Improvement of bean production in the Dominican Republic through breeding for multiple disease resistance

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Improvement of bean production in the Dominican Republic through breeding for multiple disease resistance
Physical Description:
50 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Beaver, James S
Freytag, George F
Saladín García, Freddy
Bean/Cowpea Collaborative Research Support Program
University of Puerto Rico (Mayagüez Campus) -- College of Agricultural Sciences
Dominican Republic -- Secretaría de Estado de Agricultura. -- Departamento de Investigación Agropecuaria
Publisher:
University of Puerto Rico
Place of Publication:
Mayaguez, Puerto Rico
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Beans -- Breeding -- Dominican Republic   ( lcsh )
Beans -- Diseases and pests -- Control -- Dominican Republic   ( lcsh )
Genre:
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Dominican Republic

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
principal investigator, James S. Beaver ; coinvestigators, George F. Freytag, Freddy Saladín García.
General Note:
"Project extension proposal submitted to the Bean/Cowpea CRSP by the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus, College of Agricultural Sciences, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00708 and El Departamento de Investigacíon Agropecuaria, Secretaría de Estado de Agricultura, Santo Domingo, República Dominicana."
General Note:
"December, 1984."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 646069645
ocn646069645
Classification:
lcc - SB608.B3 B43 1984
System ID:
AA00007217:00001

Full Text











IMPROVEMENT OF BEAN PRODUCTION IN THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC THROUGH
BREEDING FOR MULTIPLE DISEASE RESISTANCE








Project Extension Proposal Submitted to the Bean/Cowpea CRSP







by


The University of Puerto Rico
Mayaguez Campus
College of Agricultural Sciences
Mayaquez, Puerto Rico 00708


and


El Departamento de Investigaci~n Agropecuaria
Secretaria de Estado de Agricultura
Santo Domingo, Repiblica Dominicana


DECEMBER, 1984








APPLICATION TO: The Bean/Cowpea Collaborative Research Support Program;
Michigan State University, Management Entity

1. Name and Address of Lead Institution

University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus
Mayaguez, Puerto Rico

2. Name anld Address of Principal Investigator

James S. Beaver
Dept. of Agronomy and Soils
College of Agricultural Sciences
University of Puerto Rico
Mayaguez, Puerto Rico OO708

3. Names and Addresses of other Participating Institutions and
Co inve sti gators

a. U.S.

George F. Freytag
Tropical Agriculture Res arch Station (TARS)
P. O. Box 70
Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 007ps

b. H.C.


Amount to be Contributed:


Institutional Representative

Dr. Alejandro Ayala


Dean and Director
College of Agric. Sciences
QVsity of Puer aRto
I luez amps /M yag a, P.R. 00708


Freddy Saladi'n Garcla
Departamento de Investigacidn Agropecuaria
Secretaria de Estado de Agricultura
Santo Domingo, RepGblica Dominicana

4. Proposed Title of Research


Improvement of bean production in the Dominican Republic through
breeding for multiple disease resistance.


5. Funding Requested for FY 86-88:


U.S.: $107,121

H.C.: $112,704


$973,524


6. Lead Institution Approvals


Department or Unit Head

Ena. Miouel A. aonzlez Romcn


Name:


Title:Associate Dean and Deputy Director
College of Agric. Sciences
Address: UniverSit, of P.R.

Signature:;Hpei at pS y UGZ, PR













1. Project Rationale

Dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are a major source of protein in the

Dominican diet. Most of the dry bean production in the Dominican Republic

is confined to small farms where inputs such as improved cultivars, fertili-

zer, and pesticides are seldom used. As a result, seed yields of dry beans

are low averaging less than 1000 kg/ha. Most producers of dry beans on small

farms use the crop not only as a source of income but also for subsistence.

Consequently, these farmers need varieties with the capacity to yield pre-

dictably over a wide range of environmental conditions.

Diseases are one of the principal sources of low and erratic yields of

beans in the Tropics. Several diseases have the potential to cause losses

in the Dominican Republic. Moreover, the severity of bean diseases often

depends on the location and time of year in which beans are planted. There-

fore, in order to insure a greater, more predictable level of performance,

small farmers need bean varieties with multiple disease resistance.

There are possible sources of resistance to many of the bean diseases

important in the Dominican Republic. However, it is often not known how

these sources of resistance will perform when exposed to the local races

or strains of pathogens in the Dominican Republic. Although much of the

selection and testing of beans needs to be conducted locally, the bean re-

search program in the Dominican Republic has lacked both the human and fi-

nancial resources necessary to support an active bean breeding program.

Another limitation is that known sources of resistance often are present

in genotypes which are unadapted in the Dominican Republic or in genotypes

which have seed characteristics which are undesirable to the Dominican

consumer. In order to be useful to the small farmer in the Dominican














Republic, sources of resistance to the most important bean diseases need to be

accumulated into adapted lines with acceptable seed characteristics.

The University of Puerto Rico has the capacity to collaborate with the Min-

istry of Agriculture (Secretaria de Estado de Agricultura) of the Dominican

Republic in addressing some of the problems related to the development of

multiple disease resistant bean varieties for the Dominican Republic. Since

1973 researchers at the University of Puerto Rico and the Tropical Agricul-

ture Research Station (USDA/ARS) have collaborated on research designed to

accumulate genes for resistance to different bean diseases into bean germ-

plasm adapted to the Tropics. As a result, the Bean/Cowpea CRSP project in

the Dominican Republic was able to initiate its research with a multiple dis-

ease resistant germplasm base which has proved to be well adapted to Dominican

conditions. The bean research group in Puerto Rico has developed expertise

working with many of the bean diseases that are important in the Dominican

Republic. This knowledge has proved useful when providing formal and in-

formal training to Daminican bean researchers and graduate students. The

Bean/Cwopea GRSP also has proved to be beneficial for Puerto Rico since the

multiple disease resistant germplasm can be used by the local breeding pro-

gram.

2. Statement of five year objectives

A. Research

1. US Institution

a. Identify sources of resistance to the most important
bean diseaess in the Dominican Republic.

b. Develop populations with a greater frequency of major
and minor genes for resistance to the more common bean
diseases.














c. Closely related species of Phaseolus vulgaris will be
screened for resistance to important diseases that are
not available in adequate or durable forms in Phaseolus
vulgaris .

d. Develop and release breeding lines and cultivars with
high levels of multiple disease resistance.

2. Host Country

a. Field test the available cultivars and breeding lines
for multiple disease resistance under the principal
farming systems in the major bean production regions.

b. Initiate a breeding program to transfer multiple dis-
ease resistance to the standard bean cultivars of the
Host Country

B. Training

1. Provide formal and informal training for H.C. project
personnel in order to enhance the research capabilities
in bean breeding and bean pathology.

C. Anticipated impact on H.C. populations

1. The research capacity of the national bean research pro-
gram will be strengthened. As a result, the program
should be more effective in developing bean varieties
and management techniques which will increase bean pro-
duction in the country.

2. Promising bean germplasm will be tested on small farms.
If the farmer likes one of the lines, he will be free
to keep some seed for his own use. Data from the small
farms will be used to determine if one or more of the
lines are worthy of release on a regional or national
scale.

3. Major Accomplishments

a. Research

1. Release of multiple disease resistant white seeded va-
riety Arroyo Loro No. 1. Approximately 400 kg of basic
seed was turned over to the Foundation Seed Department
of the Ministry of Agriculture during 1984.

2. Trials conducted on small farms provided valuable in-
formation concerning the stability of performance of












promising germplasm and the frequency and severity of
bean diseases.

3. Several populations have been developed from crosses
between sources of resistance to bacterial blight,
rust, and BCMV and genotypes having the "Pompadour"
seed type. These populations will be tested and
selected in the Dominican Republic.

4. Phaseolus coccineus genotypes with resistance to BCMV,
~BGMV, cowpea mosaic virus, and bacterial blight were
identified. Interspecific crosses with Phaseolus
vulgaris have been made in an attempt to transfer these
resistance.

5. Promising germplasm from CIAT, Brasil, and the U.S.
have been screened for adaptation and for resistance
to rust, common blight, bean common mosaic virus, bean
golden mosaic, and root rots.

6. Techniques for conducting a field crossing block using
drip irrigation were refined. This is needed because
bean research programs in countries such as the Dominican
Republic generally do not have adequate resources to
construct and maintain greenhouses and screenhouses.

7. A survey of bean production practices on small farms was
conducted in the San Juan de la Maguana valley.

8. Efforts have been made to document project supported re-
search achievements. 'Two manuscripts have been prepared
Eor publication in scientific journals and six papers have
been presented at professional meetings.

b. Training

1. Completion of a M.S. degree in Crop Protection by Miguel
Martinez, Mr. Martenez has returned to the Dominican
Republic and he is currently dedicating a portion of his
time to the project.

2. Anticipated completion of a M.S. degree in Agronomy by
Manuel Mateo. Upon termination of his studies in August
1985, Mr. Mateo will return to the Arroyo Loro Experiment
Station in the conduct breeding and selection work with
the project.

3. Anticipated completion of a M.S. degree in Crop Protection
by Hugo Deschamps. Upon completion of his studies in 1986,
Mr. Deschamps will return to the Dominican Republic to work














on bean entomology.

4. Anticipated completion of a M.S. degree in Crop Protection by
Hiram V61ez. Upon completion of his studies Mr. V41ez plans
to work with the project in Puerto Rico.

5. Informal short courses given to Dominican Republic project
technicians concerning research techniques in bean breeding
and pathology. These short courses permitted project per-
sonnel in the Dominican Republic to initiate research activ-
ities. The University of Puerto Rico staff is well qualified
to train technicians with little or no background in English.

c. Actual Impact on H.C. populations

1. By the end of the five year period, two members of the bean
research tean will have completed their M.S. degrees at the
University of Puerto Rico and will have returned to the
Dominican Republic. This will enhance the bean research
capabilities in the H.C.

2. Five technicians, including three women, have received short
term training at the University of Puerto Rico dealing with
research techniques in bean breeding and pathology. This
short term training enable these technicians to be effective
in carrying out project activities.

3. One variety, Arroyo L~oro #1, has been released and is currently
being multiplied. Seed should be available to farmers in 1985.
?Two other varieties are being considered for release in 1985.

C. Three year (FY 86-88) project extension goals for US and HC

1. Research

a. U.S. Institution

1, Identify additional sources of resistance to the most
important diseases in the Dominican Republic.

2. Utilize germplasm derived from interspecific crosses
between Phaseolus vulgaris and P. coccineus and inter-
specific crosses between P. vulgaris and P. acutifolius
in order to attempt to transfer resistance to bean golden
mosaic virus, bean common mosaic virus, and common blight
into a P. vulgaris genetic background.

