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UFJUD



Forṿerṭs
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00007219/00010
 Material Information
Title: Forṿerṭs Forward = Vorwärts
Parallel title: Forward
Vorwärts
Alternate Title: Jewish daily forward
Yiddish forward
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 55 cm.
Language: Yiddish
Publisher: Jewish Socialist Press Federation
Place of Publication: New York, N.Y
Creation Date: 1950
Publication Date: 1897-
Frequency: weekly[feb. 4, 1983-]
frequency varies[ former ]
weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Jewish newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- New York (N.Y.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- New York County (N.Y.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York -- New York
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia -- Philadelphia
United States -- Illinois -- Cook -- Chicago
 Notes
Language: In Yiddish and some English.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Apr. 22, 1897.
Numbering Peculiarities: Has separately paged section in English <Nov. 18, 1983->.
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Apr. 22, 1917 has special section with title: Yubileum oysgabe "Forverts."
General Note: English title varies.
General Note: Has numerous editions.
General Note: Published in New York, N.Y. and Philadelphia, Pa. 1897-Jan. 28 1909; in New York, N.Y. thereafter.
General Note: Distributed by Norman Ross Publishing Inc., N.Y.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 77123616
ocm77123616
System ID: AA00007219:00010
 Related Items
Related Items: Forward (New York, N.Y.)
Related Items: Forṿerṭs (Philadelphia, Pa.)
Related Items: Forṿerṭs (New York, N.Y. : Boston ed.)
Preceded by: Forṿerṭs (Chicago, Ill.)

Full Text

FORWARD wto4 Dump ig S "'=,=U==l 1
ART SECTION 3 19 ,~ON







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WE SALUTE
The International Ladies' Garment
S Workers' Union on Its Golden Jubilee Z ... i.- .. -,
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Art Section, May 21, 1950. FORWARD -2- rLC ,111 ,o 210 ,;;'g = ? mo



AMERICA'S LARGEST MURALS ^rm tr-3n yrr

Show Unions Mean Progress in Garment Industry 7" Z 'HPY-T'P "l lt t S 0M7 "n; f-lS ...trW

THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE GARMENT INDUSTRY IN THE U. S., AND THE GREAT CONTRIBU- ,05"l '" "z i 71.4 Op"p ot tit' """ 0 flR L0 t,"SO 1OR il "Vtti' 1
TIONS OF THE UNIONS TOWARD THE ESTABLISHMENT OF DECENT WORKING CONDITIONS '0 "nB 1 i.11 .2 y;'?- *. L " tn r 5e '71 71 I 'oi z' 5or 1i 11
ARE DRAMATICALLY DEPICTED BY THE TWO REPRODUCED MONUMENTAL WALL PAINTINGS IN ;i"-,o Nr ".O '!'" 'Z"11 -' t S *' D l r',", N; !y'w N < 'i'W ,0"1K ,-"fIn"'7,
THE AUDITORIUM OF NEW YORK CITY CENTRAL NEEDLE TRADES HIGH SCHOOL. ,"i l;V -S i'nBy "*, 712 ,' ': F i ', ;'s -, ? 'n :-ty"' -5P1O "Y'n


HARMONY AND ACHIEVEMENT (Below)

S N this panel wall the bie needle trades are shown. Centered at
the top are the Iodies garment workers; to their right are
th furriers, to their left the shoe-makers; Iserted in the diagonal
panel at left are the men's clothing workers. To the left below
s a group symbolzmg the U.on He.lth Center maintained by
the Internatonal Ladies' Germent Workerh' Union. In the section
re portraits of Dr. George W. Price, founder and former director
of the Health Center; Dr. Leo PIce, present director; and Mis
Pauline Newman. At the lower right is an inset symbolizng the
play and cultural life of the workers, in the Iorm of a 1 ene from
"Pins and Needles." Centering the entire wll is a panel repro-
tenting personalities who have been gr are at present instrumental
in raising the standards of the industry, representing government,
education, monusctutrers and the unions. (Left to right, seated)-
Sidney Hillmon, deceased President of the Amalgamated Clothing
Workers; Dudley Sicher, deceased philanthropist; August Bellaneo
(ACWA); La Guarda; David Dubinsky, President of the ILGWU;
Max. Ztritsky President of the Millinery Union. (Left'to right-
standing): Maurice Renter, Walter K. Marks. Smuel Klein and
Samuel Deitch, manufacturers and spokmen for the industry; Ste-
phen Voorhees, city archtect; Morns Hillquit, Max Meyer, President,
Needle Tade Education Commission; Senator Wagner, Raymond W.
Ingersoll, Mrs. Roder C. Bacon. Nathan Ohrhbah, Gustave Strauben-
muller, 1st ILGWU Vice President Luig Antonini, and Ernest Fiene


