Broadcasters letter - 1996

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Title:
Broadcasters letter - 1996
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Office of Communications
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, DC
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

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Subjects / Keywords:
Radio in agriculture -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Television in agriculture -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Broadcasting -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
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serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Office of Communications.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Letter no. 2670 (July 15, 1994)-
General Note:
Title from caption.
Citation/Reference:
Picklist A21_34B

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001950703
oclc - 31030522
notis - AKC7245
lccn - sn 94028429
sobekcm - AA00007144_00003
System ID:
AA00007144:00003

Related Items

Preceded by:
Farm broadcasters letter

Full Text





United States Department of Agriculture- f of CommunicaN tjn & a ton, DC 20250-1300
N" L ibrarry
Letter No. 2747 FE 1 S S MAR 0 11996 January 5, 1996

USDA, HHS RELEASE T i E'RY G DELINES tfnTlWsf~ctrfplggernment released
(January 2) its new e uidel s or Americans," providing easily understood,
science-based informational can choose diets that promote good health. At a
joint news conference, Agricultu Dan Glickman and HHS Secretary Donna E. Shalala
presented the fourth edition of "Nutrition and Your Health: Dietary Guidelines for Americans." The
two Secretaries said the new Guidelines are more user-friendly, more specific inciting good food
sources for specific nutrients, and based on the strongest scientific evidence yet concerning diet
and health. The new Dietary Guidelines put increased emphasis on physical activity, calling for
30 minutes or more of moderate physical activity on most (preferably all) days of the week.
Contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.

FINAL '96 UPLAND COTTON ARP -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman announced (December
29) that the acreage reduction percentage factor for the 1996 acreage reduction program (ARP)
for upland cotton will be zero percent. This is a reduction from the preliminary level announced
on November 3. Since that time, estimates of 1995 production have declined by 5 percent.
Further, acreage estimated to be planted to cotton in 1996 also has been reduced, as there are
indications cotton producers may switch to crops such as grains and soybeans for more favorable
returns. The zero percent level most closely conforms with the applicable statutory requirement
regarding the maintenance of the desirable 1996-97 end-of-year stock level. Contact: Bruce
Merkle (202) 720-8206.

WHEAT, BARLEY AND OATS PRODUCERS TO RECEIVE $72 MILLION -- Grant Buntrock,
USDA's Executive Vice President of the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), announced
(January 2) that wheat, barley, and oats producers who used the 0/85 and 0/92 provisions of the
1995 price support and acreage reduction program (ARP) will receive approximately $72 million
in additional deficiency payments. Participants in the 1995 wheat, barley, and oats program who
used the provisions are guaranteed minimum payment rates of 70 cents per bushel, 40 cents per
bushel, and 20 cents per bushel for wheat, barley and oats, respectively. These amounts were
the projected deficiency payment rates for these crops when producers signed up for the program.
Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

REGULATORY REFORMS TO IMPROVE MEAT AND POULTRY SAFETY -- U.S. Department
of Agriculture's acting Under Secretary for Food Safety Michael R. Taylor announced (January
3) that the regulatory reform actions are part of USDA's strategy to improve food safety. Adopting
modem regulatory tools and streamlining or eliminating old rules and requirements will enhance
the safety of meat and poultry products. The changes are part of USDA's comprehensive overhaul
of the nation's meat and poultry inspection program. The reforms are intended to support the new
food safety measures USDA plans to adopt for all federally inspected meat and poultry plants.
Contact: Hedy Ohringer (202) 720-9113.








SUPPORT PURCHASE PRICES FOR MILK AND MILK PRODUCTS ANNOUNCED -- The U.S.
Department of Agriculture's Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) announced (December 29) that,
since the adjusted estimate of surplus dairy products to be removed from the commercial market
during calendar year 1996 is below 3.5 billion pounds (milk equivalent, total milk solids basis), the
support price for milk will be increased by twenty-five cents per hundredweight (cwt.) to $10.35
per cwt. effective January 1, 1996. This announced price is for milk with the U.S. annual average
milkfat content of 3.67 percent. The equivalent support price for milk with milkfat content of 3.5
percent is $10.25. CCC-owned dairy products will continue to be available for purchase for
unrestricted use at prices which are about 10 percent over the prevailing CCC price support
purchase price. Currently, only nonfat dry milk is available. Further terms and conditions for CCC
purchases of dairy products will be contained in subsequent CCC announcements. Contact:
Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206..

'96 CROP SOYBEAN PLANTING PERMITTED ON OFA -- Deputy Secretary of Agriculture
Richard Rominger announced (December 27) that soybeans may be planted in 1996 on optional
flexible acreage (OFA) as provided by subsection (b) of Section 504 of the Agricultural Act of
1949, as amended. The 1949 Act prohibits the planting of soybeans on optional flexible acreage
if, on January 1, 1996, the estimated price of 1996-crop soybeans is less than 105 percent of the
loan rate, or $5.17 per bushel. Since soybean prices are projected to be greater than $5.17,
soybeans may be planted on OFA. Producers may plant designated crops on up to 25 percent
of an upland cotton acreage base enrolled in the upland cotton production adjustment programs
and the crops planted can be credited as "considered planted" to upland cotton. Twenty-five
percent of a crop acreage base is referred to as "flexible acres," with the first 15 percent called
"normal flexible acreage" and the other 10 percent called "optional flexible acreage." Contact:
Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

PEANUT PRODUCERS APPROVE POUNDAGE QUOTAS -- Preliminary results of a referendum
held December 11-14 show that peanut producers have approved poundage quotas for the 1996
and 1997 crops, according to Grant Buntrock, Administrator of the U.S. Department of
Agriculture's Farm Service Agency. Of 9,287 votes cast, 9,004, or 97 percent, were in favor of
quotas for the next two crop years, Buntrock said. Two-thirds of the voting producers must favor
continuing poundage quotas in order for quotas to be in effect. In a 1990 referendum, 98.2
percent of voting producers favored quotas. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

FOOD COMPANY OFFICIALS SENTENCED -- Agriculture Inspector General Roger C. Viadero
announced (December 27) that two former officials of a food manufacturing and processing plant
have been sentenced after pleading guilty to defrauding USDA's National School Lunch Program
of approximately $1.4 million by diverting donated commodities and supplying substandard meat
products. On December 19, Roger Peters, former president of Kold Kist Brands, Inc., of
Commerce, Calif., was sentenced to 27 months in prison and five years' probation, and ordered
to pay $10,000 in restitution for six counts of conspiring to defraud USDA, defrauding USDA, and
bank fraud. Dahl Casey, Kold Kist's former vice president of manufacturing, was sentenced to 12
months and one day in prison and three years' probation, and ordered to pay $2,000 in restitution
for five counts of conspiracy and defrauding USDA. The defendants fraudulently obtained a
school lunch contract by submitting, for analysis and inspection, burritos that were significantly
superior to the products they later supplied under the contract. Contact: Dallas Hayden (202)
720-6701. EDITED BY LESLIE PARKER








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 2014 -- Tight world grain supply is putting pressure on world grain prices
and could prevent poorer nations from buying grain. What are world exporters doing to help those
third world nations? Brenda Curtis interviews the Administrator of USDA's Foreign Agricultural
Service about the world grain trade situation. (Weekly cassette -- five minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1493 -- Diet and exercise a must. New meat safety plan just about ready.
Low-tech energy saver. The consequences of living paycheck to paycheck. Don't bring back a
hitchhiker. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE # 2006 -- U.S. farm exports continue an upward trend. Europe's export tariff on wheat.
Dairy outlook. Changes in cotton ARP. USDA raises milk support price for 1996. (Weekly
cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tuesday, January 16, weekly weather and crop
outlook. Tuesday, January 23, weekly weather and crop report, livestock, dairy and poultry
outlook and U.S. agriculture trade update. The week of January 23, 1996, Brenda Curtis will be
traveling to the Mississippi Delta with officials from the National Resource Conservation Service
to visit wetland areas and produce daily radio reports on conservation problems and
accomplishments.
These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries many stories
every day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES: Lynn Wyvill reports on an Urban Resources Partnership gardening project in
Seattle, Washington. The Urban Resources Partnership is active in eight cities across the
country. It brings agencies of the federal government, including USDA's Natural Resources
Conservation Service, together with local leadership to make urban environments better places
to live. The Seattle garden project is helping build community spirit among a diverse group of
neighbors while protecting the urban environment.

ACTUALITIES: Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman and Health and Human Services Secretary
Donna Shalala release the Federal government's new "Dietary Guidelines for Americans." The
guidelines provide easily understood, science-based information on how Americans can choose
diets that promote good health. Scenes and excerpts are from January 2 news conference.

SATELLITE COORDINATES: Thursdays, 3:45-4:00 p.m. ET on Telstar 402R, Transponder 13
(Vertical), Downlink Frequency 3960 MHz (89 degrees West), Audio, 6.2/6.8.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.






4 II/
OFF MIKE 31

MATURE FOCUS...is the name of a regular radio feature carried by 553 stations nationwide. Jim
Harriott is the host of this program produced by the American Association of Retired People
(AARP). Jim reports that he regularly uses excerpts of our "Agriculture USA" and "Consumer
Time" features and our daily Radio Newsline. "Mature Focus" is a Monday through Friday
program, and there is a 5-minute weekend version, too.

WATCHING GRAIN PRICES CLIMB...is a favorite pastime for listeners of Neal Anderson
(WLLR-FM, Davenport, IA). Neal says farmers wish that new crop prices could match current
levels. Cattle and hog farmers are envious of grain farmers for prices they are receiving. This
good crop year has increased demand for new tractors. Neal says that good, clean, used tractors
are selling high, too. An Iowa State University report shows a 6 to 9 percent increase in Iowa
farfiFahid prices over last year.' Neal started his 16th year in farm broadcasting on January 1 (last
six years at WLLR). His other full-time job is farming.

NEW CORN PROCESSING PLANT...is under development with a Spring ground breaking
planned in Glenville, MN, reports Al Carstens (KATE, Albert Lea, MN). This $67 million plant will
produce ethanol and glycerin in this small community of 750. When we called this week, Al was
on the air using a news feature produced by our Brenda Curtis. He says he usually makes daily
use of USDA features. Al begins promotion next month for his annual giveaway to a lucky farmer
all the products needed to grow 40 acres of corn and 40 acres of soybeans. The drawing will be
held on National Agriculture Day, March 20. Local merchants cooperate in providing the fuel,
seed, fertilizer, etc. that will be part of the prize.

PAST PRESIDENT...of the Midlands Chapter of National Agri-Marketing Association (NAMA) Kim
Dlouhy (WOW, Omaha, NE) is busy this week coordinating their regional competition for "Best
of NAA." At the ame time, she continues in her eighth year of farm broadcasting at WOW.

LARRY AQUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use S300










United States Depar e uof "Agr.ctt Office of Commurlotltidnms Sc iWashington, DC 20250-1300
Library


Letter No. 274 MAR 0 7 1996January 12 & 19, 1996

COMBINED IS leBiz a '96 kept us frVflVjiilstfrfsri6irr January 12 issue of
Broadcasters Let are i tdi highlights from that week with this issue. We regret any
inconvenience that ca' our readers.

FAT INTAKE CONTINUES TO DROP -- Americans are eating less fat as a percentage of total
calories, according to a new U.S. Department of Agriculture nationwide food survey. Data from
the first year (1994) of the three-year survey, "What we Eat in America," found that Americans
consumed 33 percent of calories from fat in 1994, continuing a downward trend. In the late 1970's
Americans consumed 40 percent of calories from fat. According to a 1989-1991 survey,
Americans consumed 34 percent of calories from fat. Even with this decrease, two-thirds of adult
Americans still eat more than the 30 percent recommended limit for fat calories. Also, the survey
found that nearly as many Americans are consuming more than the recommended limit for
saturated fat. Survey participants in 1994 reported a total calorie intake about 6 percent higher
than 17 years ago. Thirty percent of the men and 45 percent of the women reported that they
rarely engaged in vigorous exercise. This may help explain why participants reported weights
averaging 11 to 12 pounds heavier. Contact: Judy McBride (301) 344-2861.

GLICKMAN TALKS WITH EU COMMISSIONER FISCHLER -- Agriculture Secretary Dan
Glickman said among the items covered in a January 11 discussion with European Union Farm
Commissioner Franz Fischler were the hormone issue, biotech issues, status of the farm bill and
prospect for European enlargement into Eastern Europe. On the hormone ban, Commissioner
Fischler outlined the current status of the problem in Europe and indicated that the report of
scientific conference held late last year was now completed. Fischler was not able to indicate that
steps would be taken to resolve the problem to U.S. satisfaction in the near term. Secretary
Glickman said, "The evidence is overwhelming that proper use of these hormones poses no
danger to human health, and the World Trade Organization (WTO) Sanitary and Phytosanitary
Agreement ensures that the principles of sound science must prevail in matters such as this."
Secretary Glickman said he will recommend that the United States initiate WTO dispute
settlement proceedings against the EU ban. Glickman added that the U.S. will continue to pursue
efforts with the EU to find a bilateral solution. Contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.

USDA EXTENDS DEADLINE FOR MARKET PROMOTION The U.S. Department of Agriculture
extended its deadline for applications for participation in the Market Promotion Program (MPP) to
5:00 p.m. (EST) Monday, January 22, 1996, due to severe weather conditions in the Washington,
DC metropolitan area and closure of the federal government last week. Applications may be
hand-delivered to USDA, FAS Marketing Operations Staff, Room 4932-S, 14th and Independence
Ave., S.W., Washington, DC 20250-1042, or mailed to USDA, FAS Marketing Operations Staff,
Ag Box 1042, Washington, DC 20250-1042. For additional information on the program, call (202)
720-5521. Contact: Donald Washington (202) 720-3101.







CARLIN SWORN IN AS ASSISTANT SECRETARY-- J. David Carlin was sworn in as assistant
secretary for congressional relations by Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman. Carlin will be
responsible for planning, formulating, directing, and coordinating legislative affairs and
intergovernmental relations for USDA. Before joining USDA, Carlin was an attorney with the law
firm of Akin, Gump, Strauss, Hauer & Feld, L.L.P. where he concentrated on public law and policy
since 1988. He is a member of the District of Columbia and Missouri bars. Carlin is a co-founder
of Project Northstar, a tutorial program begun in 1988 for homeless children in Washington, D.C.
A native of Smolan, Kansas, Carlin holds a J.D. degree from Harvard Law School. He received
his B.A. degree from Kansas State University. Contact: Martha Cashion (202) 720-3310.

ROBINSON NAMED CSREES ADMINISTRATOR -- Bob H. Robinson has been named the
administrator of the USDA's Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service
(CSREES). As administrator of CSREES, Robinson will oversee the agency formed by the merger
of the Cooperative State Research Service and the Cooperative Extension Service during USDA's
reorganization. Its primary responsibility is to provide leadership to the land-grant university
system and its partners in research, higher education, and extension. Robinson comes from
USDA's Economic Research Service (ERS) where he served as director of the Natural Resources
and Environment Division since October 1994. He was director of ERS' Agricultural and Trade
Analysis Division from 1990-94. Robinson was ERS' associate administrator from 1986-90. He
started his career with ERS in 1965 as an economist. Robinson served on the faculty of Clemson
University from 1972 through 1986. Born in Madison County, N.C., Robinson earned a B.S.
degree in agricultural science from Berea College in Kentucky, a Master of Science degree in
economics from North Carolina State University, and a Ph.D. degree in agricultural economics
from Clemson University. Contact: Maria Bynum (202) 720-5192.

QUOTA INCREASED FOR RAW-CANE SUGAR -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman
announced (January 17) that the fiscal year 1996 tariff-rate quota (TRQ) for raw-cane sugar has
been increased by 400,000 metric tons (440,924 short tons). The fiscal year 1996 TRQ level is
set at 1,817,195 metric tons (2,003,114 short tons). Country allocations of the increased TRQ will
be announced by the U.S. Trade Representative. USDA will continue monitoring import
requirements and will adjust the TRQ accordingly. Final TRQ adjustments will be made on the
basis of the most reliable supply and use information available. Any future TRQ adjustments
would likely occur in the first and second quarters of calendar year 1996, when the USDA supply
and use estimates provide a reliable barometer of import needs. The Department also will
continue to monitor possible supplying-country shortfalls. Contact: Glenn Kaup (202) 720-3329.

INTERIM RULES FOR NATIONAL APPEALS DIVISION ISSUED -- Agriculture Secretary Dan
Glickman announced (January 11) the interim final rules for the National Appeals Division of the
U.S. Department of Agriculture. The Secretary said, "By publishing interim final rules, we
establish a process for current operations while leaving the rulemaking door open. We needed
to get procedures in place to serve our customers, but we recognized the need to evaluate how
the rules work in practice and to receive comments on agency rules for informal appeals." The
interim rules incorporate comments and recommendations from the 46 public responses to the
proposed rules published May 22, 1995. They also include changes to internal agency rules for
optional and required informal appeals in agencies whose adverse decisions are now subject to
review by the National Appeals Division. Contact: Martha Cashion (202) 720-3010.
EDITED BY LESLIE PARKER







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 2016 -- For one reason or another, more people are turning to home-
based businesses. In this edition, Brenda Curtis talks to an expert about the ups and downs of
home-based businesses. (Weekly cassette -- five minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1495 Americans are eating less fat, but consuming more calories. Grocery
shopping at home. Teenage pregnancy and nutrition. Updating food safety rules. Helping people
in transition. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE # 2008 -- U.S. to forward beef hormone issue to World Trade Organization. Wheat
outlook. Higher corn prices. A tight, strong soybean market. Tobacco-good times for awhile.
(Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tuesday, January 30, weekly weather and crop
outlook. Wednesday, January 31, agricultural prices, dairy world markets and trade, tobacco
world markets and trade. Thursday, February 1, catfish production and world horticultural trade.
NOTE: Brenda Curtis will be covering a special Wetlands tour of the Mississippi Delta with
Natural Resource Conservation Service Chief Paul Johnson January 23-25. Curtis will provide
special coverage to the USDA Radio newsline as well as upcoming features on the radio cassette
service. These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries many
stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE


FEATURES: Lynn Wyvill reports onf research at USDA's Agricultural Research Service in
Beltsville, MD to preserve and study snowflakes. The close examination of snowflakes using a
scanning electron microscope could hold the key to more accurately predicting western water
supplies that are important for agriculture and other uses.

ACTUALITIES: USDA World Board Chairman Gerald Bange comments on USDA analysts'
January crop production, use and stock estimates for wheat, corn, soybeans, rice and cotton.
Wheat, corn, rice and soybean price estimates are up from a month ago.

SATELLITE COORDINATES: Thursdays, 3:45-4:00 p.m. ET on Telstar 402R, Transponder 13
(Vertical), Downlink Frequency 3960 MHz (89 degrees West), Audio, 6.2/6.8.


Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
4 u~y1 11|1ill11
OFF MIKE 31262081359399

BLIZZARD OF '96...will live long in our memory after the more than 30-inch snowfall in the
Washington area is melted and gone. We were only able to work Thursday last week during a
lull between storms. We regret inconveniences that many of you experienced in not being able
to access our radio and television programs or to receive this letter. We were able to operate the
radio newsline on January 11, but shipment of our weekly radio cassette service was delayed
until early this week. Our satellite TV news package was prepared and ready, but the teleport
confused the master tapes and replayed last week's features. We have tried hard to recover
quickly and restore services that so many of you have called about.

THIS LETTER...was not printed last week, but we did prepare a shortened alternative which was
made available via AgNewsFax arid Internet that included our weekly listing of radio and TV news
features. We continue to hear from our readers responding to our circulation survey. Because
of the weather delay, we will postpone the paring of our subscriber list until the delayed mail
arrives, and we can process the responses. Several respondents have asked if we could
distribute Broadcasters Letter by automatic e-mail. That's a good suggestion, and we are
planning to establish such a system.

20,000 CALLS...were made to our radio newsline during the past calendar year (actually 20,111).
This is an increase of about 3,500 calls over last year's total. We offered a grand total of 2,053
news stories 1,805 included actualities and 248 did not. Last year, we offered 1,903 stories on
the daily newsline. We appreciate broadcasters' regular use of this service. The 24-hour dial-up
service is available by calling (202) 488-8358. Comrex encoded number is (202) 720-2545. Last
year, we also produced 52 Agriculture USA documentaries and 520 features in our Agritape
and Consumer Time seri.



LARRY A. UINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300









United States Department of Agriculture Office of Communications Washington, DC 20250-1300
APR 0 11996

Letter No. 2749 University of Florida January 26, 1996

GLICKMAN MEETS WITH CONGRESSIONAL LEADERSHIP -- The goal of a January 23
meeting with Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman and congressional leaders was to bring the
key players together to express the growing concern over congressional inaction on farm bill
legislation. The Secretary of the U.S. Department of Agriculture is not required by law to
implement the 1949 Agriculture Adjustment Act in the absence of new farm legislation. Agriculture
Secretary Dan Glickman said, "I firmly believe that if we work together in a bipartisan fashion, we
can get a farm bill and end the uncertainty for U.S. producers. Only through honest dialogue,
consensus and compromise can we reach a point where we can get some movement." In the
meeting, Glickman repeated that any farm bill must preserve an adequate saf t meet
investment needs in rural America and permit farmers greater flexibility to p
rather than government farm programs. Without new farm legislation, Se lickm a
he will announce terms of the rice program under the existing authority by B iYary 15. Cont
Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.

JOINT COMMUNIQUE ISSUED FROM MEXICO CITY TALKS -- Agr secretary D
Glickman and Secretary of Agriculture, Livestock and Rural Developme o exico Franc
Labastida Ochoa released a joint communique on the conclusions from their s.4
City, January 15-16, 1996. Discussions between the two Secretaries contrib rch
for solutions to problems between the two countries and to the review of areas of cooperation,
which is of mutual interest and benefit to both countries. It was agreed that commercial matters
should be handled in the spirit of NAFTA, in a positive manner. At the conclusion of the meeting
between the two delegations, a Memorandum of Understanding was signed between the Mexican
National Livestock Council of Mexico and the National Cattlemen's Association of the United
States, witnessed by the two Secretaries of Agriculture. Contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-
4623.

U.S.-CANADA JOINT COMMISSION ISSUES FINAL REPORT-- Agriculture Secretary Dan
Glickman announced (January 22) the availability of the "Final Report of the United States -
Canada Joint Commission on Grains." This report was prepared in accordance with the
Commission's mandate when it was created in September 1994. The Commission issued a
preliminary report in June 1995. Secretary Dan Glickman said, "On behalf of Ambassador Kantor
and myself, I would like to thank the Commission members from both countries for their hard work
on these issues. Their report will be very helpful as the two governments attempt to resolve grain
marketing issues that led to the formation of the Commission." Issued in two volumes, the report
is available from USDA's FAS Publications Office, Room 5555-S, 14th and Independence Avenue,
Washington, DC, 20250. Copies may be requested by calling this office at (202) 720-7938.
Contact: Wayne Baggett (202) 720-2032.








JENSON SELECTED AS NEW JUDICIAL OFFICER William Jenson was selected as the new
judicial officer for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, effective January 21, 1996. By law, the
judicial officer is the final deciding officer in adjudicatory proceedings conducted under numerous
USDA programs. Jenson has been with USDA's Office of General Counsel since 1976, currently
serving as senior counsel to provide legal services to three regulatory agencies within USDA.
Jenson is vice chairman of the American Bar Association's section on administrative law and
regulatory practice for agriculture. In addition, he teaches administrative law and other courses
in the paralegal program of USDA's Graduate School. Jenson was born in Hartford, Connecticut,
and received a B.A degree from Hobart College in Geneva, N.Y. After graduation, Jenson served
in the United States Army in Vietnam. Following his military service he received a J.D. degree
from Suffolk University Law School. He is a member of the Massachusetts Bar Association.
Contact: Martha Cashion (202) 720-3310.

SOYBEAN ENZYME REPLACING FORMALDEHYDE -- An enzyme from soybean hull is now
replacing formaldehyde in adhesives, abrasives, protective coatings and other products. In the
early 1980's, U.S. Department of Agriculture research scientists were the first to purify the enzyme,
a soybean perokidase, and scrutinize its properties. That work led to five industry patents. The
enzyme assists the reactivity of oxygen and peroxides with many compounds. Its marketed uses
range from medical diagnostic tests to removal of chlorine-containing pollutants from high-
temperature industrial wastewater. Soybean peroxidase is more easily isolated than peroxidase
from horseradish, now a major source. Contact: David J. Sessa (309) 681-6351.

A KIT TO DETECT MEDICINE -- Under a cooperative research and development agreement
(CRADA), the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Neogen Corporation of Lansing, Michigan are
developing a commercial kit to detect the presence of a medication, called salinomycin, in poultry
feed and broiler chicken meat. Salinomycin is added to broiler feed to protect the birds from
coccidiosis. Caused by a protozoan, the disease costs U.S. poultry producers about $450 million
a year in drugs and production losses. The kit will use monoclonal antibodies to check whether
salinomycin has been properly mixed with feeds and whether residues linger in tissues of
slaughtered chickens. Salinomycin is not a synthetic chemical, but it is prepared from
fermentations of natural microorganisms. Contact: Larry Stanker (409) 260-9306.

SPECIAL UPLAND COTTON QUOTA#1 RELEASED -- High cotton prices have triggered
another special import quota that will permit the importation of a quantity of upland cotton equal
to one week's domestic mill use, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced (January 18). The
special import quota that will permit the importation of 43,657,604 kilograms (96,248,619 pounds)
of upland cotton was established on January 24. Quota Number 1 was announced on April 6,
1995, ended on October 8, 1995, and was based on domestic mill consumption for the period
December 1994 through February 1995. Quota Number 1 closes on July 21, 1996, and the
amount is based on consumption for a more recent 3-month period. If another quota triggers
January 29, it will be designated as Quota Number 2 and any that follow will be numbered
sequentially. This announced quota applies to upland cotton purchased not later than April 22,
1996, and entered into the U.S. not later than July 21, 1996. The special import quota identifies
a quantity of imports that is not subject to the over-quota tariff rate of a tariff-rate quota. Contact:
Janise Zygmont (202) 720-8841.
EDITED BY LESLIE PARKER






FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #2017 With crop supplies already tight and prices high, experts say 1996
crop production will be critical for both farmers and consumers. Gary Crawford talks with some
of those experts in this edition of Agriculture USA. (Weekly cassette -- five minute
documentary).

CONSUMER TIME #1496 -- U.S. experts helping Central America save its environment.
Youngsters get close encounter with farming. A unique financial program for women. Food prices
in '96-no cause for alarm. Smart grocery shopping. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE #2009 -- Tough issues discussed in Mexican meeting. U.S. farm trade trends still
looking good. It's "cost and returns" survey time for farmers. Higher crop prices-how will farmers
respond? Milk output less than expected. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wednesday, January 31, agricultural prices and
tobacco exports. Thursday, February 1, we expect to be talking with Agriculture Secretary Dan
Glickman from China and will have news items from that event. Also that day, consumer food
price index, catfish production and horticultural exports. Tuesday, February 6, crop/weather
update. Thursday, February 8, cotton situation and citrus production. Friday, February 9, U.S.
crop production, world agricultural supply and demand and world cotton situation. NOTE: On
Friday, February 9, we will change the newsline twice to incorporate release of morning production
reports. New material will be added at 10:30 a.m. EST and then also at the usual 5:00 p.m. EST.
These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries many stories
every day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES: Exclusive interview with Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman as he talks about
progress in Farm Bill talks with Congress, the possible impact of implementing the 1949
Agricultural Adjustment Act and about his upcoming trade mission to Asia. Newsfeed includes
footage of Glickman and Congressional agriculture leaders after their Capitol Hill meeting on
January 23. Patrick O'Leary reports on a new solution to soil erosion on row crop farms. A
polymer known as "PAM," (short for Polyacrylomide) which can dramatically reduce soil erosion
when added to irrigation water applied to furrows. The polymer treatment is part of a successful
program being administered by USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service. The story
focuses on results in the West Stanislaus County, California watershed (2:09 minutes).
ACTUALITIES: Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman talks about progress in Farm Bill talks with
Congress.
SATELLITE COORDINATES: Thursdays, 3:45-4:00 p.m. ET on Telstar 402R, Transponder 13
(Vertical), Downlink Frequency 3960 MHz (89 degrees West), Audio, 6.2/6.8.
Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

S1111262 08135 934 0
OFF MIKE12

NEW PRESIDENT...of the National Press Club in Washington is agricultural communicator Sonja
Hillgren, Editor, Farm Journal magazine. Master of Ceremonies for the January 20 inaugural
evening was Orion Samuelson (WGN, Chicago, IL) with storytelling entertainment (Cecil and
Leonard stories) provided by Ray Wilkinson, retired farm broadcaster from Raleigh, NC.
Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman made a special presentation to Sonja, and she was
sworn-in by Gus Schumacher, Administrator of USDA's Foreign Agricultural Service. Other
speakers were Senator Larry Pressler of Sonja's home state of South Dakota and
Congressman Pat Roberts of Kansas, who is Chairman of the House Agriculture Committee.
All took the opportunity to make a strong pitch for agriculture.

OPENING BELL...for the new milk futures contract at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange was rung
recently by Orion Samuelson. His colleague, Max Armstrong (WGN, Chicago, IL), says "that
is a rather nice honor. They usually select politicians!" Max and I corresponded by E-mail while
I was snowbound in northern Virginia.

NEW APPOINTMENTS...at AgriAmerica Network (Indianapolis, IN) include Darrin Johnston,
moving up to Farm Director after having served as Assistant Farm Director for the past four years,
Heidi Burnworth, Director of Data Services, and Karl Locascio, Senior Account Executive.
Network General Manager Gary Truitt said that Darrin, in his new position, will share all editorial
and program responsibilities with him, increasing his travel and broadcasting schedule.
AgriAmerica Network provides farm programming to 70 radio stations in Indiana, Illinois and Ohio.

ON THE MOVE...from Iowa to Indiana is Kevin Morse (WOC, Davenport, IA) who becomes the
new farm director at WOWO (Fort Wayne, IN) on February 12. Kevin spent nearly three years
-as WOC's farm director after having served as radio program director at WGEN (Geneseo, IL).


LARRY .I QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300









United States Department of Agriculture Office of Comruications *i Washington, DC 20250-1300
rson Science
Library
Letter No. 2750 APR 01 199E February 2, 1996

GLICKMAN RETURNS EARLY FROM ASIA -- Agricitr. cptgipan Glickman cut short his
Asian trade trip this week to return and work closely with the members of Congress in an effort to
adopt a new Farm Bill. And after months of debate, it appears these efforts are now bearing fruit.
This week, Congress is expected to bring bipartisan Farm Bill legislation to the floor. Secretary
Glickman explained, "Because of the critical nature of this business, it is with deep regret that I
must shorten my trip to Asia and return to Washington, D.C. after I complete my discussions in
Beijing with my Chinese counterparts. I want to state clearly, that I plan to make myself and my
staff available to assist Congress as they work in a bipartisan manner to craft this important
legislation and give U.S. farmers the information they need as they enter the planting season."
Contact: Jim Petterson (202) 720-4623.

USDA OFFERS "EARLY-OUT" FOR CRP -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman announced
(January 25) an 'early-out' option for some producers with acreage enrolled in the Conservation
Reserve Program (CRP). Acreage released under 'early-out' will have crop acreage bases,
allotments and quotas restored for the 1996 crop year. Secretary Glickman said, "This early out
option is important for several reasons. First, producers should have the opportunity to take
advantage of the high market prices by planting more of their land. Second, the offer is consistent
with USDA's responsibility of ensuring a grain supply that meets market demand ng
an 'early out' for productive, less erodible land is consistent with the
environmentally sound, cost-effective CRP." This early-out' option appli to those
contracts scheduled to expire on September 30, 1996. Eligible land must ha erodibility inde
of 15 or less. Contact: Wayne Baggett (202) 720-2032. r

FOOD STAMP PARTICIPATION DECLINES -- Agriculture Secretary Dan man announce
(January 25) that participation figures for November 1995 show 25.9 million p ere receii
food stamps, down from 26.9 million people in November 1994. Glickman cre d
economy for the decline in participation. Contact: Alicia Bambara (703) 305-2

PL 480 COUNTRY ALLOCATIONS REVISED FOR FY '96 The U.S. Department of Agriculture
(January 30) issued second quarter revised fiscal year 1996 allocations under Title I of the Food
for Peace Program (P.L. 480) and the Food for Progress Program funded by Title I appropriations.
According to Christopher E. Goldthwait, general sales manager for USDA's Foreign Agricultural
Service, Title I funds totaling $210 million have betn signed with 19 countries under P.L. 480 Title
I and Food for Progress agreements. In October, allocations totaling $30 million were also
announced for Angola, Croatia, Moldova, and Poland. Because USDA's authority for entering into
P.L. 480 agreements expired at the end of calendar year 1995, these agreements cannot be
signed until Congress acts to provide new legislative authority. Contact: Glenn Kaup (202) 720-
3329.








GLICKMAN COMMENTS ON THE U.S. REQUEST FOR CONSULTATIONS -- U.S. Trade
Representative Mickey Kantor's action to request consultations under Article XXII of the World
Trade Organization against the European Union's Hormone Ban underscores the U.S.
government's determination to end this long-standing unfair trade practice and restore access for
U.S. meat exporters to this important market. Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman said, "I view
this action with frustration, resignation and resolve. Frustration because the evidence is
overwhelming that proper use of these hormones poses no danger to human health. Resignation
because the United States can wait no longer in hope that the EU will willingly follow the principles
of sound science as outlined in the WTO Sanitary and Phytosanitary Agreement and allow the use
of these hormones. Resolve because the U.S. position is the right one. It has been proven
scientifically over and over again." Glickman concluded by saying that the U.S. meat producers
and exporters should be assured that our government will not allow bad science to be used as a
non-tariff barrier. Contact: Jim Petterson (202) 720-4623.

