionalcomment.Manyjuniorhigh school teachers, even teachersofEnglish, resist teaching readingperse and assumethatthis age group canbenefitmorefromappreciative readingthroughstudies in literature.Withoutinanysense downgradingthevalueofliteraturetostudents,theremustbe a developmental reading programme which embracesbothpractical and appreciative aspects. Although teachersofEnglish havethisresponsibility very clearly intheirassignment, all teachers canmakea positivecontributiontothereading programme intheschoolsthroughplanned readinginstructionin relationtotheirown subject areas.32.Aconcentratedeffortin1976-77todesign andmounta developmental reading programme forjuniorhigh schoolstudentsisimperative. TeachersofEnglish injuniorhigh schoolswhodonothavethenecessary skillstoconductsuch a programme require special training. Also,inthepre-service allstudentswhoelecttobecomejuniorhigh school teachers should themselves undergo a developmental reading programme. OBJECTIVE SEVEN: TO EVOLVE AN ORGANIZATIONAL FRAMEWORK WHICH WOULD ACHIEVE FLEXIBILITY IN THE PROGRAMME AND INDUCE STUDENT MOTIVATION33.Thepresent organizational arrangementsforjuniorsecondaryeducationdoesnotseemtobe conducivetostudentmotivation.Studentsmove from gradetograde indifferentlyandsome eventually achieve a few passesattheBJC levelorhigher.Theorganizationalstructuremightbechanged somewhattoincreasethe43

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amountofstudenteffortandmotivationastheymovefromgradetograde.Itshouldbenoted,however,thatteachersoughttobethemajorfactorinstudentmotivation. 34. As suggested earlier,theawardofthejuniorcertificate might be basedontheattainmentofthesuc cessfulcompletionofa specifiednumberofcreditsobtainedatthejuniorhigh school.Forexample, eighteen credits(minimumofsix courses during eachofthethreeyears) couldconstitutetheminimumprogramme.Studentsmustaccumulate these credits over approximately a three-year period.Forvariety as well asutility,some courses mightbeconsideredtorepresentonlyhalf-credit. Ultimately,studentswho didnotobtaintherequisitenumberofcredits wouldnotbeadmittedtothesenior high school pro gramme.Theymay, however, pursue a rangeoftraining activitiesmoredirectly relatedtotheworldofworktotheirownadvantageandthatofthecountry.35. Also, intheinterestofflexibility, consideration shouldbegiventoa semesteroreventrimestersystem (usingthesummervacation periodforsome activities). A semesterortrimestersystem also provides for utilityandvariety inasmuch as organizingtheschoolyearin half'sorthird'scanfacilitatethemovementofstudentsastheyprogress variablythroughouttheprogrammeandoffsetsthepossibilityofjamming inthefinalyearbecauseofdifferentlearning aptitudes. More ablestudentscouldearn additional credits duringthethreeyearprogramme. OBJECTIVE EIGHT:TODEVELOP AND IMPLEMENT A COMPREHENSIVE"LIFE"SKILLS PROGRAMME IN APPLIED ARTS36.Throughoutone'sadultlifenumerousoccasions present themselves where practical knowledgeabouteverydaymatterscouldbeofimmense valuetotheindividual. Manyofthese practical"life"skills can be learnedbybothgirls andboysaspartofthejuniorhigh school programme. Through applied artsofvarioustypeslifelong accomplishments aremadepossibleandschool learning greatly enriched. These skills should be relatedtotheneedsandproblems which arise in ordinary day-to-day living: constructing simple house hold items, repairing things, makingandaltering clothes, preparingfood,caringforchildren and older people, paintinganddecorating, gardening, simple landscaping,etc.These areonlya few activities which have greatpotentialforencouraging purposeful learningandencouraging self-sufficiency.37.Consideration shouldbegiventotheuseofparaprefessionals who have a skillortradebutwhodonothave a teaching certificate.Underthegeneral directionofa certificatedteacherseveral part-time paraprofessionalscouldteachmanyskillsforwhichitwouldbeuneconomicaltoprovide a certificated teacher. OBJECTIVE NINE: TO GAIN AND MAINTAIN PARITY BETWEEN ACADEMIC AND NON ACADEMIC SUBJECTS38.Withoutunderminingthetraditionalrespect accorded academic studies,theschoolsmustclearlystamptheirimprimaturonnon-academic studiesandbegin a changeofparental andstudentattitudetowardvocational studies.Itiscommonpractice intheschoolstohonouracademic accomplishment;itmustalso becomecommonpracticetohonourvocationalattainmentsinthesame way. Moreover, allstudentsinthejuniorsecondary programmemustberequiredtoachieve pass standing in a specifiednumberofvocationalorpractical courses fortheawardoftheBahamas Junior Certificate andlaterthesenior certificate.39.Duringtheperiod1976-81a plannedapproachtochangingcommunityattitudesthroughouttheCommonwealthtowardvocational studiesmustbeundertakenbytheschools in co-operationwiththeMin istryofEducationandCultureandotherministriesofgovernment.40.Finally, credibilityofpractical vocational studies during1976-81willdependonbudgetallocatedtosupportthetypeofappliedartsprogramme advocatedinthis plan. OBJECTIVE TEN: TO DEVISE AND INSTALL A COHERENT ANDEFFICIENTTESTING SYSTEM44

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Bytheendoftheplanning period(1981)theprogrammeandtheexaminationsystemforjuniorsecondary education mustbeinalignment.Toaccomplish this requires confidence and convictionabouttheworthoftheprogrammebyall Bahamianeducatorsandin particular juniorhigh school education. 41. An effective testingandexamination systemisnecessarytolend credibilitytotheprogrammeatthejuniorhigh school level as well astoensureorderlypupil progress.Unfortunately,thepresentexaminationsystem appearstobeworkingatcross-purposestothefulfilmentofthenew Bahamian schoolorientation. l2Y-tl}e endoftheplanning period(1981)the andtheexaminationsystemforjunior secondarY educationmustbeinalignment.Toaccomplishthisrequires confidenceandconvictionabouttheworthoftheprogrammebyall Bahamianeducatorsandin particularjuniorhigh school educators. 42. By1981thequalityofthecoursesandthequalityofteaching shouldbeata leveltosupporttheaugmentedinfluenceofschool-based assessmentindeterminingthefinal standingofastudentina courseorprogramme. Accordingly,by1981thefinal marksofacandidatefortheBahamasJuniorCertificate should be basedonacombinationofschool assessment (40%)andexternalnationalexaminations (60%). 43.Itisofutmostimportancethatjuniorhigh school teachers receiveexpertassistanceonthepreparationofdifferenttypesofschool examinations. 44. InadditiontheTestingandEvaluationUnitshould prepare standardized objectivetestsinEnglishandMathematics which are relatedtothejuniorsecondary school programmeandshould administer suchtestsinthelasttermoftheGrade Nine Year. OBJECTIVE ELEVEN: TO PROVIDE A QUALIFIED TEACHINGSTAFFFORJUNIORSECOND ARY SCHOOLS 45. Unliketheirconterpartsinthesenior high school,juniorhigh school teachers shouldbeabletoteachaminimumofthreesubjects, possible adoublemajorandaminorora majorandtwominors. Overspecial izationatthis levelofeducationisunsoundinbotheducationalandpracticalterms.Thejuniorhigh schoolteachershould be sufficiently versatiletoundertakea varietyofteaching assignments as required.46.Bytheendoftheplanning period(1981)theminimumadmissionrequirementstothepre-service train ing programme forjuniorhigh school teaching should include a Bahamas Senior Certificate (Grade XI) plusthreeyearsofpost-secondaryeducationin a programme which combines academicandprofessional studies.47.AstheCollegeofTheBahamasisnowbeginningtoexpanditsactivities inthetrainingofsecondary school teachers,itis anopportunetimetodevelop a meaningful training programme.Itwouldbeusefultoinvolvetheprincipalsofthejuniorhigh schools inthedesignofa pre-service training programmeforthis level during1976-77.A useful beginning inthedevelopmentofanewprogramme isoutlinedintheREPORTOFSPECIAL COMMITTEEFORTEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMMES: COLLEGEOFTHE BAHAMAS (1974). 48. Consideration shouldbegiventoofferingtheMethodologyofDevelopmental Reading and Bahamian Studies as compulsory subjects.49.With respecttothenumberofteachers requiredforjuniorhigh schools in1976-81a formula governingstaff:studentratio shouldbeagreedonearly intheplanning period,probablyinthe1:23rangewithamaximumclass size establishedat35-40studentswithspecial consideration giventothepractical subjects particularly where a safetyfactoris present. 50.Thecharacteristicsofthenewjuniorsecondary school programmeandthemodified pre-service train ing programme forjuniorsecondary school teachers willbeinfluential factors indeterminingthenumberofteachers for specific subject areas.Ifthedecision ismadetodevelopmoregeneralistjuniorhigh school teachers,thengreater flexibility in school assignments will altertheproductionofsubject specialistsandthusmakepossible more equitable class loading.45

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51. Athirdfactorin calculatingteachersupplyrequirementsisthemannerinwhich space limitations are dealtwith.Forexample, a shift system requires approximately 20% additionalstafftoimplement.52. Finally,theroleoftheCollegeofTheBahamasinparticulartheTeacherEducationDivisionandotherDivisions, in dealingwiththematterofmeetingteacherneeds inthejunior(and senior) secondary school sectormustbeworkedoutduring1976,particularlywithrespecttotraining teachersofpractical studies. OBJECTIVE TWELVE:TODEVISE A USEFUL CUMULATIVE RECORD SYSTEMOFEDUCA TIONAL PROGRESS 53.Asalsorecommendedfor use in primary schools, arecordofprogressforeachjuniorhigh school student, clearlyunderstoodbyteachers,studentsandparents, is essentialtostrengthenthejuniorsecondary school programme.Themethodofrecording and reporting pupil progress shouldbetiedinwiththedevelopmentofthenewsecondary school programmeandshouldbeintroducedcoincidentwiththepro gramme itselfintheschoolyear1977-78.54. A checklistformatcovering specific educationaloutcomeswithin each subject for each schooltermwould be a useful device. OBJECTIVETHIRTEEN:TO DEVELOP CONTINUAL LINKAGES WITH THE PRIMARY SCHOOLS 55.Juniorhigh schooleducatorstendtorelatemorereadilytosenior high school colleaguesthantotheircounterparts intheprimary schools.Itiscommonpracticeforjuniorand senior high school principalstohave combined meetingsforeducational planningandsharingbutmuchlesscommonforprimary andjuniorhigh school principalstomeetsimilarly.Ifthejuniorhigh school istoserve asthemeansofarticulating primary and secondaryeducation,thenregular planning sessions involving primaryandjuniorhigh school principals shouldbescheduledthroughouttheschoolyearundertheauspicesoftheresponsible Assistant DirectorsofEducation. OBJECTIVE FOURTEEN: TO OPERATIONALIZE ANEFFECTIVEINSPECTING SYSTEM INJUNIORHIGH SCHOOL EDUCATION 56. The inspecting system appliedtosecondaryeducationwillundoubtedlyhave somedifferentopera tional characteristicsthanthatappliedtoprimaryeducation.However,theobjectivesofthesystem,themethodofoperating,thetypeofreporting,theparticipationofprincipalsanddepartmentheads (where applicable), etc. shouldbeclarified beforethefull systemisputintooperation.Asthisis a sensitive area in education,itmaybeusefultohave a special programmeofin-house training in evaluationandcoun selling for Ministry officerswhowillbeinvolved, particularly astheinspecting system ismeanttobringaboutimprovements ineducationas well as monitoringtheon-going school activities. OBJECTIVEFIFTEEN:TO INSTALL A LEARNING RESOURCESAREAIN EACHJUNIORHIGH SCHOOL 57.Theusefulnessofa learning resources area in a schoolbecomemoreapparentateach succeeding levelofeducation. Training in self-relianceandresourcefulness is greatly assisted when an areaofthistypeexists nearathandforlearningonone'sown.Thoughprintedmaterial isthemajorcomponent,othermaterials such as audiotapes, setsof35mm. slides, three-dimensional objects, visualsofvarious sorts, etc. can be useful inpromotingindependentlearning.Thestudentsandstaffcantogetherprepare useful instructional materialsatlowcostas a schoolprojectoraspartofa programme in applied arts. Thebenefittoteachers andstudentsofa functional and accessible learning resources area is incalculable. Adviceontheestablish mentofworkable areas shouldbeprovidedbytheMinistryofEducationthrougha co-ordinatorofthelearning resourcesunit.OBJECTIVE SIXTEEN: TO PROVIDE IN-SERVICE TRAININGFORJUNIORSECONDARY46

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SCHOOL TEACHERS IN SELECTIVE AREAS58. Duringtheplanning period in-service trainingshould relate directlytotheinstallation of thenewjuniorsecondary school programme.Fourspecific areasofconcern, however, are: (1) preparing examinationsandtests (2) preparing useful instructional materials (3) practical approachestodevelopmental and remedial reading (4) curriculum development fortheclassroom teacher.TheCollegeofTheBahamas shouldbeinvitedtoco-operate in a shared programmeofin-service training activities.47

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, AND TARGET DATES JUNIOR SECONDARY EDUCATION-1976-81OBJECTIVE PROJECTNo.1l.Presentationofseminars and workshopsongroup process skills for principals and teachersNo.12. Designing projects forstudentinvolvement intheschools andcommunityduring regular schoolyearand summer periodNo.23. Undertake a sociologicalstudyofBahamianyoungpeopleatthejuniorand senior high school level No.34.Conductbriefing sessionswith (Xl juniorand senior high school principals re manpower needs, etc.No.35. Prepareinformationbulletinsonvocational needsofthecountryand keepupdatedfor principalsandvocational guidance counsellors RESPONSIBILITIESTheMinistryofEducation DivisionofSupportServicesTheUniversityoftheWest Indies PrincipalsYouthDivisionTheCollegeofTheBahamasYouthDivision MinistryofEducationADE (Planning) ADE (Secondary) MinistryofEducation ADE (Planning) ADE (Secondary) TARGET DATEThroughout1976and1977Each yearthroughoutplanning periodTobegin in SpringTermof1976Tobegin in SpringTermof1975Tobegin in Spring Termof1975

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SCHEDULE FOR PROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, AND TARGET DATES JUNIOR SECONDARY EDUCATION -1976-81 OBJECTIVE PROJECT RESPONSIBILITIESNo.36.Review vocational guidance MinistryofEducation activitiesandco-ordinate efforts DivisionofSupportServiceatjuniorand senior high schoolsDeputyDirectorofEducation includingtheintegrationofADE (Secondary) guidance staff ADE (Planning)No.47.Surveycommunityplacements for Principals studentsona voluntary basis andYouthDivisionona work-study basis ADE (Secondary)No.48.Design a procedureforselecting, Principals placing and supervising students ADE (Secondary)No.49.Place students and gradually Principals increase numbers involvf'dco No.510.Develop appraisal instruments Learning Resources UnitforEnglish (vocabulary and Principals comprehension) and for mathEnglish and Mathematics ematical competencies for eachofTeachers Grades7,8and9.No.511.Employ appraisal instruments and Principals revise as needed Teachers TARGET DATE1976 1976-77 1976-77 1977-78Spring1976September1976and thereafter

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, ANDTARGETDATESJUNIORSECONDARY EDUCATION-1976-81OBJECTIVEPROJECTRESPONSIBILITIESTARGETDATENo.512.Reviewjuniorsecondary programme ADE (Secondary), Principals1975-76withviewtoconsolidationofCo-ordinatorofSecondary subjects School Curriculum ChairmenofSubject CommitteesNo.513. Prepare course outlinesforall ADE (Secondary)1976-77juniorsecondary school subjects Co-ordinatorofSecondary School Programme SubjectCommitteesNo.514.Installnewjuniorsecondary ADE (Secondary)1977-78school programme PhaseI:ADE(SupportServices)CommunicationStudies, Principals 01 Mathematic Studies, Science0StudiesNo.515.Installnewjuniorsecondary ADE (Secondary)1978-79school programme PhaseII:ADE(SupportServices) Applied Arts, BahamianandPrincipalsandSocial Studies, PhysicalandHealth StudiesNo.516. Evaluate successofPhase I ADE (Secondary)1979-80PrincipalsNo.517.Evaluate successofPhaseIIADE (Secondary), Principals1980-81 ..-.... .. _.......

