North Florida FSR/E program

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Material Information

Title:
North Florida FSR/E program description of projects, 198182
Alternate title:
North Florida Farming Systems Research and Extension Program, description of projects, 1981/82
Physical Description:
5, 3 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Agricultural extension work -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre:
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
"August 17, 1981."
General Note:
Typescript.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 646069273
ocn646069273
Classification:
lcc - S544.3.F6 N67 1981
System ID:
AA00007215:00001

Full Text
















NORTH FLORIDA FSR/E PROGRAM

DESCRIPTION OF PROJECTS

1981/82


August 17, 1981









CONTENTS


I. Socio-economic studies

A. Sondeo
B. General information transfer
C. Enterprise records
D. Ad-valorum taxes
E. Marketing

II. Cropping studies

A. Modular intercropping systems
B. Machinery
C. Irrigation
D. Nutrient recycling
E. On-farm trials

III. Livestock studies

A. Cattle systems
1. Alternate forage systems
B. Swine systems
1. Corn processing
2. Alternate feed sources
3. Nutrition studies

TABLES

1. Project allocation of general 000 items
2. Project allocation of FTE contributions
3. Priority of graduate assistantships by department









NORTH FLORIDA FSR/E PROGRAM

DESCRIPTION OF PROJECTS

1981/82


I. Socio-Economic Studies

A. Sondeo

The Sondeo was initiated in June and only four weeks is budgeted

in the 1981/82 budget year. The sondeo is the non-statistical, qualitative

survey of the farmers in the area and serves as the initial basis for pro-

blem definition and orientation of other research. Field work for the Sondeo

is completed and the report is being written.

B. General information transfer

This is a continuing activity and involves a constant interaction

with area farmers, primarily by the anthropologist, but with active partici-

pation of all the member of the inter-disciplinary team. Information flow

is both to and from the farmers.

Information transfer studies will include comparison of black and

white kin and social networks and information transfer mechanisms in order

to more completely identify resources and constraints found in the various

farmer groups, The kinds of differences in capital and labor constraints

between black and white farmers, for example, may require somewhat different

approaches. Under this project, characteristics of small farmers in other

North Florida counties will also be studied to determine homogeneity with

the target area (Suwannee and Columbia counties) farmers. As we approach

the stage of technology transfer, an even more intimate understanding of

the socio-economic complexes at work will be critical.


17 Aug, 1981








C. Enterprise records

Cooperating farmers will be asked to keep recores on enterprises

of specific interest to the pro-ram. These budgets will be used as a basis

of comparison for analyzing new technology as it is being tested and will

also provide basic information for general budgeting purposes. A graduate

assistant will have primary responsibility for initiating this project.

D. Ad-valorum taxes

A study will be initiated to determine the effect of ad-valorum

taxes on the small farms in the study area. Specifically the effects of

greenbelt assessment on decline of small farm numbers will be studied.

E. Marketing

Studies of marketing alternatives available to area farmers, par-

ticularly in conjunction with modular vegetable production systems, will

provide a guide for further directions of research.


II. Cropping Studies

A. Modular intercropping system

A modular system designed around 42 inch rows and small one or two

row tractors will be studied utilizing intercropping to increase efficiency of

fertilizer use, decrease the use of pesticides, intensify farming operation

and spread risk. Specific vegetable crops and crop mixes will require minimal

capital investment and assume adequate labor availability. Effects of inter-

cropping and reduced use of pesticides upon nematodes and other pests will
be monitored.

B. Machinery

Simple and inexpensive equipment will be designed around a 20 hp

tractor which is similar to many used by small farmers in the area. The


17 Aug, 1981









equipment will be designed for the modular system, but will be flexible so

it can be adapted to conventional systems should that prove more appropriate.

Interest in low cost, reduced tillage agriculture suitable for

smaller equipment with parts readily available on farms was evidenced very

strongly in Suwannee county and this will be included in the study.

C. Irrigation

Low cost, small scale irrigation systems will be studied as one

means of increasing the intensity of operations on small farms and reducing

risk. Low cost, low input irrigation systems for high income crops, in con-

junction with alternate fuel sources, will be investigated.

D. Nutrient recycling

This project will be conducted both on the campus and at Live Oak

ARC with graduate students and in cooperation with several departments. It

is a continuationof a general exploratory study with perennial peanut (Arachis

91aborata), initiated in late 1980 but will shift emphasis to study nitrogen
effects of the living mulch on intercrop mixes.