WHEAT RELEASED FROM FOOD SECURITY WHEAT RESERVE -- President Clinton
authorized Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman to release up to 1.5 million metric tons of wheat
(January 23) as needed over time from the Food Security Wheat Reserve for emergency
humanitarian food assistance program. The wheat can be used by the USDA to provide food
assistance to developing countries during fiscal year 1996 under the Agricultural Trade
Development and Assistance Act of 1954, otherwise known as Public Law 480. Secretary
Glickman said, 'The release from the wheat reserve will allow the USDA and the Agency for
International Development (AID) to meet our anticipated food aid and shipping requirements. This
action allows the U.S. Government to honor its commitment of providing humanitarian aid to
developing countries." For fiscal year 1996, 300,000 metric tons of wheat are available from
commercial supplies for programming under P.L. 480 operations. Because of this limited
availability; it was necessary to access the wheat reserve. Contact: Glenn Kaup (202) 720-
3329.

SPECIAL UPLAND COTTON QUOTA #2 RELEASED -- High cotton prices have triggered
another special import quota that will permit the importation of a quantity of upland cotton equal
to one week's domestic mill use, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced (January 25). The
special import quota that will permit the importation of 43,242,096 kilograms (95,332,580 pounds)
of upland cotton was established on January 31. The quota applies to upland cotton purchased
not later than April 29, 1996, and entered into the U.S. not later than July 28, 1996. The special
import quota identifies a quantity of imports that is not subject to the over-quota tariff rate of a
tariff-rate quota. Future quotas will be established if price conditions warrant. Contact: Janise
Zygmont (202) 720-8841.

FAX -- You can obtain our radio and TV programming information and the Broadcasters Letter
through your facsimile machine by calling USDA's AgNewsFax. Use the telephone connected
to your FAX machine to call (202) 690-3944. At voice prompts press 1, press 4, then to receive
Broadcasters Letter, press 9200; radio newsline information, press 9250; TV contents billboard,
press 9260; TV scripts, press 9270. After all your selections, then press #, press 3, and press the
start button on your FAX machine.


EDITED BY LESLIE PARKER







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 2018 -- In this edition, you will hear more ways to take off weight wisely.
The experts say the key is simple "Diet and Exercise." (Weekly cassette -- five minute
documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1497 -- No proven benefits from Beta Carotene supplements. Cooking
healthy. Bringing back the wetlands to-the Mississippi Delta. Products from sheep abound.
Weight off wisely. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE # 2010 -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman returns from China trip. CRP early out.
Cotton demand strong despite high prices. The new cattle report. U.S. pork exports continue to
rise. Pork production costs rising. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thursday, February 8, crop production
(cotton/citrus). Friday, February 9, full crop production report, cotton markets and trade, world
agricultural supply and demand, cotton and wool outlook. Monday, February 12, world agricultural
production, grain markets and trade, world oilseeds markets and trade, feed outlook, rice outlook,
oil crops outlook, cattle and sheep outlook. Tuesday, February 13, farm labor report and weekly
weather and crop report. These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline
carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE


FEATURES: Lynn Wyvill reports on a community garden in Seattle, Washington which is one
example of the Urban Resources Partnership in action. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's
Natural Resources Conservation Service is one of several federal agencies working with local
communities in eight cities to protect and improve natural resources in the urban environment.

ACTUALITIES: USDA Farm Service Agency Administrator Grant Buntrock comments on the
"early-out" for Conservation Reserve Program acreage and USDA meteorologist Bob Stefanski
describes weather's impact on the winter wheat crop and the improving situation in California.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FIR TV NEWS FEEDS: Thursday from 3:45 to 4:00 p.m. ET,
Telstar 402R (located at 89 degrees West), Transponder 13, Vertical Polarity, Downlink
Frequency 3960 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.







4
OFF MIKE

WELCOME VISITOR... last week was Karl S. Gutknecht, Director of Public Affairs for the
Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection. Karl is the newly elected
president of the National Association of Government Communicators (NAGC) for 1996. A
Wisconsin native, he holds an advanced journalism degree from University of Wisconsin and
began his government communications career as an Army combat correspondent in Vietnam.
"The information revolution is having a tremendous impact on the way government serves its
customers, on how information is delivered and received, and on how the public relates to
government services," Karl says. "Government communicators are challenged as never before
to effectively use cyberspace technologies."

IT'S DRY...in the High Plains of the Texas Panhandle, reports Bob Givens (KGNC, Amarillo, TX).
They have received less than a half inch of moisture since October, only .07 inches in January.
As storms passed that area this week, they were hopeful of boosting their moisture records. Our
thanks to Bob's colleague, Larry DeSha, who alerted us to a quality problem on one of our daily
radio newsline machines. It happened to be on the first machine in the rotation so stations who
called at less busy times constantly heard tapes from that machine. We have removed that
machine from our newsline service so stations should experience more consistent quality now.

1996 AGRICULTURE FACT BOOK...is off the press and like earlier editions, this 244-page book
offers basic facts about U.S. agriculture and rural America. It also describes programs in USDA's
seven major mission areas. The fact book is available for $9.50 from the Superintendent of
Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. (Phone: 202-512-1800).
Members of the National Association of Farm Broadcasters will be receiving copies of this book
soon. Other readers of this letter can obtain a single free copy by contacting my office.



LARRY A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300









United States Department of Agriculture Office of Commu y *u Washington, DC 20250-1300

Letter No. 2751 PR 011996 February 9, 1996

GLICKMAN COMMENDS SENATE APPROVAL OF I~RMi'b ll iF r Bill legislation, S.1541,
was approved by the U.S. Senate (February 7). Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman said, "Senate
approval of the 1995 Farm Bill legislation is a step in the right direction even though it doesn't
address all of my concerns." Glickman remains concerned that the bill will continue to provide
payments when market conditions are good and that it does not provide as strong a safety net for
family farmers as he would like. However, Glickman notes that the amendments adopted to the
base bill are significant improvements and a good place to begin negotiations as the bill goes to
conference. Glickman stressed certain priorities that he felt must be met in the Farm Bill
legislation: an adequate safety net for producers, meeting investment needs in rural America and
permitting farmers greater flexibility to plant for the market rather than the gove
provision of the bill that he has supported consistently. Glickman credits the Senat 1-
research, trade, rural development and credit titles in the bill, that are Il to the
competitiveness of U.S. agriculture in the international marketplace. Contact-t m Amontree
(202) 720-4623. 1 o,

U.S. AND MEXICO TO CONTINUE CONSULTATION PROCESS Secretary Agriculture Dan
Glickman announced (February 5) that representatives from the U.S. Departm agriculture
and the Mexican Ministry of Agriculture would meet during the week of February to
the consultation process regarding tomatoes and to facilitate conversation
representatives of agricultural producer organizations in both countries. This consultative process
was agreed to by Secretary Glickman and Minister of Agriculture Labastida during their meetings
in Mexico City on January 15. Contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.

USDA TARGETS MARKETS UNDER EEP AND DEIP Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman
announced (February 2) a three-month continuation of the interim allocations under the 1995/1996
Export Enhancement Program (EEP) and Dairy Export Incentive Program (DEIP). During the
interim period, procedures for EEP and DEIP are similar to the previous programs. Export sales
will be facilitated through the payment of bonuses by the USDA's Commodity Credit Corporation
(CCC). Sales will be made through normal commercial channels at competitive world prices.
While recent program activity has been limited, USDA will continue to monitor the prices and
actions of our competitors and fully intends to use the EEP and DEIP as appropriate. Contact:
Glenn Kaup (202) 720-3329.

USDA TO HOLD 1996 AG OUTLOOK FORUM USDA's Agriculture Outlook Forum will be held
February 21-22 in Washington, D.C. Leading experts will discuss the farm and commodity outlook
at a time of tight supplies, changing farm policies and new world trade rules. Top farm officials
from several nations will discuss trade strategies and issues. For information on attending the
Forum, call (202) 401-9139. To receive program details by fax, use handset on a fax machine to
call (202)219-0296 or 219-1107 and request document 66666.







BURKE NAMED DEPUTY UNDER SECRETARY -- Brian E. Burke has been appointed deputy
under secretary of agriculture for natural resources and environment. In this role, he will oversee
the programs and activities of USDA's Forest Service. Burke began his work as a senior policy
analyst on the White House Domestic Policy Council (DPC) in July 1993. The DPC advises the
President on a wide range of domestic policy issues. He was one of the primary officials within
the Executive Office of the President responsible for shaping and articulating the Administration's
domestic policy agenda and legislation on the environment, agriculture, natural resources and
energy issues. He is a member of the Bar in the District of Columbia and Massachusetts. A
native of Boston, Burke holds an A.B. degree from Brown University in Providence, RI and a J.D.
degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. Contact: Janet Sledge (202) 720-
2065.

LOWER FAT FRENCH FRIES MADE FROM RICE -- People who love french fries, but need to
cut their fat intake, may soon be saying that the nice fry is the rice fry. U.S. Department of
Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) food technologist Ranjit Kadan said, "This new
french fry has 25 to 50 percent less fat than regular fries. The main ingredient is rice. Since the
process starts with rice flour, it can be fortified with protein and minerals to make an even more
nutritious, wholesome food." Researchers say the fries taste just like rice, so in order to enhance
a mild tapte you can add onions, spices or anything. Kadan says the new product will offer
consumers way to enjoy a snack and still maintain a healthy diet. Contact: Ranjit Kadan (504)
286-4430.

MORE HEART BENEFITS FROM BARLEY Until recently, oats have been mostly for horses and
barley mainly for beer drinkers. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research
Service (ARS) scientists say that's all changing now. These scientists have been among the first
to study and report the cholesterol-lowering effects of barley. ARS chemist Warren Burger and
other researchers at the University of Wisconsin have identified tocotrienol as a natural
component of barley that inhibits the body's production of cholesterol. Tocotrienols are found in
layers of the barley kernel and also in oat bran. Studies done over the past decade by ARS
scientists confirm that these compounds in barley and oats lowered cholesterol in chickens and
pigs. Contact: Y. Victor Wu (309) 685-4011.

FOLLOW-UP TRIP YIELDS POTENTIAL APPLE BONANZA -- Plant explorers who collected
more than 60,000 apple seeds from rare, wild trees in Central Asia last summer say the material
contains a potential genetic bonanza for breeders looking for better flavor, disease resistance, and
other traits. U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service scientist Philip
Forsline said, 'This was the most successful collecting trip we've made to the Kazakhstan region,
based on our field observations of the apples growing in their natural habitat." The follow-up trip
was the third in a series to Central Asia, where the modern domestic apple is thought to have
originated. Contact: Philip Forsline (315) 787-2390.

CCC INTEREST RATE IS 5-118 PERCENT U.S. Department of Agriculture's Commodity Credit
Corporation's (CCC) Executive Vice President Grant Buntrock announced that commodity loans
disbursed in February by USDA's CCC will carry a 5-1/8 percent interest rate. This is down from
January's 5-3/8 percent and reflects the interest rate charged CCC by the -U.S. Treasury.
Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.
EDITED BY LESUE PARKER







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 2019 High grain prices of the 1970's meant plowing every available acre
of land and planting a crop. However, farmers living in the Mississippi Delta are still suffering the
environmental and economic consequences of planting fence row to fence row. In this edition,
Brenda Curtis travels to the Mississippi Delta to get a firsthand look at the consequences of "over
farming." (Weekly cassette -- five minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1498 -- Is smoking on the rise again? Record cold threatens yard/garden
plants. Can you trust the groundhog? Farming on a few acres. More jobs than people. (Weekly
cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE # 2011 The FCRS is "The" farm survey. A low profile tobacco program. How much
production from CAP early out? Canadian/US farm trade troubles. Food wheat security grain to
go for food aid. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE Friday, February 16, poultry outlook, milk production
report and agricultural income and finance. Monday, February 19, Federal Holiday. Tuesday,
February 20, weekly weather and crop and agricultural outlook. Wednesday, February 21,
agricultural exports. NOTE: Wednesday and Thursday, February 21 and 22, are the dates for the
AG OUTLOOK FORUM. USDA RADIO will provide coverage of the forum on the.5:00 p.m. daily
newsline feed. Be sure to call 202-488-8358 for all the latest economic outlook reports. These
are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day
which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES: "U.S. Cattle to Turkey" Thanks to falling European export subsidies and
competitive U.S. prices, new markets are opening up for U.S. cattle exports. A recent sale of 5,700
head of dairy cows to Turkey could be a good sign for U.S. exporters and producers. Pat O'Leary
reports from the Port of Richmond, Virginia.

"(JSDA Supports Livestock Exports" With promising prospects for U.S. cattle exports this year,
producers and exporters are gearing up for the market. Part of that preparation involves working
with USDA experts, on everything from caring for animals to financial arrangements. Pat O'Leary
reports.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS: Thursday, 3:45-4:00 p.m. ET on Telstar
402R, Transponder 13 (Vertical), Downlink Frequency 3960 MHz (89 degrees West), Audio,
6.2/6.8.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


OFF MIKE 3 1262 08135 9241
OFF MIKE

COLD...has been the predominant weather word for many agricultural regions in recent days from
the Midwest to the Deep South. Neal Anderson (WLLR, Davenport, IA) reports that a record low
of -29 degrees was reached last week in Davenport, but thawing temperatures were on the way
this week. Even in the Washington suburbs, temperatures dipped to a record -13 degrees early
this week.

AGRICULTURAL FORUM...for Kansas farmers with Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman as
a keynote speaker is scheduled February 23, reports Rex Childs (KFDI, Wichita, KS). Rex says
his station and the Kansas Farmers Union are sponsors. Western Kansas is experiencing a lot
of wind erosion because of cold weather and little cover. South Central Kansas has had problems
with "blowout" of the young winter wheat crop.

DAIRY HERD...in Wisconsin that was mysteriously losing cows has responded to moving of an
electric transformer December 29, reports Lori Struve (WCUB, Manitowoc, WI). Since then, milk
production is up an average of 7 pounds per cow and only one cow has been lost. Cows are now
drinking water more freely rather than "lapping" it, showing more patience in the milking parlor,
holding their heads up, looking bright-eyed, and resuming chewing their cuds. On request, Lori
can supply a checklist of stray voltage symptoms that 60 area farmers developed. Her phone
number is (414) 683-6800.

DIRECTOR OF RADIO SERVICES...for the North Carolina Farm Bureau is Dave Smith, formerly
with WPTF/WQDR (Raleigh, NC). Dave produces a weekly five-minute program on ag issues
and a daily (five per week) one-minute ag commentary. Also, he is the on-air host of a weekly TV
program. Dave spent more than 20 years in commercial radio, 13 years in Raleigh and the
remainder in northwest Pennsylvania.


LARY A. A INN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300









United States De l ent otAgrjcullture' Office of Cpmmupcations Washington, DC 20250-1300
arson Science
Library
LMAR 14 19
Letter No. 275 R 14 JMAR 2 8 1996 February 16, 1996

STUDY ON M CKER C iC TRACTION RELEASED --Ariculture Secretary Dan
Glickman release s ,entration in the i'pa ki0' dustry (February 14).
Responding to widesp en about increasing concentration in certain key agricultural
sectors, Glickman announced the formation of an advisory committee to address further the issue
of concentration in agriculture. Secretary Glickman said, "This past year I have heard more
concerns about concentration in agriculture than just about any other issue. I want to assure
producers that we take these concerns seriously." The study was mandated by Congress in
USDA's 1992 appropriations act. Glickman credits the study for offering a broad view of structure
and behavior in the cattle and hog industries and provides a wealth of information about an
important sector of the food chain. Glickman notes, however, that it doesn't give any definitive
answers. To address growing concerns among producers and others about competition and
concentration in agriculture, Glickman is appointing an advisory committee on concentration to
pick up where the study left off. There are 21 members on the advisory committee. Contact:
Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.

INTEGRATED WILDLAND FIRE POLICY ENDORSED -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman and
Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt endorsed a joint federal wildland fire policy (February 14) that will
provide greater uniformity, help to streamline and improve interagency coordination and
communication, and reduce risks to both people and resources. After the 1994 fire season, the
Secretaries chartered a comprehensive, year-long study to give form, substance, direction and
priority to the ideas and lessons learned by wildland fire managers over the past two decades.
Their 45-page report is a landmark document which translates what managers have learned in the
field over the years into a cohesive, uniform federal policy. That policy directs managers to
integrate wildland fire into land and resource management plans to protect, maintain, and enhance
natural resources. The policy outlines that fire management activities, including suppression
actions, will be based on the values to be protected, costs, and land and resource management
objectives. Also, the policy articulates roles and responsibilities of federal agencies in the
wildland/urban interface (where inhabited areas mix with undeveloped wildland) and ensure that
federal policies are uniform and programs are implemented cooperatively and cohesively.
Contact: Jim Petterson (202) 720-4623.

GLICKMAN, KANTOR TO OPEN USDA'S AG OUTLOOK FORUM Secretary of Agriculture Dan
Glickman, U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor and a number of agricultural leaders are
scheduled to be keynoters for the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Outlook Forum '96
on February 21 and 22. The forum will open at 1:00 p.m. February 21 with speeches by Glickman
and Kantor. Top government officials, analysts and industry experts will report to the Forum on
economic and policy developments and offer their views on farm prospects for 1996 and future
years. Contact: Raymond Bridge (202) 720-5447.








REPORT SPOTLIGHTS RURAL HOMELESSNESS As the nation reels from a winter of record
breaking cold temperatures, the U.S. Department of Agriculture is releasing its report, "Rural
Homelessness What Can Be Done." Homelessness is as common in rural areas as urban
areas, but it is less obvious to community residents, the report says. Jill Long Thompson, USDA
Under Secretary for Rural Economic and Community Development (RECD), said, "The rural
homeless are often 'hidden' in campgrounds, outbuildings and even caves. To make matters
worse, rural communities rarely have the shelters, soup kitchens and transitional services that
homeless individuals and families need, and are more commonly found in urban areas." The
report summarizes perspectives of hundreds of people across the country who provide housing,
health and food assistance to the homeless in rural communities. Contact: Eileen McMahon
(202) 720-6903.

NATIONAL PORK PRODUCERS DELEGATE BODY APPOINTED -- Secretary of Agriculture
Dan Glickman has appointed 162 pork producers and five importers to the 1996 National Pork
Producers Delegate Body. Appointees will serve a one-year term. Established under the Pork
Promotion, Research and Consumer Information Act of 1985, the Delegate Body and the National
Pork Board have implemented a national program designed to improve the pork industry's position
in the marketplace. The program is funded by a mandatory assessment currently set at 0.45
percent of the market value of all hogs sold in the United States. An equivalent amount is
assessed on imported hogs, pork and pork products. Assessments began November 1, 1986.
Delegates meet annually to recommend the rate of assessment, determine the percentage of
assessments that state associations will receive and nominate producers and importers to the
15-member National Pork Board. Representation on the Delegate Body is based on annual net
assessments collected on sales of domestic hogs within individual states, with a minimum of two
producers from each state. States have the option of not submitting nominees. Contact: Becky
Unkenholz (202) 720-8998.

SPECIAL UPLAND COTTON QUOTA #4 RELEASED -- High cotton prices have triggered
another special import quota that will permit the importation of a quantity of upland cotton equal
to one week's domestic mill use, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced (February 8). The
special import quota that will permit the importation of 42,591,701 kilograms (93,898,705 pounds)
of upland cotton was established on February 14. The quota applies to upland cotton purchased
not later than May 13, 1996, and entered into the U.S. not later than August 11, 1996. The special
import quota identifies a quantity of imports that is not subject to the over-quota tariff rate of a
tariff-rate quota. Future quotas will be established if price conditions warrant. Contact: Janise
Zygmont (202) 720-8841.

FAX AND INTERNET -- You can obtain our radio and TV programming information and the
Broadcasters Letter through your facsimile machine by calling USDA's AgNewsFax or by
accessing USDA's Home Page. FAX: Use the phone connected to your machine to call (202)
690-3944. At voice prompts, press 1, press 4, then to receive Broadcasters Letter, press 9200;
radio newsline information, press 9250; TV contents billboard, press 9260; TV scripts, press 9270.
After all your selections, then press #, press 3, and press the start button on your FAX machine.
INTERNET: Address for this letter is http://www.usda.govlnewslbdcasterlbdcaster.htm.


EDITED BY LESLIE PARKER








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #2020 -- What's all the fuss about diet supplements and optimum health?
In this edition, Leslie Parker talks to two experts on eating for health and supplementing, too.
(Weekly cassette -- five minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME #1499 -- Learning through the Expanded Food and Nutrition Program.
Supermarket traffic control. Total recycling for rural residents. Growing trees for cleaner air.
Community service programs. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE #2012 -- Cotton: Fewer acres in '96 or more? Rice prices still surprise some folks.
Wheat outcome uncertain. Benefitting from the Wetlands Reserve Program. Is their concentration
in the meat packing industry? (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Friday, February 23, catfish processing and
cattle on feed. Monday, February 26, livestock, dairy and poultry and wheat outlook. Tuesday,
February 27, weekly weather and crop report. Thursday, February 29, tobacco world markets and
trade and agricultural prices. Friday, March 1, world horticultural trade and U.S. export
opportunities. These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries
many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES: Lynn Wyvill reports on USDA's Meat and Poultry Hotline campaign to encourage
people to use meat thermometers when they cook meat and poultry. Meat thermometers take the
guesswork out of determining if meat and poultry are thoroughly cooked. Thorough cooking is an
important step in preventing food borne illness. John Snyder reports on USDA "taking the pulse
of American agriculture." The Department is conducting its annual Farm Costs and Returns
Survey. The survey collects information from farmers on their costs and returns over the past
year. Results are used to help determine future farm policy.

ACTUALITIES: Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman releases USDA's report on concentration
in the meat packing industry.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWS FEEDS: Thursday from 3:45 to 4:00 p.m. ET,
Telstar 402R (located at 89 degrees West), Transponder 13, Vertical Polarity, Downlink
Frequency 3960 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

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AG BROADCAST SCHOLARSHIPS...for three college juniors or graduate students will be
awarded by the National Association of Farm Broadcasters (NAFB) Foundation for the 1996-97
year. Students may be enrolled in agricultural journalism/communications curriculum or may have
plans to use the scholarship to transfer to a university which offers a professional program of study
in agricultural radio-TV broadcasting. Two $2,500 scholarships plus a $3,000 scholarship
presented in the name of Glenn Kummerow will be awarded. All three winners also will receive
expense-paid trips to the 1996 NAFB Convention in Kansas City, November 13-17. Applications
are due March 31. For information or applications, call NAFB Foundation President Orion
Samuelson (WGN, Chicago, IL) at 312-222-5089.

VIDALIA ONIONS... and peaches were hurt during rei ~i- t c!d snp -, ':t went through Georgia,
but a good crop of peaches is still expected, reports Steve Malone (Georgia Farm Bureau). Steve
hosts a weekly agricultural TV show carried by 15 Georgia stations which has been on-the-air for
25 years. He has anchored the program since 1985 and is helped by four reporters who travel
the state to produce features. Steve notes that he uses our weekly satellite TV newsfeed.

COLD...temperatures last week came within one degree of breaking an all-time record of -27
degrees set in 1905 in Burlington, IA area, reports John Weir (KBUR/KGRS). A veteran of 22
years at his station, John says farmers' attitudes are very positive now because of good
commodity prices. Not far away, a reading of -28 degrees was the lowest temperature ever
recorded in the Quad-Cities of Rock Island, Moline, Davenport and Bettendorf, according to Rick
Pierce (WGEN, Geneseo, IL). Rick hosts a 5:00-6:00 a.m. agricultural news program daily and
continues as the "morning show" host until 9:00 a.m. In addition, his station carries hourly
markets, and he hosts a 12:00-12:30 p.m. agricultural news summary.



LARRY A. UINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Prtvate Use $300









United States Department of Agriculture bt ications Washington, DC 20250-1300


Letter No. 2753 J February 23, 1996

AGRICULTURE POLICY FOR A CENTU, -- retary of Agriculture Dan Glickman
opened the USDA's 1996 Agricultu tlookl'Forumr' uary 21) in Washington saying he is
optimistic because the United States frundam i.y strong farm economy. 'There will be
a surge in world grain production this ji.r an said, "based on current prices and
pre-season conditions. Livestock and poultry producers may be squeezed as feed costs rise but
generally they are maintaining inventories. Beef, pork, and broiler output are expected to
increase." Under the continuation of the 1990 farm bill, producers would have been looking at
small deficiency payments and no set asides because of higher expected prices. Glickman
added, "As agriculture continues to move away from restrictive government programs to more
market-oriented ones, what government does outside the traditional commodity programs will
become increasingly important." Since trade, not commodity programs will define agriculture's
future, Glickman said, "China is becoming an extremely important customer for a number of U.S.
commodities." He noted that movement toward freer trade must continue. Bringing down trade
barriers is only part of the battle. "American agriculture is the most competitive in the world,"
Secretary Glickman said. "It remains the role of the eed:ra, govprpment to keep open access to
world trade; to ensure research for new crops; to keep our soil sqund, our water safe, our wildlife
protected; to inspect food before it goes on American tables, and to make sure no American goes
hungry." Contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.ryY 1 5 1936

INTERIM TERMS OF RICE PROGRAM -- Acting isf s"of0p9ayhe uncertainty caused by
Congress' inability to pass a 1995 Farm Bill, Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman announced
(February 16) proposed terms of a rice program for the 1996 crop year. Glickman used his
authority under the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) Charter Act to determine program
provisions. Secretary Glickman said, "I want to stress that these interim provisions are not
designed to take the place of a rice program adopted by Congress. Rice producers can use these
provisions as an 'insurance policy' to arrange for financing and begin making their planting
decisions. In the absence of new legislation, the industry can be assured that these provisions
will provide an adequate safety net." Sign up for participation in the 1996 rice program is not
required to be eligible for price support. Absent new statutory authority, no deficiency payments
will be made on the 1996 crop. The only benefit available for eligible 1996-crop rice would be a
nonrecourse loan at a proposed minimum price support rate of $9.50 per hundredweight. This
loan rate will protect farm income and result in comparable costs to the government. Contact:
Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

PEANUT SUPPORT LEVELS ANNOUNCED -- USDA's Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC)
announced (February 15) that the national average support level for 1996 quota peanuts will be
$679.25 per short ton which is up 89 cents from 1995. Farm legislation now under consideration
by Congress may change the statutory provisions relative to this program announcement.
Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.







PROPOSED SETTLEMENT OF ALASKA TIMBER LAWSUIT -- Agriculture Secretary Dan
Glickman announced (February 20) a proposed lawsuit settlement that will help ensure a more
predictable timber supply in Southeast Alaska's Tongass National Forest. The case is Alaska
Wilderness Recreation and Tourism Association (AWRTA) v. Morrison. If approved by a federal
court, the proposed settlement will release from injunction an estimated 105 million board feet
(mmbf) of timber. Timber operators have up to three yearsito harvest timber purchased from a
national forest. The AWRTA lawsuit challenged Forest Service timber sales in the Tongass
National Forest originally planned for sale to meet contract obligations for the Alaska Pulp
Corporation (APC). After APC closed its facility in Sitka, the Forest Service sought to offer those
sales to other operators. The lawsuit forced the Forest Service to restudy the sales. The lawsuit
and subsequent injunction affect approximately 280 mmbf of timber. Under terms of the proposed
agreement, additional timber not released in the settlement will be subject to further environmental
review before it can be offered for sale. Contact: Jim Petterson (202) 720-4623.

PRINCIPALS INVITED TO JOIN TEAM NUTRITION SCHOOLS -- Agriculture Secretary Dan
Glickman invited the principals of more than 94,000 National School Lunch Program schools to
join in what he called "one of the most exciting initiatives in the history of the school lunch
program: Team Nutrition." In a letter to elementary and secondary principals, Glickman urged
them to join thousands of their colleagues across the country, and organizations representing
food, agriculture, nutrition, and health, in working for a healthier future for America's children.
Team Nutrition is a nationwide program designed to support schools implementing USDA's School
Meals Initiative for Healthy Children. The program ensures that children have healthy meals at
school. Team Nutrition helps schools plan, purchase, prepare and serve healthy school meals
and teaches children about making food choices for a healthy diet for a lifetime. By joining Team
Nutrition, schools gain access to innovative educational and technical resources that will actively
involve children and their parents in nutrition education programs at home and in school.
Contact: Alicia Bambara (703) 305-2039.

AMERICORPS ACCOMPLISHMENTS -- USDA's AmeriCorps members planted 65,000 trees in
Oklahoma during 1994-95. This was a project that rooted the new national service program in the
tradition of the 1930's Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman
said, 'We now have the data showing that AmeriCorps indeed is doing what national service was
created to do. AmeriCorps is getting things done while strengthening communities, providing
opportunity and boosting personal responsibility." The annual report indicates that
AmeriCorps/USDA members in 38 states provided nearly two million hours of service. The
document also indicates that 14,176 non-compensated volunteers were recruited by
AmeriCorps/USDA members to serve in community service projects. USDA is running three types
of AmeriCorps teams in 45 states, composed of approximately 1,350 members: an anti-hunger
team, a public lands and environment team and a rural development team. Contact: Joel Berg
(202) 720-6350.

FAX AND INTERNET -- Radio and TV listings and Broadcasters Letter can be accessed by
calling USDA's AgNewsFax or by going to USDA's Home Page. FAX: Use phone connected to
your fax to call (202) 690-3944. At voice prompts, press 1, press 4, then to receive Broadcasters
Letter, press 9200; radio newsline information, press 9250; TV contents billboard, press 9260;
TV scripts, press 9270. After all your selections, then press #, press 3, and press the start button
on your FAX. INTERNET: Letter address is http://www.usda.gov/news/bdcaster/bdcaster.htm.
EDITED BY LESLIE PARKER







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #2021 -- In this edition, Brenda Curtis reports from the so-called "Mississippi
Flyway" to describe why the duck population of this country is being replenished on the nation's
wetlands. (Weekly cassette -- five minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME #1500 -- Saving the ducks. Earned income tax credit. The high cost of melting
ice. Lower poultry prices for consumers. Bird problems coming to roost. U.S. dairy cattle to
Turkey. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE #2013 -- E.U. hormone ban continues, despite WTO challenge. U.S. soybean
prospects closely tied to Brazil. Report says Farm Credit System healthy. Poultry producers'
profits down. U.S. dairy cattle to Turkey. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tuesday, March 5, weekly weather and crop
outlook. Thursday, March 7, aquaculture report. Monday, March 11, cotton/citrus production,
world cotton supply and demand. Tuesday, March 12, crop production, world agricultural supply
and demand, cotton and wool outlook. Wednesday, March 13, feed outlook, oil crops outlook, rice
outlook, and wheat outlook. These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our
newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.



USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.




FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE



ACTUALITIES: Statements include comments from Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman, U.S.
Trade Representative Mickey Kantor and USDA's Chief Economist Keith Collins made at the 1996
Agricultural Outlook Forum in Washington, D.C.


SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWS FEEDS: Thursday from 3:45 to 4:00 p.m. ET,
Telstar 402R (located at 89 degrees West), Transponder 13, Vertical Polarity, Downlink
Frequency 3960 MHZ.


Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


4 3
OFF MIKE

GLOOMY FACES...were seen at a meeting of Oklahoma wheat farmers recently, reports Carey
Martin (Oklahoma Agrinet, Oklahoma City, OK). The weather is so dry there that the Governor
called for a "day of prayer for rain" last Sunday. Carey says there is a lot of blowing dust in
northern Oklahoma because wheat cover is so inadequate. Many stocker cattlemen are having
to ship calves to feedlots early or to pastures outside the state. Growth in hog production has
increased so much that Oklahoma is now included in USDA's regular Hogs and Pigs Report.
Expansion has occurred throughout the state, but Carey notes that a major hog processing plant
opened recently in the Oklahoma Panhandle.

HOG WASTE CONTROL...continues to be a concern in Missouri according to Stacy Handke
(KTTS, Springfield, MO) who was substituting for Joann Locke this week while she was covering
a variety of producer and commodity meetings and sending back reports. An agricultural
communications graduate of Southwest Missouri State University, Stacey is in her second year
at the station. She works in advertising sales, but steps in to assist Joann with farm news when
needed.

WHEAT SITUATION...in Nebraska doesn't look good there either, reports Jack McConnell
(KMMJ, Grand Island, NE). He says they haven't had any measurable moisture in several weeks
with only three inches of snow which came with high winds and sub-zero temperatures. With little
snow cover and severe cold, the usually hardy wheat plants are struggling. Jack starts his
broadcast day with a 6:00-9:00 a.m. stint at the helm of an all-talk news, weather and farm
program. Then, he hosts "Talk of Nebraska" from 9:00-9:30 a.m. which has included the Governor
and other staff officials recently. He switches hats and heads to KHAS-TV in Hastings, NE for the
10:30 a.m. taping of a mar t and farm news segment and then returns for his noon radio show.



LARRY A. INN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penaly for Private Use $300









United States Departen e Agriculture Q ;e of communications wasnington, U z 0250-1300


Letter No. 2754 .. M rston Sc fence March 1, 1996
Library
DISASTER ASSIS f COVE EXPANDED gg pji If e Secretary Dan Glickman
announced (February r .. i implementing an0 1Bp ig provisions of USDA's
Noninsured Crop Disaster e Program. PayrJ~p ts re made to eligible producers when
the expected "area" yield is less than 65 percent ofl ni AidcFti fWidual crop losses are in
excess of 50 percent of the approved yield. Defining an "area" is a critical step in determining
whether assistance will be provided. The new regulations will allow an entire county to be
considered an 'area'. The acres and values criteria are the same as those used last year.
However, allowing counties to qualify as an 'area' will allow assistance to growers who suffered
major crop losses but were formerly disqualified based on the value and acreage loss criteria.
Different types or varieties of a crop or commodity will now be treated as separate crops if their
prices differ substantially from other types or varieties. Contact: Jerry Alanko (202) 720-5622.

CROP INSURANCE REMINDER -- Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman reminded growers
(February 27) that they need to obtain crop insurance offered under the Federal Crop Insurance
Act by the local sales closing date to stay eligible for many USDA farm programs and loans. Sales
closing dates are significant because signing up for insurance, changing the crops insured or
changing coverage levels must be done prior to the announced date. The first Spring sales
closing date was February 28, and the next closing date will be March 15. Sales closing dates
vary by crop and location. USDA has increased price elections on major crops and introduced two
new pilot programs to test the concept of revenue insurance. The two pilot programs are called
Crop Revenue Coverage and Income Protection. Contact: Ken Ackerman (202) 690-2803.