3. Utilize recurrent selection to continue to develop large
seeded bean populations with a greater frequency of major
and minor genes for resistance to the more common bean














diseases found in the Dominican Republic.

4. Develop and release breeding lines and cultivars
with multiple disease resistance and improved
agronomic characteristics.

b. Host Country

1. Strengthen the local breeding program with special
emphasis on the selection and testing of multiple
disease resistant lines with seed characteristics
that are acceptable to the Dominican consumer.

2. Continue testing cultivars and breeding lines on
small farms in order to measure the effectiveness
of different sources of disease resistance and to
monitor the frequency and severity of bean diseases.

3. Screen promising germplasm for resistance when ex-
posed to local races or strains of pathogens.

4. Measure the effectiveness of different sources of
disease resistance when tested under different
management systems.

5. Determine how multiple disease resistant material
can be most effectively utilized by small farmers.

2. Training

a. U.S.

1. Provide support for a U.S. graduate student to ini-
tiate a M.S. degree program at the University of
Puerto Rico to study problems related to seed pro-
duction and storage by small farmers in the Dominican
Republic.

2. Provide support for short term training at CIAT for
a UPR agronomist in germplasm preservation and seed
technology.

b. Host Country

1. Provide support for a Dominican graduate student to
initiate a Ph.D degree program at the University of
Nebraska to study the genetic variability of the
virulence of the bean golden mosaic virus.

2. Provide support for two Dominican graduate students













to initiate M.S. degree programs at the University
of Puerto Rico in Agronomy, Crop Protection, or
Agricultural Economics.

3. Sponsor a workshop on farming systems research tech-
niques for project personnel in the U.S. and the
Dorsinican Republic.

3. Anticipatbed Impact on H.C. populations

a. Bean varieties with multiple disease resistance and seed
characteristics preferred by the Dominican consumer will
be released and become available to farmers. In order to
measure the potential impact of these varieties, limited
quantities of these varieties will be multiplied and dis-
tributed to a group of small farmers in the principal bean
growing regions. Project personnel will monitor the per-
formancee of these varieties and attempt to measure th~e
degree of their acceptance by the small farmers.

b. Additional members of the Dominican bean research team
will finish their graduate studies and return to the
Dominican Republic. As a result, H.C. bean research
capabilities will be enhanced.

D. Anticipate~d contributions of project extension goals

1. Contributions to the Bean/Cowpea CRSP

Diseases are one of the major factors limiting bean pro-

duction on small farmers in the Tropics. In order to be

useful to small farmers, bean varieties must possess re-

sistance to the most serious diseases. Small farmers be-

nefit from multiple disease resistance through increased

and/or stabilized bean yields. Multiple disease resistance

also decreases the cost of production of small farmer by

reducing the need for pesticides to control diseases or

their vectors.

2. Contributions to U.S. Agriculture

Bean production in the Tropics and the U.S. are threatened

by manyJ of the same diseases. Research sponsored by this













project is directly beneficial to U.S. agriculture be-

cause sources of resistance to diseases identified in

the Tropics often are found to be effective in the U.S.

In fact, screening for disease resistance in the Tropics

can be more effective because disease pressure tends to

be greater for some diseases. The Bean/Cowpea CRSP pro-

ject in the Dominican Republic should be of particular

benefit to U.S. breeding programs working with large

seeded classes of beans. Large seeded bean classes have

a narrow germplasm base and are very susceptible to cer-

tain diseases such as common blight.

II. Detailed Workplan

1. Detailed objectives, methodology/experimental plan

A. U.S. Institution FY 1986

1. Objective 1: Identify additional sources of resistance
to the most important diseases in the
Dominican Republic

Field Screening

Promising bean germplasm from CIAT and other bean research pro-

grams will be tested in Puerto Rico for adaptation and disease resistance.

Cooperative nurseries from CIAT will include the International Bean Rust

Nursery, a Bacterial Blight Nursery, the International Bean Golden Mosaic

Virus Nursery, and an Adaptation Nursery for seed types used in the Carib-

bean. The experimental plans and methodologies utilized for these nurseries

will be those outlined by CIAT.

Germplasm from other bean research programs will be evaluated

in separate nurseries. Promising bean lines will be evaluated for rust at













the Isabela Research and Development Center during the winter months. In order

to insure a uniform infection with rust, spreader rows of a variety susceptible

to rust will be planted approximately two weeks before the other bean lines are

planted. The potential productivity of bean lines will be evaluated at the

Fortuna Research and Development Center during the winter months. During the

summer months bean lines will be grown at the Fortuna Research and Development

Center where they will be evaluated for common blight, root rots, and perfor-

mance under a longer photoperiod. In order to insure a uniform infection of

common blight, the summer planting at Fortuna will be inoculated with a sus-

pension of the common blight bacteriaum 2-4 weeks after planting. A random-

ized complete block design with 2-4 replications will be used for the trials.

Most lines will be gorwn in single rows 3-5 m in length. Rodrigo Ech~ivez,

Hfiram V61ez and James Beaver will be responsible for the conduct of these

trials .

Greenhouse Screening

Elite bean germplasa will be evaluated in the greenhouse for

resistance to bean common virus and bean golden mosaic virus. Inoculations

will be conducted with the proper strains of bean common mosaic virus to

confirm "I" gene and recessive resistances. Segregating populations will

be screened to measure the strengthof the association between the violet

seed color and the "I" gene source of resistance to bean common mosaic

virus. Reaction to the Bean Golden Mosaic Virus will be conducted using

a grafting technique developed by Mildred Zapata. The greenhouse screen-

ings will be the responsibility of David Unander.

2. Objective 2: Utilize germplasm derived from interspecific
crosses Phaseolus vulgaris and P. coccineus and inter-
specific crosses between P. vulgaris and P. acutifolius













in order to attempt to transfer resistance to bean
golden mrosaic virus, bean common mosaic virus, and
common blight into a P. vulgaris genetic background.

Populations of Phaseolus coccineus have been identified which

show good levels of resistance to bean golden mosaic virus, bean common

mosaic virus and common blight. Interspecific crosses have been made bet-

ween P. vulgaris lines and the resistant P. coccineus populations. Due to

problems with sterility and poor adaptation several backcrosses to P.

vulgaris will be required before these populations can be used directly in

the breeding program. Genotypes with a "Pompadour" seed type will be used

as the recurrent parent in order to develop lines with seed types that are

acceptable to the Dominican consumer. The backcrosses will be conducted by

Dr. George Freytag and Kiram V41ez in greenhouses at the Tropical Agricul-

ture Research Station. The resulting populations will be tested for adap-

tation at the Adjuntas Research Substation. Adapted lines recovered from

these populations will be screened in the greenhouse for resistance to bean

golden mosaic virus and bean common mosaic virus by David Unander. The

lines also will be screened in the field for resistance to common blight

using the methodology previously described.

The project also will utilize common blight resistant bean

germplasm developed at Cornell University by Dr. Robert Wilkinson. Some

of these populations were derived from interspecific crosses between P.

vulgaris and P. coccineus. In addition, common blight resistance popula-

tions derived from crosses between P. vulgaris and P. acutifolius will be

utilized. The populations from Cornell are more fertile and better adapted

than the populations available in Puerto Rico. As a result, these popula-

tions can be immediately incorporated into the breeding program. A













subordinate agreement will be made with Cornell University to provide funds

for Dr. Wilkinson to screen populations for common blight resistance in growth

chambers and to make crosses among resistant lines during the winter months

when conditions are unfavorable for common blight in Puerto Rico. Those pop-

ulations found to be most resistant to common blight in New York will be

tested in a field nursery conducted during the summer at the Fortuna Research

and Development Center. This collaboration should result in a more rapid

accumulation of genes for resistance to common blight.

3. Utilize recurrent selection to continue to develop large
seeded bean populations with a greater frequency of major
and minor genes for resistance to the more common bean
diseases found in the Dominican Republic.

A form of recurrent selection has been and will continue to be

utilized to accumulate major and minor genes for resistance. The base popu-

lation of this recurrent selection scheme consisted of a group of bean geno-

types that were considered sources of resistance to common blight, bean com-

mon mosaic virus, rust and root rot and a group of large red mottled bean

varieties used in the Dominican Republic. Each cycle of selection requires

two years to complete. Approximately 20-30 of the best lines will be in-

termated in a crossing block which will be conducted at the Isabela Research

and Development Center between January and April of the first year. The Fl

generation will be advanced during the summer months at the Fortuna Research

and Development Center. The F2 populations will be planted at the Isabela

Research and Development Center in October. There will be an attempt to

grorw at least 500 plants of each F2 generation. Individual F2 plants will

be selected on the basis of plant type. Plants will be chosen from all

populations in order to preserve genetic variability. After harvest, F3













Lines will be selected on the basis of seed size and type. Between January

and April of the following year the selected F3 lines will be grown at the

Isabela Research and Development Center in individual rows 3 m in length.

Each line will be evaluated for adaptation, agronomic characteristics, and

reaction to rust. Seed of the selected lines will be bulked. The F4 gen-

eration will be grown at the Fortuna Research and Development Center during

the hot and hurmid summer months where each line will be evaluated for adapt-

ation under a longer photoperiod, agronomic traits, and resistance to bac-

terial blight and root rot. Each F4 line will be grown in paired plots 3

m in length. The experimental design will be a randomized complete block

with three replications. Individual plants will be harvested from the

selected F4 lines. From September to December of the second year, the

selected F5 line will be evaluated in the greenhouse for reaction to bean

common mosaic virus and bean golden mosaic virus. The information obtained

for each line will serve as the basis for the selection of parents for the

next cycle of selection. James Beaver will be responsible for the manage-

ment of the recurrent selection populations.

4. Objective 4: Develop and release breeding lines and
cultivars with multiple disease resistance and improved
agronomic characteristics.

Promising F5 lines obtained from the recurrent selection pro-

gram will be tested in replicated yield trials at the Isabela and Fortuna

Research and Development Centers. The experimental design will be a ran-

domized complete block with four replications. Field plots will consist

of four rows, five meters in length with a 60 an spacing between rows.

Those lines with the best overall performance will be sent to the Dominican

Republic for field testing. Lines found to have superior levels of multiple













disease resistance, desirable agronomic traits and desirable seed character-

istics will be considered for release as breeding lines or varieties. Lines

found to have good levels of multiple disease resistance and desirable agro-

nomic characteristics, but seed types unacceptable to the Dominican consumer

will be crossed with the large red mottled varieties of the Dominican Republic.