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, ANDTARGETDATESJUNIORSECONDARY EDUCATION-1976-81OBJECTIVE PROJECT RESPONSIBILITIESNo.618.Design a developmental reading ADE (Secondary) programmeinconjunction with Co-ordinatorofSecondary preparationofEnglish syllabus School Curriculum English Subject Committee No; 619.Introducedevelopmental ADE (Secondary) readingthroughoutalljuniorhigh Principals school grades EnglishStaffNo.720. Reviewofjuniorhigh school Director witha viewtoDeputyDirector implementing a credit system, ie; ADE (Secondary)onecourse equalsonecredit Principals C11 No.721. Implementationofcredit system ADE (Secondary) .... atjuniorhigh school level PrincipalsNo.722. Considerationofsemester and ADE (Secondary) trimester organization for Principalsjuniorhigh schoolsNo.823.Specificationsofneeded"life"ADE (Secondary) skillstobeincluded in practical Principals studies programme TARGET DATE1976-77 1977-78 1976-77 1977-78 1976-771976-77

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, AND TARGET DATES JUNIOR SECONDARY EDUCATION -1976-81OBJECTIVE PROJECT RESPONSIBILITIESTARGETDATENo.824. Preparationofcourses in ADE (Secondary)1976-77practical studies Subject CommitteesNo.925. Provisionofequipmentand facilities MinistryofEducation for Director1977-78ADE (Secondary)No.826. EstimateofstaffrequiredtomountMinistryofEducation1976-77programme in all areas trained Directorandpara-professionals ADE (Secondary) ADE (Planning)No.827.Recruitmentand/ortrainingofMinistryofEducation1976-77staffforthepractical studiesDeputyDirector CJ1 programme ADE (Secondary) CollegeofTheBahamasNo.828. Installationofpractical studies ADE (Secondary)1977-78programme inthejuniorhigh schools PrincipalsNo.929. Planned approachtochanging ADE (Secondary)1976-81studentand parentalattitudeaboutPrincipalsthevalueofpractical studies

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, AND TARGET DATES JUNIOR SECONDARY EDUCATION-1976-81 01 OBJECTIVE No.10No.10No.10No.10No.11PROJECT30.EstablishmentofanExamination and Testing Unit in MinistryofEducation31. PreparationofNational Standardized Tests in English and Mathematical Competencies (Grade9)relatedtojuniorhigh school"new"programme32.AdministrationofPreliminary Standardized Tests in English and Mathematical Competencies (Gr.9.)33.AdministrationoftheBahamianTestofEnglish and Mathematical Competencies Grade9.34. Developmentofa pre-service pro gramme forjuniorsecondary school teacherswithspecific referencetopractical studies, sciences, developmental readingandBahamian studies RESPONSIBILITIES DirectorDeputyDirector ADE (Secondary) ADE(SupportServices) Examination Unit ADE (Secondary ADE(SupportServices) Examination and TestingUnitADE(SupportServices) Examination and TestingUnitCollegeofTheBahamas MinistryofEducationPrincipalsTARGETDATE19761977-79May,1978May,1979May,19801976-77

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, AND TARGET DATES JUNIOR SECONDARY EDUCATION -1976-81OBJECTIVE PROJECT RESPONSIBILITIES TARGET DATE No. 11 35. Policy decisionsaboutstudent:Director1976staffratio,typeand qualificationsDeputyDirectorofjuniorsecondary teachers and ADE (Secondary) organizational frameworkofjuniorPrincipals high school during planning period No.1136. Calculationofteacherneeds for Director1976thejuniorsecondary schoolDeputyDirector during each yearofplanning period ADE (Secondary) ADE (Planning) No.12.37. Constructionofan achievement ADE(SupportServices)1976-77record system for eachstudentADE (Secondary) basedontermperformance and Principals <:1l transmittedtoparentsand teachers ,j:>. ofsucceeding grades in conjunctionwith"new"programme No.1238.Implementationofpupil progress ADE (Secondary)1977-78record system Principals No.1339. Scheduled meetings between primary ADE (Primary1976-77head teachers andjuniorsecondary ADE (Secondary school principals

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS,ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, ANDTARGETDATESJUNIORSECONDARY EDUCATION-1976-81 01 01 OBJECTIVE No.14No.15No.15No.16No.16PROJECT40. Designandimplementationofinspectingsystemas appliedtojuniorhigh schools41.Design aprototypeofa school learning resourcesarea42.Install inonejuniorhigh school in New Providenceandinatleasttwojr./sr.highschoolsintheFamilyIslands43.Evaluateandaddsuchareastoadditionalschools44.Presentin-servicetrainingworkshops,seminarsandcourses in a.preparingexaminationsandtestsb.preparingusefulinstructionalmaterials c.developmentalandremedial readingd.curriculumdevelopmentintheclassroom RESPONSIBILITIES ADE (Supervisory) ADE(Secondary)ADE (Primary)ADE(Support)ADE(Secondary)Learning ResourcesUnitPrincipals ADE(Secondary)ADE(Secondary)ADE(Support)ADE(Support)College oi'i'he BahamasTARGETDATE1976-77 1976-77 1977-78 1978-81 1976-81(annually)

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B.RATIONALE SENIOR SECONDARY EDUCATION 59. Universal secondaryeducationuptoGrade Twelve has beentheeducational goalofmanyWestern countries, particularly CanadaandtheUnited States.Thecomprehensive high school was designed inthe50'stoprovide secondaryeducationforallstudentsirrespectiveoftheirdiffering aptitudes, abilitiesandinterests.Ofrecentdatethecompartmentalizationofprogrammesintoacademic, vocational,andcommer cial sections has undergone major revision sothatstudentsarenowabletochoose courses from among a wide arrayofofferings.Tofacilitatethefree selectionofcourses varioustypesofcredit systems have been devised which enablethestudenttoproceedthroughthesecondary school programme accordingtohisownabilitiesandinterests. Also, basic courses are offeredatdifferent levelsofdifficulty from remedialtoadvanced. 60.Thenon-selective high school, therefore, is enormously different inbothqualityandquantityfrom its elitist predecessor.Theapparenterosionofeducational standards whentheproductofthetwotypesofhigh schooois arecomparedis misleadingandallegationsoflowering standards are unfairtoteachers andstudentsalike.Thetraditionalexpectationsaboutachievement levels no longer apply acrosstheboard.61.Itisestimatedthatonly10to15%ofsenior high schoolstudentscanbenefitfromfurtherformal academic studiesattheuniversity levelbutthisminority(importantthoughitis) receivesabout90%ofthehigh school'seffortand admiration.Intheyears ahead senior high schoolsmustattempttoextri cate themselvesfromthemystiqueofacademeandface realisticallytheirnewclienteleandtheiraltered purposes. And amongthosealtered purposesthetaskofbridgingthe'school'worldwiththe'workday'worldisofparamountimportance. PRESENT STATUSOFSENIOR SECONDARY EDUCATION 62. Some12senior high schools intheCommonwealthexclusiveofindependentschools are providing completing secondaryeducationin atwoorthreeyearprogrammeforapproximately6,500students.InNew Providencethesenior high schoolisa self-containedunitwhereas intheFamily Islands seniorandjuniorlevels arecombinedin a central high school organization. 63.Theprogramme consistsofacademicandnon-academic subjectsforwhich revised course outlines are availableinFrench, Spanish, History, Biology, Agricultural Science, Social StudiesandReligious Know ledge. BJC GCEandRSA syllabuses are also usedinthesenior high schools. Commercial subjects, industrial arts and guidance are available in all senior high schools in New Providence. 64.Studentsareadmittedtosenior high school irrespectiveoftheirperformance levelonleavingjuniorhigh school. Thusthesenior high school providesanopportunityforstudentstoachieve pass standing in BJCandRSA examinations as well as prepareothersformoreadvanced standingattheGCE(0)level. AsnotedintheMARAJ REPORTthesuccessrateintheGCE(0)level examinations is"amostdisappoint ingreturnfortheexpenditureandeffortwhich areputeachyearintopreparing pupilsforthisexamination."Thereisatpresent no Bahamas Senior Certificateforgraduatesofthecompletesecondary school programme.65.Throughout1974-75committeesofteacherswithrepresentatives frombothMinistryandindependentschoolsdraftedcourse outlinesforthesubjects listed above. Thisworkcontinuesin readinessfortheintroductionofthenewsecondaryschool programme in1977which willpayparticularattentiontopre paringstudentsforemployment.Thus, specialized science studiesandtechnicalandvocational subjects willbeaddedtothebasic subjects. Ultimately,thegraduatesofthesenior secondary programme willbeawardedtheBahamas National Senior Certificate.66.Thestaff/studentratiois inthe1:18rangethoughthereisa shortageofteachers in some areas,56

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principally, mathematics, scienceandtechnicalandvocational subjects.Approximately75%ofthestaffconsistsofexpatriateteacherswith30%oftheentire teachingstaffholding a university degree. 85%oftheteachingstaffin senior high schools are trained teachers. Overcrowdingofclasses persists becauseofinadequate space. 67.Thesenior high schools arenotdepartmentalized.Studentsare streamed accordingtoabilityandremedial classes are provided forthelowachiever. 68. Facilities for teaching scienceandtechnical and vocational subjects are inadequate. Library facilities also are insufficientforthepurposeofencouragingindependentstudy.69.Intheopinionofmanysenior high schooleducatorsthefollowing problemshinderthedevelopmentofsenior high schooleducationthroughouttheCommonwealth: (1)anunstable and imprecise curriculum (2) lackofco-ordinationbetweenjuniorandsenior high schools (3) irrelevant examination system (4) lackofstudentmotivation (5) overcrowdingandshortageofsuppliesand'equipment57

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OBJECTIVESFORSENIOR SECONDARY EDUCATION 70.ShortTermObjectives (1)todefine comprehensive secondaryeducationin Bahamianterms(2)todesign a two-year programme which culminates in a Bahamas National Senior Certificate (3)todeviseandinstall an effective examination system (4)todevise an efficient systemofrecordingandreportingstudentperformance (5)todevelopaneffective systemforinforming schoolsaboutmanpowerneedsandtrends(6)tostrengthenthecurrentguidance programme activities (7)toprovide everystudentwitha marketable skill inadditiontobasiceducation(8)toupgrade scienceeducationinthesenior high schools (9)toarticulatethesenior high school programmewiththeprogrammeattheCollegeofTheBahamas (10)toevolve a work-study programme forstudents(11)totrainall categoriesofsecondary school teachers (12)todevelop an effectiveandefficientrecruitmentprocedure for senior high schools staffing (13)toprovide professionaldevelopmentopportunitiesforsenior high school teachers (14)toprovideaneffective inspective system 71. LongTermObjectives (15)todevelopadequatelearning resources areas in each senior high school (16)toencouragecommunityparticipation in senior high school activities (17)toencourage self-relianceandself-sufficiencyinthesenior high schools58

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PROJECTS AND STRATEGIES OBJECTIVE ONE: TODEFINECOMPREHENSIVE SECONDARY EDUCATION IN BAHA MIAN TERMS72.TheCommunicationoftheMinister(June,1975)statedthatsenior secondary education istoprovide specific preparationforemploymentas well as preparation forfurtherstudyand higher education. Definingwhatcomprehensive secondaryeducationwillbeinTheBahamas fortheyears ahead mustbea priorityattheoutsetofthepresent planning period,1976-81.73.Forsenior secondary educationtheperiod1976-81mightbeconsidered Phase Oneofa two-cycle schedule spanningthedecade1976-86,andtheactivities during PhaseOneprovidingthenecessary ground workformoresubstantial accomplishments during Phase Two,1981-86.74. Traditionally, comprehensiveeducationhas referredtoa complete arrayofsubjects including academic, technical, vocationalandcommercial subjectswithmultiple programmes tailoredtomeettheneedsofthenon-selectivestudentpopulation.Theprogramme has coveredthreeorfouryearswithsupportfrom spe cialized facilities,equipment,staff,etc.Inthetwo-year senior secondary programmeofTheBahamastheinfra-structure, including techniques for changingattitudesofparents,studentsand teachers, will havetobe developed during PhaseOneinordertosupporta Bahamian comprehensive secondary school programmethereafter.59

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OBJECTIVE TWO: TO DESIGN A TWO-YEAR PROGRAMME WHICH CULMINATES IN A BAHAMAS NATIONAL SENIOR CERTIFICATE 75.Thecomponentsofthesenior secondary school programme are basic learnings and practical studies with provision forstudentswho wishtoqualify for post-secondary educationattheCollegeofTheBaha mas and elsewhere. 76.Thefollowing programme is suggested asthe ofprogramme which mightbeimplemented duringthecurrentplanning period: SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOL PROGRAMME BASIC LEARNINGS Compulsory Year One (1 ) English Studies (2) Mathematic Studies (3) Science Studies (4) PhysicalandHealth Studies00000000000000000004 credits Year Two (1) English Studies (2) Science Studies (3) Bahamian Studies (4) PhysicalandHealth Studies00000000000000000004 creditsTotal8 CREDITS PRACTICAL STUDIES Optional-Compulsory YearOneand TwoArtAutobodyAutoserviceFoodandNutritionElectrical Small Engine Nursing Aid Power SewingFoodService Sewing&Textile Horticulture Heating Service Beauty Culture MachineShop Office Practice Sheet Metal Painting and Decorating Carpentry Building Maintenance Masonry 4 CREDITS PER YEAR 8 CREDITS SUPPLEMENTARY STUDIES Optional Year One and Two (1) Foreign Languages (2) Music (3) Social studies (4) Religious Knowledge Year Two (1) Mathematics0000000000000000000Additional 2-4 credits 4 CREDITS (Maximum) 77.Thefollowing factors mightbeconsidered when designingthetwo-year comprehensive secondary school programme: (1) Allstudentswill have compulsoryandoptionalsubjects (2) Compulsory courses in English, mathematics and science shouldbeofferedattwolevels ordinaryand remedial.60