COTTON DEFICIENCY PAYMENT RATE -- Grant Buntrock, Executive Vice President of the
U.S. Department of Agriculture's Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) announced (February 23)
that the deficiency payment rate for the 1995 crop of upland cotton will be zero. Deficiency
payments are required when the national average price received by producers during the calendar
year is below the established target price of 72.9 cents per pound. The payment rate is equal to
the difference between the target price and the higher of the calendar year national average
market price or the price support loan rate. The 1995 calendar year average price was 76.8 cents
per pound. Since the year average price was above the target price, the deficiency payment rate
is zero. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

DEFICIENCY PAYMENTS FOR RICE ANNOUNCED -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture
announced (February 23) that eligible rice producers will receive about $171 million in final
deficiency payments for the 1995 crop of rice. The 1996-crop total payment rate is based on the
difference between the established target price ($10.71 per hundredweight) and the higher of the
national average price support loan rate ($6.50 per hundredweight) for the crop, or a selected
market price. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.








ANIMAL WELFARE GETS ADDED ATTENTION -- Pet theft, inhumane treatment and the
improper care and breeding of animals are receiving added attention from the U.S. Department
of Agriculture. Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman said, "Pet theft and animal abuse will not be
tolerated. Animal welfare is not a second-class issue at the USDA. We intend to improve
standards and toughen enforcement." Under Glickman's direction, Mike Dunn, head of USDA's
marketing and regulatory programs, is spearheading efforts to improve USDA's oversight of the
care and handling of companion animals. Currently, USDA is working on a legislative proposal
to strengthen the Animal Welfare Act; holding a series of three public hearings to seek widespread
input into making regulatory improvements; and toughening inspection and enforcement efforts.
Two of three public forums on these issues already have been held. A third forum will be held in
Washington, D.C. at a future date. Contact: Patrick Collins (202) 720-2511.

NATIONAL TALLGRASS PRAIRIE ESTABLISHED The National Defense Authorization Act for
1996 that became law February 10 transferred the former Joliet Army Ammunition Plant from the
Department of Defense to the U.S. Department of Agriculture and establishes the Midewin
National Tallgrass Prairie. USDA's Forest Service will be responsible for prairie restoration and
management under the administration of the Shawnee National Forest, headquartered in
Harrisburg, Illinois. The new National Tallgrass Prairie encompasses 19,195 acres, 40 miles
southwest of Chicago. In addition to use by the American people, the Midewin Tallgrass Prairie
will provide habitat for many North American grassland birds which have had greater, more
consistent and more widespread declines than any other bird group. Contact: Alan Polk (202)
205-1134.

PACKER AND BUYER AGREE TO CONSENT DECISION Taylor Packing Co., Inc., Wyalusing,
Pennsylvania, and packer buyer Harold A. Roney of Preston Park, Pennsylvania, have entered
into an agreement with the U.S. Department of Agriculture to settle an administrative complaint.
Michael V. Dunn, assistant secretary for marketing and regulatory programs, said, "Under the
terms of the settlement, Taylor Packing Co. and Roney shall not take turns with others in buying
livestock at livestock markets, manipulate or control prices of livestock sold in commerce, restrict
competition in the purchasing of livestock in commerce, or agree or arrange with others to refrain
from bidding on livestock against any competitive livestock buyer." Taylor Packing Co. and Roney
jointly and severally paid a $50,000 civil penalty, and another $20,000 is being held in abeyance
for three years so long as Taylor Packing and Roney do not violate the terms of the settlement.
Contact: Sara Wright (202) 720-9528.

AARC CENTER BOARD MEMBERS APPOINTED -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman
appointed (February 23) three members to the Board of Directors of the Alternative Agricultural
Research and Commercialization (AARC) Center. The AARC Center is the only venture capital
organization in the Federal government making equity available to commercialize industrial
(non-food, non-feed) uses for agricultural materials and animal by-products. Glickman
reappointed Harold Gilchrist, President and CEO of Gilchrist & Company, Inc., and Dr. Ralph
Hardy, who recently retired as President of the Boyce Thompson Institute. Also appointed was
Robert Raun, a farmer from Minden, Nebraska. The announcements were made at a recent AARC
meeting in Mobile, Alabama. Contact: Ron Buckhalt (202) 690-1624.


EDITED BY LESLIE PARKER








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #2022 -- In this edition, Gary Crawford offers a glimpse into a crystal ball
to find out what food prices are expected to be. (Weekly cassette -- five minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME #1500 -- Tips for sending mail to our troops in Bosnia. Another look at food
prices. Economic rebirth for our cities and towns. Shopping for interest rates. Looking to the
future for the 1890's Colleges and Universities. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE #2014 The Russian poultry ban. Milk output lower than expected. Are we due for
a drought? Wheat supplies may increase somewhat in 1996/97. Grain and oilseed demand
expected to remain strong. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE --Wednesday, March 13, milk production report, feed
outlook, oil crops outlook, rice outlook, wheat outlook, world agricultural production, world grain
production, and world oilseed outlook. Monday, March 18, former USSR update. Tuesday, March
19, sugar and sweeteners outlook, weekly weather and crop outlook. These are USDA reports
we know about in advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not
listed in this lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE


FEATURES: Patrick O'Leary reports on USDA's latest farm export forecast. Analysts are
predicting record high exports this fiscal year and say the long term prospects improved as well.
This forecast was released during USDA's annual Agricultural Outlook Forum in Washington.
O'Leary also reports on a recent conference on community empowerment where President Clinton
heard success stories from participants in the federal Empowerment Zone program. The "EZ/EC"
program in rural areas is administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

ACTUALITIES: Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman comments on agricultural prices, trade,
the farm economy and the Farm Bill. Excerpts are from a February 26 speech to commodity
groups in Phoenix, Arizona.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWS FEEDS: Thursday from 3:45 to 4:00 p.m. ET,
Telstar 402R (located at 89 degrees West), Transponder 13, Vertical Polarity, Downlink
Frequency 3960 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
III nr*llHllIrllrII rI I
3 1262081359092
OFF MIKE

TEXAS FIRES...burned an estimated 181,000 acres last week, reports Blair Stewart (Texas State
Networks, Arlington, TX). Smoke is clearing after some rain, but fires due to the extended drought
moved into Oklahoma and Kansas, too. Blair and his father, Jim Stewart (KFYO, Lubbock, TX)
co-anchor a morning Lone Star Farm and Ranch Show that is carried by 56 affiliate radio stations.

MANAGEMENT AFTER WILDFIRE...workshops are scheduled next week in the South Central
Kansas counties of Meade and Barber. Hap Larson (KBUF, Garden City, KS) said fences,
outbuildings and some cattle were lost in grass fires last week. Local producers are seeking
alternative feeds or hay to replace the burned-out grazing lands. Local range management
specialists are suggesting that straw or manure be spread on some unprotected sandy soils.
Highway visibility was reduced in affected areas by smoke or blowing ashes.

SNOW...has been abundant in the mountains, but lack of moisture is a concern for the wheat crop
in eastern Colorado, reports Colleen Martin (Martin Agri-Country Network, Deer Trail, CO).
Colleen grew up in agriculture and has been in broadcasting for 18 years. She is the former
owner of the local radio station, but now produces a twice-daily agricultural network radio program
carried by eight stations throughout the state. She covers current agricultural news, futures
markets and Denver cash markets in her reports. Colleen called us to inquire about our daily
radio newsline and weekly cassette service.

COTTON ACREAGE...in parts of Louisiana will be switched to corn this year because it is
cheaper to grow and because farmers suffered significant cotton crop losses last year due to
insect damage. Don Molino (Louisiana Agri-News Network, Baton Rouge, LA) reports that one
parish expects to double its corn acreage. Don will be hosting the Southern Regional Meeting of
the National Association of Farm Broadcasters in New Orleans, March 28-30.



LARRY A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










United States Department of Agricy ffimunications Washington, DC 20250-1300


Letter No. 2755 a\ / L library March 8,1996

HOUSE APPROVES FARM BIL culture c aryF Ai A said House passage of
the Farm Bill (February 29) represe im m .over the earlier version passed by the
House Agriculture Committee. Glickma he parit~ rd9/iofifjgprovement were in the
areas of conservation and exports, which are similar to the provisions approved by the Senate."
The new farm legislation is needed for producers to make sound planting decisions. However,
Glickman said, "This bill does fall short of provisions for nutrition, research, and rural
development. In addition, the legislation, as passed by the House, would directly challenge the
safety net that farm programs currently offer." The legislation in most cases also excludes new
farmers from receiving these payments. Glickman noted that the Conference Committee must
make improvements in both the Senate and the House bills before he can recommend the
President sign the legislation. Contact: Laura Trivers (202) 720-4623.

NATIONAL NUTRITION MONTH COMMEMORATED -- For the first time, children in thousands
of classrooms will be using new educational tools to motivate them to improve their diets as
schools prepare to implement historic policy changes to ensure healthy meals at school.
Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman and Under Secretary for Food, Nutrition, and Consumer
Services Ellen Haas joined students (March 4) at the New Hampshire Estates Elementary School
in Silver Spring, Maryland, to highlight Team Nutrition education tools in the classrooms and
recognize the school's commitment to Team Nutrition. Glickman said, 'The educational tools are
designed to be fun for children and teach them about improving their diet." The event showcased
nutritional education activities developed through Team Nutrition partnerships. Contact: Alicia
Bambara (703) 305-2039.

CROPS IGNORE WINTRY BLASTS -- Whether it's icy wind or knee-deep snow, it hasn't stopped
Tom Kaspar, plant scientist for the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service
from growing crops in Iowa. His crop is growing on 7,000 pounds of soil that fill each of six metal
bins inside a USDA laboratory on the flatlands of Iowa. Kaspar can dictate or duplicate whatever
kind of weather he wants. Kaspar's "garden" grows in-two chambers each two-stories tall, which
are far different from a greenhouse. These chambers and a third one are being used for the first
time at the National Soil Tilth Laboratory in Ames, Iowa. A stairway takes Kaspar and his
colleagues to the lower level where each of the 3.3-foot square by 5-foot deep soil bins holds the
7,000 pounds of Iowa farmland. Holes in the side of each bin let scientists use fiber-optic probes
to see plant roots grow at various depths. On the upper level, plants as tall as corn can be grown
to maturity. Kaspar said, "Experiments in the chambers will give farmers new findings, for
example, on how soil temperatures help or hinder the growth of plant roots." All this and other
research continues year-round in the chambers. Contact: Hank Becker (301) 344-2769.







PROMOTION AND RESEARCH PROGRAM APPROVED -- Secretary of Agriculture Dan
Glickman announced (March 5) that a proposed national promotion, research and information
program for sheep and wool passed in an industry-wide referendum. OSDA's Agricultural
Marketing Service (AMS), an agency in the marketing and regulatory program mission area, has
oversight responsibility for federal research and promotion programs. AMS Administrator Lon
Hatamiya said, "Of the 19,801 valid ballots cast in the February 6 referendum, 10,707 (54.1
percent) favored and 9,094 (45.9 percent) opposed implementation of the Sheep and Wool
Promotion, Research, Education and Information Order." Those persons voting in the referendum
who cast valid ballots and favored the order accounted for 40 percent of the total production voted.
Those voters opposing the order accounted for 60 percent of production voted. The final order
and effective date for beginning of the program will be published in a future issue of the Federal
Register. Contact: Becky Unkenholz (202) 720-8998.

ACREAGE ALLOTMENTS FOR TOBACCO -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced
(March 5) acreage allotments and price support levels for six kinds of tobacco for the 1996
marketing year. The 1996 price support levels for the six kinds of tobacco announced range
between 1.7 and 2.7 percent higher than the 1995-crop levels. USDA's Commodity Credit
Corporation will establish individual grade loan rates before the marketing season begins. The
1996-crop marketing assessment to be paid by both growers and buyers will be 0.5 percent each
of the support level, or a total of 1 percent per pound. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

CCC INTEREST RATE -- Grant Buntrock, Executive Vice President of the U.S. Department of
Agriculture's Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) announced (March 1) that commodity loans
disbursed in March by the USDA's CCC will carry a 4-7/8 percent interest rate. The 4-7/8 percent
rate is down from February's 5-1/8 percent and reflects the interest rate charged CCC by the U.S.
Treasury. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

NAL CATALOG ON INTERNET ISIS, the Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC) of the National
Agricultural Library (NAL), the largest agricultural library in the world, is now available over the
Internet at telnet address . The catalog can be searched Monday through
Saturday from 6:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., EST. ISIS contains two agricultural databases, the NAL
Online Catalog and the Journal Article Citation database. Internet access to these resources will
help to meet a critical need for agricultural information worldwide. The NAL Online Catalog and
Journal Article Citation database is updated daily by NAL and contains the most current
bibliographic citations for books, reports, maps, periodicals, audiovisuals, CD-ROMs, electronic
media and other material being added to the NAL collection. The National Agricultural Library is
part of USDA'S Agricultural Research Service. Contact: Brian Norris (301) 504-6778.

FAX AND INTERNET -- You can obtain our radio and TV programming information and the
Broadcasters Letter through your facsimile machine by calling USDA's AgNewsFax or by
accessing USDA's Home Page. FAX: Use the phone connected to your machine to call (202)
690-3944. At voice prompts, press 1, press 4, then to receive Broadcasters Letter, press 9200;
radio newsline information, press 9250; TV contents billboard, press 9260; TV scripts, press 9270.
After all your selections, then press #, press 3, and press the start button on your FAX machine.
INTERNET: Address for this letter is http://www.usda.govlnews/bdcasterlbdcaster.htm.
EDITED BY LESUE PARKER







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #2023 In this edition, Gary Crawford takes you shopping in the high-tech
supermarket of today. (Weekly cassette -- five minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME #1501-- High-tech grocery shopping. Something different for meat lovers.
Consumer credit tips. Americans are ignoring new apple varieties. The new detergents.
(Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE #2015 -- Uncertainty about China. Farm finance outlook remains mixed. India's
importance to U.S. agriculture. A huge job: the first Chinese agricultural census. USDA helps
producers ship dairy cattle to Turkey. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Monday, March 18, former USSR update. Tuesday,
March 19, sugar and sweeteners report and weekly weather and crop outlook. Wednesday,
March 20, agricultural outlook report. Thursday, March 21, dairy outlook. Friday, March 22, cattle
on feed report and livestock slaughter report. These are USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES March is National Nutrition Month. USDA is marking the occasion by promoting its
"Team Nutrition" program in elementary schools. Patrick O'Leary reports from a suburban
Washington, D.C. elementary school that hosted Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman and USDA
Under secretary for Food, Nutrition & Consumer Services Ellen Haas on March 4. Continuing the
National Nutrition Month theme, USDA's 'Team Nutrition" is sending school food service
personnel to special training sessions. In a pilot project, school cooks are learning from chef
instructors at culinary schools how to make healthier lunches that also are appealing to students.
Patrick O'Leary reports from the Johnston & Wales University in Providence, Rhode Island, where
a workshop took place a few weeks ago. Featured remarks are from USDA Under secretary for
Food, Nutrition & Consumer Services Ellen Haas and Chef Michael Moskwa.

ACTUALITIES USDA Secretary Dan Glickman comments on farm bill progress and the Russian
ban on U.S. poultry.


SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWS FEEDS: Thursday from 3:45 to 4:00 p.m. ET,
Telstar 402R (located at 89 degrees West), Transponder 13, Vertical Polarity, Downlink
Frequency 3960 MHZ.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

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WHAT'S ON YOUR MIND?...That's the topic of a weekly 6:00 7:00 a.m. live radio show that
Cyndi Young (WTAX/WWTE/WPRC, Springfield, IL) does during winter months from local coffee
shops, grain elevators or other gathering points. She involves both active and retired farmers who
choose the topics for discussion. Illinois Director of Agriculture Becky Doyle has been among
participants.

NEW ASSISTANT...to farm broadcaster Gary DiGiuseppe (KWMT, Fort Dodge, IA) since
November is Mary Ann Haas who was formerly news director for a Hoopeston, IL radio station.
Growing up in the suburbs of Chicago, Mary Ann is a print journalism/radio broadcasting graduate
of St. Mary's College in Winona, MN who doubles as both an agricultural and news reporter for
KWMT.

BEEF CATTLE PRICES...have dropped below the cost of production, yet the lamb market is at
an all-time high, reports Jim Thoreson (KWAT, Watertown, SD). Beef production is the number
one source of agricultural income for South Dakota so this is a concern as farmers look forward
to spring. Temperatures in the first week of March gave no hint of spring, however, averaging 20
degrees below normal. Snowdrifts 8-10 feet high still surrounded many farmsteads having blown
off the fields.

NEW FACES...have joined Miles Carter (KMZU/KAOL/WHB, Carrollton & Kansas City, MO)
recently. Melisa Bertz, a Kansas State University (KSU) graduate and a former member of the
KSU livestock judging team is handling farm broadcasting duties on KMZU/KAOL. She was a
vocational agriculture teacher in Kansas for three years and replaces Jay Truitt who is now with
the Missouri Soybean Growers. Rich Hawkins, formerly with KRVN, Lexington, NE for 16 years,
has assumed farm bro casting duties for WHB following Paul Pippert who recently retired.



LA RY A. UINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300






;AI W i


a Washington, DC 20250-1300


United States Departmen

Letter No. 2756 I


March 15, 1996


KARNAL BUNT DET ICED IN ARIZNA ,SDA, in conjunction with the Arizona Department
of Agriculture, announ d l that I bunt, a fungal disease of grain, was detected in
durum wheat seed. S e, ed _I .sawere detectdj a sped dealership during routine
testing by the Arizona agriculture. After f dligc samples to the state's
agricultural lab, USDA's Agricultura Research Service was givj sffnples for final confirmation.
The disease was confirmed as karnal bunt. A scientificeA1e 'eopsed of state, federal and
industry technical experts and scientists is being convened to deterifMe further actions. This is
a localized find and emergency quarantines have beet nktel gn those infected properties,
seed, farm equipment, planted wheat and soil associated with hUidatdcted wheat. State and
Federal quarantines will be put into place to augment this emergency action and the Department
has established a wheat export certification team to develop options for dealing with potential
trade issues. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 734-3256.

WHEAT SUPPLY FORECAST DOWN -- USDA's latest wheat outlook report (March 13) forecasts
1995/96 supplies at 2,762 million bushels -- the lowest in six years and the second lowest in 20
years. Area planted, area harvested and yield have declined for three years in a row. Unusual
planting conditions for the past three years have contributed to reduced area planted, especially
in Montana and Missouri. Excess moisture and cool conditions prevented some spring wheat from
being planted, especially in South Dakota. Yields in 1995 were hurt by late frost and rain at
harvest in important wheat areas. Other factors were delayed planting, disease and insect
problems and summer heat. Wheat production in 1995 was 2,186 million bushels, down 6 percent
from a year earlier. Contact: Ed Allen (202) 501-8512.

FEED GRAIN SITUATION -- The feed grain situation will continue extremely tight for the
remaining months of 1995/96, according to the latest report from USDA (March 13). Changes in
this month's forecast were fairly small, but reinforced this tight outlook. Corn exports were
increased 50 million bushels, while imports went up 5 million. This reduced projected ending
stocks 45 million bushels. Oats imports and ending stocks each dropped 5 million bushels.
Barley export forecast was raised 10 million bushels and imports lowered by 5 million, resulting
in small cuts in domestic use and stocks. Contact: Pete Riley (202) 501-8512.

USDA SIGNS MEMO WITH WINTER OLYMPIC GAMES -- Under Secretary of Agriculture for
Natural Resources and Environment James R. Lyons signed a Memorandum of Understanding
(March 14) with the Salt Lake City Olympic Organization Committee (SLOOC). The signing took
place during a meeting of the SLOOC's board of trustees. This memorandum joins USDA and
SLOOC in partnership and assures collaboration on environmental issues associated with the
2002 Winter Olympic Games. The signing ceremony took place at the Salt Lake Olympic
Organizing Committee board room in Salt Lake City, Utah. Tom Welch, president of the Salt Lake
City Olympic Organization Committee, joined Lyons at the signing ceremony. Contact: Jim
Petterson (202) 720-4623.


ltI WkI H





2
PUBLIC INPUT ASKED ON AGRICULTURAL CONCENTRATION -- The Advisory Committee
on Agricultural Concentration, which was announced last month (February 14) by Agriculture
Secretary Dan Glickman, is requesting public input during its second meeting March 25 in St.
Louis. The committee meeting is being held specifically to hear views from the public. Due to time
constraints, oral statements will be limited to five minutes at the meeting. However, written
statements of any length may be submitted to the committee at the meeting, by mail or fax.
Following the public input session March 25, the committee will meet in open session on March
26 and until noon March 27. Purpose of the committee is to advise the Secretary regarding the
extent of concentration, or lack of competition, in the agricultural industry, the causes and effects
of concentration and whether there is need for legislation or modification.of U.S. Department of
Agriculture programs to address the issue. Contact: Jerry Redding (202) 720-6959.

GENE GIVING PLANTS LIVELIER DEFENSE IS PATENTED -- A modified gene that helps
protect tomato and other crops from insect pests was patented (March 5) as a new biotechnology
tactic. It was developed by U.S. Department of Agriculture scientists. When chewed by insects,
plants engineered with this gene chum out large amounts of a multipurpose plant hormone called
cytokinin. USDA molecular geneticist Ann Smigocki said, "Overproducing the hormone at levels
up to 70 times normal jump starts the plant's own biochemical defenses." In Smigocki's tests,
homworms that fed on the bioengineered plants did not die, but ate much less than normal. The
smaller percentage of aphids that survived wound up smaller and often failed to mature. Smigocki
is trying to purify natural insect-killing compounds that the plants make as part of their response
to cytokinin. The engineered gene may simulate plants' natural defenses more closely than the
most common biotechnology approach. Contact: Jim De Quattro (301) 344-2736.

A CURE FOR PLUM POX VIRUS -- Ralph Scorza, horticulturalist for U.S. Department of
Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service, with help from French collaborator Michel
Ravelonandro, has been working for the past five years on protecting U.S. fruit growers from plum
pox virus. The deadly virus is now spreading in orchards throughout Europe. Recently, the virus
was discovered in South America. Plum pox, sometimes known as Sharka virus, causes fruit to
drop from affected trees 20 to 40 days before maturity and leaves the remaining fruit
unmarketable. The disease is transmitted by aphids and by grafting. Scorza said, "This virus
causes severe damage and crop loss in plums, peaches and apricots. There is no remedy, once
it attacks a tree." Scorza and his colleagues recently developed transgenic plum plants that resist
the virus. The new gene was put into plum trees and sent to France to be tested with the virus.
After two years of tests, one breeding of the line appears to have complete immunity to plum pox
virus. Contact: Ralph Scorza (304) 725-3451.

ALGAE SHOW PROMISE AGAINST CANCER -- A blue-green alga rich in beta carotene and
other disease-fighting carotenoids may help prevent cancer of the mouth. In developing countries,
Spirulina algae are cheaper than supplements of beta carotene or vitamin A. Researchers have
shown these vitamins to reverse leukoplakia thick, white, precancerous patches in the mouth.
A new study, coordinated by a USDA Agricultural Research Service scientist, was the first
evaluation of Spirulina's cancer-preventive potential in humans. After consuming a gram of algae
daily for a year, 45 percent of the study's volunteers had complete regression of leukoplakia.
Another 12 percent significantly improved. The study was conducted in southwestern India, which
has a high incidence of leukoplakia. Cancer of the mouth and of the cervix, having the same kind
of mucus membrane, is on the rise worldwide. Contact: Padmanabhan P. Nair (301) 504-8145.
EDITED BY LESLIE PARKER







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #2024 -- Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is becoming a popular
management tool for America's farmers. Brenda Curtis reports on IPM from both the scientists'
and farmers' viewpoints. (Weekly cassette -- five minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME #1502 -- The silent epidemic. The house eaters. Weeds into flowers. The
incredible edible egg. Lamb a red meat alternative. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE #2016 -- Rapid response to "Kamal Bunt" discovery. An analysis of the Farm Bills.
The future of CRP. USDA testing new forms of crop insurance. The economic benefits of IPM.
(Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thursday, March 21, dairy outlook. Friday, March
22, U.S. agricultural trade update. Monday, March 25, livestock, dairy and poultry outlook.
Tuesday, March 26, weekly weather and crop outlook. Wednesday, March 27, fruit and tree nut
report. These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries many
stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE


FEATURES: Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman talks with a multi-generational farm family in
Ohio about the past and future of American agriculture in this video special intended for use
during National Agriculture Week.

ACTUALITIES: Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman comments on how USDA is dealing with
the fungal disease called karnal bunt that has been found in durum wheat seed in Arizona and
what impact it will have on trade.

UPCOMING FEATURES: Lynn Wyvill reports on a research and education program in
Washington state to control emissions of very fine particles of dust called PM10.


SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS: Thursday from 3:45 to 4:00 p.m. ET,
Telstar 402R (located at 89 degrees West), Transponder 13, Vertical Polarity, Downlink
Frequency 3960 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Interet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

4 3
OFF MIKE

GREEN WEEK...in Germany features a large international food exhibit that is displayed in more
than 20 buildings. Lynn Ketelsen (Linder Farm Network, Willmar MN) was one of two U.S.
journalists officially invited to attend last month's celebration. Journalists from 40 countries were
there. Lynn joined with fellow farm broadcaster, Jack Crowner (Kentucky Ag Network, Louisville,
KY) who also attended, to take their own tour of farms and factories in the former East Germany
and northwest Germany. I expect their listeners are now hearing about their adventures. Also,
Lynn earned two awards recently. He became the first broadcaster to win the Friends of
Agriculture Award from Minnesota Corn Growers, and he received the top Service to Agriculture
Award from the University of Minnesota Waseca Alumni Association. A statewide poll of
graduates chose Lynn for the recognition.

MICHIGAN EVENTS...getting coverage Jast- week by Rod Zamarron (Michigan Farm Radio
Network, Lansing, MI) included Michigan State University's Agriculture and Natural Resources
Week, the Michigan FFA Convention and the Great Lakes Peach Conference. Rod says that
Michigan State Cooperative Extension Service is joining with Purdue University on March 21 to
produce a satellite broadcast to county extension offices on the Farm Bill. Rod joined the 25-year-
old Michigan Farm Radio Network in 1993.

39 YEARS...in radio, 11 as a farm director is the benchmark that Neil Trobak (KCIM/KKRL,
Carroll, IA) passes this year. Neil says farmers are waiting for spring, but have enjoyed good hog
and grain prices. Beef producers are not doing as well with losses of several dollars per head in
fed cattle marketing. Neil was planning some special promotions related to National Agriculture
Week and Agriculture Day, March 20.

TV SURVEY IS DUE...by March 22 from those of you who use our weekly satellite services. Fax
number return bc y of survey is (202)-720-5773.


LA RYA UINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










United States Department of A Og ffic municatiofi tcWa1il tQi, DC 20250-1300
.. library


s AM 6 %96 JUN 2 0 1 M996
Letter No. 2758 March 29,1996
U university of Firi
FARM BILL CONFERENCE IEE Agriculture ecret'a 'n Glickman was
pleased that the farm bill confer fpleted work on the 1995 Farm Bill (March 21).
However, Secretary Glickman said, e Congress' final farm bill has a lot of problems. I
remain concerned about the dissolution of the safety net that protects farmers and rural America
during lean times. I still have reservations about making large payments to producers regardless
of market conditions." With reluctance, Glickman recommended to President Clinton that he sign
this bill. Glickman commented that he was pleased to see strong research and trade titles, an
extension of the nutrition safety net and the Fund for Rural America. Contact: Jim Petterson
(202) 720-4623.

RUSSIAN POULTRY BAN LIFTED -- The United States and Russia have successfully concluded
discussions on sanitary requirements that will permit the immediate resumption of exports of U.S.
poultry to Russia. This result was achieved through a joint effort by the Government and private
sector. Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman said, "The accord reached (March 26) establishes
a framework for reviewing U.S. poultry processing plants and cold storage that export poultry to
Russia and provides for development of mutually agreed criteria for review of U.S. facilities in the
future." Initially, such reviews will be conducted jointly by U.S. and Russian veterinarians.
Subsequent reviews will be carried out by the USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service. The
additional problem of new Russian tariffs on poultry imports remains to be resolved. Contact:
Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.

"MAD COW" DISEASE -- The U. S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection
Service and the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service are currently working with their state
and public health counterparts, the scientific community and industry representatives to review
current policies and regulations concerning BSE (bovine spongiform encephalopathy). The United
States has not imported processed beef or cattle from the United Kingdom since 1989 and
enforces similar stringent restrictions on importations from other countries where BSE exists.
USDA's BSE surveillance program has examined more than 2,660 specimens from 43 states, and
no BSE has ever been detected in cattle in the United States. Contact: Kendra Pratt (301) 734-
6573.

MEETING HELD ON BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY -- The U.S. Department of
Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service held a meeting (March 22) to review
current U.S. policies and regulations dealing with Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE). The
meeting was called in quick response to an announcement (March 20) in Great Britain of a newly
identified variation of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, a human neural disease, that may be linked to
the BSE epidemic in British cattle. USDA's intent is to review current policies to ensure that the
U.S. maintains a coordinated, science-based and effective approach that will keep the U.S. free
of BSE. Contact: Kendra Pratt (301) 734-6573.






FUNDS AUTHORIZED TO COMBAT KARNAL BUNT -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman
announced (March 27) that he has signed a "declaration of emergency" authorizing the transfer
and use of funds to conduct a program to identify, control and eradicate Karnal bunt. This
declaration was made in conjunction with the "extraordinary emergency" he announced (March
21) that gives USDA the ability to take a wide range of actions within states, including the use of
quarantines, to control and eradicate the outbreak. Secretary Glickman said, "We are taking
these steps to protect our producers, protect our export markets and to provide growers affected
by Kamal bunt with the best possible options." The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service,
a part of USDA's marketing and regulatory programs mission area, in cooperation with Texas,
Arizona and New Mexico, is conducting surveys and establishing regulatory controls necessary
to protect wheat production areas of the United States. Contact: Beth Hulse (301) 734-7280.

KARNAL BUNT QUARANTINE ANNOUNCED The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced
(March 26) a quarantine for the state of Arizona, four counties in the state of New Mexico and two
counties in Texas because of Karnal bunt, a fungus that infects wheat. This quarantine restricts
the interstate movement of regulated articles, such as wheat, conveyances used to move wheat,
grain elevators or equipment used to store wheat and milling products or byproducts, from
quarantined areas. Don Husnik, deputy administrator for USDA's Animal and Plant Inspection
Service said, "This quarantine is necessary to prevent the spread of Karnal bunt into noninfected
areas of the United States and to help protect our export markets." Dona Ana, Hidalgo, Luna and
Sierra are the four quarantined counties in New Mexico. El Paso and Hudspeth are the two
quarantined counties in Texas. Contact: Beth Hulse (301) 734-7280.

BUDGET PROPOSALS FOR RESEARCH, EDUCATION AND ECONOMICS -- Under Secretary
of Agriculture Karl Stauber presented FY 1997 budget proposals (March 20) for the U.S.
Department of Agriculture's research, education and economics areas. In testimony before the
House Committee on Appropriations, Stauber requested $1.8 billion for 1997, about the same as
the 1996 appropriation for the Agricultural Research Service (ARS), the Cooperative State
Research, Education and Extension Service (CSREES), the Economic Research Service (ERS),
and the National Agricultural and Statistics Service (NASS). Total funding requested for ARS is
$806 million-an increase of $66 million. Budget request for CSREES is $847 million, a reduction
of $65 million, and proposed funding for ERS is $55 million. Proposed budget for NASS is $103
million-an increase of $22 million. Contact: Stephen Teasley (202) 720-8329.

VENTURE CAPITAL REPAYMENTS ACCEPTED -- As part of National Agriculture Day, (March
20) Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman recognized the work of two companies. These two
companies are taking part in a U.S. Department of Agriculture venture capital program. The two
companies BioPlus, Inc., of Ashburn, Georgia, and Aquinas Technologies of St. Louis, Missouri
- repaid part of the investments made in these firms by the Alternative Agricultural Research and
Commercialization (AARC) Center. Aquinas repaid $24,090.10 and BioPlus repaid $22,746.53.
Contact: Ron Buckhalt (202) 690-2164.

FAX AND INTERNET -- Radio and TV programming information and Broadcasters Letter can
be obtained through USDA's AgNewsFax or from USDA's Home Page. FAX: Use fax phone to
call (202) 690-3944. At voice prompts, press 1, press 4, then to receive Broadcasters Letter,
press 9200; radio newsline information, press 9250; TV contents billboard, press 9260; TV scripts,
press 9270. After all selections, then press #, press 3, and press the start button on fax machine.
INTERNET: Address for this letter is http:/lwww.usda.govlnews/bdcaster/bdcaster.htm.
EDITED BY LESUE PARKER







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #2026 -- Gary Crawford takes an in-depth look at a different type of radio,
"Farm Broadcasting -- From 1926 to the Present." Included are lots of interviews with farm
broadcasters as well, as sound recordings from decades ago. (Weekly cassette -- five minute
documentary).

CONSUMER TIME #1504 -- No "mad cow" disease in this country. Farm Broadcasting: a different
type of radio. Turning corporate landscapes into wetlands. National trails are getting more
visitors than ever before. Turning munitions into fertilizers. (Weekly cassette -- consumer
features).

AGRITAPE #2018 -- Russia lifts poultry ban. Beef production is up considerably. Slow start for
new apples. U.S. scientists are working on ways to protect U.S. fruit growers. Turning weeds into
cash crops. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wednesday, April 10, cotton/citrus production, world
agricultural supply and demand (cotton). Thursday, April 11, world agricultural supply and
demand, and cotton and wool outlook. These are USDA reports we know about in advance.
Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Wind erosion and air quality are the focus of a research and education program
in Washington state to control PM10 emissions. PM10 is particulate matter less than 10 microns
in size. These very fine particles of dust are believed to cause health problems. In this three-part
series, Lynn Wyvill reports on efforts by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the rest of the
agricultural community to learn more about PM10 and ways to control it.