E. On-farm trials

At least 10 on-farm trials are planned for the year. Most of these

will be in the specific study area, but some may be on farms in surrounding

counties to obtain broader regional response information. The nature of the

trials remains to be determined, but may include some of the following:

1) Sorghum and pigeon pea as a means of penetrating compaction

layers of soil,

2) Establishment of perennial peanut or intercropping inpreviously

established stands,

3) Variety trials under specific small farm conditions. For

example, corn has traditionally been a cash crop in the sample area. Inter-


17 Aug, 1981








views have indicated a need for testing of corn varieties under non-irrigated,

low input, local conditions.

4) Soil type and farming systems

For the farming systems chosen for study, the soils will be classi-

fied to determine any specific relationships which may exist. If small farms

predominately are found on poorer soils or on any specific types of soils,

this will facilitate crop and livestock research efforts. Soil types versus

farming systems studies will provide a valuable tool for future recommenda-

tions. A preliminary study is nearing completion.


III. Livestock Studies

A. Cattle system

1) Alternate forage systems

Examination of alternative forage systems to include: alfalfa,

perennial peanut, leucaena, and others. These systems would incorporate

adaptable Tow cost, energy efficient concepts.

B. Swine system

1) Corn processing

The hog-corn association is of great importance in the region.

One major constraint found has been the need for the farmer to utilize off-

farm facilities for drying, sotting, grinding and mixing the corn for feed.

The resulting negative cash-flows involved have drastically reduced the pro-

fit margin for corn production. Investigation of on-farm drying, storage,

grinding and mixing facilities, using low capital alternate and appropriate

technology will be included in this study.

2) Alternate feed sources

Possible alternate crops which could be integrated into present

systems are sorghum, wheat, soybeans, and others.


17 Aug, 1981









3) Nutrition studies

Nutrition studies studies in conjunction with the Swine Unit at

Live Oak Research Center. Specifically studied will be the feasibility of

feeding mixes such as pigeon pea and grain sorghum to swine.














Socio-Economic Studies


Cropping Studies


Livestock Studies

Cattle Swine


General 000


Project Allocation of General 000 Items for Fiscal year 1981-82


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CP3 Backpack sprayer
Soil Penetrometer
Rototiller implement
Tensiometer (20)
Scale (2)
Sickle bar plot mower
Sprayer
Chopper
Tool box, pick up (4)
Well drilling equipment
Pump, irrigation
Portable generator
Refrigerator
Projector
Typewriter
File cabinet
Light table
Desk & Chair
Camera & Lenses
pH meter
Vacuum pump
Tool set
Li-cor leaf area meter &
portable area meter
Disk
Sweeps, rotovators
Drill (used)
Trailer


X
X
X
X
X X
X
X
X
X X


X
X
X
X
X X
X
X
X X
X X


X X X X X X X
GENERAL EQUIPMENT IN SUPPORT OF ALL PROJECTS


"I "
"I "
II I
"I I


X X X
XX X X
X X X
XXX X





























Agricultural Engineering 0.3 1 X X* X X X X

Agronomy 0.4 2 X X X X X X X X

Animal Science 0.3 1 X X X. X X X X

Dairy Science 0.3 1 X X X X

Food & Resource Economics 0.4 2 X X X X X

Live Oak ARC (J. Rich) 0.3 1 X X X X X

'Live Oak ARC (C. White) 0.3 1 X X X

Soil Science 0.5 2 X X X X X

Vegetable Crops 0.3 1 X X X X X X

Other (Social Science)


+Indicates priority research areas for graduate student thesis or dissectation projects.

17 Aug., 1981


Project Allocation of FTE Contributions by Appropriate Departments for Fiscal Year 1981-82


Socio-Economic Studies


Cropping Studies


Livestock Studies


Cattle Swine


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Department






Priority of Graduate Assistantships, by Department


1. Soils Department

2. Animal Science

3. Agricultural Engineering

4. Agronomy

5. Vegetable Crops

6. FRE

7. Ag. Extension Education

8. Soils

9. Agronomy

10. FRE





Priority list was determined by viewing project a eas in light of the collective

expertise presently sequestered within the FSR/E t am.


17 Aug T W1







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