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(3) (4) (5) (6)(7)(8)(9)(10)(11)(12)(13)Allstudentsmustearn a minimumof16credits for graduationwitha senior certificate.Onecredit equals a coursetakenfor40minutes eachday,fivedaysa week,throughouttheschool year. Each practical subject should havetheweightingof2 credits. Selectedstudentsmayearn additional creditsuptoamaximumof4 credits.Thecompulsory programme for yearsoneandtwowouldbedivided 50% academic and 50% practical.Ifpractical subjects were offeredona semester basis duringthefirst year,thenstudentscould explore amaximumof4 different subject areas, e.g. auto-body,autoservice, small engine, electri cal for familiarization purposes.Inthesecond yearoneortwosubjectsofspecialization equivalenttofourcredits wouldbetakenbyeachstudent.Theworkofeachstudentwouldbeexaminedattheendofeach coursebytheclassroomteacherandrecommendedfor a creditornocredit.Thesummer vacation period mightbeusedtoprovide instructions in some areas for credit purposes forthosewhofailedtoachieve credit standingandforthosewho wishedtoextendtheirlearning inthesameoranothersubject field.Studentswho perform wellonTheBahamian TestofEnglishandMathematical Competencies (Grade 9)theBJC national examinations and school-based examinations and who wishtopursuefurtheracademicand/orpractical studiesmayacquire additional creditsuptoa maximumof4 duringthetwo-year secondary programme. Some subjectsmayrequireanadditional periodofstudybeyondthesenior certificatetoachieve a desirable levelofmastery beforeemploymentorfurtherstudy.Itisnotnecessarytoofferallthelisted subjectsunderpractical studies in all senior high schools. 78. Admissiontothevarious programmesattheCollegeofTheBahamas shouldbebasedonthestudent'scomplete performance profile duringthefive-year secondary programme andthescoresonstandardized tests in English and Mathematics (Grade 9 and Grade 11). DiscussionswiththeCollegeofTheBahamasaboutadmission requirements and procedures should get underway immediately. 79. Pre-university credits shouldbeawardedbytheCollegeofTheBahamas. Hopefully, such credits wouldberecognized as validbypost-secondary institutions elsewhere. OBJECTIVE THREE: TO DEVISE AND INSTALL AN EFFECTIVE EXAMINATION SYSTEM80.Thefinal mark inany subjectforall pupils shouldbea composite mark fromtermassignments, proj ects,studentparticipation and final examinations. 81. Assumingthatthesenior secondary schools willbeorganizedona credit system in some form,thentheexamination system leadingtotheawardoftheBahamas Senior Certificate shouldbemodified as well.Theindividual teacher, principal and schoolmustassume greater responsibility for determiningthefinal standingofastudentin a courseorprogramme. Thoughitmaybeadvisabletohold national examinations duringtheperiod1976-81,itmustberecognizedinevitablythattheteachermustultimatelydeterminethedegreeofachievement experiencedbyher/his pupils. Moreover,anyassistance initsnational examinationsthatTheBahamas might receivethroughtheCaribbean Examination Councilmustnotdistorttheaims, 61

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objectives andcontentoftheBahamian curriculum. Beginning in1981thefinal marksofa candidate fortheBahamas Senior Certificate shouldbebasedona combinationofschool assessment (50%) and external national examinations (50%). 82. Standardized testing in English (principally reading comprehension)attheendofGrade11involving allstudentsthroughouttheBahamas wouldbeuseful in monitoring achievement levels inthisfundamental subject. OBJECTIVE FOUR: TO DEVISE AN EFFECTIVE SYSTEMOFRECORDING AND REPORTING STUDENT PERFORMANCE83.Many teachers are dissatisfiedwiththecurrentprocedures for recording and reportingstudentperform ance arguingthatthepresent system is excessively time-consuming andyetineffective.Inadditiontoa numerical markorlettergrade indicating his final standing in each course a listofspecificcontentmastered duringthecourse should alsobeprovided fortheadvisementofstudents, parents and succeeding teachers. Checklists canbeprepared for each course and mastery checkedoffatintervals duringtheyear (or semester). Onecopyshouldberetained inthestudent'sfile. OBJECTIVE FIVE: TO DEVELOP A SYSTEMFORINFORMING SCHOOLS ABOUT MAN POWER NEEDS AND DEVELOPMENTS INCLUDING THE APPOINTMENTOFADVISORY VOCATIONAL COMMITTEES 84.Theprincipals andkeystaff membersofthejunior and senior high schools shouldbekeptfully in formedaboutmanpower needs and developments in The Bahamas.TheADE (Planning) andtheADE (Secondary) shouldholdannual briefing sessionswithprincipals anddepartmentheads forthispurpose and also supplythemfrom timetotimewith manpower bulletins whichinterpretthedataand indicatetheimplications for school programme planning. 85.Throughouttheplanning period periodicstaffconferencesonthetheme: THE ECONOMY AND THE SCHOOLS shouldbeconvenedtokeepall high school teachers informedofthecritical developments inthecountry.86.As well,theappointmentofknowledgeable personstoadvisory vocational committees -onein Nassau andoneforeach central high school intheFamily Islands representing various sectorsofthecommunitywouldbeusefultoensure two-way communication betweentheschools andthebusinesscommunity,particularlywithrespecttothetechnicalandvocational aspectsofthehigh school programme. OBJECTIVE SIX: TO RE-DEFINE THE ROLEOFGUIDANCE IN THE SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS87.Thejuniorand senior high schools should collaborateonguidance activities which directthestudentsin a meaningful waytowardrealistic vocational choices and vocational preparation Asthefocus inthehigh schools willbeoneducation foremployment,theguidance worker should direct his effortstowardassistingbothstudentandstafftounderstand clearly societal needs inthework force. He should therefore.,,be informedaboutjobrequirements,thejobmarket,studentplacementona part-time and full-time basis,opportunitiesforfurthertrainingorstudyattheCollegeofTheBahamas and elsewhere intheBahamas. He should find ways and meansofbringing this informationtotheattentionofstudents,staffand parents.88.During1976-77theduties and responsibilitiesofguidance workers inthejuniorand senior high schools shouldbere-defined inthelightofnew directions in Bahamian education. OBJECTIVE SEVEN: TO PROVIDE EVERY STUDENT WITH A MARKETABLE SKILL IN62

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ADDITIONTOBASIC EDUCATION89.Thefollowing questionsmustbeanswered beforethisobjective canbeachieved efficientlyandef fectively: 1. What skills willbemarketable overthenexttenyears which shouldbeacquired intheschools?2.How long (weeks,months,years) wouldittakeastudenttoacquirecompetencyintheparticular skill(s)? 3. Howmanystudentsshould acquire a particular skill inanyoneyear? 4. What levelofskill mastery should secondary schools aimat?5. What aretheexactresources (personnel, material) requiredtosupportthelearningoftheskill?Attheearliest possibledate,andnolaterthanDecember,1976,these questions shouldbeconsideredbytheAssistant DirectorofEducation(Secondary) and his colleagues inordertorationalizethevocational aspectofthesecondary school programme andtoensuremaximumsocial and cost benefits. 90.Ifa skill, e.g., typewriting, smallmotorrepair, couldbegraded basic, intermediate, specialist andtherequired skills described clearlyateachofthesethreelevelsthentheschools could determinetheamountofschooltimerequired,thelevelorlevelstheschool programme should aimat,andtheresources requiredtomeetthecommitment.91.Thespecialist levelmayrequire an additional semester (winterorsummer)oreven a full year (fullorpart-time).Thatis, somestudentsmayremain in school for a fewmonthsora yearbeyondthesenior certificate Grade (Grade XI). Also, some skills, e.g. gardening, landscaping might begin inthejuniorhigh school inordertohave amaximumfive year span. 92.Fewskills begun inthesenior high school canbemastered in a two-year programme. Therefore,theutilizationofsummerand after-hour classes in high schoolsand/ortheCollegeofThe Bahamas willprobablybe requiredtoachievethehighest levelofmasteryatthespecialist level. 93. ByJanuary,1977,thevocational profileofthesecondary school programme shouldbedecideduponandthestagesofimplementingthevocational profile mappedout.Atleastthreeyears will be requiredtoworkouta marketable skills programme in all high schools. OBJECTIVE EIGHT: TO UPGRADE SCIENCE EDUCATION IN THE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS94.Thenew secondary school science programmeoughttobeviewed withinthecontextofchanging ob jectivesoftheBahamian high school. Scientificmethod,contentand understandings shouldbelearned in relationtotheacquisitionofpractical skills. Accordingly, new curricula in science educationmustbebasedonthepresent and future needsofThe Bahamas. 95.Thefollowing recommendationsoftheMARAJ REPORT are presented here for immediate action: (i)theearlyappointmentofa small advisorycommittee,reporting directlytotheDirectorofEducation,to(a) formulate, oversee and review continuously a specific programmeofAgricultural Science: (b) give counselonthetreatmentthatis desirable withintheoverall school programme (Le. withinthecontextofSocial Studies, Home Economics etc.)ofmatters relatedtotheinfra-structure and63

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secondary industriesofAgriculture and Fisheries.(ii)theformationwithintheMinistryofa science group comprisingthreemembers, includingtheleaderwhoitis suggested wouldbeand S.E.O., which wouldreportas appropriatetoeach A.D.E., and where so requiredtotheDirector,andoneortwoE.O.'s; OBJECTIVE NINE: TO ARTICULATE THE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAMME WITH THE PROGRAMME AT THE COLLEGEOFTHE BAHAMAS 96.Theeducational programme inthesecondary schools andattheCollegeofTheBahamas are evolving independently andwithlittleifany consultation betweenthetwopanels. To ensure articulation between secondary andtertiaryeducation inTheBahamastheDirectorofEducationandthePrincipaloftheCol lege should examinetheemerging programmesofeach panel and develop policies relatingtoadmission requirements and standardstotheacademic, vocational and professional programmes offeredattheCol legeofTheBahamas. OBJECTIVE TEN: TO EVOLVE A WORK-STUDY PROGRAMMEFORHIGH SCHOOL STU DENTS 97.Thata work-study programmebedevised forjuniorhigh schoolstudentshas been previously recom mended in this plan.Ithas also beenrecommendedthata surveyofpart-timeemploymentopportunitiesbeundertakenduringthe1976-77 school year. 98.Atthesenior high school levelconcentratedeffortbytheschoolstafftoinvolve a significantnumberofstudentsin work-study schemesisimperative.Theappointmentofa Manager for Work-Study Pro grammesbytheMinistryofEducationisalso recommended.TheManagerofWork-Study Programmes wouldberesponsibletoworkwithhigh school principals and guidance counsellors in planning andconducting a comprehensive programmeofworkopportunitiesfor students stillatschool in co-operation withotherdepartmentsofgovernment and private companies, institutions and agencies. 99.Studentsinthesenior high schools shouldbeallowedtoearn some creditstowardthenational senior certificate foranapproved programmeofwork-study. Approvaloftheactivity and 90% on-the-jobattendance shouldconstitutetherequirements foranearned credit. 100.Thework-study programme could coverbothsummer andwintersessions. OBJECTIVE ELEVEN: TO TRAIN SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERSFORTHE MAJOR HIGH SCHOOL SUBJECTS101.Inordertostaffthesecondary schoolswitha majorityofBahamian teacherstheTeacher Education DivisionoftheCollegeofTheBahamasmustassumetheresponsibilityoftraining high school teachers forbothjuniorand senior high schools.102.Intheproposed re-organized senior high school programme teachers willberequired inthecore Basic LearningsofEnglish, Mathematics, Science, Bahamian Studies and PhysicalandHealth Education. These areas shouldberegarded as priority academic subjects duringtheplanning period1976-81.Bahamianstudentsreturningtothecountryonthecompletionoftheirundergraduateorgraduate degree studies abroadshouldbeactively encouragedtoentertheteaching professionatthesecondary school level. Full and part-timestudyprogrammes leadingtoa BachelorofEducationdegree andteachercertification should be made availablethroughtheTeacherEducationDivisionoftheCollegeofTheBahamas.103.Inco-operationwithotherdivisionsoftheCollegeofTheBahamastheTeacherEducationDivisionmustalso train teachersofPractical Studies.Itmaybenecessarytomountan emergency summer programme for teachersofvocational subjects beginning in1977and continuingthereafterthroughouttheplanning64

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period. Experienced craftsmenwhohavepotentialas well for communicatingtheirskills effectivelytoyoungpeople shouldberecruited fortheemergency training programme for teachersofpractical subjects.Thenumberofsuch teachersforeach skill areacannotbecomputeduntiltheprogramme in eachjuniorandsenior high school has been determinded.104.With respecttoSupplementary Studies itmaybenecessarytorecruit foreign language teachers from abroad. OBJECTIVE TWELVE: TO DEVELOP AN EFFECTIVE ANDEFFICIENTRECRUITMENT PRO CEDUREFORHIGH SCHOOL STAFFING105.Tomeetstaffing needs in an evolving high school programme will necessitate close andcontinuousdialogue betweentheAssistant DirectorofEducation(Secondary) andtheprincipalsofthehigh schools. A sequenceofactivities fortheidentification,recruitmentand placementofteachersmustbemappedoutnolaterthanSeptember,1976,foroperationintheplanning year1976-77.Theprocedure wouldbere viewed criticallyattheendoftheschool year inJune1977and adjustmentsmadefortheensuing year's procedures.106.Itis especiallyimportantthattheDistrictEducationOfficers intheFamily Islandsandtheprincipalsofcentral high schools be actively involved intheprocesstoensureanappropriatenumberofteachers inthedifferent subject areas.107.Inordertofacilitatetherecruitmentand placementofteachers duringthenextcritical five year periodtheMinistryofEducationshouldbegiven discretionarypowerofappointmenttotheteaching servicewithoutreferencetothePublic Service Commission. OBJECTIVE THIRTEEN:TOPROVIDE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIESFORSENIOR HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS AND ADMINISTRATORS108.Duringtheplanning periodtheAssistant DirectorofEducation(SupportServices) in co-operationwithprincipals,departmentheadsandteachers in senior high schools should plan a professional developmentprogramme which focusesonthefollowing educational concerns: (a) classroom teachersandteachersofreading (b) curriculum and course design (c) evaluatingstudentperformance (d)theBahamian adolescent learner (e) Bahamian studies social, cultural, legal, economic109.TheMinisterofEducationin co-operation withtheBahamas Teachers Union might examinethepossibilityofrecognizing those teachers who complete successfully a specifiednumberofhoursin pro fessional development activities. A cumulative record system maintainedbytheteacherwouldbeuseful in identifyingthoseteachers and administratorswhohave additional qualifications when professional advancement is being considered. OBJECTIVE FOURTEEN:TOPROVIDE AN EFFECTIVE INSPECTING SYSTEM IN THE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS110.Theinspecting system fortheBahamas school systemmustofnecessityadaptitselftothecharacter isticsoftheeducational leveltowhichitwillbeapplied.Thesenior high school is a complex institution65