ACTUALITIES -- Includes highlights of Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman's testimony before
the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Agriculture (March 21).

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS: Thursday from 3:45 to 4:00 p.m. ET,
Telstar 402R (located at 89 degrees West), Transponder 13, Vertical Polarity, Downlink
Frequency 3960 MHz.
\ **Note: Effective May 2-September 26, the satellite newsfeed coordinates will change to:
Telstar 401(97 degrees West), Transponder 7, Vertical Polarity, Downlink Frequency 3840
MHz.
Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


OFF MIKE 3 1262 08135

CORRECT ANSWERS...to agricultural trivia questions on Agriculture Day last week earned gift
certificates for listeners who were tuned-in to Rita Frazer (WSMI-FM, Litchfield, IL). Rita says she
gave away about $500 worth of agricultural product prizes. Soil temperatures in her area are still
cool with corn planting expected to begin around April 15. Rita was raised on a farm nearby and
has handled farm broadcasting duties for six years with her station.

SNOW CONTINUES...this week in northern and midwestern locations. Charlie Kampa (KBRF-
AM, Fergus Falls, MN) said an eight-inch snowfall pushed this winter's total in his area to near 75
inches. It's still cold, too. Charlie said temperatures dipped to 11 degrees this week. Snow
melting has been slow thus far, but a sudden warm up could cause some flooding concerns. He
predicts there will be plenty of topsoil moisture for spring planting. A 16-year broadcasting
veteran, Charlie has been a farm broadcaster with his station for the past six years.

RAIN FOR DRY TEXAS...brought some encouragement to farmers and ranchers there this week.
Curt Lancaster (Voice of Southwest Agriculture Network, San Angelo, TX) said rainfall totals were
less than a half-inch, but were widespread over the state. Fire danger is still high, but pastures
are beginning to "green up." Amy Bugg, formerly with WSDR in Sterling, IL and a marketing firm
in Peoria, IL, joined the VSA team this week. Curt says their network now serves nearly 70 Texas
stations.

COUNTRY MUSIC... freelance reporting for ABC Radio is the new occupation for Dan Gordon
(formerly with Tennessee Agrinet, Nashville, TN). Steve Hayes, who has been with Tennessee
Agrinet for seven years, has assumed agricultural reporting duties. Formerly, Steve was a
morning news anchor and a state capitol reporter. He now produces three 10-minute agricultural
shows per day (5:00 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and noon), four 2-minutes features, market news and
weath Also, Stev does farm news for Alabama Agrinet.


LARRY UINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










United States Department of Atrturjpu Office df jmunications Washington, DC 20250-1300


Letter No. 2759 ,April 5, 1996

SWIFT IMPLEMENTATION FO LR bILL'-- Iture Secretary Dan Glickman pledged that
the U.S. Department of Agr -woul quickly to implement the farm bill passed by
Congress last week and signed "4 b dent Clinton. "Now that the farm bill is law, the
next critical round of work begins -- impmentation," Glickman said. "Congress left us in a very
tight time crunch. Producers have been patiently waiting for information about how these new
programs will work." Glickman said, "I pledge that this department will do everything in its power
to disseminate information to the public as quickly as possible." Dates for the one-time sign-up
for the seven-year market transition program will be announced within two weeks, and all program
details will be available at that time. "I remain concerned that this legislation fails to provide an
adequate safety net for family farmers," Glickman said. "While we implement the new farm bill we
also will continue to seek innovative ways to inmppy vthef farm safety net and help producers
manage risk." Contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-4 cle.

AGRICULTURAL TRADE UPDATE -- U.S. agriculfkMI oflpr January totaled a record $5.5
billion, according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture report (April 2). Exports rose 3 percent
compared with December 1995 and were 24 per0ntihlte llt,,January 1995. Imports rose 13
percent over December to $2.7 billion, but were only percent higher than a year earlier. The
agricultural trade surplus was $2.8 billion, second only to December 1995's record of nearly $3
billion. Accumulated exports for October 1995-January 1996 totaled $21.2 billion, 15 percent
higher than the same period of fiscal 1995. In fiscal 1996, bulk exports, especially wheat, corn,
soybeans and cotton, were up 30 percent compared with 1995. Year-to-date bulk export volume
was only up 3 percent at 46 million tons. Tight global grain and soybean stocks continued to push
commodity prices higher, driving export value upwards. Beef, pork, poultry meat, and fruit and nut
exports continued to advance, boosting high-value product (HVP) exports. However, a 22-percent
decline in fresh vegetable exports offset some of the HVP gains. Contact: Joel Greene (202)
219-0816.

STEPS TO KEEP U.S. FREE OF "MAD COW" DISEASE -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture
and the U.S. Public Health Service expressed support (March 29) for voluntary measures by the
livestock industry to ensure that the U.S. remains free of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
(BSE). USDA has been monitoring for BSE for ten years and has never identified a single case.
In addition, no beef from England has been imported into the U.S. since at least 1985. The
measures announced will provide an additional level of assurance that the U.S. remains free of
BSE. Both agencies stressed that these measures are designed to provide the American public
the assurance that the U.S. food supply remains among the safest in the world. This industry
announcement includes a voluntary program to ensure that ruminant products are not used in
ruminant feed. Ruminant animals include cattle, sheep and goats. In addition, the Centers for
Disease Control emphasized that since they began monitoring Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease mortality
data, the number of cases in the U.S. has remained stable at about one case per million per year
since 1979. Contact: Will Hueston (301) 734-8093.







CROP DESTRUCTION FOR KARNAL BUNT ANNOUNCED -- The U.S. Department of
Agriculture announced (April 1) crop destruction orders for farming operations infected with Karnal
bunt in New Mexico and Texas, approximately 4,000 acres. Farming operations that comply with
the emergency action order and plow their wheat crops down may be eligible to receive
compensation. USDA will use the funding available under the declaration of emergency, which
Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman announced (March 28), to compensate producers. USDA's
Chief Economist Office has determined that compensation for crop destruction in New Mexico and
Texas would be appropriate at a rate of $275 an acre plus $25 an acre for plowing. Producers
who receive compensation under the declaration of emergency may not be eligible for crop
insurance indemnity. Contact: Beth Hulse (301) 734-7280.

PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS TO RECEIVE EXTRA DEFICIENCY PAYMENTS -- Corn and
sorghum producers who used the 0-85/92 provisions of the 1995 feed grain and price support
acreage reduction program will receive approximately $27 million in additional deficiency
payments, Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman announced (April 1). The Agricultural Act of 1949,
as amended, requires that deficiency payments be made when either the national weighted
average market prices received by producers during the first five months of the marketing year
(September 1995 through January 1996) plus seven cents or the projected 12-month average
market price is below the established target price. Because the adjusted five-month prices and
the projected 12-month average farm prices for corn and sorghum are above the target price
established for each crop, no regular deficiency payments are due producers at this time.
However, participants in the 1995 corn and sorghum program who used the 0-85/92 provisions
are guaranteed minimum payment rates of 40 cents per bushel for corn and 39 cents per bushel
for sorghum, which were the estimated final deficiency payment rates for these crops when
producers enrolled in the program. Contact: Phil Sronce (202) 720-4417.

USDA TARGETS MARKETS UNDER EEP AND DEIP -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman
announced (April 1) a three-month continuation of the interim allocations under the 1995/1996
Export Enhancement Program (EEP) and Dairy Export Incentive Program (DEIP) for the period
April through June. During the interim period, procedures for EEP and DEIP are similar to the
previous programs. Export sales will be facilitated through the payment of bonuses by the USDA's
Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC). While recent program activity has been limited, USDA
will continue to monitor the prices and actions of competitors, and fully intends to use the EEP and
DEIP as appropriate. Details of the program, including invitations for offers, will be issued in the
future. Contact: Lynn Goldsbrough (202) 720-3930.

INCREASE IN FY '96 TARIFF-RATE QUOTA FOR RAW-CANE SUGAR -- Agriculture Secretary
Dan Glickman announced (April 1) that the fiscal year 1996 tariff-rate quota (TRQ) for raw-cane
sugar has been increased by 200,000 metric tons (220,462 short tons). The fiscal year 1996 TRQ
level is therefore set at 2,017,195 metric tons (2,223,577 short tons). Country allocations of the
increased TRQ will be announced by the U.S. Trade Representative. The Department will
continue monitoring import requirements and will take necessary action to assure sufficient sugar
supplies in the domestic market. TRQ adjustments will be made based on the most reliable supply
and use information available. USDA is also monitoring the export intentions of foreign suppliers
and will take action in conjunction with the U.S. Trade Representative, including reallocation if
necessary, to facilitate the timely arrival of TRQ allocations. Contact: Lynn K. Goldsbrough
(202) 720-3930. EDITED BY LESLIE PARKER







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #2027 -- It's called BSE or "mad cow" disease, and it has caused a panic
in Great Britain. What is this disease and what is the latest scientific information available on
Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE). Brenda Curtis covers the subject. (Weekly cassette
-- five minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME #1505 -- The new Farm Bill and consumers. The Healthy Eating Index. BSE
Update. Sports and eating disorders. Gaining weight can be part of old age for some men.
(Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE #2018 -- 1996 farm payments and sign-up. What are farmers planting? U.S. livestock
industry places voluntary ban on certain types of feed. Pork expansion slowing down. New Farm
Bill--new farming philosophy. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Friday, April 12, feed outlook, oil crops outlook, rice
outlook, wheat outlook, hog outlook, world agricultural production, grains: world markets and
trade, oilseeds: world markets and trade. Tuesday, April 16, weekly weather and crop outlook.
Friday, April 19, agricultural outlook. These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our
newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on how the 1996 Farm Bill will affect farmers and nonfarmers.
Eric Parsons reports on the new Farm Program in the Farm Bill.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman highlights provisions of the new Federal
Agriculture Improvement and Reform Act of 1996. USDA Chief Economist Keith Collins and Farm
Services Agency Administrator Grant Buntrock make additional comments on the new Farm Bill.


SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS: Thursday from 3:45 to 4:00 p.m. ET,
Telstar 402R (located at 89 degrees West), Transponder 13, Vertical Polarity, Downlink
Frequency 3960 MHz.

**Note: Effective May 2-September 26, the satellite newsfeed coordinates will change to:
Telstar 401(97 degrees West), Transponder 7, Vertical Polarity, Downlink Frequency 3840
MHz.
Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFF MIKE 3 1262 08135 948 0

CHERRY BLOSSOMS...and 70 degree temperatures have arrived in Washington, D.C. this week.
The blossoms and holiday week have brought many out-of-town visitors to the Nation's capital.
Members of the National Association of Farm Broadcasters (NAFB) are coming here April 20-23
for their annual "Washington Watch" conference. We're looking forward to welcoming participants
at USDA on Monday, April 22, starting with a morning reception in our Video, Teleconference and
Radio Center.

PLANTING TIME...is nearing for many crops. John Everly (KDTH, Dubuque, IA) says they need
some rain to chase away residual ground frost because soil temperatures are still cool. He says
river terminals in his area have been doing a brisk business with strong demand for U.S. grains.
Not many farmers have "old crop" corn left since a high percentage of grain grown in John's region
is fed locally to livestock. Alfalfa also is a major crop with harvesting usually done in early May.
John begins his seventh year as farm broadcaster for KDTH next week. His radio career began
in 1982, and for the past 10 years he has worked in farm broadcasting.

COTTON...planting intentions are lower this year, reports Dave Black (WMC, Memphis, TN), but
early indicators point to a better than average yield. Boll weevils have not overwintered to the
extent they did last year. Because of the improved prospects, some farmers who were going to
try corn this year may be switching back. Dave says a good rule for cotton planting time is after
five consecutive days of 60 degree soil temperature, which usually falls around April 15. Corn
planting in his region has already been done, but some farmers are having to re-plant. Next year
will be Dave's 40th year with WMC. He prepares four broadcasts throughout the day, Monday-
Friday, and hosts a "Sunrise" program on Sunday mornings where he uses features from our
weekly radio cassette service. Dave uses humor and character voices to liven his broadcasts.

FARM BILL...information is now available from USDA's Home Page on the Internet. Watch for
details of the Federal Agriculture Improvement and Reform Act of 1996. You can access the home
pa e at his addre s: http://www.usda.gov. This letter is there, too.

LARRY AQUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Prkate Use S300









United States Department of Agriculture ,fie Communications Washington, DC 20250-1300
-""- e ,. h Marston Science


Letter No. 2761 N i MA ['Y 2 9 1996 April 19, 1996

USDA OPENS TRADE OFFI(4; SHANG -- A'icAjri psieofeitldDan Glickman has
announced the opening of an Agrl I lt Trade ffije Shanghai, China. Glickman said, "We
are acutely aware of the tremendoihinese agricultural trade and its growing
importance to both of our nations. Sh i gateway to China's vast eastern and central
market. This region of roughly 400 million people is larger than the population of many major
countries with whom we have trading relationships." The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Foreign
Agricultural Service (FAS) is opening the office to help U.S. exporters tap into this growing market.
U.S. food, fish and forestry exports to China in fiscal year 1995 were $2.5 billion, making it the
ninth largest market. The Shanghai opening brings to 13 the number of agricultural trade offices
operated by FAS. These offices are centers for U.S. export sales promotions and contact points
for importers seeking to buy agricultural products from the United States. The agricultural trade
officer is Scott Reynolds. Contact: Glen Kaup (202) 720-3329.

USDA ANNOUNCES ONE-TIME SIGNUP PERIOD -- Producers wishing to enroll their farms in
a Production Flexibility Contract must do so during a one-time signup period from May 20 through
July 12. Authorized by the 1996 Farm Bill, the contracts are for seven years, beginning in 1996.
Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman said, "I wish to stress that this is the only opportunity
producers will have to enroll and those who fail to do so now will not be eligible at a later date.
There will be no further additional signups except for land coming out of the Conservation Reserve
Program. This is required by the 1996 Act, and I have no discretion to extend this date." Glickman
reminded producers that compliance with conservation and wetlands provisions continues to be
a condition of participation. The total amount of payment a person may receive in any fiscal year
may not exceed $40,000. A producer may enroll all or part of the farm's contract base acreage
in the program and, after signup, may request a permanent reduction in the acreage without
penalty. Payment and loan rates will be announced soon. Contact: Dann Stuart (202) 690-
0474.

FOOD STAMP PARTICIPATION CONTINUES TO DECREASE -- Continuing steady declines in
food stamp participation resulted in savings of more than $1 billion between August 1994 and
January 1996. January participation totaled 25.90 million people, down by more than one million
from January 1995. December participation included 25.88 million people, down by more than one
million from December 1994. Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman said, "The continuing decline
in food stamp participation means significant savings to the taxpayer." January was the 18th
consecutive month in which food stamp participation was lower than it was in the same month in
the previous year. Contact: Alicia Bambara (703) 305-2039








USDA'S TEAM NUTRITION REACHING MILLIONS OF CHILDREN -- Team Nutrition, the U.S.
Department of Agriculture's program to improve school meals and promote the health and nutrition
education of children, is already reaching millions of children at thousands ofschools with its
dietary messages of lower fat, more variety, and more fruits, vegetables and grains. Launched
last June as a tool to help implement USDA's School Meals Initiative for Healthy Children, Team
Nutrition has strategically partnered with and developed an extensive network of more than 200
organizations ranging from top health and industry organizations and federal agencies to local
community businesses representing food, agriculture, nutrition, health and education. During the
next few months, Team Nutrition will announce new partnerships and programs to reach middle
and senior grades. Also, a family, food and resource guide will be released in commemoration
of the 50th Anniversary of the National School Lunch Program that will be filled with family
activities and 50 nutritious, economical, kid-friendly recipes. Contact: Alicia Bambara (703)
305-2039.

USDA/AMERICORPS COMMEMORATES OKLAHOMA BOMBING -- The U.S. Department of
Agriculture's AmeriCorps members nationwide will observe April 23 as a Day of National Service
with treeplanting and other activities to commemorate the first-year anniversary of the bombing
of the federal building in Oklahoma City. AmeriCorps/USDA members from Cheyenne, Sentinel
and Woodward, Oklahoma, will join members of other organizations in Oklahoma City to plant
trees, present educational programs concerning conservation, and conduct cleanup and repair
activities at the Mark Twain Elementary School, a mile from the bombing site. The school was
slightly damaged by the explosion, but did not qualify for special funding for repairs available in
the wake of the bombing. On April 19, the actual anniversary of the explosion, AmeriCorps/USDA
members in Claremore, Oklahoma, participate in two treeplanting ceremonies at the Rogers State
College Conservation Reserve. Contact: LeRoy Tull (405) 742-1207.

DEPUTY UNDER SECRETARY APPOINTED -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced
the appointment of Mary Ann Keeffe as Deputy Under Secretary for Food, Nutrition and Consumer
Services. Keeffe most recently served as deputy administrator for special nutrition programs at
USDA's Food and Consumer Service where she was charged with overseeing child nutrition
programs, including the School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs; the Special Supplemental
Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children; the Commodity Distribution Programs; and
nutrition education and technical services activities. In her new role as Deputy Under Secretary,
Keeffe will be responsible for policy and program development for the Food and Consumer
Service's 15 food assistance programs. Keeffe also will help oversee Team Nutrition, USDA's
nationwide program designed to support schools in providing healthful school meals and to
educate children about good nutrition. Contact: Alicia Bambara (703) 305-2039.

FAX AND INTERNET -- Radio and TV programming information and Broadcasters Letter can
be obtained through USDA's AgNewsFax or from USDA's Home Page. FAX: Use fax phone to
call (202) 690-3944. At voice prompts, press 1, press 4, then to receive Broadcasters Letter,
press 9200; radio newsline information, press 9250; TV contents billboard, press 9260; TV scripts,
press 9270. After all selections, then press #, press 3, and press the start button on fax machine.
INTERNET: Address for this letter is http://www.usda.gov/news/bdcaster/bdcaster.htm.


EDITED BY LESLIE PARKER







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #2029 -- The new Farm Bill will dramatically change the world of U.S.
agriculture. It is important to remember that the Farm Bill is for both producers and consumers.
Gary Crawford reports on this revolutionary legislation. (Weekly cassette -- five minute
documentary).

CONSUMER TIME #1506 -- Early spring gardening. Spring lawn care. Pruning out the
deadwood. A food stamp reserve request. Teaching Native American Children about their
conservation heritage. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE #2020 -- It's a bull market for grains. Grain "rationing." Farmers and the new
telecommunications bill. IPM consultants. Does soil effect plant growth? (Weekly cassette --
news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Monday, April 29, crop progress and catfish
production. Tuesday, April 30, agricultural prices. These are USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES: Patrick O'Leary reports on the Urban Resources Partnership and environmental
program that was launched on Earth Day 1994. The program teams federal agencies and
communities to solve problems. Lynn Wyvill reports on the New York City Watershed Project, a
voluntary farmer-run, fully funded program aimed at protecting water quality. USDA's Natural
Resources Conservation Service provided technical assistance for the program.

ACTUALITIES: Paul Johnson, chief of USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service, outlines
a series of environmental forums to be held next week throughout the nation. USDA Under
Secretary of Agriculture James Lyons comments about Earth Day and agriculture.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS: Thursday from 3:45 to 4:00 p.m. ET,
Telstar 402R (located at 89 degrees West), Transponder 13, Vertical Polarity, Downlink
Frequency 3960 MHz.


**SATELLITE CHANGE: Effective May 2-September 26, the satellite newsfeed coordinates
will change to: Telstar 401(97 degrees West), Transponder 7, Vertical Polarity, Downlink
Frequency 3840 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

lll l! II ll
OFF MIKE 3 262 08135 943 1
OFF MIKE

KANSAS FARMERS...can tune their tractor and pickup radios to the Kansas City Royals network
(Topeka, KS) for a two-hour Farm Bill interactive discussion on Saturday, April 20, 5:00-7:00 p.m.,
reports Sam Knipp, manager of radio programs for the Kansas Farm Bureau, who will host the
broadcast. He explains that this will be a "nuts and bolts" session about the Farm Bill featuring
on-air guests: Greg Frazier, Chief of Staff, U.S. Department of Agriculture; Gary Mitchell, House
Agriculture Committee staff; and Chuck Conner, Senate Agriculture Committee staff. Sam
anticipates that some farmers who still may be planting corn at that time of day will call in from
their tractor cellular phones to participate along with others having questions and comments.
Kansas did get some needed snow and rain over last weekend, but Sam says he's heard reports
that the state's leading wheat county of Sumner has plowed up 90 percent of its acreage because
of lack of moisture.

CATTLE MARKET...has affected many of the South Dakota listeners who tune in Don Wick and
Judy Stratman (WNAX, Yankton, SD). Don says the cow-calf producers are having a tough time,
and other cattle producers are experiencing high feed grain costs. Even though there was
snowfall within the last few days, planting is expected to begin by the end of the week. Don and
Judy are on-the-air 30-35 hours per week with five-state weather information, auction market
reports and general news for their wheat, corn, soybean and livestock producers. Don assumed
the farm director position at WNAX last August and is currently President-Elect of the National
Association of Farm Broadcasters (NAFB). He's already busy planning the program for NAFB's
annual conference in November.

HALL OF FAME...has a new member. On April 12, Orion Samuelson (WGN, Chicago, IL) was
inducted into the Chicago Journalism Hall of Fame. Congratulations, Orion!




LARRY A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-6
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penaky for Priate Usa $300







Ir; i


HI H


United States Department of Agri officee of m iunications Washington, DC 20250-1300

Letter No. 2762 188. April 26, 1996

GLICKMAN VISITS DROUG I ARE Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman is
scheduled to visit the Texas Pan rteato, t eet with farmers and view drought-stricken
areas. On April 27, Glickman plans,', i. ntral Kansas to see drought conditions there
and talk with local producers. During hii~! e will hold a town hall meeting to hear concerns
from local farmers. Contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.

COMMENTS SOUGHT ON '96 FARM BILL CONSERVATION PROVISIONS -- U. S. Department
of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is seeking public comments and
views from across the country on innovative ways to implement the conservation provisions of the
1996 Farm Bill. Written comments may be mailed or faxed to: Paul Johnson, Chief, USDA
NRCS, P.O. Box 2890, Washington, D.C. 20013. The fax number is (202) 720-1838. Comments
should be postmarked or faxed no later than April 30. New provisions include the Environmental
Quality Incentives Program, Farmland Protection Program, Flood Risk Reduction Program,
Conservation Farm Option, Conservation of Private Grazing Land Initiative, National Natural
Resources Conservation Foundation and Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program. Modified provisions
include those to the wetlands conservation program, conservation compliance, Conservation
Reserve Program, Emergency Watershed Protection Prddfir t, Wt chnical committees and
Wetlands Reserve Program. Contact: Diana Morse (202) 72r 47f2.

WHERE OUR CHILDREN EAT More of the nation's children are eating away from home during
the mid-1990's than in the late 1970's. They're also consuming ore averages and grain-based
snack foods and combination foods, such as pizza. Child re ah~n'' fat and drinking less
milk, according to data from the first year of the current three-year U.S. Department of Agriculture
nationwide food consumption survey "What We Eat in America." Agriculture Secretary Dan
Glickman said, 'This is the only nationwide survey that measures the kinds and amounts of food
eaten by Americans, and links the diet and health knowledge of individuals with their food and
nutrient intakes." Survey results show that roughly two-thirds of those who are school-aged six
through 19 consumed food and drink that were provided away from home in 1994, up from about
55 percent in 1977-78. Contact: Johna Pierce (202) 720-4623.

OFFICE CONSTRUCTED WITH ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY PRODUCTS -- Agriculture
Secretary Dan Glickman and Deputy Secretary Richard Rominger visited a new Washington, D.C.
office (April 24), constructed with environmentally friendly agricultural materials that might
otherwise go to waste-products that have been developed with the help of the U.S. Department
of Agriculture. USDA's venture capital program, Alternative Agricultural Research and
Commercialization (AARC) Corporation, provided start-up funds to several businesses which
contributed to the construction of the office, the new headquarters for the Natural Resources
Defense Council (NRDC). The AARC Corporation provides venture capital to businesses to
commercialize industrial (non-feed, non-food) uses for agricultural products. Glickman toured the
NRDC office as part of USDA's Earth Week activities. Contact: Ron Buckhalt (202) 690-1624.


,1






EFFORTS TO FEED THE HUNGRY ANNOUNCED -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman has
announced 17 states where AmeriCorps members will participate in gleaning and food rescue
activities this summer. Glickman said, 'The 17 USDA gleaning projects and their 84 AmeriCorps
members will serve as a nucleus that fans out into local communities and mobilizes other
volunteers Boy Scouts, church groups, students and trains them to go out to the farms, talk
to restaurants and farmers' markets and work with local food banks." Glickman added, "Forging
these direct links will help ensure that when our AmeriCorps people return to school, the important
work of feeding needy families will continue." Secretary Glickman also announced that USDA
recently established a toll-free number (1-800 GLEAN IT) to serve as a clearinghouse for
gleaning and food rescue efforts throughout the country. Contact: Laura Trivers (202) 720-
4623.

$4 MILLION FOR URBAN RESOURCES PARTNERSHIPS -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture
will award $4 million for community-based environmental action as part of Urban Resources
Partnerships, Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman announced (April 22). This program began in
1994 and is a coalition of seven federal agencies as well as state and local governments. The
partnerships are in eight cities: Atlanta, Chicago, Denver, East St. Louis, Los Angeles, New York,
Philadelphia and Seattle. Nationwide, the Urban Resources Partnership provides funding and
technical assistance to community-based groups participating in a variety of natural resource
projects. Federal agencies participating include: USDA's Forest Service, Natural Resources
Conservation Service and the Cooperative Research, Education and Extension Service;
Department of Interior's National Park Service and the Fish and Wildlife Service; U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.
Contact: Janet Sledge (202) 720-2065.

USDA HOLDS THIRD RURAL FORUM Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman and U.S.
Representative Tim Holden held a rural forum April 19 in Pennsylvania at the Berks County
Agriculture Center in Bern Township. This was the third of six regional forums to discuss local
agricultural concerns as the nation moves into the 21st Century. Agriculture Secretary Dan
Glickman said the forum provided "an opportunity for us to listen and share ideas about critical
farm bill issues: production, conservation and dairy issues, as well as the food stamp and school
lunch programs." Among the presenters at the forum included Ralph Heffner, Agway president
and fruit farmer; Lary Kehl, dairy farmer and USDA Farm Service Agency committee member; Ed
Hartman, sixth-generation farmer; Bill Wehry, farmer; Gary Rightmire, executive director of Berks
County Assistance Office; and Linda Roeberg, teacher, Lorane Elementary School in Reading,
Pennsylvania. Contact: Johna Pierce (202) 720-1691.

USDA'S ECONOMIC RESEARCH SERVICE ADMINISTRATOR -- Susan Offutt was recently
named administrator of USDA's Economic Research Service (ERS). In this position, she manages
the USDA agency that provides economic and social science information and analysis for public
and private decisions on agriculture, food, natural resources and rural America. ERS creates new
knowledge from research and database development activities. That knowledge is used to
provide timely, analytically-based information about conditions and changes in the food and
agricultural system and the rural economy and likely effects on U.S. agriculture and rural America.
As an alumna of ERS, Offutt is no stranger to the agency she leads. She rejoined ERS from the
National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences where she was the executive
director of the Board on Agriculture and assistant executive officer. Contact: Maria Bynum (202)
720-5192. EDITED BY LESLIE PARKER







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #2030 -- There is some concern about the new product "Olestra." Brenda
Curtis talks with nutritionist Mark Kantor about the pros and cons of this fake fat. (Weekly
cassette -- five minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME #1507 -All about Olestra. Is Spring "bugging" you? Low income families can
buy and build their own home. What do kids eat? One drink too many may deplete the body of
an essential vitamin. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE #2021 -- China's trade status. Will farmers plant more? The Farm Bill and
Conservation. Farm product promotion and the Farm Bill. Well-water testing. (Weekly cassette
-- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thursday, May 9, world agricultural supply and
demand; crop production: citrus. Friday, May 10, world supply and demand; cotton and wool
outlook; crop production; cotton and wool outlook. These are USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES: Lynn Wyvill reports on USDA's support of local community efforts to feed the
hungry. Secretary Dan Glickman announced a summer of gleaning project that will put 84
AmeriCorps members to work in 17 states to feed needy families. Patrick O'Leary reports on
Secretary Dan Glickman's visit to a new Washington, D.C. office, constructed with environmentally
friendly agricultural materials that might otherwise go to waste. These products were developed
with help from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. USDA's venture capital program, Alternative
Agricultural Research and Commercialization Corporation (AARC), provided startup funds to
several businesses which contributed to the construction of the office, the new headquarters for
the Natural Resources Defense Council.

ACTUALITIES: Excerpts from Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman's remarks to farm
broadcasters in Washington, D.C. April 22.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS: Thursday from 3:45 to 4:00 p.m. ET,
Telstar 402R (located at 89 degrees West), Transponder 13, Vertical Polarity, Downlink
Frequency 3960 MHZ. (Transponder will change next week. See below.)

**NEW SATELLITE COORDINATES: Effective May 2-September 26, the satellite newsfeed
coordinates will change to: Telstar 402R (89 degrees West), Transponder 20, Horizontal
Polarity, Downlink Frequency 4100 MHZ.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFF MIKE 4

SECRETARY GLICKMAN...and other key USDA officials met with 40 broadcasters representing
the National Association of Farm Broadcasters (NAFB) who were here for their "Washington
Watch" conference this week. Following keynote remarks by Secretary of Agriculture Dan
Glickman on April 22, broadcasters heard a panel of experts discuss Farm Bill issues, Karnal bunt
and results of a meat concentration study. Participants questioned USDA officials after their
remarks and spent the early afternoon doing individual interviews with Under Secretaries Jill
Long Thompson, Gene Moos and Karl Stauber; Assistant Secretary Mike Dunn; Agency
Administrators Paul Johnson (Natural Resources Conservation Service) and Lon Hatamiya
(Agricultural Marketing Service); and other USDA experts on a variety of current topics. During
a luncheon break, several participants visited our radio and TV staff and facilities. NAFB
President John Winfield (Mississippi Network, Jackson, MS), President-Elect Don Wick (WNAX,
Yankton, SD), and Vice President Stewart Doan (ARN Agriculture, Little Rock, AR) led the
delegation. Conference Coordinator was Gary Wergin (WHO, Des Moines, IA).

NORTH TO NEBRASKA...is the move Carey Martin (formerly with Oklahoma Agrinet, Oklahoma
City, OK) made in early April to become Farm Director for WOW in Omaha, NE.
Carey says he is planning to add a full-time assistant farm broadcaster to help in preparing the
14 daily programs that air from 5:50 a.m. to 5:15 p.m. A graduate of Louisiana State University,
he grew up in Louisiana working in his family's cattle operation. Carey replaces Kim Dlouhy who
left WOW to become director of communications for a corporate hog farm in Iowa Falls, IA.
Carey's phone number is (402) 573-5900.

OKLAHOMA NATIVE...returns to take Carey Martin's place at the microphone. Raised on a
peanut farm in southwestern Oklahoma, April Lovell has joined Ron Hays (Oklahoma Agrinet,
Oklahoma City, OK) on the network. She had been farm director for KTNZ/KBUY in Amarillo, TX.



LARR A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300







-IlIll,


United States Departr
Letter No. 2763 I


of Communications Washington, DC 20250-1300


May 3, 1996


EMERGENCY G RJll. PPROED ".While visiting the Texas Panhandle area to evaluate
drought conditions )gricul eSecretary Dan Glickman announced additional relief
measures for produr ergency grazing on Conservation Reserve Program
(CRP) acreage. The ne 'f-ilct action will be five percent for each month or any part of a
month that the emergency grazing authority is used. But, the payment reduction cannot exceed
the 25 percent payment reduction previously assessed. This new payment reduction provides
more flexibility to producers because they can determine the number of months the livestock graze
the CRP acreage. Glickman's decision is in response to the continued severe drought plaguing
the Southwest and concern that the CRP repayment reduction may be too severe considering the
quality of cover on CRP acreage. Farm Service Agency State Committees will evaluate weather
conditions in their states to determine whether the emergency grazing rovis ions- Ild continue.
When the emergency situation no longer exists (not to exceed Octob SB te emergency
grazing authority will expire. Contact: Dann Stuart (202) 690-0474.
JUN 7 1996
COMMODITY PAYMENT RATES ANNOUNCED -- Estimated Production Flexibility Contract
payment rates for fiscal years 1996 through 2002 for wheat, feed grq gH rl rfttt and rice
have been announced by Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman. The corr'facf ra'es reflect potential
payments to owners and producers who enroll their farms in a 7-year Production Flexibility
Contract. Final annual payments will be made to producers with contracts no later than
September 30, for each of fiscal years 1996-2002 payments. When final 1996 payments are
made, participating producers of wheat, barley, oats and upland cotton will receive an additional
payment, based on the amount of the 1995 deficiency payments required to be repaid. Also,
participating producers of these commodities who have not repaid their unearned 1995-crop
deficiency payments will have the amount due deducted from their final 1996 payments. These
overpayments occurred because advance payments for the 1995 crops must be repaid since
market prices have increased above the respective established (target) prices. Contact: Dann
Stuart (202) 690-0474.

REGULATORY REFORM PROPOSALS ISSUED -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food
Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced (May 1) two reform proposals as part of its
ongoing effort to improve food safety and modernize meat and poultry inspection. Agriculture
Secretary Dan Glickman said, "These proposals reflect our strategy to shift from a prescriptive
command and control system of regulation that can stifle innovation to one that provides greater
flexibility and responsibility to industry to produce safe products for consumers." One regulatory
revision being proposed would establish objective performance standards for the safe production
of cooked beef products, uncured meat patties and certain fully and partially cooked poultry
products. The second proposed rule would eliminate requirements for industry to obtain prior
approval from FSIS for facility blueprints and equipment and for most quality control programs.
The proposed rules were published in the May 2 Federal Register. Contact: Jacque Knight
(202) 720-9113.