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LIGHT CONQUERS DARKNESS (Above)

T HIS mural symbolizes the struggle of enlightenment against
the forces of darkness. In the background immigrants of all races
ore entering America through old Castle Garden. They pass to
the left to the dark tenement of the East Side. Below on the
far right are shown the sweat shop, home work and child labor
conditions of early needle trade shops in New York, over which
hovers a huge green figure symbolizing greed who with his right
hand clutches the cut cloth which typifies what in the needle
trades was known as the "struggle for the bundle." The central
group illustrates men, women and children carrying off these bundle
for home work. To the left is the large figure symbolizing Enlighten-
ment.twho with his right hand points to the great Trrangle Fire,
and with his left hand protests aoginst darkness and greed.
Below this figure is a group of prominent union men, progressive
manufacturers and civic leaders, who created and drew up the
cloakmakers' "Protocol of Peace," the first collective agreement
between labor and manufacturers in the needle trades industry.
From left to right the portraits are: Lillian Wald, Henry Street
Settlement; John E. Williams, early arbitrator; Morris Sigman,
Benjamin Schlesinger, both former Presidente of ILGWU; LouI
D. Brandeis, head of the committee; Max Schware, progressive
manufacturer; Meyer London, labor's representative; Dr. Henry
Moscowitz; Gvernor Al Smith; Ju[ls Henry Cohen and Louist
Marshall, lawyers


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Pioneers and Builders of I. L. G. W. U.

Before they built their fortress, the union, the life of the workers in the women's garment industry
was difficult and hard. The employers were united and powerful. The workers were unorganized and
weak. The whiplash of hunger drove a number of them to become, tools in the hands of the manu-
facturers. Some of them became contractors and sub-contractors creating the sweatshop, that breeding
place of starvation and disease.
But among the immigrant workers were also many idealists and fighters who readily sacrificed
their own welfare for the good of their fellow men. These idealists, intellectuals, socialists agitated
the workers in the shops, spoke to them at meetings, organized them into unions and lead them in
the tough fight against the inhuman working conditions that prevailed in the women's garment industry.
We present the pictures of some of them here.


I PRESIDENTS


JAMES McCAULoY


1 '


ITl2 X'1- 1DIS


r
OW3S'''' *Ie..


HEAN GROSS-AN


1914-19o
ABRANAM BAROFF


Is-s I*


Labor Leaders oad Intellectuals
Who Helped Build the lUnion


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GIENEAL EXECUTIE BOAD.' 195 (sae rmlftI ih)CARLES THMERMAN, MEYER pEULITEIN, ISRAEL ...... R, 1"T 'ICE pRESIDENT LUIGI ANTOINI1, PRESIDENT DAYID DBIHNSKY,
EXC SECRETARY nREDERICK UMHEYi JULIUS HOCHMAN. JENIE MATYAS, ISIDORE HNAGLErR, (M o1. -., st 1-n ,H o tiNh). HARR' GREENBERG. HARRY WANDaER ..iSEPH BRESLAWr
;(onr'wi u' m l l10 '1OO5 yTV 0 ~yr-iO0 -i .-!-***:. yBB ,rO') rTiO ru^3''l ?
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LOUIS LEVY, EDWARD u OOLSANI SALVATORE NINFO, MORRINSlBIALIS, rPiL 05.0K0ER, (Tne row, -,-.g 1-o l i H) EN uAMIu KAPuAN, SAMUEL OuO, LOUIS STULuERG, GEORGE
R5051, J.. IsTN, MoX COHEN, CHARLES sRENice ODiD GNGOLDu


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JAMEI SO L E I i P r 111 .1' lld y1.E R ,- W-11 1a1 1 r I CL I E
= A "SAM BERGMAN, JOSEPH S-Y0E1


I I


FORWARD 3 C L*** p 111R E


Art Section, May 21, 1950


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YE.