F2 populations of these crosses will be sent to the Dominican Republic for

use by local breeding program. James Beaver and Rodrigo Echivez will be

responsible for the testing of advanced lines.

B. H.C. FY 1986

1. Objective 1: Strengthen the local breeding program with
special emphasis on the selection and testing of multiple
disease resistant lines with seed characteristics that
are acceptable to the Dominican consumer.

Manuel Mateo and Eladio Arnaud Santana are~iexpected to return to

the Dominican Republic during FY 1985. Both will have completed M.S. degrees

in Plant Breeding and Genetics. As a consequence, the project should be in

the position to initiate the selection and testing of bean populations in the

Dominican Republic for local adaptation and for multiple disease resistance.

This work should be particularly effective because the bean populations will

be exposed to Dominican races or strains of pathogens. The plant breeding

activities in the Dominican Republic will concentrate on those populations

which have the greatest potential for producing lines with useful levels of

multiple disease resistance and seed characteristics that are acceptable to

the Dominican consumer. Screening of the early generations will be con-

ducted at the Arroyo Loro experiment station in San Juan de la Maguana.

Lines will be selected and advanced using the pedigree and/or the single

seed descent breeding methods. During 1986 segregating populations will













be supplied by the University of Puerto Rico. However, a field crossing block

will be conducted in the Dominican Republic in 1985 to produce segregating

populations for .the following year. Testing of advanced lines will be con-

ducted on the Ministry of Agriculture experiment stations at San Cristobal,

Santiago, Higuey, San Juan de la Maguana and Constanza. The experimental

design for these trials will be a randomized complete block with 2-4 repli-

cations.

2. Objective 2: Continue testing cultivars and breeding
lines on small farms in order to measure the effective-
ness of different sources of disease resistance and to
monitor the frequency and severity of bean diseases.

Field trials will continue to be conducted on small farms in

the major bean producing regions of the Dominican Republic such as the San

Juan de la Maguana valley and the Cibao. The trials will include standard

cultivars, promising breeding lines, and genotypes which are considered as

possible sources of resistance to diseases common in the Dominican Republic.

Each genotype will be grown in a single row 2-4 m in length. The experimental

design will be a randomized complete block with 2-4 replications. The beans

will be planted using cultural practices similar to those utilized by the

cooperating farmer. The lines will be evaluated for agronomic traits and

disease resistance. Data from the different locations will provide a

measure of the degree and range of effectiveness of different sources of

disease resistance. These trials will be conducted by project agronomists.

3. Objective 3: Screen promising germplasm for resistance
when exposed to the local races or strains of pathogens.

Resistance can be most effectively identified by exposing pro-

mising bean germplasm to local strains or races of pathogens. Nurseries

for several important bean diseases will be conducted in the Dominican











Republic. The International Bean Golden Mosaic Virus Nursery from CIAT will

be conducted at 1-2 locations. The nursery will be planted in January when

conditions are most favorable for the development of the disease. Milton

Morales will be responsible for this research. The International Bean Rust

Nursery and a Bacterial Blight Nursery from CIAT will be conducted at the

Arroyo Loro Experiment Station in San Juan de la Maguana. Miguel Martinez,

Graciela Godoy and Manuel Mateo will conduct these trials. An Adaptation

Nursery from CIAT for seed types used in the Caribbean will be conducted

at the Arroyo Loro Experiment Station. Manuel Mateo will conduct this trial.

A nursery from CIAT to screen lines for resistance to web blight will be con-

ducted by cooperating agronomists located at the CENDA Experiment Station

in Santiago. The experimental plans and methodologies utilized for these

nurseries will be those outlined by CIAT.

Nurseries to screen for resistance to ashy stem blight will

be conducted at the experiment stations at San Crist~bal and San Juan de

la Maguana. The nursery will be inoculated using techniques currently

being developed by Graciela Godoy and Miguel Martinez. The experimental

design will be a randomized complete block with 3-4 replications. Miguel

Martinez and Graciela Godoy also will screen bean lines for resistance to

angular leaf spot. The lines will be inoculated with strains of the angular

leaf spot fungus collected from different regions of the Dominican Republic.

This should provide important information concerning the variability of the

pathogen. This research will be conducted in a screenhouse at the Arroyo

Loro Experiment Station in San Juan de la Maguana.

Advanced lines from Puerto Rico also will be tested in the

Dominican Republic. The initial screening will be conducted at the Arroyo













L~oro Experiment Station. The lines will be grown in paired rows 3-5 m in

length. The experimental design will be a randomized complete block with

2-3 replications.

4. Objective 4: Measure the effectiveness of different sources
of resistance when tested under different management systems.

Beans are grown in the Dominican Republic using a wide range

of management systems. Rotation, crop association and cultural practices

have been shown to influence the effectiveness of certain forms of disease

resistance. The ideal would be identify management systems which enhance

or make more durable genetic forms of disease resistance. Therefore, re-

search will be conducted to determine how the most common management systems

used in the Dominican Republic affect the disease resistance of the most

promising bean lines,

Field tests will be conducted on experimental stations using

conventional agranomic research techniques. A three year study to measure

the effect of crop rotation on the frequency and severity of bean diseases

will be conducted, A split plot arrangement of a randomized complete block

with 3-4 replications will be used as the experimental design. Whole plots

will be the rotation treatments and the sub-plots will be the bean lines.

These trials will be conducted at: 3 locations.

Another set of field tests will be conducted to measure the

effect of multiple cropping and cultural practices on the frequency and

severity of disease. A split plot arrangement of a randomized complete

block with 3-4 replications will be used. The whole plots will be a fac-

torial arrangement of the association and cultural practice treatments

and the sub-plots will be the bean lines. These trials will be conducted

at 3 locations.












Freddy Saladin will be responsible for the conduct of these tri-

als. It is hoped that the results of these experiments will aid in the in-

terpretation-of results obtained from the trials conducted on small farms.

These trials also should produce data of use to the University of Nebraska

project in studying the epidemiology of rust and common blight.

5. Objective 5: Determine how multiple disease resistant
material can be most effectively utilized by farmers.

In spiteof the best efforts by the Ministry of Agriculture to

promote the sale and distribution of new varieties, most of the bean seed

planted by small farmers continues to be grown by the farmers themselves or

obtained from neighbors. Therefore, it is important to determine how newly

released multiple disease resistant varieties will perform when handled by

small farmers.

The project will cooperate with the extension service in dis-

tributing a few kg of seed of 3-4 of the most promising bean varieties to

at least 50 farmers in each of the major bean producing regions of the

Dominican Republic. At least one of these varieties will be black seeded.

The farmer will be requested to plant this seed using the same practices

he would use to plant his traditional variety. The extensionist and a

member of the Bean/Cowpea CRSP project will visit the farm during the

growing season to compare the disease resistance and agronomic traits of

the newly released varieties with the traditional variety used by the

farmer. The project also will cooperate with the extension service in

the preparation and publication of a type of bulletin describing tech-

niques that a small farmer could use to improve the quality of home

grown seed. The project will be able to measure the impact of the newly

released varieties on these small farms by conducting a study the following













year to measure to degree of acceptance of the new varieties by the farmers.

These results should provide valuable information to the local breeding pro-

gram concerning the preferences of the small farmer. This research will be

coordinated by freddy Saladin with the assistance of agronomist Bimeni de

Mantilla c~ruz.

C. U.S. Institution FY 1987-88

The development of bean populations with improved levels of multiple

disease resistance requires several years of research. As a consequence, many

of the project activities at the University of Puerto Rico will not change

greatly from year to year. Project personnel will continue to perform similar

functions during FY 1987 and FY 1988. Promising bean germplasm from CIAT and

other bean research programs will continue to be tested for adaptation and

disease resistance using the procedures outlined for FY 1986. The backcross

populations derived from the interspecific crosses will be screened for re-

sistance to bacterial blight, bean golden mosaic virus, and bean common

mosaic virus. The bacterial blight resistant populations derived from in-

terspecific crosses will continue to be selected and intermated. Since two

recurrent selection populations are maintained, the procedures outlined for

objective 3 are repeated each year. Moreover, the testing of advanced lines

is conducted each year.

D. H.C. FY 1987-88

The local breeding program will continue to evaluate and select

segregating populations during FY 1987-1988. However, increased emphasis

will be placed on the testing of advanced lines. During FY 1987-88 advanced

line trials will be conducted at 3-4 locations in the country. The small

farn trials will continue to be conducted. These trials are important in













monitoring the effectiveness of ~different sources of disease resistance and in

the evaluation of the performance of lines that are serious candidates for re-

lease as varieties. Promising germplasm for disease resistance becomes avail-

able each year. Moreover, the relative importance of different races or strains

of pathogens can change over time. As a consequence, screening for disease re-

sistance will continue during FY 1987-88. Since management studies are long

term in nature, the rotation and cropping system trials will be repeated dur-

ing FY 1987-88. The second and third year of the extension also will be used

to conduct surveys on the small farms that grew the newly released varieties

in order to measure the variety's impact on the farmers and their families.

2. Methods of Data Analysis

Data from experiments conducted in Puerto Rico will be analyzed using

a Digital DEC 10 computer located at the Mayaguez Campus of the University

of Puerto Rico. Statistical analyses will be conducted using the statistical

software package SPSS. Most experiments will be analyzed using analysis of

variance, regression or correlation. Qualitative treatments such as varie-

ties will be compared using multiple comparison procedures. The Department

of Agronomy also has an Apple IIe microcomputer which is available to the

project. The project has purchased the MSTAT statistical software package

for this microcomputer and has used this program for the analysis of simple

experiments, layout of experiments and for the management of breeding re-

cords. James Beaver will coordinate the analysis of experimental data in

Puerto Rico.

At present, data from experiments conducted in the Dominican Republic

are analyzed at the University of Puerto Rico. However, the project in the

Dominican Republic expects to purchase an IBM microcomputer during FY 1985.












As a result, most of the analyses of field experiments will be conducted in the

Dominican Republic using the MSTAT statistical software package. Freddy Saldin,

Manuel Mateo and Eladio Arnaud Santana have taken a short course on the use of

MSTAT. Both Mr. Mateo and Arnaud have taken at least two semesters of biometry

and should be well qualified to analyse data from most experiments.