II K I I I H-








ROLES CLARIFIED FOR NEW CONSERVATION PROGRAMS -- Secretary of Agriculture Dan
Glickman clarified (April 26) the roles of the Farm Service Agency (FSA) and the Natural
Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in the administration of the new conservation programs
created by the 1996 Farm Bill. Glickman designated the NRCS as having primary responsibility
for setting conservation policy for new programs, in particular, the Environmental Quality
Incentives Program. He reaffirmed FSA as the lead agency in the administration of the
Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). He also directed NRCS and FSA jointly to develop a
system utilizing to the fullest extent their networks of state, county and local officials to assist in
program delivery. Contact: Johna Pierce (202) 720-4623.

MARKETING ASSISTANCE LOAN RATES ANNOUNCED -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman
said (April 26) that the U.S. Department of Agriculture would offer nonrecourse marketing
assistance loans to producers with production flexibility contracts for the 1996 crops of wheat, feed
grains, rice and upland cotton and to any producers of soybeans, minor oilseeds, (sunflower seed,
canola, rapeseed, safflower, mustard seed, flaxseed) and ELS cotton. Both marketing loan and
loan deficiency payments will be implemented for 1996 crops as they were for 1995 crops.
Producers of ELS cotton are not eligible for either marketing loans or loan deficiency payments
under the Federal Agriculture Improvement and Reform Act of 1996. However, ELS cotton loans
continue to be nonrecourse, allowing the producer to forfeit the commodity to USDA's Commodity
Credit Corporation as full satisfaction of the loan if market prices are below principal plus interest.
Marketing assistance loan rates for all commodities (except rice) may differ from year to year.
Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

MEAT AND POULTRY HACCP ALLIANCE GETS USDA CONTRACT -- The U.S. Department
of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced (April 26) it has awarded
a contract to the International Meat and Poultry HACCP Alliance. Under the contract, the
organization will develop model plans to help implement the system of food safety controls known
as HACCP, Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point. FSIS requested the development of ten
generic models that could be used to assist meat and poultry plants in implementing new food
safety rules which are based on HACCP. These models will address operations such as beef,
pork and poultry slaughter as well as cooked ready-to-eat products. The $207,000 bid by the
Alliance, a Texas A & M University foundation, was one of five submitted to FSIS. Contact:
Jacque Knight (202) 720-9113.

FOOD STAMP RULE TO ENFORCE WORK REQUIREMENTS -- The U.S. Department of
Agriculture published new regulations (April 30) that impose tougher sanctions on people who
refuse to work or who break the rules of federal, state and local assistance programs. Agriculture
Secretary Dan Glickman said, "The regulations issued will end a system where one government
agency sanctions people and another increases their benefits. It helps move people from welfare
to work, and puts an end to a system that rewards individuals on Food Stamps and other programs
for not participating in the job programs and other requirements. This rule gives States the tools
they need to impose tougher sanctions on people who refuse to work." The final rule was
published in the April 30 Federal Register and will become effective in 30 days. Contact: Alicia
Bambara (703) 305-2039.
EDITED BY LESLIE PARKER







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #2031 -- Americans have a love affair with fresh cut flowers in their homes.
However, more and more of those flowers are coming from outside the United States. Gary
Crawford has this story. (Weekly cassette -- five minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME #1508 -- A break on fresh vegetable prices. Will a nutrient help you to lose
weight? The great Mother's Day flower invasion. A nutrient that helps diabetics. Get to know
your good bugs. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE #2022 -- USDA announces 1996 Farm Program payment rates. A quick look at the
new crop payment rates from USDA. U.S. requests WTO action on beef ban. Agricultural trade
surplus still growing. Holding onto your crop insurance? Emergency help for cattle producers.
(Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Monday, May 13, feed outlook, oil crops outlook,
rice outlook, wheat outlook, cattle and sheep outlook, world agricultural production, world grain
trade and world oilseed trade. Tuesday, May 14, farm labor report and weekly weather and crop
outlook. Friday, May 17, poultry outlook and cattle on feed report. These are USDA reports we
know about in advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed
in this lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.



FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES: Patrick O'Leary reports on government help for cattle producers, announced this
week at the White House.

ACTUALITIES: Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman comments on drought conditions in Texas
and Kansas as well as government help for cattle producers. USDA Farm Service Agency official
Parks Shackelford describes grazing allowance on Conservation Reserve Program acres. USDA
Under Secretary Ellen Haas describes "Operation Trident," a food stamp fraud sweep in
Tidewater, Virginia, Jacksonville, Florida and Seattle, Washington.


**NEW SATELLITE COORDINATES: Effective May 2-September 26, the satellite newsfeed
coordinates are: Telstar 402R (89 degrees West), Transponder 20, Horizontal Polarity,
Downlink Frequency 4100 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

4 3 1262 08135 933 2
OFF MIKE

NO RAIN, HIGH WINDS AND DUST...continue to describe conditions in the Texas Panhandle,
reports Larry DeSha (KGNC, Amarillo, TX). Only 1.11 inches of rain has fallen in Amarillo since
October 1, but Dalhart (at the top of the Panhandle) had its last rain in September. Secretary of
Agriculture Dan Glickman was there to inspect the agricultural situation last Friday. Conditions
are the worst Larry's seen in his 10 years at KGNC. Old-timers say if it weren't for the
Conservation Reserve Program and the land now planted to grass, they would be experiencing
Dust Bowl conditions. As it is, they've had five or six dust storms with 50-60 mph winds. Seventy-
five percent of the Texas wheat crop is in poor to very poor condition, but in the Panhandle, Larry
says 90 percent is in very poor shape. "It's an exciting time to be a farm broadcaster," he said.
Listeners are anxious for the latest word on market prices, weather and government
announcements.

CATTLE PRICES...continue to create tight margins for livestock producers who are paying record
prices for feed, reports Tom Riter (KFKA, Greeley, CO). Corn, barley and seeded onions are
being planted there with expectations up for corn acreage this year. KFKA is celebrating its 75th
Anniversary on May 21. In the early years, market reports were prepared by a reporter riding the
rails to Denver and back in time for a noon report. In his fifth year at KFKA, Tom earned the
Outstanding Media Support Award this year from his local soil conservation district.

KARNAL BUNT...is affecting a well-developed international market that Arizona producers had
for their durum wheat, reports George Gatley (Western Agri-Radio Network, Yuma, AZ). Seventy
wheat fields in California's Imperial Valley and fields in the Yuma area have found to be clean, he
said. Arizona's pasta wheat has been finding good markets in Italy. After 18 years, an agricultural
TV program that George hosted has gone off the air, but he continues his radio network which
includes 18 station hat cover California and Arizona.



ARR QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300




Full Text




SUPPORT PURCHASE PRICES FOR MILK AND MILK PRODUCTS ANNOUNCED -- The U.S.
Department of Agriculture's Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) announced (December 29) that,
since the adjusted estimate of surplus dairy products to be removed from the commercial market
during calendar year 1996 is below 3.5 billion pounds (milk equivalent, total milk solids basis), the
support price for milk will be increased by twenty-five cents per hundredweight (cwt.) to $10.35
per cwt. effective January 1, 1996. This announced price is for milk with the U.S. annual average
milkfat content of 3.67 percent. The equivalent support price for milk with milkfat content of 3.5
percent is $10.25. CCC-owned dairy products will continue to be available for purchase for
unrestricted use at prices which are about 10 percent over the prevailing CCC price support
purchase price. Currently, only nonfat dry milk is available. Further terms and conditions for CCC
purchases of dairy products will be contained in subsequent CCC announcements. Contact:
Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206..

'96 CROP SOYBEAN PLANTING PERMITTED ON OFA -- Deputy Secretary of Agriculture
Richard Rominger announced (December 27) that soybeans may be planted in 1996 on optional
flexible acreage (OFA) as provided by subsection (b) of Section 504 of the Agricultural Act of
1949, as amended. The 1949 Act prohibits the planting of soybeans on optional flexible acreage
if, on January 1, 1996, the estimated price of 1996-crop soybeans is less than 105 percent of the
loan rate, or $5.17 per bushel. Since soybean prices are projected to be greater than $5.17,
soybeans may be planted on OFA. Producers may plant designated crops on up to 25 percent
of an upland cotton acreage base enrolled in the upland cotton production adjustment programs
and the crops planted can be credited as "considered planted" to upland cotton. Twenty-five
percent of a crop acreage base is referred to as "flexible acres," with the first 15 percent called
"normal flexible acreage" and the other 10 percent called "optional flexible acreage." Contact:
Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

PEANUT PRODUCERS APPROVE POUNDAGE QUOTAS -- Preliminary results of a referendum
held December 11-14 show that peanut producers have approved poundage quotas for the 1996
and 1997 crops, according to Grant Buntrock, Administrator of the U.S. Department of
Agriculture's Farm Service Agency. Of 9,287 votes cast, 9,004, or 97 percent, were in favor of
quotas for the next two crop years, Buntrock said. Two-thirds of the voting producers must favor
continuing poundage quotas in order for quotas to be in effect. In a 1990 referendum, 98.2
percent of voting producers favored quotas. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

FOOD COMPANY OFFICIALS SENTENCED -- Agriculture Inspector General Roger C. Viadero
announced (December 27) that two former officials of a food manufacturing and processing plant
have been sentenced after pleading guilty to defrauding USDA's National School Lunch Program
of approximately $1.4 million by diverting donated commodities and supplying substandard meat
products. On December 19, Roger Peters, former president of Kold Kist Brands, Inc., of
Commerce, Calif., was sentenced to 27 months in prison and five years' probation, and ordered
to pay $10,000 in restitution for six counts of conspiring to defraud USDA, defrauding USDA, and
bank fraud. Dahl Casey, Kold Kist's former vice president of manufacturing, was sentenced to 12
months and one day in prison and three years' probation, and ordered to pay $2,000 in restitution
for five counts of conspiracy and defrauding USDA. The defendants fraudulently obtained a
school lunch contract by submitting, for analysis and inspection, burritos that were significantly
superior to the products they later supplied under the contract. Contact: Dallas Hayden (202)
720-6701. EDITED BY LESLIE PARKER




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

4 3 1262 08135 904 3
OFF MIKE

WHAT'S ON YOUR MIND?...That's the topic of a weekly 6:00 7:00 a.m. live radio show that
Cyndi Young (WTAX/WWTE/WPRC, Springfield, IL) does during winter months from local coffee
shops, grain elevators or other gathering points. She involves both active and retired farmers who
choose the topics for discussion. Illinois Director of Agriculture Becky Doyle has been among
participants.

NEW ASSISTANT...to farm broadcaster Gary DiGiuseppe (KWMT, Fort Dodge, IA) since
November is Mary Ann Haas who was formerly news director for a Hoopeston, IL radio station.
Growing up in the suburbs of Chicago, Mary Ann is a print journalism/radio broadcasting graduate
of St. Mary's College in Winona, MN who doubles as both an agricultural and news reporter for
KWMT.

BEEF CATTLE PRICES...have dropped below the cost of production, yet the lamb market is at
an all-time high, reports Jim Thoreson (KWAT, Watertown, SD). Beef production is the number
one source of agricultural income for South Dakota so this is a concern as farmers look forward
to spring. Temperatures in the first week of March gave no hint of spring, however, averaging 20
degrees below normal. Snowdrifts 8-10 feet high still surrounded many farmsteads having blown
off the fields.

NEW FACES...have joined Miles Carter (KMZU/KAOL/WHB, Carrollton & Kansas City, MO)
recently. Melisa Bertz, a Kansas State University (KSU) graduate and a former member of the
KSU livestock judging team is handling farm broadcasting duties on KMZU/KAOL. She was a
vocational agriculture teacher in Kansas for three years and replaces Jay Truitt who is now with
the Missouri Soybean Growers. Rich Hawkins, formerly with KRVN, Lexington, NE for 16 years,
has assumed farm bro casting duties for WHB following Paul Pippert who recently retired.



LA RY A. UINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










United States Department of Atrturjpu Office df jmunications Washington, DC 20250-1300


Letter No. 2759 ,April 5, 1996

SWIFT IMPLEMENTATION FO LR bILL'-- Iture Secretary Dan Glickman pledged that
the U.S. Department of Agr -woul quickly to implement the farm bill passed by
Congress last week and signed "4 b dent Clinton. "Now that the farm bill is law, the
next critical round of work begins -- impmentation," Glickman said. "Congress left us in a very
tight time crunch. Producers have been patiently waiting for information about how these new
programs will work." Glickman said, "I pledge that this department will do everything in its power
to disseminate information to the public as quickly as possible." Dates for the one-time sign-up
for the seven-year market transition program will be announced within two weeks, and all program
details will be available at that time. "I remain concerned that this legislation fails to provide an
adequate safety net for family farmers," Glickman said. "While we implement the new farm bill we
also will continue to seek innovative ways to inmppy vthef farm safety net and help producers
manage risk." Contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-4 cle.

AGRICULTURAL TRADE UPDATE -- U.S. agriculfkMI oflpr January totaled a record $5.5
billion, according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture report (April 2). Exports rose 3 percent
compared with December 1995 and were 24 per0ntihlte llt,,January 1995. Imports rose 13
percent over December to $2.7 billion, but were only percent higher than a year earlier. The
agricultural trade surplus was $2.8 billion, second only to December 1995's record of nearly $3
billion. Accumulated exports for October 1995-January 1996 totaled $21.2 billion, 15 percent
higher than the same period of fiscal 1995. In fiscal 1996, bulk exports, especially wheat, corn,
soybeans and cotton, were up 30 percent compared with 1995. Year-to-date bulk export volume
was only up 3 percent at 46 million tons. Tight global grain and soybean stocks continued to push
commodity prices higher, driving export value upwards. Beef, pork, poultry meat, and fruit and nut
exports continued to advance, boosting high-value product (HVP) exports. However, a 22-percent
decline in fresh vegetable exports offset some of the HVP gains. Contact: Joel Greene (202)
219-0816.

STEPS TO KEEP U.S. FREE OF "MAD COW" DISEASE -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture
and the U.S. Public Health Service expressed support (March 29) for voluntary measures by the
livestock industry to ensure that the U.S. remains free of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
(BSE). USDA has been monitoring for BSE for ten years and has never identified a single case.
In addition, no beef from England has been imported into the U.S. since at least 1985. The
measures announced will provide an additional level of assurance that the U.S. remains free of
BSE. Both agencies stressed that these measures are designed to provide the American public
the assurance that the U.S. food supply remains among the safest in the world. This industry
announcement includes a voluntary program to ensure that ruminant products are not used in
ruminant feed. Ruminant animals include cattle, sheep and goats. In addition, the Centers for
Disease Control emphasized that since they began monitoring Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease mortality
data, the number of cases in the U.S. has remained stable at about one case per million per year
since 1979. Contact: Will Hueston (301) 734-8093.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
4 u~y1 11|1ill11
OFF MIKE 31262081359399

BLIZZARD OF '96...will live long in our memory after the more than 30-inch snowfall in the
Washington area is melted and gone. We were only able to work Thursday last week during a
lull between storms. We regret inconveniences that many of you experienced in not being able
to access our radio and television programs or to receive this letter. We were able to operate the
radio newsline on January 11, but shipment of our weekly radio cassette service was delayed
until early this week. Our satellite TV news package was prepared and ready, but the teleport
confused the master tapes and replayed last week's features. We have tried hard to recover
quickly and restore services that so many of you have called about.

THIS LETTER...was not printed last week, but we did prepare a shortened alternative which was
made available via AgNewsFax arid Internet that included our weekly listing of radio and TV news
features. We continue to hear from our readers responding to our circulation survey. Because
of the weather delay, we will postpone the paring of our subscriber list until the delayed mail
arrives, and we can process the responses. Several respondents have asked if we could
distribute Broadcasters Letter by automatic e-mail. That's a good suggestion, and we are
planning to establish such a system.

20,000 CALLS...were made to our radio newsline during the past calendar year (actually 20,111).
This is an increase of about 3,500 calls over last year's total. We offered a grand total of 2,053
news stories 1,805 included actualities and 248 did not. Last year, we offered 1,903 stories on
the daily newsline. We appreciate broadcasters' regular use of this service. The 24-hour dial-up
service is available by calling (202) 488-8358. Comrex encoded number is (202) 720-2545. Last
year, we also produced 52 Agriculture USA documentaries and 520 features in our Agritape
and Consumer Time seri.



LARRY A. UINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

SI II flllu IIeIflflhL I
4 31262081359191
OFF MIKE

AG BROADCAST SCHOLARSHIPS...for three college juniors or graduate students will be
awarded by the National Association of Farm Broadcasters (NAFB) Foundation for the 1996-97
year. Students may be enrolled in agricultural journalism/communications curriculum or may have
plans to use the scholarship to transfer to a university which offers a professional program of study
in agricultural radio-TV broadcasting. Two $2,500 scholarships plus a $3,000 scholarship
presented in the name of Glenn Kummerow will be awarded. All three winners also will receive
expense-paid trips to the 1996 NAFB Convention in Kansas City, November 13-17. Applications
are due March 31. For information or applications, call NAFB Foundation President Orion
Samuelson (WGN, Chicago, IL) at 312-222-5089.

VIDALIA ONIONS... and peaches were hurt during rei ~i- t c!d snp -, ':t went through Georgia,
but a good crop of peaches is still expected, reports Steve Malone (Georgia Farm Bureau). Steve
hosts a weekly agricultural TV show carried by 15 Georgia stations which has been on-the-air for
25 years. He has anchored the program since 1985 and is helped by four reporters who travel
the state to produce features. Steve notes that he uses our weekly satellite TV newsfeed.

COLD...temperatures last week came within one degree of breaking an all-time record of -27
degrees set in 1905 in Burlington, IA area, reports John Weir (KBUR/KGRS). A veteran of 22
years at his station, John says farmers' attitudes are very positive now because of good
commodity prices. Not far away, a reading of -28 degrees was the lowest temperature ever
recorded in the Quad-Cities of Rock Island, Moline, Davenport and Bettendorf, according to Rick
Pierce (WGEN, Geneseo, IL). Rick hosts a 5:00-6:00 a.m. agricultural news program daily and
continues as the "morning show" host until 9:00 a.m. In addition, his station carries hourly
markets, and he hosts a 12:00-12:30 p.m. agricultural news summary.



LARRY A. UINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Prtvate Use $300







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #2027 -- It's called BSE or "mad cow" disease, and it has caused a panic
in Great Britain. What is this disease and what is the latest scientific information available on
Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE). Brenda Curtis covers the subject. (Weekly cassette
-- five minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME #1505 -- The new Farm Bill and consumers. The Healthy Eating Index. BSE
Update. Sports and eating disorders. Gaining weight can be part of old age for some men.
(Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE #2018 -- 1996 farm payments and sign-up. What are farmers planting? U.S. livestock
industry places voluntary ban on certain types of feed. Pork expansion slowing down. New Farm
Bill--new farming philosophy. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Friday, April 12, feed outlook, oil crops outlook, rice
outlook, wheat outlook, hog outlook, world agricultural production, grains: world markets and
trade, oilseeds: world markets and trade. Tuesday, April 16, weekly weather and crop outlook.
Friday, April 19, agricultural outlook. These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our
newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on how the 1996 Farm Bill will affect farmers and nonfarmers.
Eric Parsons reports on the new Farm Program in the Farm Bill.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman highlights provisions of the new Federal
Agriculture Improvement and Reform Act of 1996. USDA Chief Economist Keith Collins and Farm
Services Agency Administrator Grant Buntrock make additional comments on the new Farm Bill.


SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS: Thursday from 3:45 to 4:00 p.m. ET,
Telstar 402R (located at 89 degrees West), Transponder 13, Vertical Polarity, Downlink
Frequency 3960 MHz.

**Note: Effective May 2-September 26, the satellite newsfeed coordinates will change to:
Telstar 401(97 degrees West), Transponder 7, Vertical Polarity, Downlink Frequency 3840
MHz.
Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #2022 -- In this edition, Gary Crawford offers a glimpse into a crystal ball
to find out what food prices are expected to be. (Weekly cassette -- five minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME #1500 -- Tips for sending mail to our troops in Bosnia. Another look at food
prices. Economic rebirth for our cities and towns. Shopping for interest rates. Looking to the
future for the 1890's Colleges and Universities. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE #2014 The Russian poultry ban. Milk output lower than expected. Are we due for
a drought? Wheat supplies may increase somewhat in 1996/97. Grain and oilseed demand
expected to remain strong. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE --Wednesday, March 13, milk production report, feed
outlook, oil crops outlook, rice outlook, wheat outlook, world agricultural production, world grain
production, and world oilseed outlook. Monday, March 18, former USSR update. Tuesday, March
19, sugar and sweeteners outlook, weekly weather and crop outlook. These are USDA reports
we know about in advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not
listed in this lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE


FEATURES: Patrick O'Leary reports on USDA's latest farm export forecast. Analysts are
predicting record high exports this fiscal year and say the long term prospects improved as well.
This forecast was released during USDA's annual Agricultural Outlook Forum in Washington.
O'Leary also reports on a recent conference on community empowerment where President Clinton
heard success stories from participants in the federal Empowerment Zone program. The "EZ/EC"
program in rural areas is administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

ACTUALITIES: Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman comments on agricultural prices, trade,
the farm economy and the Farm Bill. Excerpts are from a February 26 speech to commodity
groups in Phoenix, Arizona.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWS FEEDS: Thursday from 3:45 to 4:00 p.m. ET,
Telstar 402R (located at 89 degrees West), Transponder 13, Vertical Polarity, Downlink
Frequency 3960 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.







Ir; i


HI H


United States Department of Agri officee of m iunications Washington, DC 20250-1300

Letter No. 2762 188. April 26, 1996

GLICKMAN VISITS DROUG I ARE Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman is
scheduled to visit the Texas Pan rteato, t eet with farmers and view drought-stricken
areas. On April 27, Glickman plans,', i. ntral Kansas to see drought conditions there
and talk with local producers. During hii~! e will hold a town hall meeting to hear concerns
from local farmers. Contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.

COMMENTS SOUGHT ON '96 FARM BILL CONSERVATION PROVISIONS -- U. S. Department
of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is seeking public comments and
views from across the country on innovative ways to implement the conservation provisions of the
1996 Farm Bill. Written comments may be mailed or faxed to: Paul Johnson, Chief, USDA
NRCS, P.O. Box 2890, Washington, D.C. 20013. The fax number is (202) 720-1838. Comments
should be postmarked or faxed no later than April 30. New provisions include the Environmental
Quality Incentives Program, Farmland Protection Program, Flood Risk Reduction Program,
Conservation Farm Option, Conservation of Private Grazing Land Initiative, National Natural
Resources Conservation Foundation and Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program. Modified provisions
include those to the wetlands conservation program, conservation compliance, Conservation
Reserve Program, Emergency Watershed Protection Prddfir t, Wt chnical committees and
Wetlands Reserve Program. Contact: Diana Morse (202) 72r 47f2.

WHERE OUR CHILDREN EAT More of the nation's children are eating away from home during
the mid-1990's than in the late 1970's. They're also consuming ore averages and grain-based
snack foods and combination foods, such as pizza. Child re ah~n'' fat and drinking less
milk, according to data from the first year of the current three-year U.S. Department of Agriculture
nationwide food consumption survey "What We Eat in America." Agriculture Secretary Dan
Glickman said, 'This is the only nationwide survey that measures the kinds and amounts of food
eaten by Americans, and links the diet and health knowledge of individuals with their food and
nutrient intakes." Survey results show that roughly two-thirds of those who are school-aged six
through 19 consumed food and drink that were provided away from home in 1994, up from about
55 percent in 1977-78. Contact: Johna Pierce (202) 720-4623.

OFFICE CONSTRUCTED WITH ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY PRODUCTS -- Agriculture
Secretary Dan Glickman and Deputy Secretary Richard Rominger visited a new Washington, D.C.
office (April 24), constructed with environmentally friendly agricultural materials that might
otherwise go to waste-products that have been developed with the help of the U.S. Department
of Agriculture. USDA's venture capital program, Alternative Agricultural Research and
Commercialization (AARC) Corporation, provided start-up funds to several businesses which
contributed to the construction of the office, the new headquarters for the Natural Resources
Defense Council (NRDC). The AARC Corporation provides venture capital to businesses to
commercialize industrial (non-feed, non-food) uses for agricultural products. Glickman toured the
NRDC office as part of USDA's Earth Week activities. Contact: Ron Buckhalt (202) 690-1624.


,1







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 2018 -- In this edition, you will hear more ways to take off weight wisely.
The experts say the key is simple "Diet and Exercise." (Weekly cassette -- five minute
documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1497 -- No proven benefits from Beta Carotene supplements. Cooking
healthy. Bringing back the wetlands to-the Mississippi Delta. Products from sheep abound.
Weight off wisely. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE # 2010 -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman returns from China trip. CRP early out.
Cotton demand strong despite high prices. The new cattle report. U.S. pork exports continue to
rise. Pork production costs rising. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thursday, February 8, crop production
(cotton/citrus). Friday, February 9, full crop production report, cotton markets and trade, world
agricultural supply and demand, cotton and wool outlook. Monday, February 12, world agricultural
production, grain markets and trade, world oilseeds markets and trade, feed outlook, rice outlook,
oil crops outlook, cattle and sheep outlook. Tuesday, February 13, farm labor report and weekly
weather and crop report. These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline
carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE


FEATURES: Lynn Wyvill reports on a community garden in Seattle, Washington which is one
example of the Urban Resources Partnership in action. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's
Natural Resources Conservation Service is one of several federal agencies working with local
communities in eight cities to protect and improve natural resources in the urban environment.

ACTUALITIES: USDA Farm Service Agency Administrator Grant Buntrock comments on the
"early-out" for Conservation Reserve Program acreage and USDA meteorologist Bob Stefanski
describes weather's impact on the winter wheat crop and the improving situation in California.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FIR TV NEWS FEEDS: Thursday from 3:45 to 4:00 p.m. ET,
Telstar 402R (located at 89 degrees West), Transponder 13, Vertical Polarity, Downlink
Frequency 3960 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.






4 II/
OFF MIKE 31

MATURE FOCUS...is the name of a regular radio feature carried by 553 stations nationwide. Jim
Harriott is the host of this program produced by the American Association of Retired People
(AARP). Jim reports that he regularly uses excerpts of our "Agriculture USA" and "Consumer
Time" features and our daily Radio Newsline. "Mature Focus" is a Monday through Friday
program, and there is a 5-minute weekend version, too.

WATCHING GRAIN PRICES CLIMB...is a favorite pastime for listeners of Neal Anderson
(WLLR-FM, Davenport, IA). Neal says farmers wish that new crop prices could match current
levels. Cattle and hog farmers are envious of grain farmers for prices they are receiving. This
good crop year has increased demand for new tractors. Neal says that good, clean, used tractors
are selling high, too. An Iowa State University report shows a 6 to 9 percent increase in Iowa
farfiFahid prices over last year.' Neal started his 16th year in farm broadcasting on January 1 (last
six years at WLLR). His other full-time job is farming.

NEW CORN PROCESSING PLANT...is under development with a Spring ground breaking
planned in Glenville, MN, reports Al Carstens (KATE, Albert Lea, MN). This $67 million plant will
produce ethanol and glycerin in this small community of 750. When we called this week, Al was
on the air using a news feature produced by our Brenda Curtis. He says he usually makes daily
use of USDA features. Al begins promotion next month for his annual giveaway to a lucky farmer
all the products needed to grow 40 acres of corn and 40 acres of soybeans. The drawing will be
held on National Agriculture Day, March 20. Local merchants cooperate in providing the fuel,
seed, fertilizer, etc. that will be part of the prize.

PAST PRESIDENT...of the Midlands Chapter of National Agri-Marketing Association (NAMA) Kim
Dlouhy (WOW, Omaha, NE) is busy this week coordinating their regional competition for "Best
of NAA." At the ame time, she continues in her eighth year of farm broadcasting at WOW.

LARRY AQUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use S300








ANIMAL WELFARE GETS ADDED ATTENTION -- Pet theft, inhumane treatment and the
improper care and breeding of animals are receiving added attention from the U.S. Department
of Agriculture. Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman said, "Pet theft and animal abuse will not be
tolerated. Animal welfare is not a second-class issue at the USDA. We intend to improve
standards and toughen enforcement." Under Glickman's direction, Mike Dunn, head of USDA's
marketing and regulatory programs, is spearheading efforts to improve USDA's oversight of the
care and handling of companion animals. Currently, USDA is working on a legislative proposal
to strengthen the Animal Welfare Act; holding a series of three public hearings to seek widespread
input into making regulatory improvements; and toughening inspection and enforcement efforts.
Two of three public forums on these issues already have been held. A third forum will be held in
Washington, D.C. at a future date. Contact: Patrick Collins (202) 720-2511.

NATIONAL TALLGRASS PRAIRIE ESTABLISHED The National Defense Authorization Act for
1996 that became law February 10 transferred the former Joliet Army Ammunition Plant from the
Department of Defense to the U.S. Department of Agriculture and establishes the Midewin
National Tallgrass Prairie. USDA's Forest Service will be responsible for prairie restoration and
management under the administration of the Shawnee National Forest, headquartered in
Harrisburg, Illinois. The new National Tallgrass Prairie encompasses 19,195 acres, 40 miles
southwest of Chicago. In addition to use by the American people, the Midewin Tallgrass Prairie
will provide habitat for many North American grassland birds which have had greater, more
consistent and more widespread declines than any other bird group. Contact: Alan Polk (202)
205-1134.

PACKER AND BUYER AGREE TO CONSENT DECISION Taylor Packing Co., Inc., Wyalusing,
Pennsylvania, and packer buyer Harold A. Roney of Preston Park, Pennsylvania, have entered
into an agreement with the U.S. Department of Agriculture to settle an administrative complaint.
Michael V. Dunn, assistant secretary for marketing and regulatory programs, said, "Under the
terms of the settlement, Taylor Packing Co. and Roney shall not take turns with others in buying
livestock at livestock markets, manipulate or control prices of livestock sold in commerce, restrict
competition in the purchasing of livestock in commerce, or agree or arrange with others to refrain
from bidding on livestock against any competitive livestock buyer." Taylor Packing Co. and Roney
jointly and severally paid a $50,000 civil penalty, and another $20,000 is being held in abeyance
for three years so long as Taylor Packing and Roney do not violate the terms of the settlement.
Contact: Sara Wright (202) 720-9528.

AARC CENTER BOARD MEMBERS APPOINTED -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman
appointed (February 23) three members to the Board of Directors of the Alternative Agricultural
Research and Commercialization (AARC) Center. The AARC Center is the only venture capital
organization in the Federal government making equity available to commercialize industrial
(non-food, non-feed) uses for agricultural materials and animal by-products. Glickman
reappointed Harold Gilchrist, President and CEO of Gilchrist & Company, Inc., and Dr. Ralph
Hardy, who recently retired as President of the Boyce Thompson Institute. Also appointed was
Robert Raun, a farmer from Minden, Nebraska. The announcements were made at a recent AARC
meeting in Mobile, Alabama. Contact: Ron Buckhalt (202) 690-1624.


EDITED BY LESLIE PARKER









United States De l ent otAgrjcullture' Office of Cpmmupcations Washington, DC 20250-1300
arson Science
Library
LMAR 14 19
Letter No. 275 R 14 JMAR 2 8 1996 February 16, 1996

STUDY ON M CKER C iC TRACTION RELEASED --Ariculture Secretary Dan
Glickman release s ,entration in the i'pa ki0' dustry (February 14).
Responding to widesp en about increasing concentration in certain key agricultural
sectors, Glickman announced the formation of an advisory committee to address further the issue
of concentration in agriculture. Secretary Glickman said, "This past year I have heard more
concerns about concentration in agriculture than just about any other issue. I want to assure
producers that we take these concerns seriously." The study was mandated by Congress in
USDA's 1992 appropriations act. Glickman credits the study for offering a broad view of structure
and behavior in the cattle and hog industries and provides a wealth of information about an
important sector of the food chain. Glickman notes, however, that it doesn't give any definitive
answers. To address growing concerns among producers and others about competition and
concentration in agriculture, Glickman is appointing an advisory committee on concentration to
pick up where the study left off. There are 21 members on the advisory committee. Contact:
Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.

INTEGRATED WILDLAND FIRE POLICY ENDORSED -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman and
Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt endorsed a joint federal wildland fire policy (February 14) that will
provide greater uniformity, help to streamline and improve interagency coordination and
communication, and reduce risks to both people and resources. After the 1994 fire season, the
Secretaries chartered a comprehensive, year-long study to give form, substance, direction and
priority to the ideas and lessons learned by wildland fire managers over the past two decades.
Their 45-page report is a landmark document which translates what managers have learned in the
field over the years into a cohesive, uniform federal policy. That policy directs managers to
integrate wildland fire into land and resource management plans to protect, maintain, and enhance
natural resources. The policy outlines that fire management activities, including suppression
actions, will be based on the values to be protected, costs, and land and resource management
objectives. Also, the policy articulates roles and responsibilities of federal agencies in the
wildland/urban interface (where inhabited areas mix with undeveloped wildland) and ensure that
federal policies are uniform and programs are implemented cooperatively and cohesively.
Contact: Jim Petterson (202) 720-4623.

GLICKMAN, KANTOR TO OPEN USDA'S AG OUTLOOK FORUM Secretary of Agriculture Dan
Glickman, U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor and a number of agricultural leaders are
scheduled to be keynoters for the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Outlook Forum '96
on February 21 and 22. The forum will open at 1:00 p.m. February 21 with speeches by Glickman
and Kantor. Top government officials, analysts and industry experts will report to the Forum on
economic and policy developments and offer their views on farm prospects for 1996 and future
years. Contact: Raymond Bridge (202) 720-5447.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

4 3 1262 08135 933 2
OFF MIKE

NO RAIN, HIGH WINDS AND DUST...continue to describe conditions in the Texas Panhandle,
reports Larry DeSha (KGNC, Amarillo, TX). Only 1.11 inches of rain has fallen in Amarillo since
October 1, but Dalhart (at the top of the Panhandle) had its last rain in September. Secretary of
Agriculture Dan Glickman was there to inspect the agricultural situation last Friday. Conditions
are the worst Larry's seen in his 10 years at KGNC. Old-timers say if it weren't for the
Conservation Reserve Program and the land now planted to grass, they would be experiencing
Dust Bowl conditions. As it is, they've had five or six dust storms with 50-60 mph winds. Seventy-
five percent of the Texas wheat crop is in poor to very poor condition, but in the Panhandle, Larry
says 90 percent is in very poor shape. "It's an exciting time to be a farm broadcaster," he said.
Listeners are anxious for the latest word on market prices, weather and government
announcements.