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STiING WA STICKERS IELEAsED iROM CHICAGO JAIL


--


Art Section, May 21, 1950


FORWARD- 4- C il


B a


PICKETS 1N WRAPPER A-KIONO M.s- S l;t e


-7




Art Section, May 21, 1950 FORWARD- 5 -- y : 1 E " lr n ,_ ,:

MILESTONES IN THE HISTORY OF THE I. L. G. W. U.

THE ROAD OF THE INTERNATIONAL LADIES' GARMENT WORKERS' UNION WAS MARKED BY MANY MILESTONES OF DRAMATIC STRUGGLES AND HEROIC ENCOUNTERS.
MANY A TRAGEDY, INVOLVING THE LIVES OF UNION MEN AND WOMEN, HIGHLIGHTED THAT ROAD THE FOLLOWING PICTURES WILL TELL OF EVENTS THAT
FORGED THE FIGHTING CHARACTER OF THE POWERFUL INTERNATIONAL LADIES' GARMENT WORKERS' UNION.


IIST FGIGT 11TH co.- IST -.o^NSTiATo >S ;1 1soNT o 1 1 s G I FIi 1 N 0 1 1. 1T.


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D0- 7 C___I_-SD V 21_ *_ a *r Art ecton, May 21, 1950 FORWARD -6 :C --E

HEALTH CENTERS. OFFICE BUILDINGS AND RADIO STATIONS OF THE 1.. m.a l? KrnmIs 1vn PD OD oso (Pn ts owIl O 1msIo naB

i..i.** C: D M. *** . -
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wArt Section, May 21, 1950 -

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.yly1nayny31 yrinT


IN TRADE N I0 TOY AND P PRACTICE




SAM.


Vj


RCAI lANA N
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CLARAO "L'LN"';

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A SCENE IN PINS AND

ALANN" N' DID'
-hN PA NNC A00
A NEEDLES, h play that be


AN H's "CD'TNC Ns 0N,,
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PINS AO' NEEDLES'
LNCP'C'N AANCVNN AN^:.


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--- .I


F9FORWARD- 8 't 11 -


''









NOT BY

BREAD ALONE...

THE IDEALISTIC FOUNDERS AND LEADERS OF
THE INTERNATIONAL LADIES' GARMENT WORKERS'
UNION WERE NOT SATISFIED WITH ECONOMIC
IMPROVEMENTS ONLY. FROM THE BEGINNING
THEIR AIM WAS TO LIFT THE WORKERS TO A
HIGHER SOCIAL AND CULTURAL LEVEL. THIS
GAVE RISE TO A NUMBER OF EDUCATIONAL AND
CULTURAL ACTIVITIES THAT GAINED WIDE-
SPREAD POPULARITY,


A GROUP OF GIRLS WITH "GRANDPA" MORRIS WINCHEVSKY IN THE FIRST UNITY HOUSE IN PINE HILL, IN THE CATSKILL MOUNTAINS


I.. .. . .. . ..
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Art Section, May 21, 1950


F O R W A R D- 9 C a -1; I S


UNITY HOuSE IN CAPE COD, MASS.





Arf Section, May 21, 1950


FORWARD-o-10-C -, 1 1~


1950 21 We :rkemy be p


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35 "mPSbu l 0nyei PIf laan iv y th Mmr2 Dosok s MY'3'l )s
An Ambulance for Egland Given by the Members of Cok Pessrs Locl 35


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One of the Many Bombers Pod for by the I L G W U Membrsh:p


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Women's Halth Brigade of I L. G W. U. Ma.-ching n a Civilian Defense Demonstration



HTROIA SO1T OMT


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-.'-' Work3 5 Eng5d, C55n W I.1 W1 5r Vi*i -1
Ma tined by I L G W. U. F.und,..


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Mcdiine fo., S nish A i Fascists from Local 155, L G. W. U.


35 33 33
33
33


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Art Section, May 21, 1950


FORWARD-11 : 1 -, ,m


The Fight Against Fascism and



Nazism; Aid for Its Victims

The I. L. G. W. U. and its members distinguished themselves by their-
vigorous participation in the struggle against Fascism and Nazism, and
by extending a helping hand to its victims. During the war they bought
war bonds for over 200,000,000 dollars. They bought liberty ships, "
bombers, ambulances, and other war material that contributed to the
victory over dictatorships. The I. L. G. W. U. helped, through the Jewish ii-S
Labor Committee, rescue from the clutches of Fascism a number of I
labor leaders and fighters for freedom. The 1. L. G. W. U. aided the -
underground movements in many countries. Great sums of money
were given by the 1. L. G. W. U. for orphanages for war orphans and for .
trade schools in Europe and Asia. Every action to aid the remnants "
of the Jewish people and the victims of war and Fascism was and still .
is generously supported by the I. L. G. W. U. l A a


Mendhlsohn Orihanaqe n Pars, Supported by Clakakm ers LocI l 117





l .