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withmanyestablished procedures which havebeendesignedtoaid inthebestfunctioningoftheschool. To ensuremaximumbenefits from an inspecting system inthesenior high schoolstheAssistantDirectorofEducation(Secondary)andADE (Supervisory) should formulate a clear setofobjectivesandprocedures duringtheschool year1976-77.Atits best an inspecting systemisseldom applaudedbyschool principalsandteachers;atitsworstan inspecting systemcandoirreparable damagetoall professionals involved intheoperation.111.Duringthetrial period1976-77thereshouldbeconsultation among all parties involvedtoachieve a constructive approachtoa singularly difficult activity. OBJECTIVEFIFTEEN:TO DEVELOP ADEQUATE LEARNING RESOURCE AREAS IN EACH SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL112.Learning resources areas are invaluable aids inpromotingself-reliance in students, particularly senior high schoolstudents.TheCo-ordinatoroftheLearning Resources Unit intheMinistryofEducationshould develop aprototypeofthis facilityafterconsultationwithprincipalsandteachers.113.Thestaff,studentsandparents should allbeinvolved in raising fundstoinstall andoperatethelearn ing resources areas. Service clubs areanothersourceoffunds. OBJECTIVE SIXTEEN: TO ENCOURAGE COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION IN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS114.Educating Bahamian childrenandyoungpeopleisonlyhalfthejob.The schoolmustplayasignifi cant role incommunityeducationas well.Theschool andthecommunitymustcometoregardoneanotheras partners inthemostimportantactivityinthecountry.115.Itisrecommendedthatthestaff membersofsenior high schoolspromotecommunityeducationthroughallorsomeofthefollowing activities: (a) useofvoluntaryassistants (b)fundraising (c) educational seminars, discussions, lectures (d) clubs, e.g. sports, films,drama,etc.(e) literacy programmes (f) curriculum councils (g) vocational coursesandactivities (h)communityexhibitions116.Permissiontouse school facilitiesbythepublic isonlyoneaspectofcommunityinvolvement intheschools. Beyondthisaremanywaysbywhich citizens can cometoregardthesenior high schools astrulycommunitycentres.117 ..J;)uring 1976-77aCommunityInvolvement Plan shouldbedrawnupbya speciallyappointedMinis terialcommitteeofeducatorsand citizens. OBJECTIVE SEVENTEEN: TO ENCOURAGE SELF-RELIANCE AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY IN66

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THE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS118.Each senior high school, in particular, hasthepotentialofbecoming a largely self-contained economicunit.Educationfor living should involvethestudentsin copingwiththepractical necessityofproducinganddistributing goods and services for profit. Such activity in senior high schools could enhancetheschool programmebyproviding practical examplesofindustryandcommerceonadaytodaybasis.67

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, ANDTARGETDATES SENIOR SECONDARY EDUCATION -1976-81OBJECTIVEPROJECTRESPONSIBILITYTARGETDATENo.1l.Define comprehensive secondary DirectorofEducationOctober,1976educationinThe Bahamas forthedecade1976-86No.22. Design a two-year senior secondary ADE (Secondary)1976-77school programme leadingtoa national senior certificateNo.23.Prepare course outlines for all ADE (Secondary)1976-77senior secondary school subjects Co-ordinatorofSecondary School Programme Subject CommitteesNo.24.Install new senior secondary school ADE (Secondary) 1977-78 O'l programme PhaseI:ADE(SupportServices) (Xl YearOne-Basic Learnings Principals Practical Studies,SupplementaryStudiesNo.25.Install new senior secondary school ADE (Secondary)1978-79programme PhaseII:Year Two ADE(SupportServices) Basic Learnings, Practical Studies, Principals Supplementary StudiesNo.26. Evaluate successofPhase I ADE (Secondary)1979-80PrincipalsNo.27. Evaluate successofPhaseIIADE (Secondary)1980-81Principals

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SCHEDULE FOR PROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, AND TARGET DATES SENIOR SECONDARY EDUCATION-1976-81OBJECTIVE PROJECT RESPONSIBILITY TARGET DATENo.28. Prepare requirements for awardofDirectorofEducation1977theBahamas Senior Certificate basedona 16-course credit systemNo.39. Prepare a policy statement concerning DirectorofEducation1977examination procedures andpromotionADE (Secondary) standards for graduatesofsecondary schoolsNo.310.PreparationofNational Standardized ADE (Secondary) 1977-79 Tests in English Competencies ADE (Support Services) for administration in Grade XI Examination and Testing Unit 0) No.311.AdministrationofNational AD E (Support Services) May,1980 co Standardized Test in English Examination and Testing Unit CompetenciestoGrade XI studentsNo.412. Constructionofan achievement ADE (Support Services)1976-77record system for eachstudentADE (Secondary) basedontermperformance and Principals transmittedtoparents and teachersatsucceeding gradesNo.413. Implementationofstudentprogress ADE (Secondary)1977-78record system Principals

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, ANDTARGETDATES SENIOR SECONDARY EDUCATION-1976-81 -J oOBJECTIVENo.5No.5 No.5No.5No.6No.7PROJECT14.Conductbriefing sessionswithjuniorandsenior high school principals remanpowerneeds, etc.15.Prepareinformationbulletinonvocational needsofthecountryandkeepupdatedfor principals and vocational guidance counsellors16.Convenestaffconferencesonthetheme:TheEconomyandtheSchools19768117.AppointAdvisory VocationalCommitteesforsenior secondary schools18.Review vocational guidance activities and co-ordinate effortsatjuniorand senior high schools includingtheintegrationofguidance staffs19.Determinevocational profileforeachsenior secondary school RESPONSIBILITY ADE (Planning) ADE (Secondary) ADE (Planning) ADE (Secondary) Manager Work-Study Programme ADE (Planning) ADE (Secondary) MinistryofEducationADE(Secondary)ADE(SupportServices) ADE (Planning) ADE (Secondary)TARGETDATETobegin in SpringTermof1976Annually1976-81FallTermThroughout1976-81TobeginnolaterthanJanuary,19771976January,1977

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, AND TARGET DATES SENIOR SECONDARY EDUCATION-1976-81 -JI-' OBJECTIVENo.7No.8 No.8No.8No.8 No.9PROJECT20.Determine level (basic, inter mediate, specialist),durationandcontentfor each skill subject and prepare courses 21.Appointsmall advisorycommitteeonscience education22.FormScience Group within Ministrytoinitiate change in science educationthroughoutallpartsofthecountryandatall levels chairedbyan SEO 23. Effect liaison with MinistryofAgriculture and Fisheriesforcurriculum development24.Inventory scienceequipmentand science material inthesenior high schools and bringuptostrength where inadequate 25. Prepare policies relatingtoadmission requirements and standardstoprogrammesattheCollegeofThe Bahamas RESPONSIBILITY ADE (Secondary) DirectorofEducation DirectorofEducation DirectorofEducation ADE (Secondary) Principals DirectorofEducation Principal, CollegeofThe Bahamas TARGET DATE January,1977September,1976September,1976September,1976September,1976January,1977

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, AND TARGET DATES SENIOR SECONDARY EDUCATION-197681 -;:Jt-:l OBJECTIVE No.10No.10No.10No.10No.11No.11&12PROJECT 26.Appointa ManagerofWorkStudyProgrammes for senior Secondary Schoolstodevise and implement a work-study programme 27. Surveycommunityplacements forstudentsona work-study programme 28. Design a procedure for selecting, placing and supervisingstudents29. Place students and gradually increase numbers involved30.Policy decisionsaboutstudent/staff ratio,typeand qualificationsofsenior secondary teachers and organizational frameworkatsenior high schools during planning period 31. Determinationofstaffing needs inthesenior high schools for each yearoftheplanning period RESPONSIBILITY MinistryofEducationManagerofWork-Study Programme ManagerofWork-Study Programme Principals ManagerofWork-Study Programme MinistryofEducation ADE (Secondary) TARGET DATE September,19761976-771976-771977-78Summer,1976Summer,1976

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS, ASSIGNMENT OF RESPONSIBILITIES, AND TARGET DATES SENIOR SECONDARY EDUCATION-197681 -J OBJECTIVE No.11No.11&12No.11No. 11 No.11No.11PROJECT 32. Prepare policystatementcoveringstudentawards for higher education which relatestoteaching service inthesenior high schools 33. Define recruitment procedures withattentiontoteachersofpractical studies and science education 34. Develop a pre-service programme for secondary school teachers with emphasisonpracticalstudies and science education 35. Begin training programme for secondary school teachers in selected subject areas 36. Design a selection procedure forthetrainingofcraftsmen as paraprofessionals in senior high schools 37. Considerthepossibilityofmounting a summer emergency programme forthetrainingofteachersofpractical subjects RESPONSIBILITY MinistryofEducation ADE (Secondary) CollegeofTheBahamas CollegeofTheBahamas MinistryofEducation ADE (Secondary) CollegeofTheBahamas MinistryofEducationCollegeofTheBahamas TARGET DATE Summer,1976Summer,1976 1976-771977-781976771976-77Programmetobegin in Summer,1977

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, ANDTARGETDATES SENIOR SECONDARY EDUCATION-197681 -JH::OBJECTIVE No.13No.14No.15No. 15 No.15PROJECT38.Present in-service training workshops, seminarsandcourses in: a. reading inthesenior high schoolb.curriculum and course design c. evaluationstudentperformanced.theBahamian adolescent learner e. Bahamianstudies 39. Design andimplementaninspecting system as appliedtosenior secondary schools40.Design aprototypeofa school learning resources area 41. Install inonesenior high school in New Providence 42. Evaluate andadd such areastoadditional schools RESPONSIBILITY ADE(Support)CollegeofThe Bahamas ADE (Supervision) ADE (Secondary) ADE(Support)ADE (Secondary) Learning ResourcesUnitPrincipals ADE (Secondary) ADE (Secondary)TARGETDATE197681 (annually)1976771976771977-781978-81

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, ANDTARGETDATES SENIOR SECONDARY EDUCATION-197681 -J01 OBJECTIVE No.16No.16No.17PROJECT 43. DrawupCommunityInvolvement Plan 44.ImplementationofCommunityInvolvement Plan45.Devise waysandmeansofconstituting each secondary school as a limited self-sufficientunitthroughproductionofgoods ,. andservices for school funds RESPONSIBILITY MinisterialCommitteeofEducatorsandCommunityLeaders ADE (Secondary) Principals PrincipalsTARGETDATE1976771977-781976-77

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III. 4.POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION 1. Anumberofagencies, organizationsandinstitutionsinTheBahamas provide a varietyofpost-secondary educationalopportunitiesin academic, vocationalandprofessional studies. Thoughnotexhaustive,thefollowing list representsthemajorcontributorstopost-secondaryeducation,viz.,TheCollegeofThe Baha mas, SchoolofNursing Education,HotelTraining Council, Public Service Training Centre, BahamasInstituteofCharteredAccountants,Bankers'Institute,theExtra-MuralDepartmentoftheUniversityoftheWest Indies,theLaw Association, Bahamas Police College, Arawak Training Centre.Inaddition, Bahamianstudentsare studyingona fullorpart-time basisattheUniversityoftheWest Indies, Miami University, Nova University, St.John'sUniversity (Minnesota)andotherpost-secondaryinstitutionsintheU.S.A., U.K.andCanada. 2.Thereis a growing feeling inmanyquartersoftheWestern worldthatpost-secondaryeducationoftheconventional universitytypeisoutoftouchwiththeneedsandinterestsoftheordinary citizen.ThepreeminentpurposeofBahamian post-secondaryeducationmustbetoadvancethebestinterestsofthenation.No Bahamianinstitutionofhigher learning should view itself as having a lifeofitsownasdistinctfromthelifeofthenationwhich creates and sustainsit.3.Thereare, however,externalfactors whichmustbeconsidered inthedevelopmentofpost-secondaryeducationin thiscountryfornotevenanislandisanislanduntoitself.Internationalacademic and pro fessional standards,forexample, present a challengetoeverycountry,encouragingthepursuitofexcellenceandensuring certain progress intheadvancement and applicationofknowledge.Thoughinternational standardsdorepresent atypeofeducational currency whosedebasementwouldnotbeintheinterestofanycountry,theyarenotsacrosanct. 4.Aswell,TheBahamas sharesmuchofits past incommonwiththerestoftheCaribbean.Itsfuturewillnodoubtbeinterwovenwiththedestinyoftheregion. As amemberoftheCaribbeancommunityofnations,TheBahamascannotturna blind eyeondevelopments in post-secondaryeducationelsewhere. However,notwithstandingtheregional affiliationofTheBahamas,theprimaryobjectivesofBahamian post-secondaryeducationmustbethenational interest. 5. TheEducationPlan(1976-81)conceptualizestheBahamian educational system as an organicunit.Post-secondaryeducation,therefore,shouldnotbeviewed as a mere extensionoftheso-called educational ladder.Rather,aspartofaninterdependentsystem, its purpose, objectivesandfunctioning affecteducationas a wholeandtouchultimatelyevery facetoflife inthecountry.6.TheEducationPlan will focusontheCollegeofThe Bahamas which is regarded astheprincipal institutionofBahamian post-secondary education.TheCollegeofTheBahamas 7.TheCollegeofTheBahamas was created in1974asthemajor publicinstitutionofhigher learning intheCommonwealth.UndertheprovisionsoftheCollegeofTheBahamas Act,theCollege incorporatedthethenexisting Teachers' CollegesandtheC.R. Walker Technical College.TheCollege also assumedtheresponsibility forthehigher levelsofacademic studiesofferedattheGovernmentHigh School.8.The Collegeisintendedtobe a multi-facetedinstitutionwhich hasbeendesignedtoserve Bahamian educational needs.IntheCommunicationtoParliament (June, themajor functionsoftheCollege are described as follows: (1)tooffercourses which wouldinclude-(a)whathas been offeredbytheC.R. Walker Technical College, Teachers' CollegeandGCE'A'Level studies;76