CATTLE PRICES...continue to create tight margins for livestock producers who are paying record
prices for feed, reports Tom Riter (KFKA, Greeley, CO). Corn, barley and seeded onions are
being planted there with expectations up for corn acreage this year. KFKA is celebrating its 75th
Anniversary on May 21. In the early years, market reports were prepared by a reporter riding the
rails to Denver and back in time for a noon report. In his fifth year at KFKA, Tom earned the
Outstanding Media Support Award this year from his local soil conservation district.

KARNAL BUNT...is affecting a well-developed international market that Arizona producers had
for their durum wheat, reports George Gatley (Western Agri-Radio Network, Yuma, AZ). Seventy
wheat fields in California's Imperial Valley and fields in the Yuma area have found to be clean, he
said. Arizona's pasta wheat has been finding good markets in Italy. After 18 years, an agricultural
TV program that George hosted has gone off the air, but he continues his radio network which
includes 18 station hat cover California and Arizona.



ARR QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300





2
PUBLIC INPUT ASKED ON AGRICULTURAL CONCENTRATION -- The Advisory Committee
on Agricultural Concentration, which was announced last month (February 14) by Agriculture
Secretary Dan Glickman, is requesting public input during its second meeting March 25 in St.
Louis. The committee meeting is being held specifically to hear views from the public. Due to time
constraints, oral statements will be limited to five minutes at the meeting. However, written
statements of any length may be submitted to the committee at the meeting, by mail or fax.
Following the public input session March 25, the committee will meet in open session on March
26 and until noon March 27. Purpose of the committee is to advise the Secretary regarding the
extent of concentration, or lack of competition, in the agricultural industry, the causes and effects
of concentration and whether there is need for legislation or modification.of U.S. Department of
Agriculture programs to address the issue. Contact: Jerry Redding (202) 720-6959.

GENE GIVING PLANTS LIVELIER DEFENSE IS PATENTED -- A modified gene that helps
protect tomato and other crops from insect pests was patented (March 5) as a new biotechnology
tactic. It was developed by U.S. Department of Agriculture scientists. When chewed by insects,
plants engineered with this gene chum out large amounts of a multipurpose plant hormone called
cytokinin. USDA molecular geneticist Ann Smigocki said, "Overproducing the hormone at levels
up to 70 times normal jump starts the plant's own biochemical defenses." In Smigocki's tests,
homworms that fed on the bioengineered plants did not die, but ate much less than normal. The
smaller percentage of aphids that survived wound up smaller and often failed to mature. Smigocki
is trying to purify natural insect-killing compounds that the plants make as part of their response
to cytokinin. The engineered gene may simulate plants' natural defenses more closely than the
most common biotechnology approach. Contact: Jim De Quattro (301) 344-2736.

A CURE FOR PLUM POX VIRUS -- Ralph Scorza, horticulturalist for U.S. Department of
Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service, with help from French collaborator Michel
Ravelonandro, has been working for the past five years on protecting U.S. fruit growers from plum
pox virus. The deadly virus is now spreading in orchards throughout Europe. Recently, the virus
was discovered in South America. Plum pox, sometimes known as Sharka virus, causes fruit to
drop from affected trees 20 to 40 days before maturity and leaves the remaining fruit
unmarketable. The disease is transmitted by aphids and by grafting. Scorza said, "This virus
causes severe damage and crop loss in plums, peaches and apricots. There is no remedy, once
it attacks a tree." Scorza and his colleagues recently developed transgenic plum plants that resist
the virus. The new gene was put into plum trees and sent to France to be tested with the virus.
After two years of tests, one breeding of the line appears to have complete immunity to plum pox
virus. Contact: Ralph Scorza (304) 725-3451.

ALGAE SHOW PROMISE AGAINST CANCER -- A blue-green alga rich in beta carotene and
other disease-fighting carotenoids may help prevent cancer of the mouth. In developing countries,
Spirulina algae are cheaper than supplements of beta carotene or vitamin A. Researchers have
shown these vitamins to reverse leukoplakia thick, white, precancerous patches in the mouth.
A new study, coordinated by a USDA Agricultural Research Service scientist, was the first
evaluation of Spirulina's cancer-preventive potential in humans. After consuming a gram of algae
daily for a year, 45 percent of the study's volunteers had complete regression of leukoplakia.
Another 12 percent significantly improved. The study was conducted in southwestern India, which
has a high incidence of leukoplakia. Cancer of the mouth and of the cervix, having the same kind
of mucus membrane, is on the rise worldwide. Contact: Padmanabhan P. Nair (301) 504-8145.
EDITED BY LESLIE PARKER







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #2023 In this edition, Gary Crawford takes you shopping in the high-tech
supermarket of today. (Weekly cassette -- five minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME #1501-- High-tech grocery shopping. Something different for meat lovers.
Consumer credit tips. Americans are ignoring new apple varieties. The new detergents.
(Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE #2015 -- Uncertainty about China. Farm finance outlook remains mixed. India's
importance to U.S. agriculture. A huge job: the first Chinese agricultural census. USDA helps
producers ship dairy cattle to Turkey. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Monday, March 18, former USSR update. Tuesday,
March 19, sugar and sweeteners report and weekly weather and crop outlook. Wednesday,
March 20, agricultural outlook report. Thursday, March 21, dairy outlook. Friday, March 22, cattle
on feed report and livestock slaughter report. These are USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES March is National Nutrition Month. USDA is marking the occasion by promoting its
"Team Nutrition" program in elementary schools. Patrick O'Leary reports from a suburban
Washington, D.C. elementary school that hosted Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman and USDA
Under secretary for Food, Nutrition & Consumer Services Ellen Haas on March 4. Continuing the
National Nutrition Month theme, USDA's 'Team Nutrition" is sending school food service
personnel to special training sessions. In a pilot project, school cooks are learning from chef
instructors at culinary schools how to make healthier lunches that also are appealing to students.
Patrick O'Leary reports from the Johnston & Wales University in Providence, Rhode Island, where
a workshop took place a few weeks ago. Featured remarks are from USDA Under secretary for
Food, Nutrition & Consumer Services Ellen Haas and Chef Michael Moskwa.

ACTUALITIES USDA Secretary Dan Glickman comments on farm bill progress and the Russian
ban on U.S. poultry.


SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWS FEEDS: Thursday from 3:45 to 4:00 p.m. ET,
Telstar 402R (located at 89 degrees West), Transponder 13, Vertical Polarity, Downlink
Frequency 3960 MHZ.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.







PROMOTION AND RESEARCH PROGRAM APPROVED -- Secretary of Agriculture Dan
Glickman announced (March 5) that a proposed national promotion, research and information
program for sheep and wool passed in an industry-wide referendum. OSDA's Agricultural
Marketing Service (AMS), an agency in the marketing and regulatory program mission area, has
oversight responsibility for federal research and promotion programs. AMS Administrator Lon
Hatamiya said, "Of the 19,801 valid ballots cast in the February 6 referendum, 10,707 (54.1
percent) favored and 9,094 (45.9 percent) opposed implementation of the Sheep and Wool
Promotion, Research, Education and Information Order." Those persons voting in the referendum
who cast valid ballots and favored the order accounted for 40 percent of the total production voted.
Those voters opposing the order accounted for 60 percent of production voted. The final order
and effective date for beginning of the program will be published in a future issue of the Federal
Register. Contact: Becky Unkenholz (202) 720-8998.

ACREAGE ALLOTMENTS FOR TOBACCO -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced
(March 5) acreage allotments and price support levels for six kinds of tobacco for the 1996
marketing year. The 1996 price support levels for the six kinds of tobacco announced range
between 1.7 and 2.7 percent higher than the 1995-crop levels. USDA's Commodity Credit
Corporation will establish individual grade loan rates before the marketing season begins. The
1996-crop marketing assessment to be paid by both growers and buyers will be 0.5 percent each
of the support level, or a total of 1 percent per pound. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

CCC INTEREST RATE -- Grant Buntrock, Executive Vice President of the U.S. Department of
Agriculture's Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) announced (March 1) that commodity loans
disbursed in March by the USDA's CCC will carry a 4-7/8 percent interest rate. The 4-7/8 percent
rate is down from February's 5-1/8 percent and reflects the interest rate charged CCC by the U.S.
Treasury. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

NAL CATALOG ON INTERNET ISIS, the Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC) of the National
Agricultural Library (NAL), the largest agricultural library in the world, is now available over the
Internet at telnet address . The catalog can be searched Monday through
Saturday from 6:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., EST. ISIS contains two agricultural databases, the NAL
Online Catalog and the Journal Article Citation database. Internet access to these resources will
help to meet a critical need for agricultural information worldwide. The NAL Online Catalog and
Journal Article Citation database is updated daily by NAL and contains the most current
bibliographic citations for books, reports, maps, periodicals, audiovisuals, CD-ROMs, electronic
media and other material being added to the NAL collection. The National Agricultural Library is
part of USDA'S Agricultural Research Service. Contact: Brian Norris (301) 504-6778.

FAX AND INTERNET -- You can obtain our radio and TV programming information and the
Broadcasters Letter through your facsimile machine by calling USDA's AgNewsFax or by
accessing USDA's Home Page. FAX: Use the phone connected to your machine to call (202)
690-3944. At voice prompts, press 1, press 4, then to receive Broadcasters Letter, press 9200;
radio newsline information, press 9250; TV contents billboard, press 9260; TV scripts, press 9270.
After all your selections, then press #, press 3, and press the start button on your FAX machine.
INTERNET: Address for this letter is http://www.usda.govlnews/bdcasterlbdcaster.htm.
EDITED BY LESUE PARKER








REPORT SPOTLIGHTS RURAL HOMELESSNESS As the nation reels from a winter of record
breaking cold temperatures, the U.S. Department of Agriculture is releasing its report, "Rural
Homelessness What Can Be Done." Homelessness is as common in rural areas as urban
areas, but it is less obvious to community residents, the report says. Jill Long Thompson, USDA
Under Secretary for Rural Economic and Community Development (RECD), said, "The rural
homeless are often 'hidden' in campgrounds, outbuildings and even caves. To make matters
worse, rural communities rarely have the shelters, soup kitchens and transitional services that
homeless individuals and families need, and are more commonly found in urban areas." The
report summarizes perspectives of hundreds of people across the country who provide housing,
health and food assistance to the homeless in rural communities. Contact: Eileen McMahon
(202) 720-6903.

NATIONAL PORK PRODUCERS DELEGATE BODY APPOINTED -- Secretary of Agriculture
Dan Glickman has appointed 162 pork producers and five importers to the 1996 National Pork
Producers Delegate Body. Appointees will serve a one-year term. Established under the Pork
Promotion, Research and Consumer Information Act of 1985, the Delegate Body and the National
Pork Board have implemented a national program designed to improve the pork industry's position
in the marketplace. The program is funded by a mandatory assessment currently set at 0.45
percent of the market value of all hogs sold in the United States. An equivalent amount is
assessed on imported hogs, pork and pork products. Assessments began November 1, 1986.
Delegates meet annually to recommend the rate of assessment, determine the percentage of
assessments that state associations will receive and nominate producers and importers to the
15-member National Pork Board. Representation on the Delegate Body is based on annual net
assessments collected on sales of domestic hogs within individual states, with a minimum of two
producers from each state. States have the option of not submitting nominees. Contact: Becky
Unkenholz (202) 720-8998.

SPECIAL UPLAND COTTON QUOTA #4 RELEASED -- High cotton prices have triggered
another special import quota that will permit the importation of a quantity of upland cotton equal
to one week's domestic mill use, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced (February 8). The
special import quota that will permit the importation of 42,591,701 kilograms (93,898,705 pounds)
of upland cotton was established on February 14. The quota applies to upland cotton purchased
not later than May 13, 1996, and entered into the U.S. not later than August 11, 1996. The special
import quota identifies a quantity of imports that is not subject to the over-quota tariff rate of a
tariff-rate quota. Future quotas will be established if price conditions warrant. Contact: Janise
Zygmont (202) 720-8841.

FAX AND INTERNET -- You can obtain our radio and TV programming information and the
Broadcasters Letter through your facsimile machine by calling USDA's AgNewsFax or by
accessing USDA's Home Page. FAX: Use the phone connected to your machine to call (202)
690-3944. At voice prompts, press 1, press 4, then to receive Broadcasters Letter, press 9200;
radio newsline information, press 9250; TV contents billboard, press 9260; TV scripts, press 9270.
After all your selections, then press #, press 3, and press the start button on your FAX machine.
INTERNET: Address for this letter is http://www.usda.govlnewslbdcasterlbdcaster.htm.


EDITED BY LESLIE PARKER





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

S1111262 08135 934 0
OFF MIKE12

NEW PRESIDENT...of the National Press Club in Washington is agricultural communicator Sonja
Hillgren, Editor, Farm Journal magazine. Master of Ceremonies for the January 20 inaugural
evening was Orion Samuelson (WGN, Chicago, IL) with storytelling entertainment (Cecil and
Leonard stories) provided by Ray Wilkinson, retired farm broadcaster from Raleigh, NC.
Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman made a special presentation to Sonja, and she was
sworn-in by Gus Schumacher, Administrator of USDA's Foreign Agricultural Service. Other
speakers were Senator Larry Pressler of Sonja's home state of South Dakota and
Congressman Pat Roberts of Kansas, who is Chairman of the House Agriculture Committee.
All took the opportunity to make a strong pitch for agriculture.

OPENING BELL...for the new milk futures contract at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange was rung
recently by Orion Samuelson. His colleague, Max Armstrong (WGN, Chicago, IL), says "that
is a rather nice honor. They usually select politicians!" Max and I corresponded by E-mail while
I was snowbound in northern Virginia.

NEW APPOINTMENTS...at AgriAmerica Network (Indianapolis, IN) include Darrin Johnston,
moving up to Farm Director after having served as Assistant Farm Director for the past four years,
Heidi Burnworth, Director of Data Services, and Karl Locascio, Senior Account Executive.
Network General Manager Gary Truitt said that Darrin, in his new position, will share all editorial
and program responsibilities with him, increasing his travel and broadcasting schedule.
AgriAmerica Network provides farm programming to 70 radio stations in Indiana, Illinois and Ohio.

ON THE MOVE...from Iowa to Indiana is Kevin Morse (WOC, Davenport, IA) who becomes the
new farm director at WOWO (Fort Wayne, IN) on February 12. Kevin spent nearly three years
-as WOC's farm director after having served as radio program director at WGEN (Geneseo, IL).


LARRY .I QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300









United States Department of Agriculture ,fie Communications Washington, DC 20250-1300
-""- e ,. h Marston Science


Letter No. 2761 N i MA ['Y 2 9 1996 April 19, 1996

USDA OPENS TRADE OFFI(4; SHANG -- A'icAjri psieofeitldDan Glickman has
announced the opening of an Agrl I lt Trade ffije Shanghai, China. Glickman said, "We
are acutely aware of the tremendoihinese agricultural trade and its growing
importance to both of our nations. Sh i gateway to China's vast eastern and central
market. This region of roughly 400 million people is larger than the population of many major
countries with whom we have trading relationships." The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Foreign
Agricultural Service (FAS) is opening the office to help U.S. exporters tap into this growing market.
U.S. food, fish and forestry exports to China in fiscal year 1995 were $2.5 billion, making it the
ninth largest market. The Shanghai opening brings to 13 the number of agricultural trade offices
operated by FAS. These offices are centers for U.S. export sales promotions and contact points
for importers seeking to buy agricultural products from the United States. The agricultural trade
officer is Scott Reynolds. Contact: Glen Kaup (202) 720-3329.

USDA ANNOUNCES ONE-TIME SIGNUP PERIOD -- Producers wishing to enroll their farms in
a Production Flexibility Contract must do so during a one-time signup period from May 20 through
July 12. Authorized by the 1996 Farm Bill, the contracts are for seven years, beginning in 1996.
Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman said, "I wish to stress that this is the only opportunity
producers will have to enroll and those who fail to do so now will not be eligible at a later date.
There will be no further additional signups except for land coming out of the Conservation Reserve
Program. This is required by the 1996 Act, and I have no discretion to extend this date." Glickman
reminded producers that compliance with conservation and wetlands provisions continues to be
a condition of participation. The total amount of payment a person may receive in any fiscal year
may not exceed $40,000. A producer may enroll all or part of the farm's contract base acreage
in the program and, after signup, may request a permanent reduction in the acreage without
penalty. Payment and loan rates will be announced soon. Contact: Dann Stuart (202) 690-
0474.

FOOD STAMP PARTICIPATION CONTINUES TO DECREASE -- Continuing steady declines in
food stamp participation resulted in savings of more than $1 billion between August 1994 and
January 1996. January participation totaled 25.90 million people, down by more than one million
from January 1995. December participation included 25.88 million people, down by more than one
million from December 1994. Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman said, "The continuing decline
in food stamp participation means significant savings to the taxpayer." January was the 18th
consecutive month in which food stamp participation was lower than it was in the same month in
the previous year. Contact: Alicia Bambara (703) 305-2039






;AI W i


a Washington, DC 20250-1300


United States Departmen

Letter No. 2756 I


March 15, 1996


KARNAL BUNT DET ICED IN ARIZNA ,SDA, in conjunction with the Arizona Department
of Agriculture, announ d l that I bunt, a fungal disease of grain, was detected in
durum wheat seed. S e, ed _I .sawere detectdj a sped dealership during routine
testing by the Arizona agriculture. After f dligc samples to the state's
agricultural lab, USDA's Agricultura Research Service was givj sffnples for final confirmation.
The disease was confirmed as karnal bunt. A scientificeA1e 'eopsed of state, federal and
industry technical experts and scientists is being convened to deterifMe further actions. This is
a localized find and emergency quarantines have beet nktel gn those infected properties,
seed, farm equipment, planted wheat and soil associated with hUidatdcted wheat. State and
Federal quarantines will be put into place to augment this emergency action and the Department
has established a wheat export certification team to develop options for dealing with potential
trade issues. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 734-3256.

WHEAT SUPPLY FORECAST DOWN -- USDA's latest wheat outlook report (March 13) forecasts
1995/96 supplies at 2,762 million bushels -- the lowest in six years and the second lowest in 20
years. Area planted, area harvested and yield have declined for three years in a row. Unusual
planting conditions for the past three years have contributed to reduced area planted, especially
in Montana and Missouri. Excess moisture and cool conditions prevented some spring wheat from
being planted, especially in South Dakota. Yields in 1995 were hurt by late frost and rain at
harvest in important wheat areas. Other factors were delayed planting, disease and insect
problems and summer heat. Wheat production in 1995 was 2,186 million bushels, down 6 percent
from a year earlier. Contact: Ed Allen (202) 501-8512.

FEED GRAIN SITUATION -- The feed grain situation will continue extremely tight for the
remaining months of 1995/96, according to the latest report from USDA (March 13). Changes in
this month's forecast were fairly small, but reinforced this tight outlook. Corn exports were
increased 50 million bushels, while imports went up 5 million. This reduced projected ending
stocks 45 million bushels. Oats imports and ending stocks each dropped 5 million bushels.
Barley export forecast was raised 10 million bushels and imports lowered by 5 million, resulting
in small cuts in domestic use and stocks. Contact: Pete Riley (202) 501-8512.

USDA SIGNS MEMO WITH WINTER OLYMPIC GAMES -- Under Secretary of Agriculture for
Natural Resources and Environment James R. Lyons signed a Memorandum of Understanding
(March 14) with the Salt Lake City Olympic Organization Committee (SLOOC). The signing took
place during a meeting of the SLOOC's board of trustees. This memorandum joins USDA and
SLOOC in partnership and assures collaboration on environmental issues associated with the
2002 Winter Olympic Games. The signing ceremony took place at the Salt Lake Olympic
Organizing Committee board room in Salt Lake City, Utah. Tom Welch, president of the Salt Lake
City Olympic Organization Committee, joined Lyons at the signing ceremony. Contact: Jim
Petterson (202) 720-4623.


ltI WkI H








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 2014 -- Tight world grain supply is putting pressure on world grain prices
and could prevent poorer nations from buying grain. What are world exporters doing to help those
third world nations? Brenda Curtis interviews the Administrator of USDA's Foreign Agricultural
Service about the world grain trade situation. (Weekly cassette -- five minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1493 -- Diet and exercise a must. New meat safety plan just about ready.
Low-tech energy saver. The consequences of living paycheck to paycheck. Don't bring back a
hitchhiker. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE # 2006 -- U.S. farm exports continue an upward trend. Europe's export tariff on wheat.
Dairy outlook. Changes in cotton ARP. USDA raises milk support price for 1996. (Weekly
cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tuesday, January 16, weekly weather and crop
outlook. Tuesday, January 23, weekly weather and crop report, livestock, dairy and poultry
outlook and U.S. agriculture trade update. The week of January 23, 1996, Brenda Curtis will be
traveling to the Mississippi Delta with officials from the National Resource Conservation Service
to visit wetland areas and produce daily radio reports on conservation problems and
accomplishments.
These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries many stories
every day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES: Lynn Wyvill reports on an Urban Resources Partnership gardening project in
Seattle, Washington. The Urban Resources Partnership is active in eight cities across the
country. It brings agencies of the federal government, including USDA's Natural Resources
Conservation Service, together with local leadership to make urban environments better places
to live. The Seattle garden project is helping build community spirit among a diverse group of
neighbors while protecting the urban environment.

ACTUALITIES: Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman and Health and Human Services Secretary
Donna Shalala release the Federal government's new "Dietary Guidelines for Americans." The
guidelines provide easily understood, science-based information on how Americans can choose
diets that promote good health. Scenes and excerpts are from January 2 news conference.

SATELLITE COORDINATES: Thursdays, 3:45-4:00 p.m. ET on Telstar 402R, Transponder 13
(Vertical), Downlink Frequency 3960 MHz (89 degrees West), Audio, 6.2/6.8.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.







4
OFF MIKE

WELCOME VISITOR... last week was Karl S. Gutknecht, Director of Public Affairs for the
Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection. Karl is the newly elected
president of the National Association of Government Communicators (NAGC) for 1996. A
Wisconsin native, he holds an advanced journalism degree from University of Wisconsin and
began his government communications career as an Army combat correspondent in Vietnam.
"The information revolution is having a tremendous impact on the way government serves its
customers, on how information is delivered and received, and on how the public relates to
government services," Karl says. "Government communicators are challenged as never before
to effectively use cyberspace technologies."

IT'S DRY...in the High Plains of the Texas Panhandle, reports Bob Givens (KGNC, Amarillo, TX).
They have received less than a half inch of moisture since October, only .07 inches in January.
As storms passed that area this week, they were hopeful of boosting their moisture records. Our
thanks to Bob's colleague, Larry DeSha, who alerted us to a quality problem on one of our daily
radio newsline machines. It happened to be on the first machine in the rotation so stations who
called at less busy times constantly heard tapes from that machine. We have removed that
machine from our newsline service so stations should experience more consistent quality now.

1996 AGRICULTURE FACT BOOK...is off the press and like earlier editions, this 244-page book
offers basic facts about U.S. agriculture and rural America. It also describes programs in USDA's
seven major mission areas. The fact book is available for $9.50 from the Superintendent of
Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. (Phone: 202-512-1800).
Members of the National Association of Farm Broadcasters will be receiving copies of this book
soon. Other readers of this letter can obtain a single free copy by contacting my office.



LARRY A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300









United States Department of Agriculture Office of Commu y *u Washington, DC 20250-1300

Letter No. 2751 PR 011996 February 9, 1996

GLICKMAN COMMENDS SENATE APPROVAL OF I~RMi'b ll iF r Bill legislation, S.1541,
was approved by the U.S. Senate (February 7). Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman said, "Senate
approval of the 1995 Farm Bill legislation is a step in the right direction even though it doesn't
address all of my concerns." Glickman remains concerned that the bill will continue to provide
payments when market conditions are good and that it does not provide as strong a safety net for
family farmers as he would like. However, Glickman notes that the amendments adopted to the
base bill are significant improvements and a good place to begin negotiations as the bill goes to
conference. Glickman stressed certain priorities that he felt must be met in the Farm Bill
legislation: an adequate safety net for producers, meeting investment needs in rural America and
permitting farmers greater flexibility to plant for the market rather than the gove
provision of the bill that he has supported consistently. Glickman credits the Senat 1-
research, trade, rural development and credit titles in the bill, that are Il to the
competitiveness of U.S. agriculture in the international marketplace. Contact-t m Amontree
(202) 720-4623. 1 o,

U.S. AND MEXICO TO CONTINUE CONSULTATION PROCESS Secretary Agriculture Dan
Glickman announced (February 5) that representatives from the U.S. Departm agriculture
and the Mexican Ministry of Agriculture would meet during the week of February to
the consultation process regarding tomatoes and to facilitate conversation
representatives of agricultural producer organizations in both countries. This consultative process
was agreed to by Secretary Glickman and Minister of Agriculture Labastida during their meetings
in Mexico City on January 15. Contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.

USDA TARGETS MARKETS UNDER EEP AND DEIP Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman
announced (February 2) a three-month continuation of the interim allocations under the 1995/1996
Export Enhancement Program (EEP) and Dairy Export Incentive Program (DEIP). During the
interim period, procedures for EEP and DEIP are similar to the previous programs. Export sales
will be facilitated through the payment of bonuses by the USDA's Commodity Credit Corporation
(CCC). Sales will be made through normal commercial channels at competitive world prices.
While recent program activity has been limited, USDA will continue to monitor the prices and
actions of our competitors and fully intends to use the EEP and DEIP as appropriate. Contact:
Glenn Kaup (202) 720-3329.

USDA TO HOLD 1996 AG OUTLOOK FORUM USDA's Agriculture Outlook Forum will be held
February 21-22 in Washington, D.C. Leading experts will discuss the farm and commodity outlook
at a time of tight supplies, changing farm policies and new world trade rules. Top farm officials
from several nations will discuss trade strategies and issues. For information on attending the
Forum, call (202) 401-9139. To receive program details by fax, use handset on a fax machine to
call (202)219-0296 or 219-1107 and request document 66666.






FUNDS AUTHORIZED TO COMBAT KARNAL BUNT -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman
announced (March 27) that he has signed a "declaration of emergency" authorizing the transfer
and use of funds to conduct a program to identify, control and eradicate Karnal bunt. This
declaration was made in conjunction with the "extraordinary emergency" he announced (March
21) that gives USDA the ability to take a wide range of actions within states, including the use of
quarantines, to control and eradicate the outbreak. Secretary Glickman said, "We are taking
these steps to protect our producers, protect our export markets and to provide growers affected
by Kamal bunt with the best possible options." The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service,
a part of USDA's marketing and regulatory programs mission area, in cooperation with Texas,
Arizona and New Mexico, is conducting surveys and establishing regulatory controls necessary
to protect wheat production areas of the United States. Contact: Beth Hulse (301) 734-7280.

KARNAL BUNT QUARANTINE ANNOUNCED The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced
(March 26) a quarantine for the state of Arizona, four counties in the state of New Mexico and two
counties in Texas because of Karnal bunt, a fungus that infects wheat. This quarantine restricts
the interstate movement of regulated articles, such as wheat, conveyances used to move wheat,
grain elevators or equipment used to store wheat and milling products or byproducts, from
quarantined areas. Don Husnik, deputy administrator for USDA's Animal and Plant Inspection
Service said, "This quarantine is necessary to prevent the spread of Karnal bunt into noninfected
areas of the United States and to help protect our export markets." Dona Ana, Hidalgo, Luna and
Sierra are the four quarantined counties in New Mexico. El Paso and Hudspeth are the two
quarantined counties in Texas. Contact: Beth Hulse (301) 734-7280.

BUDGET PROPOSALS FOR RESEARCH, EDUCATION AND ECONOMICS -- Under Secretary
of Agriculture Karl Stauber presented FY 1997 budget proposals (March 20) for the U.S.
Department of Agriculture's research, education and economics areas. In testimony before the
House Committee on Appropriations, Stauber requested $1.8 billion for 1997, about the same as
the 1996 appropriation for the Agricultural Research Service (ARS), the Cooperative State
Research, Education and Extension Service (CSREES), the Economic Research Service (ERS),
and the National Agricultural and Statistics Service (NASS). Total funding requested for ARS is
$806 million-an increase of $66 million. Budget request for CSREES is $847 million, a reduction
of $65 million, and proposed funding for ERS is $55 million. Proposed budget for NASS is $103
million-an increase of $22 million. Contact: Stephen Teasley (202) 720-8329.

VENTURE CAPITAL REPAYMENTS ACCEPTED -- As part of National Agriculture Day, (March
20) Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman recognized the work of two companies. These two
companies are taking part in a U.S. Department of Agriculture venture capital program. The two
companies BioPlus, Inc., of Ashburn, Georgia, and Aquinas Technologies of St. Louis, Missouri
- repaid part of the investments made in these firms by the Alternative Agricultural Research and
Commercialization (AARC) Center. Aquinas repaid $24,090.10 and BioPlus repaid $22,746.53.
Contact: Ron Buckhalt (202) 690-2164.

FAX AND INTERNET -- Radio and TV programming information and Broadcasters Letter can
be obtained through USDA's AgNewsFax or from USDA's Home Page. FAX: Use fax phone to
call (202) 690-3944. At voice prompts, press 1, press 4, then to receive Broadcasters Letter,
press 9200; radio newsline information, press 9250; TV contents billboard, press 9260; TV scripts,
press 9270. After all selections, then press #, press 3, and press the start button on fax machine.
INTERNET: Address for this letter is http:/lwww.usda.govlnews/bdcaster/bdcaster.htm.
EDITED BY LESUE PARKER







PROPOSED SETTLEMENT OF ALASKA TIMBER LAWSUIT -- Agriculture Secretary Dan
Glickman announced (February 20) a proposed lawsuit settlement that will help ensure a more
predictable timber supply in Southeast Alaska's Tongass National Forest. The case is Alaska
Wilderness Recreation and Tourism Association (AWRTA) v. Morrison. If approved by a federal
court, the proposed settlement will release from injunction an estimated 105 million board feet
(mmbf) of timber. Timber operators have up to three yearsito harvest timber purchased from a
national forest. The AWRTA lawsuit challenged Forest Service timber sales in the Tongass
National Forest originally planned for sale to meet contract obligations for the Alaska Pulp
Corporation (APC). After APC closed its facility in Sitka, the Forest Service sought to offer those
sales to other operators. The lawsuit forced the Forest Service to restudy the sales. The lawsuit
and subsequent injunction affect approximately 280 mmbf of timber. Under terms of the proposed
agreement, additional timber not released in the settlement will be subject to further environmental
review before it can be offered for sale. Contact: Jim Petterson (202) 720-4623.

PRINCIPALS INVITED TO JOIN TEAM NUTRITION SCHOOLS -- Agriculture Secretary Dan
Glickman invited the principals of more than 94,000 National School Lunch Program schools to
join in what he called "one of the most exciting initiatives in the history of the school lunch
program: Team Nutrition." In a letter to elementary and secondary principals, Glickman urged
them to join thousands of their colleagues across the country, and organizations representing
food, agriculture, nutrition, and health, in working for a healthier future for America's children.
Team Nutrition is a nationwide program designed to support schools implementing USDA's School
Meals Initiative for Healthy Children. The program ensures that children have healthy meals at
school. Team Nutrition helps schools plan, purchase, prepare and serve healthy school meals
and teaches children about making food choices for a healthy diet for a lifetime. By joining Team
Nutrition, schools gain access to innovative educational and technical resources that will actively
involve children and their parents in nutrition education programs at home and in school.
Contact: Alicia Bambara (703) 305-2039.

AMERICORPS ACCOMPLISHMENTS -- USDA's AmeriCorps members planted 65,000 trees in
Oklahoma during 1994-95. This was a project that rooted the new national service program in the
tradition of the 1930's Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman
said, 'We now have the data showing that AmeriCorps indeed is doing what national service was
created to do. AmeriCorps is getting things done while strengthening communities, providing
opportunity and boosting personal responsibility." The annual report indicates that
AmeriCorps/USDA members in 38 states provided nearly two million hours of service. The
document also indicates that 14,176 non-compensated volunteers were recruited by
AmeriCorps/USDA members to serve in community service projects. USDA is running three types
of AmeriCorps teams in 45 states, composed of approximately 1,350 members: an anti-hunger
team, a public lands and environment team and a rural development team. Contact: Joel Berg
(202) 720-6350.

FAX AND INTERNET -- Radio and TV listings and Broadcasters Letter can be accessed by
calling USDA's AgNewsFax or by going to USDA's Home Page. FAX: Use phone connected to
your fax to call (202) 690-3944. At voice prompts, press 1, press 4, then to receive Broadcasters
Letter, press 9200; radio newsline information, press 9250; TV contents billboard, press 9260;
TV scripts, press 9270. After all your selections, then press #, press 3, and press the start button
on your FAX. INTERNET: Letter address is http://www.usda.gov/news/bdcaster/bdcaster.htm.
EDITED BY LESLIE PARKER





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


4 3
OFF MIKE

GLOOMY FACES...were seen at a meeting of Oklahoma wheat farmers recently, reports Carey
Martin (Oklahoma Agrinet, Oklahoma City, OK). The weather is so dry there that the Governor
called for a "day of prayer for rain" last Sunday. Carey says there is a lot of blowing dust in
northern Oklahoma because wheat cover is so inadequate. Many stocker cattlemen are having
to ship calves to feedlots early or to pastures outside the state. Growth in hog production has
increased so much that Oklahoma is now included in USDA's regular Hogs and Pigs Report.
Expansion has occurred throughout the state, but Carey notes that a major hog processing plant
opened recently in the Oklahoma Panhandle.