3. Project logistics

A. Sites

3, U.S. institutions

a. University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus

(1) Offices, general library, computer center,
laboratories, and greenhouses
Mayaguez Campus

(21 Laboratory, greenhouses, and field plots
Isabela Research and Development Center

(3) Field plots
Fortuna and Adjuntas Research and Develop-
ment Centers

b. Tropical Agriculture Research Station

31) Offices, laboratories, greenhouses, and
field plots

2. Host Country

a. D~epartamento de Investigaciones Agropecuarias (DIA),
Secretarla de Estado de Agricultura

(11 Headquarters Santo Domingo

C21 Experiment Stations

(a) Centro Sur de Desarrollo Agropecuario (CESDA)

Estaci~n Exp. para Zonas Aridas (CIAZA), Azua

Estaci~n Exp. de Ocoa, Ocoa

Estaciin Exp. Palo Alto, Barahona

Est. Exp. Arroyo Loro, San Juan de la Maguana













Estaci~n Exp. El Escondido, Banr

Estaci6n Experimental Higuey, Higuey

Estaci~n Experimental Regional, San Cristibal

(b) Centro Norte de Desarrollo Agropecuario (CENDA)

Estaci~n Experimental La Cumbre, Puerto Plata

Est. Exp. Mata Larga, San Francisco de Macoris

Estaci~n Experimental Horticola, Constanza

Estaciin Experimental Quiniqua, Santiago

B. U.S. and H.C. Resources

1. Presently available

a. U.S. Institutions

(31 The University of Puerto Rico

The unit of the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus,

to be responsible for the project is the College of Agricultural Sciences

through the Agricultural Experiment Station and the Departments of Agronomyr and

Crop Protection. A well equipped plant pathology laboratory, one regular and

two mini greenhouses are available when needed. The computer center also is

located on the Mayaguez campus. The Agricultural Library and the Finance Of-

fice are located at Rio Piedras. An office, a laboratory, greenhouses, and

co~ld storage for seed are available at the Isabela Research and Development

Canter. Field plots are available at the Adjuntas, Fortuna, and Isabela Re-

search and Development Centers. Adjuntas is located in the western central

mountains at 750 meters above sea level. The climate is cool and moist and

disease levels are usually high. Fortuna is located near the southern coast.

The location is characterized by deep fertile, loamy soils and little rain-

fall. Disease pressure is usually low and beans yield well. The Isabela













Research and Development Center is located on the northwest plateau at approxi-

mately 150 meters above sea level. This location is used for screening beans

for rust and root rot resistance.

(2) Tropical Agriculture Research Station (TARS)

Researchers at the University of Puerto Rico and the Tropical

Agriculture Research Station have collaborated in bean research since 1973.

This effort has resulted in the development of a valuable multiple disease

resistant bean germplasm base. The Tropical Agriculture Research Station

facilities will continue to be available for cooperative research with the

USDA-ARS bean genetics program directed by Dr. George Freytag.

TPhe Tropical Agriculture Research Station is located on a 100

acre track of land, of whiich approximately 40 acres are tillable. TAR~S also\

maintains an experimental substation at Isabela. The facilities at Mayaguez,

include a principal office buliding with space for 12 scientists. Well

equipped plant pathology, genetics, and biochemistry laboratories are lo-

cated in the same building. Equipment in the plant pathology laboratory

includes a culture transfer chamber, dissecting and research microscopes

with apochromatic objectives and integral cameras, incubators, refrigera-

tors and autoclaves. A laboratory is available for handling seed and a

cold room is available for seed storage. There are two other rooms which

are used for the storage of materials and equipment. The Tropical Agricul-

ture Research Station also has a Radio Shack Model 16 microcomputer with

statistical and data base management software packages. The greenhouse

complex at TARS consists of six glass and screened houses, five of which

contain evaporative coolers for climate control. A screened area of about

1500 sq. ft. is located nearby and is seasonably available. Mist inoculation












chambers also are available. Vehicles stationed at TARS will be available when

required for cooperative research. In addition, field plots and irrigation

equipment are available at Mayaguez and Isabela.

b. Host Country

Bean Research is conducted by the Departamento de Investiga-

ciones Agropecuarias (DIA) through three centers and a network of experiment

stations (please note on page 21). Several of these research stations are

located in the principal bean growing regions such as the San Juan de la

Maguana valley and the Cibao. Bean research capabilities in the Dominican

Republic have been enhanced since the onset of the project. Bean/Cowpea

CRSP funds have been used to improve facilities at the Arroyo Loro Research

Station. At present, the research station at Arroyo Loro has offices, a

plant pathology laboratory, a laboratory for handling and weighing of seed,

an air conditioned room for seed storage, a room for storage of materials

and equipment, and two screenhouses. Irrigated field plots also are avail-

able. Most of the plant breeding research and much of the disease screening

will be conducted at the Arroyo Loro Experiment Station. However, a signif-

icant amount of research will be conducted at other experiment stations.

Research stations in bean growing regions will be utilized for testing of

advanced lines. The CESDA research station at San Crist~bal will provide

offices from which the project will be administered. In addition, the

CESDA research station at San Cristijbal will be used for some field and

laboratory research. This station has a plant pathology laboratory and

screenhouse facilities which will be available to the project when needed.

Two motorcycles are available to project agronomists at the Arroyo Loro

Experiment Station. The project also can utilize DIA vehicles when neces-

sary.












2. Equipment to be purchased

a. U.S. FY 1986

(1) Low temperature incubator

(2) Nursery plot thresher

b. H.C. FY 1986

(1) ITwo motorcycles

(2) Microcomputer, printer, monitor

(3) Nursery plot thresher

c. U.S. FY 1987-88

(1) Cooling system for two greenhouses located on
the Mayaguez campus of the University

(2) Light microscope

(3) Centr-ifuge

(4) pH meter

(5) Spectrophotometer

(6) Balance

d. H.C. FY 1987-88

(1) Low temperature incubator

(2) Water distiller

C3) Seed cleaner and classifier

3, Resource/Support Activities and Sites

A. U.S. Institutions

(1) Dr. James S. Beaver, Associate Professor, Department of

Agronomy and Soils, College of Agricultural Sciences RUM, Mayagues, Puerto

Rico, 00708. Dr. Beaver will be responsible for the overall direction, co-

ordination, and administration of the project. In addition, he will be














responsible for the plant breeding aspects of the project including varietal

development and population improvement. Dr. Beaver also will be available to

consult other members of the project concerning the design and analysis of

experiments.

(2) Dr. George F. Freytag, Research Geneticist, TARS/USDA/

ARS, Box 70, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico OO708, Dr. Freytag will coordinate the

research with the interspecific crosses. He also will evaluate populations

of Phaseolus coccineus and P. acutifolius for resistance to diseases of P.

vulgaris L.

C3) Dr. David Unander, Assistant Professor, Department of

Horticulture, College of Agricultural Science RUM, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico

00708. Dr. Unander will be responsible for screening promising bean geno-

types for resistance to the bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and bean golden

mosaic virus. He also will study the nature of the relationship between the

"I" gene source of resistance to BCMV and purple seed coat color. Most of

Dr. Unander's research will be conducted at the Isabela Research and Develop-

ment Center,

(4) Dr. Robert Wilkinson, Professor, Department of Plant

Pathology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York. Dr. Wilkinson will develop

populations with enhanced levels of resistance to common blight. He will

screen lines for resistance to common blight in growth chambers at Cornell

University during the winter months. The most resistant lines subsequently

will be intermated in the greenhouse. Progeny of these crosses will be

sent to Puerto Rico where they will be tested in the summer for field re-

sistance to bacterial blight.













(5) Mr. Rodrigo Echivez-Badel, Assistant Investigator, Depart-

ment of Crop Protection, College of Agricultural Science RUM, Mayaguez,

Puerto Rico 00708. Mr. Echivez-Badel will conduct the screening trials for

aerial fungal pathogens and root rots. He also will be responsible for the

disease evaluations in the advanced line trials. Mr. Echivez-Badel will

have the responsibility of coordinating informal training in Puerto Rico.

(6) Mr. Luis Ernesto Rivera, Assistant Investigator, Depart-

ment of Agronomy, College of Agricultural Science RUM, Mayaguez, Puerto

Rico 00708. Mr. Ernesto Rivera will assist the project in the conduct of

field trials at the Fortuna Research and Development Center.

(7) Mr. Hiram V41ez-Martlnez, Research Assistant, Department

of Crop Protection, College of Agricultural Science RUM, Mayaguez, Puerto

Rico 00708. Mr. V41ez-Martinez will be responsible for conducting the bac-

terial blight nurseries. He also will assist Dr. Beaver in making crosses

and Mr. Echdvez-Badel in the conduct of the field trials and screening nurs-

eries,

B. Host Country

E1J1 Mr. Freddy Saladlin Garcia, Agronomist, Departamento de

Investigaciones Agropecuarias (DIA), Secretaria de Estado de Agricultura

CSEA), Centro Sur de Desarrollo Agricola ('OBSDA), San Cristo'bal, Dominican

Republic. Mr. Saladin (Co-PI) will be responsible for the organization,

supervision, and coordination of project activities in the Dominican Republic.

He also will coordinate the management trials and the plantings of small

faxxu. He will be responsible for collecting and sharing data with his

counterparts.in Puerto Rico and will assist in its analysis and interpreta-

tion .












(2) Ms. Graciela Godoy and Mr. Miguel Martinez, Plant Patholo-

gists, DIA/SEA/CESDA, San Cristibal, Dominican Republic. Ms. Godoy and

Mr. Martinez will conduct evaluations in the disease nurseries at San Crist~bal:

and San Juan de la Maguana. They also will conduct research to develop a field

screening technique for ashy stem blight. In addition, they will collect iso-

lates of the angular leaf spot causal agent and will inoculate a set of geno-

types known to have some resistance to this disease.

(3) Mr. Manuel Mateo-Solano, Plant Breeder, DIA/SEA/CESDA,

Arroyo Loro Experiment Station, San Juan de la Maguana. Mr. Mateo-Solano

will be responsible for the varietal development program at San Juan de la

Maguana. He also will coordinate testing of advanced lines at other research

stations and participate i: the evaluation of the disease nurseries conducted

at the Arroyo Loro Experiment Station.

(4) Ms. Mercedes Rodriguez, Mr. Julio C. Nin, and Mr. Fernando

Oviedo, DIA/SEA/CESDA, Arroyo Loro Experiment Station, San Juan de la Maguana.

Ms. Rodrlguez, Mr. Nin, and Mr. Oviedo will assist project agronomists, plant

pathologists, and plant breeders in conducting field research. Technicians

at other experiment stations will be available to assist the project when

needed,

C. Training program

1. U.S. Students

The project plans to provide support for a U.S. graduate

student to initiate a M.S. degree program at the University of Puerto Rico

during FY 1986. His or her thesis research will be related to bean seed

production and storage problems of small farmers in the Dominican Republic.