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(b) academic coursesofpre-university level; (c) sub-professionalandprofessional coursesrelatedtothevarious sectionsoftheBahamianeconomy;(d) university level courses asappropriate.(2)toengage in researchthatisdirectedtowardtheoptimalutilizationofthecountry'snaturalre sources.9.ThepurposeoftheCollegeofTheBahamasistoprovide a comprehensive,nationalandcommunityorientedprogramme.ThestatedphilosophyoftheCollege istoencourage life-longeducationandtomakeavailabletoanyinterestedadults,youngorold,coursessuitedtoawiderangeofneedsandabilities.10.TheCollege hasbeenestablished as a publiccorporationmanagedbya College Council.ThePrincipaloftheCollege serves asitsacademicandadministrativehead.TheCollegeisorganized administrativelyintoseven divisions, viz., Applied Science, BusinessAdministration,Education,Humanities,NaturalScience, Social Science, TechnicalandVocational.11.In1975-76therewere2,554studentsenrolled intheCollegeapproximately70%ofthestudentsin BusinessAdministrationandTeacherEducation.12.Inadditiontoa varietyofcertificatesanddiplomastheCollege awards an Associates inArtsdegreeafteratwo-yearprogrammeofstudies.13.TheCollegeofTheBahamas is alsotheadministrativecentrefortheEveningInstituteswhichofferBJC subjects, GCE subjects, RSA subjects, music, electronics,needlework,etc.14.University level courses are beingconductedfortrainedteachersinsummersessionsundertheauspicesoftheCollegeforcreditstowardsunder-graduatedegreesoftheUniversityofMiami.15.TheCollegeandTheBahamasHotelTraining Council willcollaborateonaprogrammeofstudieswhichwillrepresentoneyearofcredittowardthedegreeprogrammeinHotelManagementoftheUniversityoftheWest Indies.TheUWIandtheBahamasGovernmentare proceedingwiththeimplementationofplansfortheestablishmentoftheFacultyofTourismandHotelManagement inTheBahamas.16.Also,arrangementshaverecentlybeenconcludedbetweentheBahamasGovernmentandtheUniversityoftheWest IndieswherebysomeoftheinstructionfortheBachelorofEducationdegreeoftheUniversity willbeincorporatedwithintheprogrammeoftheCollegeofTheBahamas.17.TodatetheCollege hasmadeonlyamoderateimpactonTheBahamas. Thisisunderstandableintheearly stageofitsdevelopment,butmorewillbeexpectedoftheCollegeduringthenextfive years(1976-81).18.Itisurgent,now,thattheCollege assume a significant role intheeducationalsystemandthatrole willbeincreasingly influencedbyitspresentandultimaterelationshipwiththeBahamasGovernmentandotherpost-secondaryinstitutions.While itisstill formative intermsofitsstaff,programmesandfacilities,thespecific objectivesoftheCollegeanditsrelationshipwiththeGovernmentandothertertiaryinstitutionscan stillbedeterminedwithoutdramaticandcostlyadjustments.OBJECTIVESOFPOST-SECONDARY EDUCATIONTHROUGHTHECOLLEGEOFTHEBAHAMAS19. Term 1.Toadvancetheintellectual, socialandculturallifeofall Bahamians77

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2.toadvance knowledgeaboutandpromoteand understandingoftheBahamian society3.toprovide a centreofresearchanddevelopment inTheBahamas 20.ShortTermObjectives 4.todefine post-secondary education in Bahamianterms5.tocontinuetheeducational processofpromotingthepersonal growthandcareer potentialofBahamianstudents6.toassist intheoverall improvementofprimary and secondaryeducation7.toensurethatfurthereducation intheCollegeofTheBahamasisgearedtothemanpower requirementsofthecountry8.toensure its own professional growththrougha plannedstaffdevelopment programme 9.toinvolvestudentsattheCollege in awork/studyexperience. PROJECTS AND STRATEGIES OBJECTIVE ONE: TO ADVANCE THE INTELLECTUAL, SOCIAL AND CULTURAL LIFEOFALL BAHAMIANS 21.Inthepast, institutionsofhigher learningtendedtobeexclusive units, shuttingoutthemajorityofcitizens fromtheirprogrammes and activities. Thisisanunfortunateand narrow view.Intoday'ssociety all institutions must become inclusive, welcoming all citizenstotakeadvantageoftheirresources. 22.TheCollegeofTheBahamas has a unique role in advancingtheintellectual, socialandcultural lifeofall Bahamians. Astheprincipal institutionofhigher learning, its influence canbeenormousintheyears ahead. ThroughtheapparatusoftheCollege,manyactivities,viz,stimulating lectures, seminars, symposia, displays, performances, conferences, and so on, shouldbeundertakenannually. 23.TheCollegeofThe Bahamas should plan and publishanannual calendarofevents which areopentothepublic and given widespread publicitybyevery possible means. Provision shouldbemadewithinthebudgetestimatesoftheCollege forthispubliceducationprogramme. OBJECTIVE TWO: TO ADVANCE KNOWLEDGE ABOUT AND PROMOTE AN UNDER STANDINGOFTHE BAHAMIAN SOCIETY 24.Theimportanceofawakening national consciousnessaboutits past, present andfutureis well under stood. As an independent and sovereignnation,whatTheBahamas willyetbecomeislinked indivisibly with its present and past experiences. A systematiceffortis requiredtopreserve andinterpretthecollective experienceoftheBahamian society, past and present, forthebenefitoffuturegenerationsofcitizens. This kindofactivity requires sound and painstaking scholarship,thesortofdisciplined approachexpectedofany institutionofhigher learning. 25.TheCollegeofTheBahamas shouldbeconcernedaboutgathering and preserving aspectsofBahamian collective experiencethroughsystematic inquiryandcodification. 26.Furthermore,theCollege should establish a Centre for Bahamian Studies where scholars, performing artists and craftsmen in word, song and materials can assembletoilluminate every facetoftheheart, mind, hand and souloftheBahamian people. TheappointmentofFellowsoftheCollegeofTheBahamas should78

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include all Bahamians, irrespectiveoftheirpresentresidence,whohave acontributiontomaketonationalidentity.OBJECTIVETHREE:TOPROVIDEACENTREOFRESEARCHANDDEVELOPMENTINTHEBAHAMAS27.TheCollegeofTheBahamas will neverbea first-rateinstitutionifresearchanddevelopmentactivitiesremainvirtuallynon-existent.Governmentandnon-Governmentgroupsshouldhave accesstoa reliablesourceofknowledgeandresearch expertise.TheCollegeshouldbesuchacentre.Forexample,thereisneededresearch in materials science,marinescienceandsolar energyandthelaunchingofdevelopmentprojectsintheseareas is vitaltopromotethenation'sgrowthas well astoadvance scientific knowledge itself. 28.Amonganumberofdevelopmentareasthefollowing arerequiredimmediateplanningandprosecution.Hopefully,theCollege willenterintoaworkingpartnershipwithotherpost-secondaryeducation,inparticular,theUniversityoftheWest Indies, in designingandconductingspecificprojectsin each developmentarea.1.CommunityDevelopment_._-..Self-helpthroughco-operativecommunityactionisbehaviourwhich canbelearned in waysotherthanbytrialanderroralone.Communityeducationrequires a multi-faceted strategy whichcombinesskillsandknowledgefrommanydisciplinestoaccomplish its objectives.Forexample,thehealth-education-welfarenetworkrequiresanintegratedcommunityapproachforwhichpostsecondaryeducationcouldprovide leadershipiftheCOB wereaugmentedbyUniversity resources. 2.EnvironmentalandTechnologicalDevelopmentTheproperdevelopmentoftheenvironmentthroughjudiciousplanningandprudentmanagementoughttobeaconcernofpost-secondaryeducation.Ontheonehand,neglectoftheenvironmenthas already diminishedthequalityoflife formanyBahamians in NassauandtheFamilyIslands.Ontheotherhand,manyimportantresourceshereareunderdevelopedornotdevelopedatall.Environmentaldevelopmentisfarmorethanstudyingtheenvironment;itimplies acommitmentofitsproperutilization. Technologicaldevelopmentis closelytiedtoenvironmentaldevelopment.BothrequirethefusionofUniversityandCollege resourcesandactivity. 3.HumanDevelopmentA learningsocietyis alsoanadvancing society. Imaginative and forceful leadershipisrequiredtoservetheneedsofall Bahamians inpromotinglife-longinterestin learning.TheEveningInstituteshave servedthiscountrywellbutthetimehascometobroadenthepurposeandscopeofadulteducationinTheBahamas.TheCollege isthelogicalcentreforplanning, organizingandconducting a comprehensive arrayoflearningopportunitiesthroughouttheCommonwealth.Anentirelynewstrategyforthebestuseofspace,time,personnelandmoneycouldbedesigned co-operativelybytheMinistry,theCollegeandtheUniversityoftheWest Indies.29.TheCollegeofTheBahamas should establish aCentreforResearchandDevelopmentwhichwouldcoordinateandinitiateresearchanddevelopmentactivities incollaborationwithotherpost-secondaryeducationinstitutionsas required.30.TheCentreofResearchandDevelopmentshouldbeavailabletothepublicandprivatesectorforspecific researchanddevelopmentassignmentsonacontractbasis.79

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31.TheCollege, as well,shouldprovide a knowledge-basethroughallofits DivisionswhichwouldbeaccessibletomanysectorsoftheBahamiansociety,particularlyinproblemsrelatingtosocialandeconomicconditionsandneeds.OBJECTIVEFOUR:TODEFINEPOST-SECONDARYEDUCATIONIN BAHAMIANTERMS32.TheCollegeofTheBahamas istheprincipalpost-secondaryinstitutioninthecountry.Itistobeamulti-purpose,multi-facetedinstitutionwhichmustservethediverseneedsofthecountry.33.Unfortunately,atthemomentitappearstolack a senseofpurposeanddirection.Itsgoalsandobjectives havenotbeenclearlystatednorhasitdevelopedasatisfactoryorganizationalframeworkinwhichthestaffcanparticipateadequatelyinits decision-making process.ItsrelationshipwiththeBahamas Government,inparticulartheMinistryofEducationandCulture,isambiguousasisitsrelationshiptotheUni versityofWestIndiesandotherpost-secondaryinstitutions.34.Thisstateofaffairsmustnotbeallowedtocontinue.Theinvestmentofresourcesinthisfacility has alreadybeensubstantialwithonlymodestreturnsso far. 35.TowhatendshastheCollegebeencreated?Whatmustitachieveduringthenextfive years?tenyears?Fortunately,theCollege isenteringanewphaseofitsdevelopmentandtheanswerstothesequestionscanstillshapetheinstitutioninthistransitionalperiod.36.TheCollegeofTheBahamasmustbetrulyBahamianwithoutbeingundulyparochial.Itmustbenowregarded as havinganintegrityofitsownanditspurposeredefinedapartfromthemorelimitedpurposesoftheconstituentsfromwhichtheCollege was firstformed.37.Ifitsfunctioncanbedeterminedwithclarityandprecision,thenitsproperform,bothitsinternalorganizationandits physicaldevelopment,willbecomemorereadily 38.TheBahamasGovernmentandtheCollegeofTheBahamasshouldreviewtheconceptoftheCollegeanditsrelationshiptotheMinistryofEducationwiththepurposeofdefiningmorepreciselyitsroleandrelationships intheBahamiansociety.OBJECTIVEFIVE:TOCONTINUETHEEDUCATIONALPROCESSOFPROMOTINGTHEPERSONALGROWTH ANDCAREERPOTENTIALOFBAHAMIANSTUDENTS39.TheCollegeofTheBahamasmustworkin closecooperationwiththesecondaryschoolsifitistotakethestudentsfurtheralongtheroadofpersonalandvocationalfulfillment.Forthenextseveralyearsstudentsadmittedto t!le Collegemayhave gapsintheirskills,knowledgeandunderstandingswhichmustbefilledbeforethestudentswillbeabletoprofitfromcertainlevelsofacademic, professionalortechnicalinstruction.40.Throughoutthe1976-81periodtheCollegeshouldestablish aFoundationStudiesprogrammewhichconcentratesthestudents'attentiononclearly-definededucationalneedswhichareprequisitetoassured progress intheirchosenfieldofspecialization.Thevariableperformancelevelsofenteringstudentswill necessitate individual schedulesforeachstudentsothatthetimeandeffortofbothstaffandstudentwillnotbewasted.41. Also,theFoundationStudiesprogrammecouldbeofferedonapart-timestudybasisbyclassattendanceand/orcorrespondencein associationwithradioprogramming.42.TheneedforaFoundationStudiesprogrammeshoulddiminishrapidlyassecondaryschoolpreparationstrengthens.80

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43. The CollegeofTheBahamas shouldintroduceaFoundationStudies programmeforbothfullandparttimestudentsona indivisualized basis, takingintoaccountthedifferingentrycharacteristicsofsecondary school graduates. 44. A two-way flowofinformationbetweentheCollegeandthesecondary school isofcriticalimportance,particularly duringthetransitional periodoftheEducationPlan.TheprincipalsandstaffoftheCollegeandthesecondary schools shouldmeetregularlytodiscussmutualconcerns andtomapstrategies for ensuringthearticulati.onbetweenthetwopanels. 45. Moreover,studentsin secondary schoolswhoexpecttoenterprogrammesattheCollegeofTheBahamas shouldbeadvised well in advanceabouttheadmission requirements andotherexpectationsofrespective programmes.TheCollege incooperationwiththeGuidance Counsellors inthesecondary schools should organize effectiveorientationprogrammes forstudentsintheirfinalyearofsecondary school. OBJECTIVE SIX: TO ASSIST IN THEOVERALLIMPROVEMENTOFPRIMARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION 46. Inordertoimprovethequalityofprimary and secondaryeducation,theCollegeofTheBahamas shouldconcentrateits besteffortsonthefollowing activities, viz.,1.training secondary school teachersofall subjectsbutparticularly science teachersandtechnical teachers 2. training specialist teachers for primaryeducationinmusic,art,crafts, physicaleducation3. training specialists in earlychildhoodeducation4. training specialistsforchildrenwithlearning disabilities 5. training librarians 6. implementingthenewcurriculaforprimaryandsecondary schools inconjunctionwiththeMinistryofEducation7. establishingtheCentreforResearch and Developmenttoinvestigate educational problems inTheBahamas andtohelp principalsandteachers improve teachingandlearning intheschools.TheCollegeofThe Bahamas shouldnotregard itself astheendofan educationalcontinuum,butratheras adynamiccentreofeducational influence whichtouchestheeducational processatall levels. OBJECTIVE SEVEN: TO ENSURETHATFURTHEREDUCATION INTHECOLLEGEOFTHE BAHAMAS IS GEARED TO THE MANPOWER REQUIREMENTSOFTHE COUNTRY47.ThePrincipal and HeadsofDivisionsmustbekeptfullyinformedaboutmanpowerpolicy and manpowerrequirements.TheCentral PlanningUnitincooperationwiththePlanning DivisionoftheMinistry should prepareinformationsheets which indicatetheeducational implicationsofeconomic developments.TheCollegemustevolve a flexible organizational and programme framework inordertorespond speedilytochanging conditions inthecountry.48.When established,theCentreforResearchandDevelopmentattheCollegeofTheBahamas should participate in gatheringandinterpretingdataaboutnationalmanpowerrequirements. 49.Oneofthegreatest needsthroughouttheentireeducational system is a greater emphasisonscience81