HOG WASTE CONTROL...continues to be a concern in Missouri according to Stacy Handke
(KTTS, Springfield, MO) who was substituting for Joann Locke this week while she was covering
a variety of producer and commodity meetings and sending back reports. An agricultural
communications graduate of Southwest Missouri State University, Stacey is in her second year
at the station. She works in advertising sales, but steps in to assist Joann with farm news when
needed.

WHEAT SITUATION...in Nebraska doesn't look good there either, reports Jack McConnell
(KMMJ, Grand Island, NE). He says they haven't had any measurable moisture in several weeks
with only three inches of snow which came with high winds and sub-zero temperatures. With little
snow cover and severe cold, the usually hardy wheat plants are struggling. Jack starts his
broadcast day with a 6:00-9:00 a.m. stint at the helm of an all-talk news, weather and farm
program. Then, he hosts "Talk of Nebraska" from 9:00-9:30 a.m. which has included the Governor
and other staff officials recently. He switches hats and heads to KHAS-TV in Hastings, NE for the
10:30 a.m. taping of a mar t and farm news segment and then returns for his noon radio show.



LARRY A. INN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penaly for Private Use $300






EFFORTS TO FEED THE HUNGRY ANNOUNCED -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman has
announced 17 states where AmeriCorps members will participate in gleaning and food rescue
activities this summer. Glickman said, 'The 17 USDA gleaning projects and their 84 AmeriCorps
members will serve as a nucleus that fans out into local communities and mobilizes other
volunteers Boy Scouts, church groups, students and trains them to go out to the farms, talk
to restaurants and farmers' markets and work with local food banks." Glickman added, "Forging
these direct links will help ensure that when our AmeriCorps people return to school, the important
work of feeding needy families will continue." Secretary Glickman also announced that USDA
recently established a toll-free number (1-800 GLEAN IT) to serve as a clearinghouse for
gleaning and food rescue efforts throughout the country. Contact: Laura Trivers (202) 720-
4623.

$4 MILLION FOR URBAN RESOURCES PARTNERSHIPS -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture
will award $4 million for community-based environmental action as part of Urban Resources
Partnerships, Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman announced (April 22). This program began in
1994 and is a coalition of seven federal agencies as well as state and local governments. The
partnerships are in eight cities: Atlanta, Chicago, Denver, East St. Louis, Los Angeles, New York,
Philadelphia and Seattle. Nationwide, the Urban Resources Partnership provides funding and
technical assistance to community-based groups participating in a variety of natural resource
projects. Federal agencies participating include: USDA's Forest Service, Natural Resources
Conservation Service and the Cooperative Research, Education and Extension Service;
Department of Interior's National Park Service and the Fish and Wildlife Service; U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.
Contact: Janet Sledge (202) 720-2065.

USDA HOLDS THIRD RURAL FORUM Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman and U.S.
Representative Tim Holden held a rural forum April 19 in Pennsylvania at the Berks County
Agriculture Center in Bern Township. This was the third of six regional forums to discuss local
agricultural concerns as the nation moves into the 21st Century. Agriculture Secretary Dan
Glickman said the forum provided "an opportunity for us to listen and share ideas about critical
farm bill issues: production, conservation and dairy issues, as well as the food stamp and school
lunch programs." Among the presenters at the forum included Ralph Heffner, Agway president
and fruit farmer; Lary Kehl, dairy farmer and USDA Farm Service Agency committee member; Ed
Hartman, sixth-generation farmer; Bill Wehry, farmer; Gary Rightmire, executive director of Berks
County Assistance Office; and Linda Roeberg, teacher, Lorane Elementary School in Reading,
Pennsylvania. Contact: Johna Pierce (202) 720-1691.

USDA'S ECONOMIC RESEARCH SERVICE ADMINISTRATOR -- Susan Offutt was recently
named administrator of USDA's Economic Research Service (ERS). In this position, she manages
the USDA agency that provides economic and social science information and analysis for public
and private decisions on agriculture, food, natural resources and rural America. ERS creates new
knowledge from research and database development activities. That knowledge is used to
provide timely, analytically-based information about conditions and changes in the food and
agricultural system and the rural economy and likely effects on U.S. agriculture and rural America.
As an alumna of ERS, Offutt is no stranger to the agency she leads. She rejoined ERS from the
National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences where she was the executive
director of the Board on Agriculture and assistant executive officer. Contact: Maria Bynum (202)
720-5192. EDITED BY LESLIE PARKER




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFF MIKE 3 1262 08135 948 0

CHERRY BLOSSOMS...and 70 degree temperatures have arrived in Washington, D.C. this week.
The blossoms and holiday week have brought many out-of-town visitors to the Nation's capital.
Members of the National Association of Farm Broadcasters (NAFB) are coming here April 20-23
for their annual "Washington Watch" conference. We're looking forward to welcoming participants
at USDA on Monday, April 22, starting with a morning reception in our Video, Teleconference and
Radio Center.

PLANTING TIME...is nearing for many crops. John Everly (KDTH, Dubuque, IA) says they need
some rain to chase away residual ground frost because soil temperatures are still cool. He says
river terminals in his area have been doing a brisk business with strong demand for U.S. grains.
Not many farmers have "old crop" corn left since a high percentage of grain grown in John's region
is fed locally to livestock. Alfalfa also is a major crop with harvesting usually done in early May.
John begins his seventh year as farm broadcaster for KDTH next week. His radio career began
in 1982, and for the past 10 years he has worked in farm broadcasting.

COTTON...planting intentions are lower this year, reports Dave Black (WMC, Memphis, TN), but
early indicators point to a better than average yield. Boll weevils have not overwintered to the
extent they did last year. Because of the improved prospects, some farmers who were going to
try corn this year may be switching back. Dave says a good rule for cotton planting time is after
five consecutive days of 60 degree soil temperature, which usually falls around April 15. Corn
planting in his region has already been done, but some farmers are having to re-plant. Next year
will be Dave's 40th year with WMC. He prepares four broadcasts throughout the day, Monday-
Friday, and hosts a "Sunrise" program on Sunday mornings where he uses features from our
weekly radio cassette service. Dave uses humor and character voices to liven his broadcasts.

FARM BILL...information is now available from USDA's Home Page on the Internet. Watch for
details of the Federal Agriculture Improvement and Reform Act of 1996. You can access the home
pa e at his addre s: http://www.usda.gov. This letter is there, too.

LARRY AQUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Prkate Use S300







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #2030 -- There is some concern about the new product "Olestra." Brenda
Curtis talks with nutritionist Mark Kantor about the pros and cons of this fake fat. (Weekly
cassette -- five minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME #1507 -All about Olestra. Is Spring "bugging" you? Low income families can
buy and build their own home. What do kids eat? One drink too many may deplete the body of
an essential vitamin. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE #2021 -- China's trade status. Will farmers plant more? The Farm Bill and
Conservation. Farm product promotion and the Farm Bill. Well-water testing. (Weekly cassette
-- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thursday, May 9, world agricultural supply and
demand; crop production: citrus. Friday, May 10, world supply and demand; cotton and wool
outlook; crop production; cotton and wool outlook. These are USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES: Lynn Wyvill reports on USDA's support of local community efforts to feed the
hungry. Secretary Dan Glickman announced a summer of gleaning project that will put 84
AmeriCorps members to work in 17 states to feed needy families. Patrick O'Leary reports on
Secretary Dan Glickman's visit to a new Washington, D.C. office, constructed with environmentally
friendly agricultural materials that might otherwise go to waste. These products were developed
with help from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. USDA's venture capital program, Alternative
Agricultural Research and Commercialization Corporation (AARC), provided startup funds to
several businesses which contributed to the construction of the office, the new headquarters for
the Natural Resources Defense Council.

ACTUALITIES: Excerpts from Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman's remarks to farm
broadcasters in Washington, D.C. April 22.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS: Thursday from 3:45 to 4:00 p.m. ET,
Telstar 402R (located at 89 degrees West), Transponder 13, Vertical Polarity, Downlink
Frequency 3960 MHZ. (Transponder will change next week. See below.)

**NEW SATELLITE COORDINATES: Effective May 2-September 26, the satellite newsfeed
coordinates will change to: Telstar 402R (89 degrees West), Transponder 20, Horizontal
Polarity, Downlink Frequency 4100 MHZ.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.








GLICKMAN COMMENTS ON THE U.S. REQUEST FOR CONSULTATIONS -- U.S. Trade
Representative Mickey Kantor's action to request consultations under Article XXII of the World
Trade Organization against the European Union's Hormone Ban underscores the U.S.
government's determination to end this long-standing unfair trade practice and restore access for
U.S. meat exporters to this important market. Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman said, "I view
this action with frustration, resignation and resolve. Frustration because the evidence is
overwhelming that proper use of these hormones poses no danger to human health. Resignation
because the United States can wait no longer in hope that the EU will willingly follow the principles
of sound science as outlined in the WTO Sanitary and Phytosanitary Agreement and allow the use
of these hormones. Resolve because the U.S. position is the right one. It has been proven
scientifically over and over again." Glickman concluded by saying that the U.S. meat producers
and exporters should be assured that our government will not allow bad science to be used as a
non-tariff barrier. Contact: Jim Petterson (202) 720-4623.

WHEAT RELEASED FROM FOOD SECURITY WHEAT RESERVE -- President Clinton
authorized Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman to release up to 1.5 million metric tons of wheat
(January 23) as needed over time from the Food Security Wheat Reserve for emergency
humanitarian food assistance program. The wheat can be used by the USDA to provide food
assistance to developing countries during fiscal year 1996 under the Agricultural Trade
Development and Assistance Act of 1954, otherwise known as Public Law 480. Secretary
Glickman said, 'The release from the wheat reserve will allow the USDA and the Agency for
International Development (AID) to meet our anticipated food aid and shipping requirements. This
action allows the U.S. Government to honor its commitment of providing humanitarian aid to
developing countries." For fiscal year 1996, 300,000 metric tons of wheat are available from
commercial supplies for programming under P.L. 480 operations. Because of this limited
availability; it was necessary to access the wheat reserve. Contact: Glenn Kaup (202) 720-
3329.

SPECIAL UPLAND COTTON QUOTA #2 RELEASED -- High cotton prices have triggered
another special import quota that will permit the importation of a quantity of upland cotton equal
to one week's domestic mill use, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced (January 25). The
special import quota that will permit the importation of 43,242,096 kilograms (95,332,580 pounds)
of upland cotton was established on January 31. The quota applies to upland cotton purchased
not later than April 29, 1996, and entered into the U.S. not later than July 28, 1996. The special
import quota identifies a quantity of imports that is not subject to the over-quota tariff rate of a
tariff-rate quota. Future quotas will be established if price conditions warrant. Contact: Janise
Zygmont (202) 720-8841.

FAX -- You can obtain our radio and TV programming information and the Broadcasters Letter
through your facsimile machine by calling USDA's AgNewsFax. Use the telephone connected
to your FAX machine to call (202) 690-3944. At voice prompts press 1, press 4, then to receive
Broadcasters Letter, press 9200; radio newsline information, press 9250; TV contents billboard,
press 9260; TV scripts, press 9270. After all your selections, then press #, press 3, and press the
start button on your FAX machine.


EDITED BY LESLIE PARKER







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #2029 -- The new Farm Bill will dramatically change the world of U.S.
agriculture. It is important to remember that the Farm Bill is for both producers and consumers.
Gary Crawford reports on this revolutionary legislation. (Weekly cassette -- five minute
documentary).

CONSUMER TIME #1506 -- Early spring gardening. Spring lawn care. Pruning out the
deadwood. A food stamp reserve request. Teaching Native American Children about their
conservation heritage. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE #2020 -- It's a bull market for grains. Grain "rationing." Farmers and the new
telecommunications bill. IPM consultants. Does soil effect plant growth? (Weekly cassette --
news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Monday, April 29, crop progress and catfish
production. Tuesday, April 30, agricultural prices. These are USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES: Patrick O'Leary reports on the Urban Resources Partnership and environmental
program that was launched on Earth Day 1994. The program teams federal agencies and
communities to solve problems. Lynn Wyvill reports on the New York City Watershed Project, a
voluntary farmer-run, fully funded program aimed at protecting water quality. USDA's Natural
Resources Conservation Service provided technical assistance for the program.

ACTUALITIES: Paul Johnson, chief of USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service, outlines
a series of environmental forums to be held next week throughout the nation. USDA Under
Secretary of Agriculture James Lyons comments about Earth Day and agriculture.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS: Thursday from 3:45 to 4:00 p.m. ET,
Telstar 402R (located at 89 degrees West), Transponder 13, Vertical Polarity, Downlink
Frequency 3960 MHz.


**SATELLITE CHANGE: Effective May 2-September 26, the satellite newsfeed coordinates
will change to: Telstar 401(97 degrees West), Transponder 7, Vertical Polarity, Downlink
Frequency 3840 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 2016 -- For one reason or another, more people are turning to home-
based businesses. In this edition, Brenda Curtis talks to an expert about the ups and downs of
home-based businesses. (Weekly cassette -- five minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1495 Americans are eating less fat, but consuming more calories. Grocery
shopping at home. Teenage pregnancy and nutrition. Updating food safety rules. Helping people
in transition. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE # 2008 -- U.S. to forward beef hormone issue to World Trade Organization. Wheat
outlook. Higher corn prices. A tight, strong soybean market. Tobacco-good times for awhile.
(Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tuesday, January 30, weekly weather and crop
outlook. Wednesday, January 31, agricultural prices, dairy world markets and trade, tobacco
world markets and trade. Thursday, February 1, catfish production and world horticultural trade.
NOTE: Brenda Curtis will be covering a special Wetlands tour of the Mississippi Delta with
Natural Resource Conservation Service Chief Paul Johnson January 23-25. Curtis will provide
special coverage to the USDA Radio newsline as well as upcoming features on the radio cassette
service. These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries many
stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE


FEATURES: Lynn Wyvill reports onf research at USDA's Agricultural Research Service in
Beltsville, MD to preserve and study snowflakes. The close examination of snowflakes using a
scanning electron microscope could hold the key to more accurately predicting western water
supplies that are important for agriculture and other uses.

ACTUALITIES: USDA World Board Chairman Gerald Bange comments on USDA analysts'
January crop production, use and stock estimates for wheat, corn, soybeans, rice and cotton.
Wheat, corn, rice and soybean price estimates are up from a month ago.

SATELLITE COORDINATES: Thursdays, 3:45-4:00 p.m. ET on Telstar 402R, Transponder 13
(Vertical), Downlink Frequency 3960 MHz (89 degrees West), Audio, 6.2/6.8.


Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


OFF MIKE 3 1262 08135 9241
OFF MIKE

COLD...has been the predominant weather word for many agricultural regions in recent days from
the Midwest to the Deep South. Neal Anderson (WLLR, Davenport, IA) reports that a record low
of -29 degrees was reached last week in Davenport, but thawing temperatures were on the way
this week. Even in the Washington suburbs, temperatures dipped to a record -13 degrees early
this week.

AGRICULTURAL FORUM...for Kansas farmers with Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman as
a keynote speaker is scheduled February 23, reports Rex Childs (KFDI, Wichita, KS). Rex says
his station and the Kansas Farmers Union are sponsors. Western Kansas is experiencing a lot
of wind erosion because of cold weather and little cover. South Central Kansas has had problems
with "blowout" of the young winter wheat crop.

DAIRY HERD...in Wisconsin that was mysteriously losing cows has responded to moving of an
electric transformer December 29, reports Lori Struve (WCUB, Manitowoc, WI). Since then, milk
production is up an average of 7 pounds per cow and only one cow has been lost. Cows are now
drinking water more freely rather than "lapping" it, showing more patience in the milking parlor,
holding their heads up, looking bright-eyed, and resuming chewing their cuds. On request, Lori
can supply a checklist of stray voltage symptoms that 60 area farmers developed. Her phone
number is (414) 683-6800.

DIRECTOR OF RADIO SERVICES...for the North Carolina Farm Bureau is Dave Smith, formerly
with WPTF/WQDR (Raleigh, NC). Dave produces a weekly five-minute program on ag issues
and a daily (five per week) one-minute ag commentary. Also, he is the on-air host of a weekly TV
program. Dave spent more than 20 years in commercial radio, 13 years in Raleigh and the
remainder in northwest Pennsylvania.


LARY A. A INN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300







CROP DESTRUCTION FOR KARNAL BUNT ANNOUNCED -- The U.S. Department of
Agriculture announced (April 1) crop destruction orders for farming operations infected with Karnal
bunt in New Mexico and Texas, approximately 4,000 acres. Farming operations that comply with
the emergency action order and plow their wheat crops down may be eligible to receive
compensation. USDA will use the funding available under the declaration of emergency, which
Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman announced (March 28), to compensate producers. USDA's
Chief Economist Office has determined that compensation for crop destruction in New Mexico and
Texas would be appropriate at a rate of $275 an acre plus $25 an acre for plowing. Producers
who receive compensation under the declaration of emergency may not be eligible for crop
insurance indemnity. Contact: Beth Hulse (301) 734-7280.

PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS TO RECEIVE EXTRA DEFICIENCY PAYMENTS -- Corn and
sorghum producers who used the 0-85/92 provisions of the 1995 feed grain and price support
acreage reduction program will receive approximately $27 million in additional deficiency
payments, Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman announced (April 1). The Agricultural Act of 1949,
as amended, requires that deficiency payments be made when either the national weighted
average market prices received by producers during the first five months of the marketing year
(September 1995 through January 1996) plus seven cents or the projected 12-month average
market price is below the established target price. Because the adjusted five-month prices and
the projected 12-month average farm prices for corn and sorghum are above the target price
established for each crop, no regular deficiency payments are due producers at this time.
However, participants in the 1995 corn and sorghum program who used the 0-85/92 provisions
are guaranteed minimum payment rates of 40 cents per bushel for corn and 39 cents per bushel
for sorghum, which were the estimated final deficiency payment rates for these crops when
producers enrolled in the program. Contact: Phil Sronce (202) 720-4417.

USDA TARGETS MARKETS UNDER EEP AND DEIP -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman
announced (April 1) a three-month continuation of the interim allocations under the 1995/1996
Export Enhancement Program (EEP) and Dairy Export Incentive Program (DEIP) for the period
April through June. During the interim period, procedures for EEP and DEIP are similar to the
previous programs. Export sales will be facilitated through the payment of bonuses by the USDA's
Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC). While recent program activity has been limited, USDA
will continue to monitor the prices and actions of competitors, and fully intends to use the EEP and
DEIP as appropriate. Details of the program, including invitations for offers, will be issued in the
future. Contact: Lynn Goldsbrough (202) 720-3930.

INCREASE IN FY '96 TARIFF-RATE QUOTA FOR RAW-CANE SUGAR -- Agriculture Secretary
Dan Glickman announced (April 1) that the fiscal year 1996 tariff-rate quota (TRQ) for raw-cane
sugar has been increased by 200,000 metric tons (220,462 short tons). The fiscal year 1996 TRQ
level is therefore set at 2,017,195 metric tons (2,223,577 short tons). Country allocations of the
increased TRQ will be announced by the U.S. Trade Representative. The Department will
continue monitoring import requirements and will take necessary action to assure sufficient sugar
supplies in the domestic market. TRQ adjustments will be made based on the most reliable supply
and use information available. USDA is also monitoring the export intentions of foreign suppliers
and will take action in conjunction with the U.S. Trade Representative, including reallocation if
necessary, to facilitate the timely arrival of TRQ allocations. Contact: Lynn K. Goldsbrough
(202) 720-3930. EDITED BY LESLIE PARKER









United States Department of Agriculture Office of Communications Washington, DC 20250-1300
APR 0 11996

Letter No. 2749 University of Florida January 26, 1996

GLICKMAN MEETS WITH CONGRESSIONAL LEADERSHIP -- The goal of a January 23
meeting with Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman and congressional leaders was to bring the
key players together to express the growing concern over congressional inaction on farm bill
legislation. The Secretary of the U.S. Department of Agriculture is not required by law to
implement the 1949 Agriculture Adjustment Act in the absence of new farm legislation. Agriculture
Secretary Dan Glickman said, "I firmly believe that if we work together in a bipartisan fashion, we
can get a farm bill and end the uncertainty for U.S. producers. Only through honest dialogue,
consensus and compromise can we reach a point where we can get some movement." In the
meeting, Glickman repeated that any farm bill must preserve an adequate saf t meet
investment needs in rural America and permit farmers greater flexibility to p
rather than government farm programs. Without new farm legislation, Se lickm a
he will announce terms of the rice program under the existing authority by B iYary 15. Cont
Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.

JOINT COMMUNIQUE ISSUED FROM MEXICO CITY TALKS -- Agr secretary D
Glickman and Secretary of Agriculture, Livestock and Rural Developme o exico Franc
Labastida Ochoa released a joint communique on the conclusions from their s.4
City, January 15-16, 1996. Discussions between the two Secretaries contrib rch
for solutions to problems between the two countries and to the review of areas of cooperation,
which is of mutual interest and benefit to both countries. It was agreed that commercial matters
should be handled in the spirit of NAFTA, in a positive manner. At the conclusion of the meeting
between the two delegations, a Memorandum of Understanding was signed between the Mexican
National Livestock Council of Mexico and the National Cattlemen's Association of the United
States, witnessed by the two Secretaries of Agriculture. Contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-
4623.

U.S.-CANADA JOINT COMMISSION ISSUES FINAL REPORT-- Agriculture Secretary Dan
Glickman announced (January 22) the availability of the "Final Report of the United States -
Canada Joint Commission on Grains." This report was prepared in accordance with the
Commission's mandate when it was created in September 1994. The Commission issued a
preliminary report in June 1995. Secretary Dan Glickman said, "On behalf of Ambassador Kantor
and myself, I would like to thank the Commission members from both countries for their hard work
on these issues. Their report will be very helpful as the two governments attempt to resolve grain
marketing issues that led to the formation of the Commission." Issued in two volumes, the report
is available from USDA's FAS Publications Office, Room 5555-S, 14th and Independence Avenue,
Washington, DC, 20250. Copies may be requested by calling this office at (202) 720-7938.
Contact: Wayne Baggett (202) 720-2032.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFF MIKE 4

SECRETARY GLICKMAN...and other key USDA officials met with 40 broadcasters representing
the National Association of Farm Broadcasters (NAFB) who were here for their "Washington
Watch" conference this week. Following keynote remarks by Secretary of Agriculture Dan
Glickman on April 22, broadcasters heard a panel of experts discuss Farm Bill issues, Karnal bunt
and results of a meat concentration study. Participants questioned USDA officials after their
remarks and spent the early afternoon doing individual interviews with Under Secretaries Jill
Long Thompson, Gene Moos and Karl Stauber; Assistant Secretary Mike Dunn; Agency
Administrators Paul Johnson (Natural Resources Conservation Service) and Lon Hatamiya
(Agricultural Marketing Service); and other USDA experts on a variety of current topics. During
a luncheon break, several participants visited our radio and TV staff and facilities. NAFB
President John Winfield (Mississippi Network, Jackson, MS), President-Elect Don Wick (WNAX,
Yankton, SD), and Vice President Stewart Doan (ARN Agriculture, Little Rock, AR) led the
delegation. Conference Coordinator was Gary Wergin (WHO, Des Moines, IA).

NORTH TO NEBRASKA...is the move Carey Martin (formerly with Oklahoma Agrinet, Oklahoma
City, OK) made in early April to become Farm Director for WOW in Omaha, NE.
Carey says he is planning to add a full-time assistant farm broadcaster to help in preparing the
14 daily programs that air from 5:50 a.m. to 5:15 p.m. A graduate of Louisiana State University,
he grew up in Louisiana working in his family's cattle operation. Carey replaces Kim Dlouhy who
left WOW to become director of communications for a corporate hog farm in Iowa Falls, IA.
Carey's phone number is (402) 573-5900.

OKLAHOMA NATIVE...returns to take Carey Martin's place at the microphone. Raised on a
peanut farm in southwestern Oklahoma, April Lovell has joined Ron Hays (Oklahoma Agrinet,
Oklahoma City, OK) on the network. She had been farm director for KTNZ/KBUY in Amarillo, TX.



LARR A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










United States Department of Agricy ffimunications Washington, DC 20250-1300


Letter No. 2755 a\ / L library March 8,1996

HOUSE APPROVES FARM BIL culture c aryF Ai A said House passage of
the Farm Bill (February 29) represe im m .over the earlier version passed by the
House Agriculture Committee. Glickma he parit~ rd9/iofifjgprovement were in the
areas of conservation and exports, which are similar to the provisions approved by the Senate."
The new farm legislation is needed for producers to make sound planting decisions. However,
Glickman said, "This bill does fall short of provisions for nutrition, research, and rural
development. In addition, the legislation, as passed by the House, would directly challenge the
safety net that farm programs currently offer." The legislation in most cases also excludes new
farmers from receiving these payments. Glickman noted that the Conference Committee must
make improvements in both the Senate and the House bills before he can recommend the
President sign the legislation. Contact: Laura Trivers (202) 720-4623.

NATIONAL NUTRITION MONTH COMMEMORATED -- For the first time, children in thousands
of classrooms will be using new educational tools to motivate them to improve their diets as
schools prepare to implement historic policy changes to ensure healthy meals at school.
Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman and Under Secretary for Food, Nutrition, and Consumer
Services Ellen Haas joined students (March 4) at the New Hampshire Estates Elementary School
in Silver Spring, Maryland, to highlight Team Nutrition education tools in the classrooms and
recognize the school's commitment to Team Nutrition. Glickman said, 'The educational tools are
designed to be fun for children and teach them about improving their diet." The event showcased
nutritional education activities developed through Team Nutrition partnerships. Contact: Alicia
Bambara (703) 305-2039.

CROPS IGNORE WINTRY BLASTS -- Whether it's icy wind or knee-deep snow, it hasn't stopped
Tom Kaspar, plant scientist for the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service
from growing crops in Iowa. His crop is growing on 7,000 pounds of soil that fill each of six metal
bins inside a USDA laboratory on the flatlands of Iowa. Kaspar can dictate or duplicate whatever
kind of weather he wants. Kaspar's "garden" grows in-two chambers each two-stories tall, which
are far different from a greenhouse. These chambers and a third one are being used for the first
time at the National Soil Tilth Laboratory in Ames, Iowa. A stairway takes Kaspar and his
colleagues to the lower level where each of the 3.3-foot square by 5-foot deep soil bins holds the
7,000 pounds of Iowa farmland. Holes in the side of each bin let scientists use fiber-optic probes
to see plant roots grow at various depths. On the upper level, plants as tall as corn can be grown
to maturity. Kaspar said, "Experiments in the chambers will give farmers new findings, for
example, on how soil temperatures help or hinder the growth of plant roots." All this and other
research continues year-round in the chambers. Contact: Hank Becker (301) 344-2769.








JENSON SELECTED AS NEW JUDICIAL OFFICER William Jenson was selected as the new
judicial officer for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, effective January 21, 1996. By law, the
judicial officer is the final deciding officer in adjudicatory proceedings conducted under numerous
USDA programs. Jenson has been with USDA's Office of General Counsel since 1976, currently
serving as senior counsel to provide legal services to three regulatory agencies within USDA.
Jenson is vice chairman of the American Bar Association's section on administrative law and
regulatory practice for agriculture. In addition, he teaches administrative law and other courses
in the paralegal program of USDA's Graduate School. Jenson was born in Hartford, Connecticut,
and received a B.A degree from Hobart College in Geneva, N.Y. After graduation, Jenson served
in the United States Army in Vietnam. Following his military service he received a J.D. degree
from Suffolk University Law School. He is a member of the Massachusetts Bar Association.
Contact: Martha Cashion (202) 720-3310.

SOYBEAN ENZYME REPLACING FORMALDEHYDE -- An enzyme from soybean hull is now
replacing formaldehyde in adhesives, abrasives, protective coatings and other products. In the
early 1980's, U.S. Department of Agriculture research scientists were the first to purify the enzyme,
a soybean perokidase, and scrutinize its properties. That work led to five industry patents. The
enzyme assists the reactivity of oxygen and peroxides with many compounds. Its marketed uses
range from medical diagnostic tests to removal of chlorine-containing pollutants from high-
temperature industrial wastewater. Soybean peroxidase is more easily isolated than peroxidase
from horseradish, now a major source. Contact: David J. Sessa (309) 681-6351.

A KIT TO DETECT MEDICINE -- Under a cooperative research and development agreement
(CRADA), the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Neogen Corporation of Lansing, Michigan are
developing a commercial kit to detect the presence of a medication, called salinomycin, in poultry
feed and broiler chicken meat. Salinomycin is added to broiler feed to protect the birds from
coccidiosis. Caused by a protozoan, the disease costs U.S. poultry producers about $450 million
a year in drugs and production losses. The kit will use monoclonal antibodies to check whether
salinomycin has been properly mixed with feeds and whether residues linger in tissues of
slaughtered chickens. Salinomycin is not a synthetic chemical, but it is prepared from
fermentations of natural microorganisms. Contact: Larry Stanker (409) 260-9306.

SPECIAL UPLAND COTTON QUOTA#1 RELEASED -- High cotton prices have triggered
another special import quota that will permit the importation of a quantity of upland cotton equal
to one week's domestic mill use, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced (January 18). The
special import quota that will permit the importation of 43,657,604 kilograms (96,248,619 pounds)
of upland cotton was established on January 24. Quota Number 1 was announced on April 6,
1995, ended on October 8, 1995, and was based on domestic mill consumption for the period
December 1994 through February 1995. Quota Number 1 closes on July 21, 1996, and the
amount is based on consumption for a more recent 3-month period. If another quota triggers
January 29, it will be designated as Quota Number 2 and any that follow will be numbered
sequentially. This announced quota applies to upland cotton purchased not later than April 22,
1996, and entered into the U.S. not later than July 21, 1996. The special import quota identifies
a quantity of imports that is not subject to the over-quota tariff rate of a tariff-rate quota. Contact:
Janise Zygmont (202) 720-8841.
EDITED BY LESLIE PARKER







CARLIN SWORN IN AS ASSISTANT SECRETARY-- J. David Carlin was sworn in as assistant
secretary for congressional relations by Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman. Carlin will be
responsible for planning, formulating, directing, and coordinating legislative affairs and
intergovernmental relations for USDA. Before joining USDA, Carlin was an attorney with the law
firm of Akin, Gump, Strauss, Hauer & Feld, L.L.P. where he concentrated on public law and policy
since 1988. He is a member of the District of Columbia and Missouri bars. Carlin is a co-founder
of Project Northstar, a tutorial program begun in 1988 for homeless children in Washington, D.C.
A native of Smolan, Kansas, Carlin holds a J.D. degree from Harvard Law School. He received
his B.A. degree from Kansas State University. Contact: Martha Cashion (202) 720-3310.

ROBINSON NAMED CSREES ADMINISTRATOR -- Bob H. Robinson has been named the
administrator of the USDA's Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service
(CSREES). As administrator of CSREES, Robinson will oversee the agency formed by the merger
of the Cooperative State Research Service and the Cooperative Extension Service during USDA's
reorganization. Its primary responsibility is to provide leadership to the land-grant university
system and its partners in research, higher education, and extension. Robinson comes from
USDA's Economic Research Service (ERS) where he served as director of the Natural Resources
and Environment Division since October 1994. He was director of ERS' Agricultural and Trade
Analysis Division from 1990-94. Robinson was ERS' associate administrator from 1986-90. He
started his career with ERS in 1965 as an economist. Robinson served on the faculty of Clemson
University from 1972 through 1986. Born in Madison County, N.C., Robinson earned a B.S.
degree in agricultural science from Berea College in Kentucky, a Master of Science degree in
economics from North Carolina State University, and a Ph.D. degree in agricultural economics
from Clemson University. Contact: Maria Bynum (202) 720-5192.

QUOTA INCREASED FOR RAW-CANE SUGAR -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman
announced (January 17) that the fiscal year 1996 tariff-rate quota (TRQ) for raw-cane sugar has
been increased by 400,000 metric tons (440,924 short tons). The fiscal year 1996 TRQ level is
set at 1,817,195 metric tons (2,003,114 short tons). Country allocations of the increased TRQ will
be announced by the U.S. Trade Representative. USDA will continue monitoring import
requirements and will adjust the TRQ accordingly. Final TRQ adjustments will be made on the
basis of the most reliable supply and use information available. Any future TRQ adjustments
would likely occur in the first and second quarters of calendar year 1996, when the USDA supply
and use estimates provide a reliable barometer of import needs. The Department also will
continue to monitor possible supplying-country shortfalls. Contact: Glenn Kaup (202) 720-3329.

INTERIM RULES FOR NATIONAL APPEALS DIVISION ISSUED -- Agriculture Secretary Dan
Glickman announced (January 11) the interim final rules for the National Appeals Division of the
U.S. Department of Agriculture. The Secretary said, "By publishing interim final rules, we
establish a process for current operations while leaving the rulemaking door open. We needed
to get procedures in place to serve our customers, but we recognized the need to evaluate how
the rules work in practice and to receive comments on agency rules for informal appeals." The
interim rules incorporate comments and recommendations from the 46 public responses to the
proposed rules published May 22, 1995. They also include changes to internal agency rules for
optional and required informal appeals in agencies whose adverse decisions are now subject to
review by the National Appeals Division. Contact: Martha Cashion (202) 720-3010.
EDITED BY LESLIE PARKER








ROLES CLARIFIED FOR NEW CONSERVATION PROGRAMS -- Secretary of Agriculture Dan
Glickman clarified (April 26) the roles of the Farm Service Agency (FSA) and the Natural
Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in the administration of the new conservation programs
created by the 1996 Farm Bill. Glickman designated the NRCS as having primary responsibility
for setting conservation policy for new programs, in particular, the Environmental Quality
Incentives Program. He reaffirmed FSA as the lead agency in the administration of the
Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). He also directed NRCS and FSA jointly to develop a
system utilizing to the fullest extent their networks of state, county and local officials to assist in
program delivery. Contact: Johna Pierce (202) 720-4623.