2. Host Country Students

Hugo Deschamps is scheduled to complete the requirements












for a M.S. degree in Crop Protection from the University of Puerto Rico during

FY 1986. His thesis research will deal with the identification of weed species

which.serve as alternate hosts to the bean golden mosaic virus. One Dominican

student will initiate a M.S. degree program at the University of Puerto Rico

in FY 1986 and another Dominican student will initiate a M.S. degree program

in FY 1987. These students will study agronomy, crop protection, or agricul-

tural economics. The project will support another Dominican graduate student

to initiate a Ph.D) degree program during FY 1986 at the University of Nebraska.

This student will study the genetic variability of the virulence of the bean

golden mosaic virus.

3. Other developing country students

None anticipated

4. Other training efforts

The project plans to sponsor a workshop during FY 1986 on

farming system research techniques. Participants will include Bean/Cowpea

CRSP personnel from Puerto Rico, Honduras, and the Dominican Republic. One

to two weeks of formal instruction will be given at the University of Puerto

Rico by personnel from the Farming System Support Project (FSSP) of the

Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville,

Florida. The formal instruction will be followed up by an on-site visit to

the Dominican Republic by a FSSP staff member. This training should be par-

ticularly useful for the surveys planned for FY 1987-88.

5, Expected outcomes of the training program

a. FY 1986

By FY 1986, Miguel Martjtnez, Manuel Mateo, and Hugo

Deschamps will have completed M.S. degrees fromn the University of Puerto

Rico. The thesis topics of these students will be in areas of research













that are relevant to problems in the Dominican Republic. All are expected to

return to the Dominican Republic to work for the bean research program. Their

contributions to the project as researchers will be the best measure of the

value of their graduate training.

b. FY 1987-88

As more individuals return to the Dominican Republic

with graduate training, the research capability of the bean research program

will be enhanced. This will be particularly true as these individuals gain

a few years of experience working in the Dominican Republic. The number and

quality of research publications produced by these individuals will provide

a means of evaluating their graduate training. The value of the farming

system workshop will be evaluated from the quality of the report of the on

farm surveys which will be conducted during FY 1987.

4. Expected outcomes

a. FY 1986

(1) Identification of additional sources of resistance to

the most important diseases in the Dominican Republic. The value of these

sources of resistance will be measured when grown in trials on small farms.

(2) Identification of a group of red mottled, multiple dis-

ease resistant advanced lines. The potential value of these lines will be

evaluated using the results from the advanced line field trials which will

be conducted at several locations.

(3) Continue accumulation of resistance genes in the re-

current selection populations. The level of resistance in the populations

will be measured in performance trials at the end of each cycle.

(4) Distribution of promising bean lines to farmers in the













bean growing regions. The effectiveness of this activity will be evaluated dur-

ing the growing season when the extensionist and project agronanist evaluate the

beans for agronomic characteristics and disease resistance.

b. FY 1987-88

11) Release of red mottled, multiple disease resistant breeding

Lines and ~varieties, Seed of the varieties will be multiplied by -tle Seed De-

partnlent of the Secretaria de Estado de Agricultura. The breed~ing lines will

be available for use by the varietal development program at San Juan de la

Maguana. The value of these varieties will be determined by their performance

on small farnms.

(2) Research will be completed which will study the9 effective-

neas of different sources of disease resistance when tested under varying man-

agement systems. This research should help determine how these sources of re-

sistance can be most effectively utilized by small farmers. Results from this

research will be published in scientific journals.

(3) The acceptance of a group of promising beam lines by a

group of small farmers will be studied. Farms which grew the lines will be

visited by during the following year. The degree of utilization of these

Lines during the second year will be measured. The information concerning

the preferences of the small farmer will be used by the breeding program

when establishing criteria for selection.

(4) An active varietal development program will be estabi-

lished at the Arroyo Loro Experiment Station. Support in screening of

populations for disease resistance will come fran researchers based at

San CristibalZ, The varietal development program will be evaluated on its

capacity to generate populations with disease resistance and the ability













to develop genotypes from these populations which are superior to the stand-

ard bean varieties.

c. Project linkages

(1) Host Country

The project has and will continue to cooperate with the

Agricultural Extension Service (AES) in the Dominican Republic. Their col-

laboration has been of particular value in conducting the trials on small

farms. The AES also will be helpful during FY 1986 when seed will be dis-

tributed to cooperating farmers. As new bean varieties are released, the

project also will need to work closely with tbe Seed Production Unit of the

Secretarla de Estado de Agricultura.

(2) Other developing countries

The University of Puerto Rico has a similar project in

Honduras which is funded by the Bean/Cowpea CRSP. This arrangement results

in the efficient use of project resources since Honduras and the Dominican

Republic share many of the same bean disease problems. Project personnel

from Honduras, the Dominican Republic and the University of Puerto Rico will

participate in the farming system workshop.

The project will continue to cooperate with the CIAT

bean research program. Data from the International Cooperative Disease

Nurseries will be collected following CIAT guidelines in order to permit

the comparison of the results from other countries. Adaptation nurseries

from CTZAT will be conducted and visits to the Dominican Republic will be

coordinated.

Efforts also will be made to exchange information

and germplasm with bean researchers in Haiti.












(3) U.S. Institutions

The project will continue to cooperate closely with the

University of Nebraska Bean/Cowpea CRSP project in the Dominican Republic.

Researchers from both projects will meet at least once a year in order to

plan research activities. The result will be a more efficient use of funds.

Cooperative rust nurseries will be conducted in Puerto Rico.

Results from the Bean/Cowpea CRSP projects in Brasil

and Tanzanila will be of use to the project in the Dominican Republic since

both deal with, bean diseases, When it is deemed appropriate, the project

will use lines identified by the Bean/Cowpea CRSP project in Brasil to have

high. levels of Biological Nitrogen Fixation (IBNF) as parents in the local

varietal development program. In addition, the most promising high BNF

lines will be screened in the Dominican Republic for adaptation and disease

resistance, The project will cooperate with another University of Puerto

Rice project in the Dominican Republic by providing some logistical support.

The principal objective of this research will be to study bean variety x

Phizobium interactions.

d, Mechanisms for evaluating project impact

Results from the survey to be conducted on small farms dur-

ing FY 1987 should provide one of the best measures of the impact of the

newly released, multiple disease resistant varieties on small farmers and

their families. An indirect and less precise method of determining the

impact of the project would be to measure the percentage of the bean crop

planted to the new varieties and estimating average seed yields. Given the

long term nature of varietal development programs, it is expected that much

or most of the impact of the project will be realized after FY 1988.
























5,000

26,088

8,918

68,583

203,463


23,644

24,031

12,340

86,400

356,164

32,385


28,000

71,364

24,395

191,620

584,975


10,000

21,560

7,370

59,239

181,259


131,464 200,253

331,717

35 576 37 920


135,895 203,463

339,358

39 090 41 760


388,549 584,975

973,524

107 121 112 704


121,190 181,259

302,449

32 455 33 024


1. PERSONNEL

2. EQUIPMENT AND
FACILITIES

3. TRAVEL AND PER DIEM

4. MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES

5. OTHER DIRECT COSTS

6. TOTAL DIRECT COSTS

7. INDIRECT COSTS

8. TOTAL DIRECT AND
INDIRECT COSTS

9. TOTAL REQUEST

10. CONTRIBUTION


BEAN/COWPEA CRSP

FY 86-88 ESTIMATED BUDGET REQUEST


Total Three-Year
Budge~tt- Rqcarct:
US HC

$209,749 $269,596


Estimated Budget
Request
F"Y 88
US HC

$76,676 $94,874


Estimated Budget
Request
F"Y 86
US HC

$63,368 $83,090


Estimated Budget
Request
F'Y 87
US HC

$69,705 $91,632


7,500

7,260

3,850

29,400

111,378

9,812


7,875

7,986

4,043

31,100

120,709

10,755


13,000

23,716

8,107

63,798

200,253


8,269

8,785

4,447

25,900

124,077

11,818

















Objectively Verifiable
Narrative Summary Indicators Means of Verification Important Assumptions


Program or Sector Goal: Measures of Goal Achievement (A-3) Assumptions for achiev-
The broader objective (A-2) ing goal targets
to which this project
contribues: (A-1) A measure of improvement of Compare the performance Small farmers continue
yield stability and yield and disease resistance to grow dry beans in the
To make multiple dis- level of MDR varieties over of MDR varieties de- Dominican Republic
ease resistant (MDS) traditional varieties veloped by the program
lines capable of pro- with traditional bean The National Seed Pro-
ducing increased and/ A measure of acceptance of varieties gram will increase seed
or more stable yields MDR varieties by small far- of the new varieties
available to small mers Determine the quantity
farmers of MDR seed planted by The Extension Service
small farmers and the will promote the MDR
production levels they varieties and small
obtain farmers will plant
these varieties


Dominican Republic/UPR Bean/Cowpea CRSP Project


LOGICAL FRAMEWORK MATRIX

(December 1984)


Conditions that will in-
dicate purpose has been
achieved and of project
status (B-2)

- Incorporation of MDR into
red mottled bean varieties
which lead to increased and/
or more stable yields of
beans


(B-3)

- Multiple disease re-
sistance will be ve-
rified by performance
of advanced bean lines
in trials conducted on
small farms and experi-
ment stations.


- Assumptions for achiev-
ing purpose (B-4)

- Sources of resistance
utilized remains effec-
tive when tested on
local strains or races
of pathogens


Project purpose (BT)

-Reduce losses due to
diseases by incorpora-
ting multiple disease
resistance (181R) into
a seed type acceptable
to the Dominican con-
sumer.