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and technological studies.Atpresenta small percentageofstudentsattheCollege are engaged in science and technological studies.TheCollegeofTheBahamasshouldexpanditsscienceandtechnological studies in accordancewiththechanging needsofthecountryduringtheperiodofthisEducationPlan. OBJECTIVEEIGHT: TOENSUREITS OWNPROFESSIONALGROWTHTHROUGHA PLANNEDSTAFFDEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME 50.ThepresentandfutureeffectivenessoftheCollege willdependlargelyonthequalityofthestaffandthecontributionofeachstaffmember.Oneofthemostcritical needsoftheCollege willbea carefullyplannedandwell-orchestratedstaffdevelopmentprogrammebywhichindividualsandgroupsontheCol legestaffstrengthentheirpresentskillsandunderstandingsanddevelop new ones. 51.TheCollege should schedule itsstaffdevelopmentprogrammeso astokeeptoaminimumdisruptiontotheCollege'sworkanddesigntheprogrammein relationtoa setofpriorities so astoensuremaximumbenefits.Theprogrammeshouldincludeacombinationofin-housestaffdevelopmentactivitiesforgroupsandindividuals as well as leavesforstudyatotherinstitutions,agencies,etc.,inTheBahamasandabroad.Aprogrammeofstaffexchangeswithothertertiarylevelinstitutionsshouldbeconsidered inordertoprovide useful experiencesforCollegestaffmemberswhileatthesametimekeepingcoststoaminimum.52. Finally,theCollegeofTheBahamasshouldrelate itsstaffdevelopmentprogrammedirectlytotheobjectivesoftheCollege. OBJECTIVENINE:TOINVOLVESTUDENTS ATTHECOLLEGE IN A WORK/STUDY EXPERIENCE53.Elsewhere inthisEducationPlanithasbeenrecommendedthatsecondaryschoolstudentsshouldbeinvolved in a varietyofwork/studyopportunities.ForstudentsattheCollege level awork/studyschemeisparticularly applicabletobroadentheireducationalexperiences.Work/studyschemes areintendedprimarilytomakeitpossible foryoungpeopletoservetheircommunities,broadentheirunderstandingoflife whileatthesametimesharpeningtheirskillsanddeepeningtheirknowledge. 54.Fortunately,therearemanytypesofwork/studyschemes emerging incountriesnotfardistantfromTheBahamas.TheCollege should arrangetohaveoneormorestaffmembersinvestigatework/studyschemes elsewhere andrecommendtotheCollege anappropriatework/studyschemeforTheBahamas. 55.TheCollegeofTheBahamasshouldincorporateintoitsprogrammeawork/studycomponentforallstudents.82

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, AND TARGET DATES POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION-197681 ex>'" OBJECTIVENo.1 No.2No.3No.4PROJECT 1. Plan andannouncean annual calendarofeventsopentothepublic2.Establish Centre for Bahamian Studies3.Establish Centre for Research and Development 4. ReviewconceptoftheCollegeofTheBahamas and redefine its role and its relationshipsiotheMinistryofEducationandotherpost secondary institutions RESPONSIBILITY CollegeofThe Bahamas CollegeofTheBahamas CollegeofTheBahamas Bahamas Government CollegeofTheBahamas TARGET DATE1977-781977-781976771976-77

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBiLITIES, AND TARGET DATES POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION-197681 00H::>OBJECTIVENo.5 No.5No.5No.6PROJECT 5. EstablishFoundationStudies programmesona full-timeandpart-time basis 6. Initiate dialogue with secondary school principalstoensure art iculationofCollege and secondary school programmes7.Organizeorientationprogrammes for secondary school graduates expectingtoentertheCollege8.Emphasize trainingatsecondary school teachersforbothacademicandpractical subjects RESPONSIBILITY CollegeofTheBahamas CollegeofTheBahamas Secondary Schools CollegeofThe Bahamas CollegeofTheBahamas TeacherEducationDiv.TARGETDATE1976-771976-771976-771976-77

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, AND TARGET DATES POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION-197681 (XlC11 OBJECTIVENo.6No.6No.6 No.6PROJECT 9. Train specialist teachers for primary education, viz., music, crafts, learning disabilities, early childhood,etc10. Assistintheimplementationofthenew primary school curriculum 11. Assistintheimplementationofthenew secondary school curriculum 12. Establish training programme for Librarians in learning resources centres RESPONSIBILITY CollegeofTheBahamas Teacher Education Div. CollegeofTheBahamas CollegeofTheBahamas CollegeofTheBahamas TARGET DATE1976-781976-781977-791977-78

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SCHEDULE FOR PROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, AND TARGET DATES POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION-197681 OBJECTIVE PROJECT RESPONSIBILITY TARGET DATENo.713. Prepare information sheet outlining Central Planning Unit1976and manpower policy and manpower reADE (Planning) Collegethereafterquirements with educationalofThe Bahamas.implications for Principal andStaffofCollegeNo.714. Expand science and technological CollegeofTheBahamas197681 studiesona selective basis during Applied Sciencetheperiod197681 Natural Science Technical and Vocational 15. Design a staff development programme -" No.8CollegeofTheBahamas1976-77fortheperiod197681 relatedtothe (Xl objectivesoftheCollege's own 0') developmentNo.9 16. Design a work-study scheme in which CollegeofThe Bahamas1976-77allstudentsattheCollege would participateNo.917. Implement work-study Scheme CollegeofTheBahamas1977-78

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111.5 RATIONALE CONTINUING EDUCATION1.Though learning itselfisofnecessity a lifelong process,thequalityofthatlearningoftendepends on accesstoadequateand meaningful resources. Much canbelearnedbyadults inmanydifferentcontextsthrougha varietyofnon-formal experiences. Notwithstanding,theformal educational systemisalso animportantcommunityresourceforhelpingmaturelearners achievebetterlivingthroughbetterlearning. Continuing educationisnotan educational luxury,butthemeans wherebythecitizensofanationcan continually renew themselvesthroughacquiring new understandings, wider interests and sharper skills.2.Duringthepasttwodecades, in particular, anumberofuseful models for continuing education with adults have emerged,manyofwhich couldbereadily adaptedtotheBahamian situation. Moreover,ourgrowing understandingofandrogogy,theartofteaching adults, enablesustoinvolvematurelearners in experiences which arebotheffectiveandeconomical, capitalizingontheirexperience andmaturity.3.Inthepast school personnel and school facilities have largely been unavailabletothecommunityona continuing basis. Now, however,widespread interest inthecommunityschoolconceptisbeginningtotransformthetraditional roleoftheschool. Isolationoftheschool fromthecommunityis being supplantedbyintegrationoftheschool withthecommunity.Schools are becomingcommunitycentres where youngandold learntogether.4.IftheCommonwealthofTheBahamasistobetrulya learning society,thenthecase for expandedadulteducationisalready made. PRESENT STATUSOFCONTINUING EDUCATION5.Fortunately,formanyyears continuing education in this Commonwealth has played a significant role in extendingtheeducationofinterested BahamiansthroughEveningInstitutesofmanykinds.Upgrading in academic and vocational areasisavailablethroughtheCollegeofTheBahamas which has off campus centresatseveral senior high schoolsaswell asatitsowncentral campus.Itis estimatedthat1500studentsare enrolled in a wide arrayofuseful duringthecurrentyear,1975-76.Annual increases areexpectedthroughouteachyearofthe1976-81period. 6.OfrecentdatetheCollegeofTheBahamas has sponsored"interest"Courses, for example,minorauto repairs, whichdonotleadtoa certificateordiploma. This represents a significantdeparturefrom the historical roleofEveningInstitutesandtheCollegeistobecommendedfor broadeningthepurpose and scopeofcontinuing education inTheBahamas.7.Unfortunately,opportunitiesfor continuing education are less well-developed in someoftheFamily Islands where continuing educationisvirtually non-existent. Hopefully,theprovisionofcentral secondary schools intheFamily Islands will stimulate interest and activities in continuing education whichmatchthe needsofBahamians intheirown communities.8.IntheCommunicationtoParliament(1975)andtheMARAJ REPORT (1975) thereisa specificrecommendationthatthetimehas cometobroadenthescopeofcontinuing education.TheCollegeofThe Bahamas has a clearmandatetoevolve a programme which willmeettheneedsofthenation.OBJECTIVESFORCONTINUING EDUCATION9.(1)toprovide a mechanismfortherational developmentofcontinuing education inTheBahamas (2)toprovide a comprehensive programmeofcontinuing educationopportunitieswhich are acces sibletoall interested Bahamians87

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(3)toensure a highstandardoffunctional literacythroughouttheadultsectorofTheBahamas (4)toencouragethedevelopmentofcommunityschools (5)toprovide training programmes incommunityleadership (6)toensure quality educationformaturelearners PROJECTS AND STRATEGIES OBJECTIVE ONE: TO PROVIDE A MECHANISMFORTHE RATIONAL DEVELOPMENTOFCONTINUING EDUCATION IN THE BAHAMAS.10.TheCollegeofTheBahamasisthelogicalcentreforthedevelopmentofcontinuingeducationthroughouttheCommonwealth.Ithas alreadymanyandvaried resources,bothpersonnelandmaterial, which,ifdeployed effectively, could have widespread and beneficial effects. 11. However,thereistheever-present dangerthattheactivitiesoftheCollege willnotreachthevast majorityofBahamian citizens forwhomtheCollege may representaninstitutionfarbeyondtheiraspiration andattainment.12.ItisessentialthattheCollege gotowherethepeople are intheircommunities.Furthermore,theCol legemustrespondwithsensitivitytothefeelingsandneedsofBahamians in all walksandconditionsoflife.13.ACoordinatorofContinuing Education, basedintheCollegeofThe Bahamas, should beappointedtoprovide leadership inthedevelopmentandimplementationofa comprehensive programmeofcontinuing education. Moreover, a national advisory counciloncontinuing education might provide abroadper spectiveontheneedsofcontinuing educationthroughouttheCommonwealth. OBJECTIVE TWO: TO PROVIDE A COMPREHENSIVE PROGRAMMEOFCONTINUING EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES WHICHAREACCESSIBLE TO ALL INTERESTED BAHAMIANS14.Inadditiontothewell-established certificate programmesoftheEveningInstituteswhich servetheacademicandvocational needsofmaturestudents,coursesandexperiences designedtorespond affirmative lytothedifferent life styles and learning needsofall Bahamians shouldbeofferedattimes and in such places as wouldbeconvenient for interested citizensthroughouttheCommonwealth. Non-credit coursesandactivities representanimportantcontributiontothelifeoftheordinary citizen andforthis reason should be steadily increased innumberandvariety.15.Learning experiences including lectures, seminars, projects, group discussions, workshops,andsoon,focussingonthefollowing areas arerecommendedforearly considerationbytheCollegeofTheBahamas:(1)consumereducation(2)Bahamianstudies(3)familyeducation(4)household management(5)career counselling(6)infantcare88

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Manyothertimely andimportantstudy areas couldbeidentified through surveys andothertechniques. OBJECTIVE THREE: TO ENSURE A HIGH STANDARDOFFUNCTIONAL LITERACY THROUGHOUT THE ADULT SECTOROFTHE BAHAMAS 16. An increasingly complex and rapidly changing Bahamian society requires a high leveloffunctional literacy for all citizens. The inabilitytoread and write with facility imposes a serious handicaponthepersonal and social lifeofanyone so disadvantaged. All Bahamians shouldbeencouragedtoachievethehighest levelofliteracyofwhichtheyare capable. 17. Centresforteaching speech, reading and writingtomature students should be established in1976atstrategic sitesthroughouttheCommonwealth within easy accessofallBahamians. OBJECTIVE FOUR: TO ENCOURAGE THE DEVELOPMENTOFCOMMUNITY SCHOOLS18.There was a time whentheschool wasthecentreofcommunitylife andtheteacher, a significantcommunityleader. Thecommunityschoolconceptisanattempttoplacetheschool once again as acommunitycentrebyinvolving citizens inthelifeoftheschool andtheschool inthelifeofthecommu nity.Itis an interactive process wherebythepersonnel and facilitiesoftheschool are made availabletocommunityactivities andthepeople andothercommunityresources are made availabletotheschool. 19.Itisevidentthattheschoolsmusttaketheinitiative in establishingtheschool as a dynamic centreforschool-community partnership. The principal and school committee should begintoexplore ways and meansofrealizingthefull potentialofcommunityschools. OBJECTIVE FIVE: TO PROVIDE TRAINING PROGRAMMES IN COMMUNITY LEADER SHIP20.Without effective leadershipatthecommunitylevel, effortstointegrate schoolandcommunityprojects and activities willbelargely unproductive. Teachers and non-teachers alike require specific training in leadership skills beforetheywillbeabletoassume leadership roles withinthecommunityschool frame work. 21.TheCollegeofThe Bahamas in cooperation withtheMinistryofEducationandCulture andotherMinistries should make provision for training schemes incommunityleadershipandcommunityeducation. OBJECTIVE SIX: TO ENSURE QUALITY EDUCATIONFORMATURE LEARNERS 22.Theadult learner doesnotlearn in preciselythesamemannerastheschool age childoradolescent.Ifthis fact isnotrecognized,thencontinuing education isoftena frustratinganddisappointing experience for mature students. Moreover,theassumptionthatan effective primaryorsecondary teacher will also be an able teacherofadults is likewise invalid. Without an understandingofthepsychologyofadultlearners, instructors in continuing education willnotbeas effective astheymight otherwise be. 23. Instructorswhoaretobe involved inthecontinuing education programme shouldundergo a training period in androgogy.89

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SCHEDULEFORPROJECTS, ASSIGNMENTOFRESPONSIBILITIES, AND TARGET DATES CONTINUING EDUCATION-197681 OBJECTIVE PROJECT RESPONSIBILITY TARGETNo.1l.AppointCo-ordinatorofContinuing CollegeofTheBahamas1977Education with responsibilitytoMinistryofEducationdevelop and implement a comprehensive programmeofcontinuing educationNo.12. Assemble a national advisory council CollegeofTheBahamas1977oncontinuing education MinistryofEducationNo.23. Develop non-credit courses in CollegeofTheBahamas1978continuing education in such areas as consumer education, Bahamian studies, family education, and so on. No.34. Establish centres for teaching speech, CollegeofTheBahamas1976readingandwriting for adults. MinistryofEducationNo.45. Explore ways and meansofdeveloping MinistryofEducation1977schools ascommunitycentres School Committees PrincipalsStaffNo.56. Provide training schemes in MinistryofEducation1977communityleadership and CollegeofThe Bahamascommunityeducation.No.67.Mounttraining programmes for CollegeofTheBahamas1977instructors involved in teaching MinistryofEducation adults