FDR Isttute and Italian war as i Palermo Italy su orted by th 1.L G U.
3k,3 '" 3 1 '-


Fril I!! f. 7

148 0v n' 48 | ,o
.ii 41351


. .. .. ',1 . . I'1. L G. W U -ntr ance to R;oosveit Memoral Library
n rw from left to right: Pr u sky, Mrs
Rooisvefo, Sculpto. Glob Darulinsky.


1 33 330ii otnvmv -i 3335-- -- ^ ^^ -~ 0 i33333383'30 'v
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.25 a i ,I itan .a
Mo,,is Sig., Orphanage in Paris, Bought had M-i ied by Lo l 253 I, L. G W. U.


Orphn- and Trade School m Chna, built
rhn and -aMt. ained by 1. L G W. U____________ gwlo d



















.i or oi Do u 3 35 ,3p:.i D 3: ..'' .. ..O8 ) i'n UD .IN .
Fanny Schndr, adopted wr orphan, ho tosser parents ars L.ca 22 members, b, ng welcomed
by (left to right) Charles Zimmerman, Mayor O'Dwyer and President Dub.nsky


OT Voatio."03 I 1'ig Cai-1D 'i F88 Su d by I1 L G 5 U.1
0RT Vocational Training Conter in France, Supported by L G W.U


riy ,21 -tq ,:!,"En *Erp


.




Art Section, May 21, 1950 X0 FORWARD-12-C T-yi'_io ,I1 -, ,M t!AB -,I


AID FOR JEWISH NEEDS HERE, ABROAD AND IN ISRAEL 14 4 I I'9b1'W4 UM"170MUaMWW Il -1' b ri7a'r
The IL G W U und itL affiliated locals haT alwys responded generously to appeals of support for worthy ..UT5K '0 U" hi W 'LL I'L'T 0 LL 'TK STL 0 f W I. UL*L '10r I'N,0 W 71 N p UV 510 T ';o' i'o 'r 1000",o VT
causes and sttutions V i L W U r aoi,, l ,,,hl 1 L G for Jcwsh pnst1tutions pn Ame1,ca and broad 1 L, 011 1 I L'L8 ,U"L'LLULO i'1L DUDK 'IU 'L8 L TI'L PS T Yt P S T'L'L 0 00. 00 "01S IW 0"I1TL 'Too"oW T OLT ,1n P1L
,dl,, l, ,h G WE U ,tpbc Lb-dT 1- ,t lla to thi U td 7iT INT", C- 1 0 I T T T 0 TI i : TTT ' illO 7- 1 I''
-1 ere a Ho ti, P-,ht o p Sh.., I t MB.. S S C.l a cve ra1 Build-, Tn AI, mid 'n N'ThI" '01 I'L ITl0TLW ''I' 1n0r I'Y L b"B 7 1. TT'PT.ll -l 110 INNE 1V l



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1. L G. W. U Locl 35 builds a street in Jerusalem r Cooperm n, Acting Mayor of Jerusalem ,,
Schreibner, Lederm n, Sc .. .. Goldowsky. Presi, d


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; 1TT">1 IT T y3"D'TI T 7S0" P' 100l111101 0'O DIT T'1T 1=5no 000 KI :(0310" 13 00=31 mT) I'1*P"UTLT"
ent Dubisky hands over a $250,000 check t r. For United Jewish Appeal Witnessing the ceremony (from I lft to right):
David K NMles, Israel L GG ldwaltr, Julius Hochma and Louis Stulberg


DIrIctors oF' Imun Israeli H,,ous Cr oratNon


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.10 SPo 110 101011900 ID '10 'pyl D1T 'TI OP'3o3
At Work in the Machine Shop in Ha PTolytchnic, School on Shoper
Dotted Ly Locl tO10, 1. L, G. W. U.


?Li.l' L G. w U Bidip-' Ing of Hafa Poy techno cal Scol
1. L G. W U BuTlddng of 14.H4 PTly-tThniTTl School


"FORSAKE ME NOT IN MY OLD AGE"


Eighty y-ar- ad dressmaker gts rst retirement check from Hary Uler
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