-i~:1 T-~L~L~-r--c--;;.-.ir=r;-_ -----?----=~f;?==2I:---i


Objectively Verifiable
Indicatoars


Important Annaumptol-na


- A bonuII dlNJInou Unfron#tly
identified as a minor pro-
blum dlocll not uln~rltar a a
mnajor problems

- The bean research program
in the Dominican Republic
has low turnover of per-
sonnel and that the Secre-
taria de Estado de Agri-
cultura continues to
support bean research


MeanR of Verification


ity of research pro-
dluoudr by thelr Domnitcan
been research program
will provide the best
measure of its capabi-
lities


pub~ili~tiou of the
anInlltlcan~l Ian1 monlarCh

and informally training
and collaborative re-
search


- 18#tab~li mnt~ul. of a viab)le
boon rouuarch programs in

capale~tr ofi developilng
MDR bean varieties


Assumptions for achieving
output (C-4)

- Screening techniques are
effective in the identi-
fication of sources of
resisutanic t~o theu im-
portant bean diseases

- Reasonably heritable
sources of resistance
can be identified for
the important bean dis-
eases

- Breeding methods are
appropriate to incorpo-
rate these resistances
into local seed types


Project Outputs (C-1)


-Identification of stable
sources of resistance to
the major diseases af-
factingc bea~in production
in the Dominican Re-
public

- Incorporation of sources
of disease resistance in-
to productive bean geno-
types with seed types
acceptable to the
Dominican consumer

- Provide seed of the MDR
varieties to the National
Seed Program for multi-
plication and distribu-
tion to small farmers


Magnitude of Outputs (C-2)

- Development of varieties
with improved levels of
resistance to one or more
diseases resulting in in-
croased and/or mnore statble
bean yields

- Seed of the MDR varieties
will be multiplied and made
available to the national
seed program

- Populations will be de-
veloped with enhanced
levels of MDR

- The quality and quantity
of bean research in the
Dominican Republic will
be increased


(C-3)

- Sources of disease re-
sistance will be
screened at several lo-
cations in the Dominican
Republic

- The value of the MDR po-
pulations will be mea-
sured by the number of
breeding lines and va-
rieties developed from
these populations

- The performance of ad-
vanced MDR lines will
be tested on small
farms and experiment
stations





Objectively Verifiable
Indicators


Narrative Summary


Means of Verification


Important Assumptions


- The national seed program
is capable of increasing
seed of promising MDR va-
rieties and making the
seed available to small
farmers

- The Extension Service
effectively promotes
use of the MDR varie-
ties


- The research capacity
of the Dominican bean
research program can
be verified from the
publication of theses,
the publication of
scientific articles,
and presentations
made at scientific
meetings

- A survey will be con-
ducted to measure the
acceptability of the
MDR varieties by small
farmers


- Strengthened research ca-
pability of the Dominican
bean research program


Indicators (D-2)

- Examination of annual re-
ports to determine per-
formance of personnel and
to evaluate facility and
resource needs of the
project

- Budget atuned to project
need approved

- Required equipment pur-
chased


Means of verification
(D-3)

- Annual reports

- Publication of theses,
scientific articles,
and presentations at
scientific meeting


Assumptions (D-4)

- Financial support from
SAID, UPR, and the HC
remains the same

- Involvement of personnel
at all levels listed in
D-1 will be continued

- Facilities mentioned in
D-1 will remain to be
available


Inputs (D-1)


University of Puerto
Ri co/US DA-ARS

- Principal investigator

- Four co-investigators

- One technician


- Laborers


- Adequate facilities for
personnel to conduct re-
search program in plant
breeding and pathology















Indicators (D-2)


Means of verification
(D-3)


Assumptions (D-4)


Departamento de In-
vestigaciones Agrope-
cuoriau S!cretaria de
Estado de Agricultura


- Trip reports


- Co-Principal Investigator

- Three Co-Investigators

- Three Technicians

- Laborers

- Adequate facilities for
personnel to conduct a
research program in
plant breeding and
pathology

- Cooperation from the
Extension Service

- Cooperation from the
National Seed Program

- Cooperation from small
farmers in the Dominican
Repub lic


- Quarterly activity re-
ports


- Fiscal reports

















NAME/PERSONAL; DATA:

DATE & PLACE OF BIRTH:


CURRICULUM VITAE


James Scott Beaver

September 25, 1950


U.S. Citizen


CIVIL STATUS:


Married


CURRENT ADDRESS:




BUSINESS ADDRESS:


TARS
P. O. Box 70
Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00709

Dept. of Agronomy and Soils
College of Agricultural Sciences
University of Puerto Rico
Mayaguez, Puerto Rico OO708


EDUCATION:


1975-1980 M.S. and Ph.D in Plant Breeding and Genetics
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois

1968-1972 B.S. with honors in Agronomy
Purdue University
West Lafayette, Indiana

1968 Hamilton Southeastern High School
Noblesville, Indiana

1956-1967 Fishers High School
Fishers, Indiana


WORK EXPERIENCE:


July, 1984 to Present:






May, 1981 to July 1984:


Associate Professor/Associate Investigator
Faculty of Agriculture and Agricultural
Experiment Station
University of Puerto Rico-RUM
Mayagues, Puerto Rico 00708

Assistant Professor/Assistant Investigator
Faculty of Agriculture and Agricultural
Experiment Station
University of Puerto Rico-RUM
Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00708













CURRICULUM VITAE:


James Scott Beaver


WORK EXPERIENCE (cont'd):

May, 1980 to May, 1981:


Research Associate
Dept. of Agronomy
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois


1975-1980


Graduate Research and Teaching Assistant
Dept. of Agronomy
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois

Peace Corps Volunteer in Matto Grosso,
Brasil working as an Agricultural
Extension Agent


1972-1974


PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES:


American Society of Agronomy
Crop Science Society of America
American Phytopathological Society
Caribbean Food Crops Society
Sociedad Puertorrique~a de Ciencias Agricolas (SOPCA)


COURSES, LECTURES, SEMINARS:

AGRO 4026 (Crop Ecology) 1982, 1984
CFIT 4003 (Plant Breeding) 1983
AGRO 6600 (Ady. Biometry) 1982 (lab), 1983, 1984
AGEQ 6695 (Special Problem) 1983

Invited paper entitled "Breeding disease resistant beans for the
Caribbean" at the 1984 annual meeting of the Caribbean Food Crop
Society, October, 1984, St. Croix, U.S.V.I.

Presented paper entitled "Yield stability of dry bean genotypes
in the Dominican Republic" at the 1983 annual meeting of the
American Society of Agronomy, August, 1983 Washington, D.C.

Invited lecture entitled "The use of statistics in bean research"
at the Dominican Republic Bean Research Workshop, October, 1983.
San Crfstibal, D.R.

Participant in the informal training of Title XII Bean/Cowpea
CRSP research personnel from the Dominican Republic and Honduras.
February, 1983.












CURRICULUM VITAE James Scott Beaver


THESIS COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN:

Manuel Mateo de Jesis Solano
Lucas Ra~mlrez


THESIS COMIMITTEEDS MEMBER:

Carmen Santiago, M.S. in Agronomy 1983
Brunilda Luciano Lugo, M.S. in Agronomy 1983
C~sar Cardona Agronomy
Luis Olivera Horticulture
Angel Bosque Agronomy
Aixa Rivera Animal Science
Froilan Avila Horticulture
Yovanni VeliJzquez Agronomy
Raquel Robledo Agronomy
H~ector Saneaux Crop Protection
Winston Martinez Agronomy


PROFESSIONAL COMMITTEES:

Member of Women in Agriculture Committee of the American Society
of Agronomy beginning in 1985.

Member of Technical Consittee of the Title XII Bean/Cowpea CRSP
3984-1985

Alternate Member of the Technical Comrmittee of the Title XII
Bean/Cowpea CRSP 1982-1983

Member of Southern Region Committee SRDC 82-07 "Role of Legume
Cover Crops in Conservation Tillage Production Systems"

Interdepartnantal Biometry Committee

Agronomy Department Graduate Admission Committee


PROFESSIONAL CONSULTING:

Advise graduate students, staff, and faculty on experimental
design and use of statistical software packages.


OFFICIAL TRIPS:

Caribbean Food Crop Society Annual Meeting,
St, C3roix, UJ.S.V.I., October, 1984












CURRICULUM VITAE James Scott Beaver


OFFICIAL TRIPS (cont'd):

Honduras, Research related to the Title XII Bean/Cowpea
CRSP. December, 1983; April, 1984; July, 1984; November, 1984

Dominican Republic. Research related to the Title XII
Bean/Cowpea CRSP. November, 1981; January, 1982; June,
1982; November, 1982; January, 1983; March, 1983; October,
1983; December, 1983; February, 1984; June, 1984

American Society of Agronomy Annual Meetings
Washington, D. C., August, 1983

Bean Improvement Cooperative Biennial Meetings
Gainesville, Fla., January, 1981 and Minneapolis,
Mn.\, December, 1982

Title XII Bean Research Workshop at CIAT, Cali,
Colombia, November, 1981


RESEARCH ,RESPONSIBILITIES:

Principal Investigator for Project TAD-17 "Improvement of Large
Seeded Dry Beans for the Tropics".

Principal Investigator for Project H-345 "Dry Bean Varietal
Laprovement for Puerto Rico"'.

Principal Investigator for Project Z-20 "Dry Bean Breeding
Winter Nursery".

Principal Investigator for Projects C488 and C489 "Improvement
of Bean Production in the Dominican Republic and Honduras
through Breeding for Multiple Disease Resistance in Preferred
Standard Cultivars".


PUBLICATIONS:

1, Schiller, C. T., J. S. Beaver, and J. B. Sinclair. 1978. The effect of
planting date and row spacing on soybean seed quality. Phytopathology
News 12(8):91,

2. Beaver, J. S. and R. R. Johnson. 1981. Cultural practices for short
statured soybeans. Illinois Research 23(1):6-7.

3. Beaver, J. S. and R. L. Nelson. 1981. Effect of grafting date and
maturity of the stock on the flowering behavior of soybean scions.
Soybean Genetics Newsletter 8:37-40.




















CURRICULUM VITAE James Scott Beaver


PUBLICATIONS (cont'd)

4. Beaver, J. S. and R. R. Johnson. 1981. Yield stability of determinate
and indeterminate soybeans adapted to the Northern United States. Crop
Science 21:449-453.

5. Beaver, J. S. and R. R. Johnson. 1981. Response of determinate and in-
determinate soybeans to varying cultural practices in the Northern U.S.
Agron. J. 73:833-837.

6. Beaber, J. S. and R. L. Cooper. 1982. Dry matter accumulation patterns
and seed yield components of two indeterminate soybean cultivars. Agron.
J. 74:380-383.

7. Beaver, J. S., C. Paniagua, D. Coyne, and G. Freytag. 1983. Yield stabil-
ity of dry bean genotypes in the Dominican Republic. 1984 Crop Science
(In review).

8. Badi.:llo-Feliciano, J., I. Reyes Soto, J. S. Beaver. 1984. A comparison
of yields of common beans at physiological and harvest maturity. J.
Agric. of UPR (In Press).

9. Zimmerman, R. H., G. I. Garris, and J. S. Beaver. 1984. Potential of
Stylosanthes spp. as a component in an integrated pest management
approach to tick control. Preventative Veterinary Medicine 2:579-588.

10, Beaver, J. S., J. Badillo-Feliciano, and I. Reyes Soto. 1984. Perfor-
mance of dry beans when grown on the coastal plains of Puerto Rico. J.
Agrilc. of UPR (In Press).