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PARTIV THE IMPLEMENTATIONOFTHE FIVE YEAR PLAN91

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IV.IMPLEMENTATION 1. This is,ofcourse,themostimportantareaofall.Iftheideas contained in this Education Plan are totakerootand if, in fact, real progress istobemade, very careful and systematicattentionmustbe giventotheways in which various aspectsoftheplan are implemented. Perhapsthemostimportantissue is con cerned with public informationandpublic education. Unlessthepublic as a whole, as well asthosemore directly concerned withtheeducational effort, cometoappreciateandunderstandwhatis beingattempted,its rationale and purpose,thecommitmentandsupportwhich are vital for reconstructingthesystem willnotbeforthcoming. However goodtheideas might be,theywill remain as ideasonly,as food forthoughtand discussion perhaps,butnotreallyforaction. 2.Itgoeswithoutsayingthatthis communicationmustnotonlybe evident betweentheprincipal actors andthepublicbutalso amongtheactors themselves.Inthesame waythatideas must be translated into action, professional advicemustresult in decisions beingtaken.Such decisions should, intheinterestofall concerned, be specific, categoricalandmadewithoutunnecessary delayorprocrastination. 3. Evenmoreimportant,however, once decisions have beentaken,thenecessary executive action must quickly followandmachinery should be establishedtoensurethatsuch action has in fact beentaken.In this connection, those officers responsible for decision taking should institute amethodfor following upwhathas beendoneaboutthedecisions, beforethe"file"withtheinstruction, makes its way backtothemin "duf! course" whenmuchtimemayhave passed andtheaction foronereasonoranotherhasnotbeentakenatall. 4.Intheschedule which follows tasks are recommended and target dates given. This is intendedtoassistthoseresponsible for implementation in proceeding systematically. Inevitably,themannerinwhich these tasks are accomplished will have implications forotheraspectsoftheimplementationtofollow and this will require continuous monitoringoftheimplementation phase. In some instances"toolingup"activities will havetobe undertaken and readiness levels will havetobe reached,etc.,lestthepaceofim plementation itself destroystheintrinsic meritsofa proposal. Muchofthis will require sensitivity and awarenessofthetotalsituation prevailing and perceivedtobeprevailingatany given time.5.Finally, this Education Plan is comprehensivethoughnotintendedtobeexhaustive.Itisgenerative ratherthanprescriptive. In pursuing a step-by-step procedure in its development,theplanners have been mindfulofthecentral importanceoftheprocess itself which has culminated inthepreparationofthisdocument.In a sense this Education Plan isnota finishedproductbutonlypartofan on-going process whichmustcontinue astheBahamian societyandits educational system change in responsetonew condi tionsandchallenges. 6. Oneoftheessential keystotheoptimumsuccessoftheplan proposed herein isthequalityofthesub plans whichmustbe preparedbyeach divisionoftheMinistry andoftheCollegeofThe Bahamas. Undertheover-all supervisionoftheDirectorofEducation, each Assistant Director and his/her colleagues (or Principal and ChairmenoftheCollege)mustprepare sub-plans for eachyearofthefive-year period1976-81.This presentdocumentshouldbeofconsiderable assistance as objectives, projectsand target dates are included,buttheprofessional officersoftheMinistryorattheCollegemustestablish priorities, arrange an appropriate scheduleofevents, determine andobtainthetypeandamountofrequired resources, launchtheprojects and evaluatethesuccessofeach activity. 7. Also,theDirectorofEducationmustensurethatthereisconsultation, coordination, and cooperation among his assistantssothatthesub-plans which are preparedforeach year from each divisionoftheMinistry articulate smoothly and functionally.Thespecific projects andtheirdevelopment require synchronisation through cooperative planning. Apart from a genuineteameffort, effective action is improbable.8.The DivisionofPlanning intheMinistrymustplayadecisive role inthepreparation and implementationofall aspectsofthis Education Plan andthesub-plans which will shortly emerge. The collection,92

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organization, analysis andinterpretationofdataare indispensable tasks intheplanning process. 9.Theadministrative officersoftheMinistrymusttransform plansintorealities. Withouttheirunder standing,cooperationand persistent effort,theideas and recommendationsoftheprofessionalstaffwillnotgetoffthedrawingboardandintotheschools and classroomsofthisCommonwealth. 10.Inconclusion,thisEducation Plan was developedontheunderstandingthatthefinancial resources for education inTheBahamas arenotunlimited.TheMARAJ REPORT recommended stronglythata perfor mance budgeting systembeutilized sothateach project couldbecosted in advance,monitoredthroughoutits development,andevaluatedatits conclusion in termsofcost-benefitstotheeducationofchildrenthroughoutthenation. Asthedivisional heads preparetheirannual detailed sub-plans, cost estimates shouldberelatedtoeach specific project andallprojectsandtheircosts reviewedbytheDirector andthePermanent Secretary.Inthis way accountabilityismore readily ensured and an inventoryofaccomplish ments more easily catalogued. 11. ThisEducationPlan doesnotrecommend grandioseorfanciful schemes in educationthatwill require monumental outlaysofpublic funds with uncertain benefitsattheend.Itdoes strenuously affirm, however,thatin education as in anyotherenterprisethepreparationof"brickswithoutstraw"isnotonly an unreal istictaskbutalsocontributestotheconstructionofanunsound andunworthyedifice. SCHEDULEOFTASKS TASK1.Producedraftplan in mimeographed form. 2. Prepare coveringletterwhich specifies finaldatefor receiptofwrittensubmissionofreactions and recommendations. 3. Distribute copiesofdraftplantogroups and individuals for initial reaction, for example, (a) Cabinet (b) Central Advisory Council (c) Ministry Officers (d) CounciloftheCollegeofTheBahamas (e) Principals (f) Executive,BUT(g)DEO's 4. Receivewrittenstatementsofreactions and recommendations finaldate5.Collate andstudyreplies andmakeadjustmentstotheplan as required 6. Produce copiesoffinalEducationPlan 7. SubmitEducationPlantoMinisterofEducationandothermembersofCabinet8.Launch professionalinformationand professional education sessions e.g. convene a two-day seminaronEducationPlan involving Key officials,DEO's,93TARGET DATEbyApril 9,1976byApril 9,19763rdweek in April May14,19763rd week Maytoend1stweekJune,19762ndweek,June1976endof4thweek,June1976

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SEO's,Principalstoconsidertheplan andtodevise a strategy for its wider understanding, acceptance, and dissemination. 9. Initiate readiness exercises involving professional conferences with pre-school, primary, secondaryandCollege personnel.10.Initiate specific projects as outlined intheEducation Plan accordingtoschedule11.Monthly reviewsofprogress12.Major reviewsofprogress inJanuaryandJulythroughouttheperiod1977-81.945thweek,June1976Julyand August,1976September,1976November,1976and eachmonthhereafter

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Professional Readiness ActivitiesThefollowing four areasofeducational development require a majoreffortduringtheprofessional readiness stageofJulyand August inordertofacilitatetheimplementationoftheEducation Plan, viz., (1)TheLearning Resources UnitTheestablishment and operationofthecentral Learning Resources Unitisvitaltothesuccessofthemajor recommendations contained in this Education Plan. The recommendation intheplanthatlearning resources areasbeprovided for pupil use intheschoolsmustnotdetractfromthecurrenteffortstoensuretheprovisionofa fully-functioning Learning ResourcesUnitfortheBahamas edu cational system. Indeed,thecentral Unit, once establishedandproperlyoutfitted,willundoubtedlybethecatalystformeaningful school unitsthroughoutthesystem. The Learning Resources Unit shouldbeconceived as a professional teacher education centrewithsatellite centres intheschools.Thecentralunitshould havethefollowing components: (a) PrintShop(b) Recording Studio (c) Photographic Section (d) Graphic Section (e) Lecture Theatre (f) Media Library (g) HardwareEquipmentLending Section (h) Classrooms for In-Service Teacher Education Sessions andStudentGroups (i) Teachers' Conference Area Intime,thecentral Learning ResourcesUnitwill generate new dimensionstoteachingandlearning, enrichingtherebytheeducational experienceofallBahamian pupils. Moreover,itis strongly recommendedthateducational broadcasting andtheproductionofprintmaterial be given high priority intheinitial stagesofthedevelopmentoftheLearning Resources Unit. (2) CompletionofthePrimary Curriculum The new primary school programme istobe underwaybySeptember,1976.Itmaynotbepossibleordesirable,tobeginthenew primary programme in all study areas. However,thosestudyareas which aretobeintroduced in September1976shouldbecarefully examinedbyprincipals and teach ers duringJulyandAugust.Theoutlineofeachstudyarea with suggestion for teacher useandanyavailablesupportmaterial shouldbeavailableforallprimary teachersforfamiliarization andunitplanning. (3) New Emphasis in Teacher Training Recognizingthatteachers will havetobepreparedformore specialized activitiesatthevarious levels 95

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ofeducation andthatsuch trainingorretraining takes time, an earlystartshouldbemade in selective areastoproducethemanpower capableofdischargingthenew responsibilities deriving fromthepresent efforts in educational reconstruction, e.g. early childhood educators, learning resources teach ers, teachers for special educations, remedial reading teachers, vocational subjects, etc. ThoughtheCollegeofThe Bahamas will be active in thismattertheBahamas UnionofTeachers andtheMinistryofEducation might undertake cooperative ventures in this areaofeducational need. ( 4)TheCollegeofThe Bahamas The direction in which this institution should be developed have been outlined in this plan.Itisevident, however,thata more detailed plan forthedevelopmentoftheCollege andthevarietyoftheprogrammestobeoffered thereinmustbedrawnupquite soon.Itwould beprudentfor a new-principaltohave fairly clear guidanceonthenatureoftheinstitution envisaged, its role andthepurposes for whichithas been conceived.Itisalso necessary fortheap propriate faculty memberstocontributetothis plan fortheCollege sothatits evolution might have comeaboutasa resultofwide consultationandconsensus. Towards this end,itwould be advisabletoconcentrateona detailed plan fortheoperationoftheCollege, coveringnotonlytheprogramme aspectsbutthephysical development as well. Such a plan, when drafted, should be refined followiQg extensive discussions with appropriate people and leadtoa definitivestatementofthepolicy and programmesonwhichtheCollegeofThe Bahamas should be engaged.96

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PART VRECOMMENDATIONS97

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-V.RECOMMENDATIONS11.1Priority Action Areas fortheCurrentYear,1975-76ILL4TheDirector,DeputyDirector and all Assistant Directors shouldconstitutethemselves as a CentralTask Forceoncurriculumtooversee curriculum development. II.1.10TheDirector and hisdeputyshould definetheareasofresponsibilityofeach Assistant DirectorofEducation. II.1.12StaffrequirementsofJuniorSecondary Schools for1976-77,particularly in practical subject areas, shouldbedetermined well in advanceofSeptember1976.II.1.14Planstoovercomeproblemofovercrowding intheSenior Secondary Schools shouldbedeveloped immediately for implementation in September, 1976. II.1.17 An effective, efficient and equitable system for ordering and delivering school suppliesthroughoutTheCommonwealth shouldbedevised. II.1.19Specificationsoftechnical and vocational subjects intheSenior Secondary schools including allocationofparticular subjectstospecific schools shouldbedecideduponbeforeJune,1976.11.1.23Themodus operandiatthenew inspecting system includingthemethodofreporting school visits shouldbediscussed with school principals and teachers. II. 1.25 Discussion between Ministry officers and Pre-School Association leaders should begin inordertodevelop in-service activities for pre-school operators andtheirassistants. II. 1.27TheMinistryofEducationandtheCollegeofTheBahamas shouldmounta research and developmentproject in pre-school education. II.1.28TheADE's (Primary and Secondary) should convenebimonthlymeetingsofprincipalstodiscuss professional matters affectingtheschools.II.1.29Apilotprojectin in-service training inoneormore Family Islands shouldbeundertakenin preparationofestablishing Teacher CentresthroughoutTheCommonwealth. II.1.31TheADE (Primary) andtheofficer in chargeoflanguage arts should assisttheHead Teachers Association in its presenteffortstorationalizethediverse approaches and materials used in primary school reading. II.1.33TheMinistry andtheCollegeofTheBahamas should collaborateonmounting a training pro gramme for unqualified teachers in accordance withtheMinister's Communication (1975). II.1.35Ways and meansofstrengtheningtheacademicandprofessional qualificationsofallprimary school teachers shouldbeinvestigatedandplanned for. II. 1.37 Aproductionunittoproduce lowcostinstructional materials, Bahamian incontentandcontext,shouldbeestablished intheMinistryofEducation. II.1.40A newconceptoflibrary services suitedtotheneedsofBahamian children and adults shouldbeformulated. II.1.44TheMinistryofEducationshould ensurethatall schools are in physical readinessforthebegin-98

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ningoftheschool year. 11.1.45Anannual NationalConferenceonEducation sponsoredbytheMinistryofEducation shouldbeinaugurated. 99

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IlL 1 PROGRAMME SPECIFICATIONS: PRE-SCHOOL EDUCATIONIII.l.12Community co-operatives should be organizedtoprovide low-costdaycare and pre-school ed ucational opportunities.IILl.13A National CommitteeonCommunityConcern should be assembledtoprovide leadership inthedevelopmentofcommunityco-operatives.IILl.16Throughthemedia, schools, churches, etc. a massiveefforttoeducatethepublic concerningtheimportanceofearly childhood education shouldbeundertaken.IILl.lSThe CollegeofThe Bahamas should plan andconducta majorstudyofthespeechpatternsofBahamian children in relationtoschool progress.IILl.20The MinistryofEducationin co-operationwiththeMinistryofHealth should establish a codeofhealth standards fordaycare and pre-school facilities and enforcethecode through annual inspections.IILl.20Alldaycare and pre-school centres should register withtheMinistryofEducationand payanannual registration fee.IILl.22The CollegeofTheBahamas should design and implement a programmeofstudies leadingtoa certificate in early childhood education.IILl.24Specialists in early childhoodeducationshould serve as itinerant teacher-consultantstopre school centres.IILl.25Oneortwomembersfromappropriate divisionsoftheMinistryofEducation shouldbenamed as adviserstothePre-School Association.100

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III.2PROGRAMME SPECIFICATIONS: PRIMARY EDUCATION 111.2.13TheMinistryofEducationshouldattempttodefine literacyinBahamiantermsandestablish reasonable literacy standards for school graduates. III.2.17 Principalsandsupervisory officersoftheMinistry should ensurethatpositive, constructiveattitudestowardchildren pervadetheentire school system. II1.2.18 Simple, inexpensive instructional materials, especially fortheprimaryreading programme, shouldbepreparedbyaproductionunit.III.2.20A varietyofstandardized testing instrumentswithBahamiannormsshouldbedeveloped. III.2.21 Preparationofdiagnostictestsin reading andarithmeticshouldbeundertakentoassistprimaryteachers. III.2.22 In-service training in classroom and school testing for principalsandclassroom teachers should be inaugurated.III.2.26Primary school teachers whose present academic background isdeemedinsubstantial shouldberequiredtoobtaina specifiednumberofacademic creditsby1981.III. 2.27 By1981candidates for ateacher'scertificate in primaryeducationshould possess academic credits equivalenttothefirstyearofuniversity. III.2.28Thefull rangeofskillsandunderstandingstobelearnedfromGrade 1to6 should be listedandarrange sequentially. III. 2.30Thebasic learning areasinprimary schools shouldbe:(1) COMMUNICATION (2) MATHEMAT ICS STUDIES(3)SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES(4)PRACTICAL ARTS. III. 2.33 A pupil performance recordsystem comprising checklists basedonthenew programmeofstudies shouldbemaintained for each pupil. III.2.37 Ministry policy and procedures respectingtheinspecting system shouldbeannouncedtoDistrictEducationOfficers, principals and teachers. III.2.38 By1979theinspecting system shouldbefullyoperationalattheprimary school level,andby1981atall school levels. III.2.38Educationofficersappointedtotheinspecting system shouldholdofficefornolongerthanfive years. III.2,42A master planofdevelopmental in-service training shouldbepreparedandshould relate directlytoeffortsoftheMinistrytoinstallthenew programmeofstudies. III.2,43 Low-cost learning resource areasforpupils shouldbedeveloped in each primary school. III. 2.47 MembersofthestaffoftheCollegeofTheBahamas shouldberepresentedonthecurriculumcommitteespreparingtheprimarycourse outlines andbeactively involvedintheimplementationofthenew primary programme. III.2,48From1976orshortlythereafterallteachereducationprogrammes shouldbethreeyears induration.101