33. Beaver, J. S., R. L. Cooper, R. Martin. 1984. Dry matter accumulation
patterns and seed yield components of determinate and indeterminate
soybean genotypes. Agron. J. (In review).

12. Beaver, J. S., C, V. Paniagua, J. R. Steadman and R. Echivez-Badel. 1984.
Reaction of dry bean genotypes to natural infection of foliar diseases
when grown in the Dominican Republic. J. Agric. of UPR (In review).

















































TITULOS PROFESIONALES:

Pre-Universitarios


Universitarios


CURRICULUM VITAE


DATOS PERSONALES:


Freddy Issu Fortune Saladin Garcia

Calle 12 esq. Lic. Virgilio Diaz
Ordoiiez, Ensanche Geraldino-Santo
Daningo, RepGblica Dominicana


NOMBRE:


DIRECTION:


TELEFONO :


565-3071

Casado


ESTADO CIVIL:


108106, Serie 1


CEDULA :


LUGAR DE NACIMIENTO:

FECHA DE NACIMIENTO:

EDAD:

NUMERO REGISTRO ELECTORAL:


Santiago de los Caballeros

28 de febrero de 1943

41

497433


ESTUDIOS REALIZADOS:


A nivel de bachillerato:

A nivel Universitario


: Colegio de La Salle, Santo Domingo

: Universidad Autinoma de Santo Domingo


: Bachiller en Ciencias Fisicas y Natu-
rales A~io 1960

: Ingeniero Agrinomo Menci6n Magna
Cud Laude A~io 1969


Otros:


1, Diploma de asistencia a cursor sobre Economia Agropecuaria
realizado por UASD-ONU con una duraci~n de dos meses y
dictedo por el Profesor Tachini 1969.

2. Adiestramiento en servicio an Fitopatolog.Ea por espacio
de dos aiios como Asistente Profesor de los Dres. Alberto
MzatiTa, de la Universidad de Torino-Italia y RaCl Moreno,
de la Universidad Autinoma de Santo Domingo, 1970-1971.

3. Diploma sobre cursor de Leguminosas de Grano con Bnfasis
en Frijol, auspiciado por el IICA-Secretaria de Agricul-
tura y dictado por el Dr. Antonio Pinchinal 1972.











Freddy Issu Fortune Saladicn Garcia


CURRICULUM VITAE


TITULOS PROFESIONALES-(cont'd):

4. Certificado de Asistencia a Seminario-Taller sobre comuni-
caciones y Redaccidn T~cnica-SEA-IICA-1981.

PROYECTOS REALIZADOS:

A nivel de Planeaci6n

1. Programaci~n de los Proyectos de Investigacidn en legumino-
sas de Grano y Mus~ceas para el Proyecto de Investigaci~n-
PIDAGRO del Subprograma de Tecnificaci~n Agropecuaria SEA-
1971-1973.
2. Program de Producci~n de Semillas de Habichuelas Secretarla
de Estado de Agricultura SEA-1973.
3. Program para la Producci~n de 01eaginosas en el pals- Se-
cretaria de Estado de Agricultura-SEA- 973.
4. Investigaci~n de Adaptaci~n en el pafs-Programa para Peque-
Hio Agricultor, PPA-II, SEA-1977.
5. Proyecto de Investigacidn-PIDAGRO III, SEA-1978.
6. Program de Producci~n de Semillas de Hatbichuelas, Grupo
Interdisciplinario de Habichuelas, SEA-1 78-1979.
7. Plan Nacional de Investigaci~n, Extensi64 y Capacitacidn
Agropecuaria-PLANTE, SEA-1978.
8. Reprogramacidn de la Actividad "Multiplicaci~n y Distribu-
ci~n de Semillas/plantas "-Programa para el Pequeiio Agricul-
tor, PPA-II-SEA, 1978-'1980.
9. Program Nacional de Fomento de Leguminosas Alimenticias
SEA-Depto. de Producci6n-1979.
10. Plan de Rehabilitaci~n de la Produccign de Leguminosas
Alimenticias-SEA-1979.
11. Proyecto sobre Produccidn de leguminosas, con fondos PL-
480-SEA-Depto. de Produccidn-1980-1981.

A nivel de Ejecuci~n:

1. Program de Investigaci~n de Lequminosas de Grano y Musiceas,
Divisi6n correspondiente del Departamento de Investigacibn
Agropecuaria-CNTA, SEA-1 970-19 74.

Asesor en los Siguientes Proyectos de Tisis:

1. Situaci~n Fitopatol~gica del Coffea en la Regi~n Sur del
pars, por el Br. Raymundo Hansen del Orge, 1971.
2. Principales enfermedades del cultivo de frijol en la
RepGblica Dominicana, por Br. Luis Belliard Alonso-1971.
3. Contribuci~n al studio de la productividad en los culti-
vares de pl~itanos amarillos y morados, por Br. Pedro L~pez-
1974.












CURRICULUM VITAE Freddy Issu Fortune Sala~i~n Garcia

Asesor en los Siguientes Proyectos de Tisis (cont'd):

4. Ensayo sobre Fertilizaci~n en Cajanus cajans, var. Pinto de
V~illalba y rentabilidad del mismo, por Br. Juan Dlaz G.-1974.
5. Resultadios de la selecci~n individual en la var. criolla de
habichuelas pompadour, por Br. Hugo Miguel de la Rosa-1971.
6. Contribuciin al studio de las enfermedades que afectan al
cultivo de gandul en Repiblica Dominicna, por Br. Rosa Julia
Cedeho-1973.

RELACION DE EMPLEOS:

1. Universidad Aut~noma de Santo Domingo, UASD
a. Mintor de Fitopatologla I-II de la Escuela de Agronomla, Fa-
cultad de Ciencias Agron~micas y'-Veterinarias, 1967-1968.
b. Asistente del Profesor de Fitopatologia I-II, cuyas funciones
comprendian los siquientes puntos: Preparacion de un herbario
fitopatol~gico con fines de utilizaci~n para las pr~cticas a
los estudiantes del 7mo. y 8vo. Semestre de la Escuela Agro-
nimica, 1969-1972.
c. Profesor de Fitopatolog'la I-II. Durante este periodo se
elaborg y fu$ impreso para uso de los estudiantes el materi-
al de referente "Apuntes de Fitopatologia I", November 1972-
Abr. 8 1974.

2. Secretarla de Estado de Agricultura
a. Asistente del Programa Nacional de Habichuelas. Las funcio-
nes de imIplementar. Program de Produccidn de Semillas de
habichuelas para el

b. Encargado de la Divisi~n de Leguminosas de Grano y Musiceas
del Departamento de Investigaciones Agropecuarias, con sede
en el C2TA-San Cristibal, 1972-1974. Responsibilidad sobre
las investigaciones en estos cultivos en los aspects de
mejoramiento y fitote'cnia. Entre otros se se~alan los si-
quientes trabajos realizados.

i. Selecciin y depuracio'n de los diferentes tipos de
habichtuelas en la variedad pompadour.
ii. Intro~duccio'n, seleccidny evaluaci~n de 204 varieda-
des y lineas experimentales de frijol procedentes
de Norte, Centro y Sur Amirica. De todo este ma-
terial se seleccion6 la linea experimental VF-1,
que luego constituyd la variedad Constanza-1.
iii. Prueba de variedades de frijoles negros en cuanto
a ren~dimiento, tolerancia a enfermedades en tres
zonas ecolggicas, seleccion8indose la variedad
Venezuela 44 para la multiplicacibn y distribuci~n
de material mejorado a los productores.
iv. Compar~acidn de tres variedades de gandul en dos











CURRICULUM VITAE


Freddy Issu Fortune Saladin Garcia


RELACION DE EMPLEOS (cont'd):

zonas ecol~gicas, determin~indose la importancia de la
variedad UASD en cuanto a precocidad, rendimiento y
beneficios por unidad de superficie.
v. Niveles de fertilizantes en el cultivo de habichuelas
en dos zonas de producci~n (Constanza y San Cristibal).
vi. Ensayos Regionales con nueve variedades de habichuelas
del tipo Rojo Pinto, seleccibnandose las variedades
Constanza 1 y Pompadour Checa, por su rendimiento.
vii. Estudio sobre densidad de poblacion en habichuelas,
variedad Constanza 1.
viii. Comparacion de los cultivares de plitano morado y ma-
dboembra verde, determinindose la mayor capacidad de
rendimiento del cultivar morado.
ix. Estudio sobre dosis y 4poca de aplicaci~n de namatici-
das granulados (Nemagon) en rendimiento de cultivar
plitano. Maricongo.

NOTA: Todos estos trabajos han sido publicados en la revista del Departa-
mento de Investigaciones Agropecuarias.

Director del Departamento de Investigaciones Agropecuarias:

Responsable de la coordinacion de las actividades de investigaci6n
a nivel national en los diferentes centros, estaciones y campos ex-
perimentales de la Secretaria de Estado de Agricultura, asi como de
la ejecucidn del Proyecto de Investigaci~n-PIDABRO, con el concurso
de la asesorIa del IICA-Instituto Intermaericano de Ciencias Agrico-
las. Agosto 1974-1978.

Fu4 elaborada una propuesta re-estructuraci~n del Departamento, se-
Hal~indose las funciones y responsabilidades de los Centros, Esta-
ciones y Campos experimentales, as como el papel de las Divisiones
T~cnicas de apoyo a las Divisiones por cultivos afines. Igualmente
se elabord un reglamento interno del mismo. Se establecid el Bole-
tin Cuatrimestral del Departamento a partir del Cuatrimestre
Septiembre-Diciembre 1974, en su primer volitmen y continfia su pu-
blicacibn peri~dica constituyendo un gran paso de advance en la di-
vulgaci~n de los trabajos de Investigaci~n Agropecuaria.

Director del Departamento de Semillas
Durante etpeoddetepse1e a cabo la reprogramaci~n y

ejecucidn de la Actividad Multiplicaci6n, Distribucion de Semillas/
plants del Programa para el Peque~io Agricultor PPA-II. Se program
un Proyecto de Semillas para su financiamiento a traves del Banco
Interamericano de Desarrollo-BID.a un costo de $18.0 millones de
pesos. Agosto-Diciembre 1978.












CURRICULUM VITAE Freddy Issu Fortune Saladin Garci~a

Director del Departamento de Semillas (cont'd)

Encargado Programa Nacional de Fomento de Lequminosas Alimen-
ticias, 1979-1982, cuyos objetivos y funciones son:

1. Aumentar la produccion y productividad de 1as lequmi-
nosas alimenticias mediante la asistencia t~cnica in-
tensiva al peque~o y median productor a traves de la
estructuracion de un cuerpo de especialistas t~cnicos
distribuidos en las diferentes Direcciones Regionales.

2. Trazar la political de producci~n de leguminosas alimen-
ticias con miras a satisfacer la demand national y por
consiguiente disminuir las importaciones de leguminosas
y por ende la fuga de divisas.

Subdirector del Departamento de Producci~n -1980-1982:

En adici~n a las actividades del Programa Nacional de Fo-
mento de Leguminosas Alimenticias. Funci6n de programar,
evaluar y controlar las actividades de fomento de la pro-
ducci~n, en los cultivos de cereales (maiz y sorgo) olea-
ginosas (coco, man y soya), hortalizas, races y tub~rculos,
mushceas (plbtano), caucho y cultivos diversos.

Gerente de Operaciones del INESPRE-Agosto 1982-Diciembre

Funciones de dirigir las actividades ticnico-administra-
tivas de los Deptos. de Ingenierla, Industrializaci~n e
Inspecci~n y Normas T~cnicas en cuanto a construcci~n y
mantenimiento de infraestructuras, procesamiento de arroz,
cebolla, papa, frijol negro y el control de las normas de
calidad para la recepci~n de los products agropecuarios
que comercializa la instituci6n y el almacenamiento de los
mismos .

Consultor en M~todos de Obtencion de Semillas de Calidad
para el Departamento de Semillas-Proyecto SEA-BID-PIDAGRO-
Octubre 1983-Julio 1984.

Funciones de Asesorar al personal t~cnico en la metodolo-
gia para la obtencidn de semillas de calidad (Mejoradas
y Certificadas), en los cultivos de habichuela roja y
gandul principalmente ast como el establecimiento de un
Sistema de Muestreo en campo y almacenes para el control
de Calidad.

PUBLICACIONES RE~ALIZADAS:


1. Resultados de los Cruzamientos Comprobatorios (Top










CURRICULUM VITAE


Freddy Issu Fortune Saladin Garcia


PUBLJCACIONES REALIZADAS {cont'd)

Crosses) de algunas lIneas de Zea mays identata-Sturt-
Tesis para optar por el titulo de Ingeniero Agrinomo


2. El cultivo de gandules en la RepGblica Dominicana folle-
to 1973, publicado por el Departamento de Extensio'n-SEA.

3. Perspectivas sobre la producci~n de Leguminosas Alimen-
ticias.en RepGblica Dominicana.

4. Habichuela, Departamento de Extensi~n Agropecuaria -
Subprograma de Tecnificaci~n Agropecuaria-Oficina de
Comunicaciones, Santo Domingo, 24 piginas-1974.

5. Documentos B~sicos sobre Habichuela. Vol. I. Subsecre-
tarla de Estado de Investigaciones, Extensibn y Capaci-
taci~n Agropecuariai San Cristibal, R.D.

6. Gufa T~cnica sobre Producci~n de Habichuela, Departamento
de Producci~n-Programa Nacional de Fomento de Leguminosas
Alimenticias-Santo Domingo, 67 piginas-1982.

7. Delineamientos sobre politica de producci~n de leguminosas
de grano,-15 piginas-1982.

8. Cultivo de Gandul-Gufa-Prictica, 35 piginas-1983 Revista
Agro.

ASISTENCIA A SEMINARIOS Y REUNIONEES:

1973 Seminario Internacional sobre Frijol-Cali-Colombia
1974 Seminario Nacional sobre Extensi~n y Capacitaci~n
Agropecuaria. Santo Domingo-Repiblica Dominicana.
1975 XXIII Reuni~n sobre mejoramiento de Cultivos Ali-
menticios PCCMCA, San Salvador-El Salvador.
1976 Seminario sobre la vinculaci6n del Cr~dito Agri-
cola con la Investigaci~n, Extensi~n y Capacitaci~n
Agropecuaria-INDOTEC, Santo Domingo.
1977 Seminario Taller sobre Leguminosas de Grano-Mayaguez,
Puerto Rico
1978 Reuni~n de las Universidades del Caribe-UNICA,
Willeamstaad-Curacao.
1980 XXV Reuni~n Anual del PCCMCA, Honduras-Tegucigalpa .
1981 Seminario sobre Politicas Agropecuarias para la
Producci~n-SEA-CIMMYT-ISA.
1981 XXII Reunidn Anual Caribbean Foods Crops Society,
Caracas-Venezuela.
1983 Seminario sobre Fortalecimiento y Politicas de
Semillas en Repiiblica Dominicana-SEA-ISA-BID.







50

CURRICULUM VI~TAE Freddy Issu Fortune Saladicn Garcla

ASOCIACIONES Y COLEGIACIONES A QUE PERTENECE:

Asociacii~n de Profesionales Agricolas-ANPA

Colegio Dominicano de Ingenieros y Arquitectos-CODIA
Colegiatura 1923.











*290 DB A t wacr BUPRAION LCONQAL


Santo Daningor D.W.,r
O 0 0 1 6 9 1 do novsarbre, 1984


Dra. Pat Barness Moonnell
Baua/Compen CRPI Managemen~t Office
200 Center Por Internaeann Programs
Eas Iv (a.wy 8 4824


gstimada ra. Barnessa

Cortleente1 y atediadno a so comanicasrida de tec~ha 20/9/84, tenemros a
bles3 cmanicarle neestra POsICidS ai sorel parBzoga~ de FT-86-88 del Pro
yesto Bean/Cowpea y de mantener omeo Investigador Pincipal (PI) ean nue
two petsl a. zag. Apan.~~Q Przddy salaata carcts, cure curriclum vta e, an* r
xae djusto a esta coamnicciacie

Desass~ de la bi1ustm resmide inte~cir-intitacioal' trre dr ean Santo Domin
go on junto de 1984 entre las Universidades de Nebraska y Puero Ric o an
esta seeo~tttttttttttttttttarto d EstIad de AgrimituraI estamOs Fixmermen convesncidae
de la oaliosa contriwiusd on l o~ralcimsiento intfstitaionl del Progra
ma Nacrionalr de Ivestiga~cidr a n Engeminosa per parte del CI1SP-Babichtil
Campea per le qru el Departamento de Investigaocines Agropeanarias-DIA
apraeba la extensida de este prayed~o para el triento 1986-88.

Whaltment qnueremo ratificar meeatra dispostaide de aporpar deade el ppnto
de vista t~nico-uadministrative lo* trabajoe a realisarse came6 cntinuacidan
de 1as actividadee queI s an v8 enide reUIaliano a la techa y at propio tiesp
po manifestadea nauetro nreco~nocideto per la valiosa colaboracida recibida
de rsted ean l ejeousid de este iampo~rta preyetoal.


neantmenta1,


Dirc~trc Depuartmeto ns



cos rp- Dr. Jae Beve ?


Dr. Jlams Stedman W-in O
Anesos COpia de la Autoarisacion del Secretario do astade de Agricultura.












REPUBLICAN DOMINICANA



"ARO DE LA SUPERACION NACIONAZL"


Santo Domingo,. D. N.



Al ': Ing. Agrbn. Leovigildo Bello,
Subsecretario de Estado de Investigacibn,
Extension y Capacitacion Agropecuarias,
SU DESPACHO

Asunto :Auto izacidn para extension por tres (3)
anos del CRSP-Proyecto Titulo XII-Bean/
Cow~p a entire la SEAI y las Universidades
de Nebraska y Puerto Rico.

Anlexo :Su oficio No.32988, de fecha 19 de octubre
del aii0 en cursor, y anexo.


DEVUELTO, cortismente, con 14 autorizacibn de este
Despacho, para que el Departamento de Investigaclones Agropecuarias rea
lice las diligencias necesarias ante la Dra, Pat Barnes 3It Connell, Di-
rectora del CRSP-Bean/Cow~pea Management Office del Centro para Programas
Interniacionales de la U~niversidad Estatal de MIichigan, en interns de lo-
.grar la extension del Proyecto Titulo XII, por un period de 3 aiios mits,
a partir del 1986, tomando en consideraci6n la importancia que tienen
las actividades que se realizan a trav~s de dicho Proyecto, para apoyar
1as investicgaciones de leguminosas de grano, especialmente en habichue-
las, en cuanto a resistencia multiple a enfermedades y capacitacidn t~c-
nica en esta Area.


Aby atentamente, 7 1




INGc. AGRON. D~OM\INGO btARTE,
Secretario de Estado de Agricultura


blgr/bhs
cc. Subsecretario de- Investigaci~n
Oficina Cooper~acidn Internatcional












REPUBLICA DOMINICANA



n ., oSanto Domin go, D. N.


Al : Eng. Agr~n. Domingo bWhrte de la Cruz
Secretario de EstadD de Agricultura
SU DESPACHO.

Asunto : Autorizaci6n para extension por tres
(3) ahos del CRSP-Proyecto Titulo XYII-
Bean/Cow\pea entire la SEA y las Univer-
sidades de Nebraska y Puerto Rico.

Anexo : Camuniibaci~n de la Dra. Pat Barnes-
Psk: Conibell Directora del Bean-Cow~pea
CR~SP-Proyecto Titulo XII.


>th( 00RIESNENTE, solicitamojs la autorizaci~n correspon_
diente de ese Sup~erior Despacho, a fin de que el Departame~nto de Inv-estiga
clones Agropecuarias encamine 1as gestiones de lugar con la Dra. Pat Barnes
. Nb Connell Directora del CRSP-Bean/CowpEea Nbnagoement Office del Centro para
Program Internacionales de la Chtiversidad EstataL de Mlidhigan'con el Pro-
p~sito de asegurar la extension del Proyecto Titulo XII por un periodo de
tres (3) aios a partir de 1986.

El Proyecto Titulo INTI que se ejecuta en el pals con
el prop6sito de apoyar las investigaciones en leguminosas de grano y- mry
especialmente en habichuelas en cuanto a resistencia m61tiple a enfermePda-
des y capacitacibn ticuica, mediante aporte econ6mico de la Agencia Inter-
nacional de Desarrollo-AID, a trav~s de las universidades de Puerto Rico y
Nebraska a titulo de donaci~n al pais; por lo que la exitensi~n de dicho
proyecto por el pe~riodo sefialado es de gran imrportmacia t~cuico-econdmica
a las actividades de investigaci~n en leum~inosas que 11eva a ca'oo el De-
partamento de Investigoaciones Agoropecuairias a nivel nacianal y en la capa
citaci~n t~cnica del personal de contraparte nacianal.

blky atentamente,


ING. A.GI 7O
Subsecreta '- de. Es nigaciones ,

LB Extension-bi it4 1cln Agropecuarias.

crist