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III.2.48TheteachereducationprogrammeoutlinedintheREPORTOFSPECIAL COMMITTEEFORTEACHER EDUCATIONPROGRAMMES:COLLEGEOFTHE BAHAMAS should be con sideredforimplementation. III.2.49Governmentawardstostudentteachers shouldbereviewed and possibly modified in viewofchanging conditions inthecountry.III.2.51 Duringtheplanning period1976-81an adequate programmeofhealth, physicaleducationand recreationforall pupils shouldbeestablished .. III.2.52ThecurrentlevelofeffortbytheMinistryofEducationwithrespecttotheeducationofchildrenwith severe learning disabilitiesmustbe raised considerably duringtheperiod1976-81.111.2.53 The CollegeofTheBahamas should provide Bahamian-trained teacherstoworkwithlearning disabled children.III.2.54The MinistryofEducationshould prepare a policystatementconcerningpromotionandretardationin primary schools.102

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r IIL3 PROGRAMME SPECIFICATIONS:JUNIORSECONDARY EDUCATIONIIL3.18Schoolandcommunityprojects suitedtotheageandcapacityofjuniorsecondarystudentsshouldbepartofthejuniorsecondary school programme.IIL3.20TheMinistryofEducationshould initiate a systematicstudyconcerningthecharacteristics, needsandinterestsoftheearly adolescent inTheBahamas.IIL3.21Theprincipal and teaching staffofeachjuniorhigh school should have accurateinformationaboutmanpowerneeds and economictrendsintheCommonwealth.IIL3.22Thegroundworkforstudentcareer selection shouldbelaidinthejuniorsecondary schoolthroughhelpingstudentsset reasonable career goals.IIL3.23Representativesfromtheentire vocational spectrum shouldbeinvitedtothejuniorsecondary schoolstodiscuss different vocationaloptions.IIL3.24Juniorhigh schoolstudentsshouldbeinvolved in some practical activity intheworkadayworldofTheBahamas aspartoftheirschool programme. III.3.25 A surveyofpossiblecommunityplacements shouldbeundertakenduring1976-77.III.3.27 Basic literacy skills shouldbethepriorityinalljuniorsecondary schools. IIL3.27 Alljuniorsecondary school teachers shouldunderstandhow isbesttaughtintheirsubject specialization. III.3.29 Six subject areas should representthecommonprogramme for eachjuniorsecondary schoolstudent,viz., (1) COMMUNICATION STUDIES, (2) MATHEMATICS STUDIES, (3) SCIENCE STUDIES, (4) APPLIED ARTS, (5) BAHAMIAN AND SOCIAL STUDIES, (6) PHYSICAL AND HEALTH STUDIES. III.3.30Thenewjuniorsecondaryschool programme shouldbeintroducedover a two-year period, viz.,1977-78and1978-79. IIL3.31 Aconcentratedeffortin1976-77todesign andmounta developmental reading programme forjuniorhigh schoolstudentsisimperative.III.3.33Thejuniorsecondaryschool programme shouldbeorganized accordingtoacreditsystem. III.3.35 Consideration shouldbegiventoa semesterortrimestersystem inthejuniorsecondary schools.III.3.36Practical"life"skills, viz., constructing simple household items, repairing things, gardeningandsimple landscaping, etc. shouldbepartofthejuniorsecondary school programme. IIL3.37 Consideration shouldbegiventotheuseofparaprofessionals who have a skillortradebutdonothave a teaching certificate. IIL3.38 Alljuniorsecondary schoolstudentsshouldberequiredtoachieve pass standing in a specifiednumberofvocationalorpractical coursesbeforetheyare awardedtheB.J.C. IIL3.41 By1981thefinal marksofacandidatefortheBahamas Senior Certificate shouldbebasedonacombinationofschool assessment (40%)andexternalnationalexaminations (60%).103

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III.3.43Juniorsecondary school teachers should receiveexpertassistanceonthepreparationofdifferenttypesofschool examinations. III.3.44National standardized tests in EnglishandMatematical Competencies shouldbeprepared and administered annuallytostudentsinthefinalyearofjuniorsecondary school. III.3.45Juniorsecondary school teachers shouldbepreparedtoteachaminimumofthreesubjectsatthejuniorsecondary level. III.3.46By1981theadmission requirementstothepre-service training programmeforjuniorhigh school teachers should include a Bahamas Senior Certificate plus aminimumofthreeyearsofpost secondaryeducationwhich combines academicandprofessional studies. III.3.47TheCollegeofTheBahamas should design a new training programmeforjuniorsecondary school teachinginconsultationwith principalsofjuniorsecondary schools. III.3.48TheMethodologyofDevelopmental ReadingandBahamian Studies shouldbecompulsory subjectsforcandidates injuniorsecondary teaching. III.3.49TheMinistryofEducationshould devise a formula governingthestaff:studentratioforjuniorsecondary schoolsatthebeginningofthe1976-81planning period. III.3.49Thesupply and trainingofteachers for practical subjects forjuniorandsenior secondary schools aremattersofgreatmoment.III.3.53 A useful cumulative record systemofeducational progress shouldbedevised in conjunctionwiththeinstallationofthenew secondary school programme. III.3.55 Regular planning sessions involving primaryandjuniorhigh school principals shouldbescheduledthroughouttheschool year. III.3.56Theinspecting systemasappliedtosecondary schools should beinterpretedtoprincipals, headsofdepartments,andteachers. III.3.56 In-house training in evaluationandcounselling for Ministry officers involved intheinspecting system should be arranged. III.3.57Alearning resources area shouldbeinstalledineachjuniorsecondary school. III.3.58 Duringtheplanning period in-service trainingforjuniorsecondary school teachers should relate directlytotheinstallationofthenewjuniorsecondary school programme.104

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III, 3 PROGRAMME SPECIFICATIONS: SENIOR SECONDARY EDUCATION III,3.72 Defining comprehensive secondaryeducationin Bahamian terms is aparamountconcern. III,3.74 A planned approachtoinforming parents, teachersandstudentsconcerning new directions in secondaryeducationmustbeundertakenduring1976-81.III.3.76Thesenior secondary school programme should consitof(1) BASIC LEARNINGS (2) PRACTI CAL STUDIESand(3) SUPPLEMENT AR Y STUDIES. III,3.77Thesenior secondary school programme should consistofcompulsory andoptionalstudies. 111.3.77Thecompulsory programme for yearsoneandtwowouldbedivided evenlybetweenacademicandpractical studies. 111.3.77 Allstudentsshould earn a minimumof16course credits for graduationwitha Bahamas Senior Certificate. III. 3. 77 Selectedstudentsmay earn additional creditsuptoamaximumof4 credits. III,3.77Thesummer vacation period shouldbeusedtoprovide instructionforthosewho failedtoachieve credit standing inoneormorecoursesandforthosewhowishtoextendtheirlearning inthesameoranotherfield. 111.3.77 Afurtherperiodofsenior secondaryeducationbeyondBSC mightbenecessary in some sub jectstoachieve a desirable levelofmastery beforeemploymentorfurtherstudy.III.3.77 Admissiontothevarious programmesattheCollegeofTheBahamas shouldbebasedonthestudent'scomplete performance profile duringthefive-yearsofsecondary school andthescoresobtainedonstandardized tests in EnglishandMathematics. 111.3.80Thefinal mark inanysubject for allstudentsshouldbea compositemarkfromtermassignments, projects,studentparticipation and final examinations. 111.3.8]Theprincipalofthesenior high school shouldbegiventheauthorityandresponsibilitytorecommendstudentsforthesenior certificatetotheMinistrywithoutexternalexaminations. III.3.82 Allstudentsshouldbeadministered a standardizedtestinEnglishattheendofGrade Eleven. II1.3.83Inadditiontoa numerical markorlettergrade indicatingthestudent'sfinal standing in each course a listofspecificcontentmastered duringthecourse should also be provided fortheadvisementofstudents,parentsand succeeding teachers. II1.3.84Theprincipalsanddepartmentheadsofjuniorandsenior secondary schools shouldbekeptfully informedaboutmanpowerneedsanddevelopments inTheBahamas. 111.3.85 Periodic conferencesonthetheme:TheEconomyandtheSchools, should be convenedtokeep all high school teachersinformedofthecritical developmentsinthecountry.III,3.86 Each senior high school should have anappointedAdvisory VocationalCommitteerepresenting various sectorsofthecommunity.III,3.88 During1976-77thedutiesandresponsibilitiesofguidance counsellors inthejuniorand senior secondary schools shouldbere-defined.105

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III.3.89 Everystudentshould acquire a marketable skill as well as basiceducationinthesenior secondary schools. III.3.90 ByJanuary1977thevocational profileofthesecondary school programme should be decideduponandthestagesofimplementingthevocational profilemappedout.III.3.95 New curricula in scienceeducationmustbe basedonthepresentandfutureneedsofThe Bahamas. III.3.96TheDirectorofEducationandthePrincipaloftheCollegeoftheBahamas should examinetheemerging programmesofthesecondary and post-secondary levels and develop policies relatingtoadmission requirementsandstandardstotheacademic, vocational and professional programmes offeredat the CollegeoftheBahamas. III.3.99Concentratedeffortbythesecondary schoolstafftoinvolve a significantnumberofstudentsin work-study schemesisimperative. III.3.99TheMinistryofEducationshouldappointa Manager for Work-Study Programmestoworkwithprincipalsandguidance counsellors in implementing comprehensive work-study opportunities.III.3.100Senior secondarystudentsshould be allowedtoearn amaximumoffourcreditstowardthe national senior certificateforanapproved programmeofwork-study.III.3.102TheTeacherEducationDivisionoftheCollegeoftheBahamasmustassumetheresponsibilityoftraining teachers forjuniorandsenior secondary school assignmentsofacademic and practical subjects.III.3.103Bahamianstudentsreturningtothecountryafterdegree studiesabroadshouldbeactively en couragedtoentertheteaching professionatthesecondary school level and fullandpart-timestudyprograms leadingtotheawardofa BachelorofEducationdegree andteachercertification shouldbemadeavailablethroughtheCollegeofTheBahamas.III.3.104Experienced craftsmenwhohavepotentialas well for communicatingtheirskills effectivelytoyoungpeople shouldberecruitedandtrained inanemergencysummerprogramme for teachersofpractical subjects.III.3.106A sequenceofactivities fortheidentification,recruitmentandplacementofsecondary school teachersmustbemappedoutno laterthanSeptember,1976,foroperationin Planning Year One:1976-77.III.3.107DEO'sandprincipalsofcentral high schools shouldbeactively involvedtoensureanappropriatenumberofteachers inthedifferent subject areas required intheFamily Islands. III.3.108Tofacilitatetherecruitmentand placementofteachers during1976-81theMinistryofEducationshouldbegiven discretionarypowerofappointmenttotheteaching servicewithoutreferencetothePublic Service Commission.III.3.109A professional development programme focussingontheteachingofreading, curriculum design, testing and evaluation,theadolescent learnerandBahamian Studies should be provided for secondary school teachers.III.3.110TheMinistryofEducationin co-operationwiththeBahamas Teachers Union should examinethepossibilityofformally recognizingthoseteacherswhocompletesuccessfully a specified numberofhoursin professional development activities.106

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IIL3.U1TheADE (Supervisory)andADE (Secondary) should formulate a clear setofobjectivesfortheinspecting system as appliedtosecondary schools.IIL3.U3TheCo-ordinatoroftheLearning Resources Unit should develop aprototypeofa learning resource areaforsenior secondary schoolsinconsultationwithprincipalsanddepartmentheads.IIL3.115During1976-77aCommunityInvolvement Plan shouldbedrawnup,a speciallyappointedMinisterialcommitteeofeducatorsandcitizenstorecommendways and meansofencouragingthedevelopmentofcommunityschools.107

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IliAI11.4.23 IIIA.25 .,;.. I11.4.26 I11.4.29 111.4.38IIIAA3I11.4A4 III. 4045I11.4A6 POST SECONDARY EDUCATION The CollegeoftheBahamas should prepare and announce a calendarofevents, opentothepublic, which will advancetheintellectual, social and cultural lifeofallBahamians.TheCollege should gather and preserve aspectsofBahamian collective experiencethroughsys tematic inquiry and codification. The College should establish a Centre for Bahamian Studies.TheCollege should establish a Centre for Research and Development which wouldbeavailabletothepublic and private sectorsofthecountry. The Bahamas Government andtheCollege should reviewtheconceptoftheCollege itself and its relationshiptotheMinistryofEducation andotherpost-secondary institutions in The Baha Jllas and elsewhere.TheCollege should introduce aFoundationStudies programmeforall students enteringtheCollege. The staffoftheCollege andtheSecondary schools shouldmeetregularlytoensurethearticulationofthesecondary and College programmes. The College andthesecondary schools should plan an effective orientation scheme for students expectingtoenroll intheCollege.Toimprovethequalityatprimary and secondary education duringtheperiod1976-81,theCollege should: (1) emphasizethetrainingofsecondary school teachers; (2) train specialists for primary schools and pre-schools; (3) train librarians for LearningResources Centres; ( 4) assist intheimplementationofthenew primary and secondary school.curricula.111.4047 The Central Planning Unit andtheMinistry Planning Division should keeptheCollege fully informedaboutmanpower policy and manpower requirements as well as economic developments inthecountry. II1AA9TheCollege shouldexpandits science and technological studies in accordance with changing needs inthecountryduringthenextfive year period.11104.50The College should plan a staff development programme with specific referencetotheobjectivesattheCollege's own development. I11.4.51 The College should emphasize in-house staff development activities and exchangearrangements withotherpost-secondary institutions. 111.4.55 The College should incorporateintoits programme a Work-studycomponentfor all students.108

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III. 5 CONTINUING EDUCATION III.5.9TheCollegeofTheBahamasisthelogical centre forthedevelopmentofcontinuing educationthroughouttheCommonwealth. III.5.12Inits activities in continuingtheCollege must gotowherethepeople are intheirowncommuni ties. III.5.13 A Co-ordinatorofContinuing Education, based intheCollege, shouldbeappointedtoplan and implement a comprehensive programme. III.5.13 A national advisory counciloncontinuing education should be assembledtoprovide abroadperspectiveontheneedsofcontinuing educationthroughouttheCommonwealth. III.5.14 Courses and experiences designedtorespond affirmativelytothedifferent life styles and learning needsofall Bahamians shouldbeofferedatconvenient times and placesthroughoutthecountry.III.5.16 Centres for teaching speech, readingandwritingtomaturestudentsshouldbeestablished in1976atstrategic sitesthroughoutthecountry.III.5.19Theprincipals and school committees should begintoexplore ways and meansofrealizingthefull potentialofcommunityschools. III.5.21TheCollegeofTheBahamas in co-operation withtheMinistryofEducation andotherrelevant Ministries should make provision for training schemes incommunityleadership andcommunityeducation. III.5.22 Instructors involved inthecontinuing education programme should undergo a training period in androgogy.109

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