MARKETING ASSISTANCE LOAN RATES ANNOUNCED -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman
said (April 26) that the U.S. Department of Agriculture would offer nonrecourse marketing
assistance loans to producers with production flexibility contracts for the 1996 crops of wheat, feed
grains, rice and upland cotton and to any producers of soybeans, minor oilseeds, (sunflower seed,
canola, rapeseed, safflower, mustard seed, flaxseed) and ELS cotton. Both marketing loan and
loan deficiency payments will be implemented for 1996 crops as they were for 1995 crops.
Producers of ELS cotton are not eligible for either marketing loans or loan deficiency payments
under the Federal Agriculture Improvement and Reform Act of 1996. However, ELS cotton loans
continue to be nonrecourse, allowing the producer to forfeit the commodity to USDA's Commodity
Credit Corporation as full satisfaction of the loan if market prices are below principal plus interest.
Marketing assistance loan rates for all commodities (except rice) may differ from year to year.
Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

MEAT AND POULTRY HACCP ALLIANCE GETS USDA CONTRACT -- The U.S. Department
of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced (April 26) it has awarded
a contract to the International Meat and Poultry HACCP Alliance. Under the contract, the
organization will develop model plans to help implement the system of food safety controls known
as HACCP, Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point. FSIS requested the development of ten
generic models that could be used to assist meat and poultry plants in implementing new food
safety rules which are based on HACCP. These models will address operations such as beef,
pork and poultry slaughter as well as cooked ready-to-eat products. The $207,000 bid by the
Alliance, a Texas A & M University foundation, was one of five submitted to FSIS. Contact:
Jacque Knight (202) 720-9113.

FOOD STAMP RULE TO ENFORCE WORK REQUIREMENTS -- The U.S. Department of
Agriculture published new regulations (April 30) that impose tougher sanctions on people who
refuse to work or who break the rules of federal, state and local assistance programs. Agriculture
Secretary Dan Glickman said, "The regulations issued will end a system where one government
agency sanctions people and another increases their benefits. It helps move people from welfare
to work, and puts an end to a system that rewards individuals on Food Stamps and other programs
for not participating in the job programs and other requirements. This rule gives States the tools
they need to impose tougher sanctions on people who refuse to work." The final rule was
published in the April 30 Federal Register and will become effective in 30 days. Contact: Alicia
Bambara (703) 305-2039.
EDITED BY LESLIE PARKER








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #2020 -- What's all the fuss about diet supplements and optimum health?
In this edition, Leslie Parker talks to two experts on eating for health and supplementing, too.
(Weekly cassette -- five minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME #1499 -- Learning through the Expanded Food and Nutrition Program.
Supermarket traffic control. Total recycling for rural residents. Growing trees for cleaner air.
Community service programs. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE #2012 -- Cotton: Fewer acres in '96 or more? Rice prices still surprise some folks.
Wheat outcome uncertain. Benefitting from the Wetlands Reserve Program. Is their concentration
in the meat packing industry? (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON THE USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Friday, February 23, catfish processing and
cattle on feed. Monday, February 26, livestock, dairy and poultry and wheat outlook. Tuesday,
February 27, weekly weather and crop report. Thursday, February 29, tobacco world markets and
trade and agricultural prices. Friday, March 1, world horticultural trade and U.S. export
opportunities. These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries
many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES: Lynn Wyvill reports on USDA's Meat and Poultry Hotline campaign to encourage
people to use meat thermometers when they cook meat and poultry. Meat thermometers take the
guesswork out of determining if meat and poultry are thoroughly cooked. Thorough cooking is an
important step in preventing food borne illness. John Snyder reports on USDA "taking the pulse
of American agriculture." The Department is conducting its annual Farm Costs and Returns
Survey. The survey collects information from farmers on their costs and returns over the past
year. Results are used to help determine future farm policy.

ACTUALITIES: Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman releases USDA's report on concentration
in the meat packing industry.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWS FEEDS: Thursday from 3:45 to 4:00 p.m. ET,
Telstar 402R (located at 89 degrees West), Transponder 13, Vertical Polarity, Downlink
Frequency 3960 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.










United States Department of A Og ffic municatiofi tcWa1il tQi, DC 20250-1300
.. library


s AM 6 %96 JUN 2 0 1 M996
Letter No. 2758 March 29,1996
U university of Firi
FARM BILL CONFERENCE IEE Agriculture ecret'a 'n Glickman was
pleased that the farm bill confer fpleted work on the 1995 Farm Bill (March 21).
However, Secretary Glickman said, e Congress' final farm bill has a lot of problems. I
remain concerned about the dissolution of the safety net that protects farmers and rural America
during lean times. I still have reservations about making large payments to producers regardless
of market conditions." With reluctance, Glickman recommended to President Clinton that he sign
this bill. Glickman commented that he was pleased to see strong research and trade titles, an
extension of the nutrition safety net and the Fund for Rural America. Contact: Jim Petterson
(202) 720-4623.

RUSSIAN POULTRY BAN LIFTED -- The United States and Russia have successfully concluded
discussions on sanitary requirements that will permit the immediate resumption of exports of U.S.
poultry to Russia. This result was achieved through a joint effort by the Government and private
sector. Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman said, "The accord reached (March 26) establishes
a framework for reviewing U.S. poultry processing plants and cold storage that export poultry to
Russia and provides for development of mutually agreed criteria for review of U.S. facilities in the
future." Initially, such reviews will be conducted jointly by U.S. and Russian veterinarians.
Subsequent reviews will be carried out by the USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service. The
additional problem of new Russian tariffs on poultry imports remains to be resolved. Contact:
Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.

"MAD COW" DISEASE -- The U. S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection
Service and the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service are currently working with their state
and public health counterparts, the scientific community and industry representatives to review
current policies and regulations concerning BSE (bovine spongiform encephalopathy). The United
States has not imported processed beef or cattle from the United Kingdom since 1989 and
enforces similar stringent restrictions on importations from other countries where BSE exists.
USDA's BSE surveillance program has examined more than 2,660 specimens from 43 states, and
no BSE has ever been detected in cattle in the United States. Contact: Kendra Pratt (301) 734-
6573.

MEETING HELD ON BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY -- The U.S. Department of
Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service held a meeting (March 22) to review
current U.S. policies and regulations dealing with Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE). The
meeting was called in quick response to an announcement (March 20) in Great Britain of a newly
identified variation of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, a human neural disease, that may be linked to
the BSE epidemic in British cattle. USDA's intent is to review current policies to ensure that the
U.S. maintains a coordinated, science-based and effective approach that will keep the U.S. free
of BSE. Contact: Kendra Pratt (301) 734-6573.









United States Department of Agriculture bt ications Washington, DC 20250-1300


Letter No. 2753 J February 23, 1996

AGRICULTURE POLICY FOR A CENTU, -- retary of Agriculture Dan Glickman
opened the USDA's 1996 Agricultu tlookl'Forumr' uary 21) in Washington saying he is
optimistic because the United States frundamr y strong farm economy. 'There will be
a surge in world grain production this ji.r an said, "based on current prices and
pre-season conditions. Livestock and poultry producers may be squeezed as feed costs rise but
generally they are maintaining inventories. Beef, pork, and broiler output are expected to
increase." Under the continuation of the 1990 farm bill, producers would have been looking at
small deficiency payments and no set asides because of higher expected prices. Glickman
added, "As agriculture continues to move away from restrictive government programs to more
market-oriented ones, what government does outside the traditional commodity programs will
become increasingly important." Since trade, not commodity programs will define agriculture's
future, Glickman said, "China is becoming an extremely important customer for a number of U.S.
commodities." He noted that movement toward freer trade must continue. Bringing down trade
barriers is only part of the battle. "American agriculture is the most competitive in the world,"
Secretary Glickman said. "It remains the role of the eed:ra, govprpment to keep open access to
world trade; to ensure research for new crops; to keep our soil sqund, our water safe, our wildlife
protected; to inspect food before it goes on American tables, and to make sure no American goes
hungry." Contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.ryY 1 5 1936

INTERIM TERMS OF RICE PROGRAM -- Acting isf s"of0p9ayhe uncertainty caused by
Congress' inability to pass a 1995 Farm Bill, Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman announced
(February 16) proposed terms of a rice program for the 1996 crop year. Glickman used his
authority under the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) Charter Act to determine program
provisions. Secretary Glickman said, "I want to stress that these interim provisions are not
designed to take the place of a rice program adopted by Congress. Rice producers can use these
provisions as an 'insurance policy' to arrange for financing and begin making their planting
decisions. In the absence of new legislation, the industry can be assured that these provisions
will provide an adequate safety net." Sign up for participation in the 1996 rice program is not
required to be eligible for price support. Absent new statutory authority, no deficiency payments
will be made on the 1996 crop. The only benefit available for eligible 1996-crop rice would be a
nonrecourse loan at a proposed minimum price support rate of $9.50 per hundredweight. This
loan rate will protect farm income and result in comparable costs to the government. Contact:
Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

PEANUT SUPPORT LEVELS ANNOUNCED -- USDA's Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC)
announced (February 15) that the national average support level for 1996 quota peanuts will be
$679.25 per short ton which is up 89 cents from 1995. Farm legislation now under consideration
by Congress may change the statutory provisions relative to this program announcement.
Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #2026 -- Gary Crawford takes an in-depth look at a different type of radio,
"Farm Broadcasting -- From 1926 to the Present." Included are lots of interviews with farm
broadcasters as well, as sound recordings from decades ago. (Weekly cassette -- five minute
documentary).

CONSUMER TIME #1504 -- No "mad cow" disease in this country. Farm Broadcasting: a different
type of radio. Turning corporate landscapes into wetlands. National trails are getting more
visitors than ever before. Turning munitions into fertilizers. (Weekly cassette -- consumer
features).

AGRITAPE #2018 -- Russia lifts poultry ban. Beef production is up considerably. Slow start for
new apples. U.S. scientists are working on ways to protect U.S. fruit growers. Turning weeds into
cash crops. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wednesday, April 10, cotton/citrus production, world
agricultural supply and demand (cotton). Thursday, April 11, world agricultural supply and
demand, and cotton and wool outlook. These are USDA reports we know about in advance.
Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Wind erosion and air quality are the focus of a research and education program
in Washington state to control PM10 emissions. PM10 is particulate matter less than 10 microns
in size. These very fine particles of dust are believed to cause health problems. In this three-part
series, Lynn Wyvill reports on efforts by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the rest of the
agricultural community to learn more about PM10 and ways to control it.

ACTUALITIES -- Includes highlights of Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman's testimony before
the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Agriculture (March 21).

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS: Thursday from 3:45 to 4:00 p.m. ET,
Telstar 402R (located at 89 degrees West), Transponder 13, Vertical Polarity, Downlink
Frequency 3960 MHz.
\ **Note: Effective May 2-September 26, the satellite newsfeed coordinates will change to:
Telstar 401(97 degrees West), Transponder 7, Vertical Polarity, Downlink Frequency 3840
MHz.
Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.









United States Department of Agriculture Office of Comruications *i Washington, DC 20250-1300
rson Science
Library
Letter No. 2750 APR 01 199E February 2, 1996

GLICKMAN RETURNS EARLY FROM ASIA -- Agricitr. cptgipan Glickman cut short his
Asian trade trip this week to return and work closely with the members of Congress in an effort to
adopt a new Farm Bill. And after months of debate, it appears these efforts are now bearing fruit.
This week, Congress is expected to bring bipartisan Farm Bill legislation to the floor. Secretary
Glickman explained, "Because of the critical nature of this business, it is with deep regret that I
must shorten my trip to Asia and return to Washington, D.C. after I complete my discussions in
Beijing with my Chinese counterparts. I want to state clearly, that I plan to make myself and my
staff available to assist Congress as they work in a bipartisan manner to craft this important
legislation and give U.S. farmers the information they need as they enter the planting season."
Contact: Jim Petterson (202) 720-4623.

USDA OFFERS "EARLY-OUT" FOR CRP -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman announced
(January 25) an 'early-out' option for some producers with acreage enrolled in the Conservation
Reserve Program (CRP). Acreage released under 'early-out' will have crop acreage bases,
allotments and quotas restored for the 1996 crop year. Secretary Glickman said, "This early out
option is important for several reasons. First, producers should have the opportunity to take
advantage of the high market prices by planting more of their land. Second, the offer is consistent
with USDA's responsibility of ensuring a grain supply that meets market demand ng
an 'early out' for productive, less erodible land is consistent with the
environmentally sound, cost-effective CRP." This early-out' option appli to those
contracts scheduled to expire on September 30, 1996. Eligible land must ha erodibility inde
of 15 or less. Contact: Wayne Baggett (202) 720-2032. r

FOOD STAMP PARTICIPATION DECLINES -- Agriculture Secretary Dan man announce
(January 25) that participation figures for November 1995 show 25.9 million p ere receii
food stamps, down from 26.9 million people in November 1994. Glickman cre d
economy for the decline in participation. Contact: Alicia Bambara (703) 305-2

PL 480 COUNTRY ALLOCATIONS REVISED FOR FY '96 The U.S. Department of Agriculture
(January 30) issued second quarter revised fiscal year 1996 allocations under Title I of the Food
for Peace Program (P.L. 480) and the Food for Progress Program funded by Title I appropriations.
According to Christopher E. Goldthwait, general sales manager for USDA's Foreign Agricultural
Service, Title I funds totaling $210 million have betn signed with 19 countries under P.L. 480 Title
I and Food for Progress agreements. In October, allocations totaling $30 million were also
announced for Angola, Croatia, Moldova, and Poland. Because USDA's authority for entering into
P.L. 480 agreements expired at the end of calendar year 1995, these agreements cannot be
signed until Congress acts to provide new legislative authority. Contact: Glenn Kaup (202) 720-
3329.










United States Depar e uof "Agr.ctt Office of Commurlotltidnms Sc iWashington, DC 20250-1300
Library


Letter No. 274 MAR 0 7 1996January 12 & 19, 1996

COMBINED IS leBiz a '96 kept us frVflVjiilstfrfsri6irr January 12 issue of
Broadcasters Let are i tdi highlights from that week with this issue. We regret any
inconvenience that ca' our readers.

FAT INTAKE CONTINUES TO DROP -- Americans are eating less fat as a percentage of total
calories, according to a new U.S. Department of Agriculture nationwide food survey. Data from
the first year (1994) of the three-year survey, "What we Eat in America," found that Americans
consumed 33 percent of calories from fat in 1994, continuing a downward trend. In the late 1970's
Americans consumed 40 percent of calories from fat. According to a 1989-1991 survey,
Americans consumed 34 percent of calories from fat. Even with this decrease, two-thirds of adult
Americans still eat more than the 30 percent recommended limit for fat calories. Also, the survey
found that nearly as many Americans are consuming more than the recommended limit for
saturated fat. Survey participants in 1994 reported a total calorie intake about 6 percent higher
than 17 years ago. Thirty percent of the men and 45 percent of the women reported that they
rarely engaged in vigorous exercise. This may help explain why participants reported weights
averaging 11 to 12 pounds heavier. Contact: Judy McBride (301) 344-2861.

GLICKMAN TALKS WITH EU COMMISSIONER FISCHLER -- Agriculture Secretary Dan
Glickman said among the items covered in a January 11 discussion with European Union Farm
Commissioner Franz Fischler were the hormone issue, biotech issues, status of the farm bill and
prospect for European enlargement into Eastern Europe. On the hormone ban, Commissioner
Fischler outlined the current status of the problem in Europe and indicated that the report of
scientific conference held late last year was now completed. Fischler was not able to indicate that
steps would be taken to resolve the problem to U.S. satisfaction in the near term. Secretary
Glickman said, "The evidence is overwhelming that proper use of these hormones poses no
danger to human health, and the World Trade Organization (WTO) Sanitary and Phytosanitary
Agreement ensures that the principles of sound science must prevail in matters such as this."
Secretary Glickman said he will recommend that the United States initiate WTO dispute
settlement proceedings against the EU ban. Glickman added that the U.S. will continue to pursue
efforts with the EU to find a bilateral solution. Contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.

USDA EXTENDS DEADLINE FOR MARKET PROMOTION The U.S. Department of Agriculture
extended its deadline for applications for participation in the Market Promotion Program (MPP) to
5:00 p.m. (EST) Monday, January 22, 1996, due to severe weather conditions in the Washington,
DC metropolitan area and closure of the federal government last week. Applications may be
hand-delivered to USDA, FAS Marketing Operations Staff, Room 4932-S, 14th and Independence
Ave., S.W., Washington, DC 20250-1042, or mailed to USDA, FAS Marketing Operations Staff,
Ag Box 1042, Washington, DC 20250-1042. For additional information on the program, call (202)
720-5521. Contact: Donald Washington (202) 720-3101.







BURKE NAMED DEPUTY UNDER SECRETARY -- Brian E. Burke has been appointed deputy
under secretary of agriculture for natural resources and environment. In this role, he will oversee
the programs and activities of USDA's Forest Service. Burke began his work as a senior policy
analyst on the White House Domestic Policy Council (DPC) in July 1993. The DPC advises the
President on a wide range of domestic policy issues. He was one of the primary officials within
the Executive Office of the President responsible for shaping and articulating the Administration's
domestic policy agenda and legislation on the environment, agriculture, natural resources and
energy issues. He is a member of the Bar in the District of Columbia and Massachusetts. A
native of Boston, Burke holds an A.B. degree from Brown University in Providence, RI and a J.D.
degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. Contact: Janet Sledge (202) 720-
2065.

LOWER FAT FRENCH FRIES MADE FROM RICE -- People who love french fries, but need to
cut their fat intake, may soon be saying that the nice fry is the rice fry. U.S. Department of
Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) food technologist Ranjit Kadan said, "This new
french fry has 25 to 50 percent less fat than regular fries. The main ingredient is rice. Since the
process starts with rice flour, it can be fortified with protein and minerals to make an even more
nutritious, wholesome food." Researchers say the fries taste just like rice, so in order to enhance
a mild tapte you can add onions, spices or anything. Kadan says the new product will offer
consumers way to enjoy a snack and still maintain a healthy diet. Contact: Ranjit Kadan (504)
286-4430.

MORE HEART BENEFITS FROM BARLEY Until recently, oats have been mostly for horses and
barley mainly for beer drinkers. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research
Service (ARS) scientists say that's all changing now. These scientists have been among the first
to study and report the cholesterol-lowering effects of barley. ARS chemist Warren Burger and
other researchers at the University of Wisconsin have identified tocotrienol as a natural
component of barley that inhibits the body's production of cholesterol. Tocotrienols are found in
layers of the barley kernel and also in oat bran. Studies done over the past decade by ARS
scientists confirm that these compounds in barley and oats lowered cholesterol in chickens and
pigs. Contact: Y. Victor Wu (309) 685-4011.

FOLLOW-UP TRIP YIELDS POTENTIAL APPLE BONANZA -- Plant explorers who collected
more than 60,000 apple seeds from rare, wild trees in Central Asia last summer say the material
contains a potential genetic bonanza for breeders looking for better flavor, disease resistance, and
other traits. U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service scientist Philip
Forsline said, 'This was the most successful collecting trip we've made to the Kazakhstan region,
based on our field observations of the apples growing in their natural habitat." The follow-up trip
was the third in a series to Central Asia, where the modern domestic apple is thought to have
originated. Contact: Philip Forsline (315) 787-2390.

CCC INTEREST RATE IS 5-118 PERCENT U.S. Department of Agriculture's Commodity Credit
Corporation's (CCC) Executive Vice President Grant Buntrock announced that commodity loans
disbursed in February by USDA's CCC will carry a 5-1/8 percent interest rate. This is down from
January's 5-3/8 percent and reflects the interest rate charged CCC by the -U.S. Treasury.
Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.
EDITED BY LESUE PARKER









United States Departen e Agriculture Q ;e of communications wasnington, U z 0250-1300


Letter No. 2754 .. M rston Sc fence March 1, 1996
Library
DISASTER ASSIS f COVE EXPANDED gg pji If e Secretary Dan Glickman
announced (February r .. i implementing an0 1Bp ig provisions of USDA's
Noninsured Crop Disaster e Program. PayrJ~p ts re made to eligible producers when
the expected "area" yield is less than 65 percent ofl ni AidcFti fWidual crop losses are in
excess of 50 percent of the approved yield. Defining an "area" is a critical step in determining
whether assistance will be provided. The new regulations will allow an entire county to be
considered an 'area'. The acres and values criteria are the same as those used last year.
However, allowing counties to qualify as an 'area' will allow assistance to growers who suffered
major crop losses but were formerly disqualified based on the value and acreage loss criteria.
Different types or varieties of a crop or commodity will now be treated as separate crops if their
prices differ substantially from other types or varieties. Contact: Jerry Alanko (202) 720-5622.

CROP INSURANCE REMINDER -- Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman reminded growers
(February 27) that they need to obtain crop insurance offered under the Federal Crop Insurance
Act by the local sales closing date to stay eligible for many USDA farm programs and loans. Sales
closing dates are significant because signing up for insurance, changing the crops insured or
changing coverage levels must be done prior to the announced date. The first Spring sales
closing date was February 28, and the next closing date will be March 15. Sales closing dates
vary by crop and location. USDA has increased price elections on major crops and introduced two
new pilot programs to test the concept of revenue insurance. The two pilot programs are called
Crop Revenue Coverage and Income Protection. Contact: Ken Ackerman (202) 690-2803.

COTTON DEFICIENCY PAYMENT RATE -- Grant Buntrock, Executive Vice President of the
U.S. Department of Agriculture's Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) announced (February 23)
that the deficiency payment rate for the 1995 crop of upland cotton will be zero. Deficiency
payments are required when the national average price received by producers during the calendar
year is below the established target price of 72.9 cents per pound. The payment rate is equal to
the difference between the target price and the higher of the calendar year national average
market price or the price support loan rate. The 1995 calendar year average price was 76.8 cents
per pound. Since the year average price was above the target price, the deficiency payment rate
is zero. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

DEFICIENCY PAYMENTS FOR RICE ANNOUNCED -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture
announced (February 23) that eligible rice producers will receive about $171 million in final
deficiency payments for the 1995 crop of rice. The 1996-crop total payment rate is based on the
difference between the established target price ($10.71 per hundredweight) and the higher of the
national average price support loan rate ($6.50 per hundredweight) for the crop, or a selected
market price. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.









United States Department of Agriculture- f of CommunicaN tjn & a ton, DC 20250-1300
N" L ibrarry
Letter No. 2747 FE 1 S S MAR 0 11996 January 5, 1996

USDA, HHS RELEASE T i E'RY G DELINES tfnTlWsf~ctrfplggernment released
(January 2) its new e uidel s or Americans," providing easily understood,
science-based informational can choose diets that promote good health. At a
joint news conference, Agricultu Dan Glickman and HHS Secretary Donna E. Shalala
presented the fourth edition of "Nutrition and Your Health: Dietary Guidelines for Americans." The
two Secretaries said the new Guidelines are more user-friendly, more specific inciting good food
sources for specific nutrients, and based on the strongest scientific evidence yet concerning diet
and health. The new Dietary Guidelines put increased emphasis on physical activity, calling for
30 minutes or more of moderate physical activity on most (preferably all) days of the week.
Contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.

FINAL '96 UPLAND COTTON ARP -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman announced (December
29) that the acreage reduction percentage factor for the 1996 acreage reduction program (ARP)
for upland cotton will be zero percent. This is a reduction from the preliminary level announced
on November 3. Since that time, estimates of 1995 production have declined by 5 percent.
Further, acreage estimated to be planted to cotton in 1996 also has been reduced, as there are
indications cotton producers may switch to crops such as grains and soybeans for more favorable
returns. The zero percent level most closely conforms with the applicable statutory requirement
regarding the maintenance of the desirable 1996-97 end-of-year stock level. Contact: Bruce
Merkle (202) 720-8206.

WHEAT, BARLEY AND OATS PRODUCERS TO RECEIVE $72 MILLION -- Grant Buntrock,
USDA's Executive Vice President of the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), announced
(January 2) that wheat, barley, and oats producers who used the 0/85 and 0/92 provisions of the
1995 price support and acreage reduction program (ARP) will receive approximately $72 million
in additional deficiency payments. Participants in the 1995 wheat, barley, and oats program who
used the provisions are guaranteed minimum payment rates of 70 cents per bushel, 40 cents per
bushel, and 20 cents per bushel for wheat, barley and oats, respectively. These amounts were
the projected deficiency payment rates for these crops when producers signed up for the program.
Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

REGULATORY REFORMS TO IMPROVE MEAT AND POULTRY SAFETY -- U.S. Department
of Agriculture's acting Under Secretary for Food Safety Michael R. Taylor announced (January
3) that the regulatory reform actions are part of USDA's strategy to improve food safety. Adopting
modem regulatory tools and streamlining or eliminating old rules and requirements will enhance
the safety of meat and poultry products. The changes are part of USDA's comprehensive overhaul
of the nation's meat and poultry inspection program. The reforms are intended to support the new
food safety measures USDA plans to adopt for all federally inspected meat and poultry plants.
Contact: Hedy Ohringer (202) 720-9113.







-IlIll,


United States Departr
Letter No. 2763 I


of Communications Washington, DC 20250-1300


May 3, 1996


EMERGENCY G RJll. PPROED ".While visiting the Texas Panhandle area to evaluate
drought conditions )gricul eSecretary Dan Glickman announced additional relief
measures for produr ergency grazing on Conservation Reserve Program
(CRP) acreage. The ne 'f-ilct action will be five percent for each month or any part of a
month that the emergency grazing authority is used. But, the payment reduction cannot exceed
the 25 percent payment reduction previously assessed. This new payment reduction provides
more flexibility to producers because they can determine the number of months the livestock graze
the CRP acreage. Glickman's decision is in response to the continued severe drought plaguing
the Southwest and concern that the CRP repayment reduction may be too severe considering the
quality of cover on CRP acreage. Farm Service Agency State Committees will evaluate weather
conditions in their states to determine whether the emergency grazing rovis ions- Ild continue.
When the emergency situation no longer exists (not to exceed Octob SB te emergency
grazing authority will expire. Contact: Dann Stuart (202) 690-0474.
JUN 7 1996
COMMODITY PAYMENT RATES ANNOUNCED -- Estimated Production Flexibility Contract
payment rates for fiscal years 1996 through 2002 for wheat, feed grq gH rl rfttt and rice
have been announced by Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman. The corr'facf ra'es reflect potential
payments to owners and producers who enroll their farms in a 7-year Production Flexibility
Contract. Final annual payments will be made to producers with contracts no later than
September 30, for each of fiscal years 1996-2002 payments. When final 1996 payments are
made, participating producers of wheat, barley, oats and upland cotton will receive an additional
payment, based on the amount of the 1995 deficiency payments required to be repaid. Also,
participating producers of these commodities who have not repaid their unearned 1995-crop
deficiency payments will have the amount due deducted from their final 1996 payments. These
overpayments occurred because advance payments for the 1995 crops must be repaid since
market prices have increased above the respective established (target) prices. Contact: Dann
Stuart (202) 690-0474.

REGULATORY REFORM PROPOSALS ISSUED -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food
Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced (May 1) two reform proposals as part of its
ongoing effort to improve food safety and modernize meat and poultry inspection. Agriculture
Secretary Dan Glickman said, "These proposals reflect our strategy to shift from a prescriptive
command and control system of regulation that can stifle innovation to one that provides greater
flexibility and responsibility to industry to produce safe products for consumers." One regulatory
revision being proposed would establish objective performance standards for the safe production
of cooked beef products, uncured meat patties and certain fully and partially cooked poultry
products. The second proposed rule would eliminate requirements for industry to obtain prior
approval from FSIS for facility blueprints and equipment and for most quality control programs.
The proposed rules were published in the May 2 Federal Register. Contact: Jacque Knight
(202) 720-9113.


II K I I I H-





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


OFF MIKE 3 1262 08135

CORRECT ANSWERS...to agricultural trivia questions on Agriculture Day last week earned gift
certificates for listeners who were tuned-in to Rita Frazer (WSMI-FM, Litchfield, IL). Rita says she
gave away about $500 worth of agricultural product prizes. Soil temperatures in her area are still
cool with corn planting expected to begin around April 15. Rita was raised on a farm nearby and
has handled farm broadcasting duties for six years with her station.

SNOW CONTINUES...this week in northern and midwestern locations. Charlie Kampa (KBRF-
AM, Fergus Falls, MN) said an eight-inch snowfall pushed this winter's total in his area to near 75
inches. It's still cold, too. Charlie said temperatures dipped to 11 degrees this week. Snow
melting has been slow thus far, but a sudden warm up could cause some flooding concerns. He
predicts there will be plenty of topsoil moisture for spring planting. A 16-year broadcasting
veteran, Charlie has been a farm broadcaster with his station for the past six years.

RAIN FOR DRY TEXAS...brought some encouragement to farmers and ranchers there this week.
Curt Lancaster (Voice of Southwest Agriculture Network, San Angelo, TX) said rainfall totals were
less than a half-inch, but were widespread over the state. Fire danger is still high, but pastures
are beginning to "green up." Amy Bugg, formerly with WSDR in Sterling, IL and a marketing firm
in Peoria, IL, joined the VSA team this week. Curt says their network now serves nearly 70 Texas
stations.

COUNTRY MUSIC... freelance reporting for ABC Radio is the new occupation for Dan Gordon
(formerly with Tennessee Agrinet, Nashville, TN). Steve Hayes, who has been with Tennessee
Agrinet for seven years, has assumed agricultural reporting duties. Formerly, Steve was a
morning news anchor and a state capitol reporter. He now produces three 10-minute agricultural
shows per day (5:00 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and noon), four 2-minutes features, market news and
weath Also, Stev does farm news for Alabama Agrinet.


LARRY UINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300






FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #2017 With crop supplies already tight and prices high, experts say 1996
crop production will be critical for both farmers and consumers. Gary Crawford talks with some
of those experts in this edition of Agriculture USA. (Weekly cassette -- five minute
documentary).

CONSUMER TIME #1496 -- U.S. experts helping Central America save its environment.
Youngsters get close encounter with farming. A unique financial program for women. Food prices
in '96-no cause for alarm. Smart grocery shopping. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE #2009 -- Tough issues discussed in Mexican meeting. U.S. farm trade trends still
looking good. It's "cost and returns" survey time for farmers. Higher crop prices-how will farmers
respond? Milk output less than expected. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wednesday, January 31, agricultural prices and
tobacco exports. Thursday, February 1, we expect to be talking with Agriculture Secretary Dan
Glickman from China and will have news items from that event. Also that day, consumer food
price index, catfish production and horticultural exports. Tuesday, February 6, crop/weather
update. Thursday, February 8, cotton situation and citrus production. Friday, February 9, U.S.
crop production, world agricultural supply and demand and world cotton situation. NOTE: On
Friday, February 9, we will change the newsline twice to incorporate release of morning production
reports. New material will be added at 10:30 a.m. EST and then also at the usual 5:00 p.m. EST.
These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries many stories
every day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES: Exclusive interview with Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman as he talks about
progress in Farm Bill talks with Congress, the possible impact of implementing the 1949
Agricultural Adjustment Act and about his upcoming trade mission to Asia. Newsfeed includes
footage of Glickman and Congressional agriculture leaders after their Capitol Hill meeting on
January 23. Patrick O'Leary reports on a new solution to soil erosion on row crop farms. A
polymer known as "PAM," (short for Polyacrylomide) which can dramatically reduce soil erosion
when added to irrigation water applied to furrows. The polymer treatment is part of a successful
program being administered by USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service. The story
focuses on results in the West Stanislaus County, California watershed (2:09 minutes).
ACTUALITIES: Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman talks about progress in Farm Bill talks with
Congress.
SATELLITE COORDINATES: Thursdays, 3:45-4:00 p.m. ET on Telstar 402R, Transponder 13
(Vertical), Downlink Frequency 3960 MHz (89 degrees West), Audio, 6.2/6.8.
Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #2021 -- In this edition, Brenda Curtis reports from the so-called "Mississippi
Flyway" to describe why the duck population of this country is being replenished on the nation's
wetlands. (Weekly cassette -- five minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME #1500 -- Saving the ducks. Earned income tax credit. The high cost of melting
ice. Lower poultry prices for consumers. Bird problems coming to roost. U.S. dairy cattle to
Turkey. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE #2013 -- E.U. hormone ban continues, despite WTO challenge. U.S. soybean
prospects closely tied to Brazil. Report says Farm Credit System healthy. Poultry producers'
profits down. U.S. dairy cattle to Turkey. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tuesday, March 5, weekly weather and crop
outlook. Thursday, March 7, aquaculture report. Monday, March 11, cotton/citrus production,
world cotton supply and demand. Tuesday, March 12, crop production, world agricultural supply
and demand, cotton and wool outlook. Wednesday, March 13, feed outlook, oil crops outlook, rice
outlook, and wheat outlook. These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our
newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.



USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.




FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE



ACTUALITIES: Statements include comments from Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman, U.S.
Trade Representative Mickey Kantor and USDA's Chief Economist Keith Collins made at the 1996
Agricultural Outlook Forum in Washington, D.C.


SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWS FEEDS: Thursday from 3:45 to 4:00 p.m. ET,
Telstar 402R (located at 89 degrees West), Transponder 13, Vertical Polarity, Downlink
Frequency 3960 MHZ.


Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.








USDA'S TEAM NUTRITION REACHING MILLIONS OF CHILDREN -- Team Nutrition, the U.S.
Department of Agriculture's program to improve school meals and promote the health and nutrition
education of children, is already reaching millions of children at thousands ofschools with its
dietary messages of lower fat, more variety, and more fruits, vegetables and grains. Launched
last June as a tool to help implement USDA's School Meals Initiative for Healthy Children, Team
Nutrition has strategically partnered with and developed an extensive network of more than 200
organizations ranging from top health and industry organizations and federal agencies to local
community businesses representing food, agriculture, nutrition, health and education. During the
next few months, Team Nutrition will announce new partnerships and programs to reach middle
and senior grades. Also, a family, food and resource guide will be released in commemoration
of the 50th Anniversary of the National School Lunch Program that will be filled with family
activities and 50 nutritious, economical, kid-friendly recipes. Contact: Alicia Bambara (703)
305-2039.

USDA/AMERICORPS COMMEMORATES OKLAHOMA BOMBING -- The U.S. Department of
Agriculture's AmeriCorps members nationwide will observe April 23 as a Day of National Service
with treeplanting and other activities to commemorate the first-year anniversary of the bombing
of the federal building in Oklahoma City. AmeriCorps/USDA members from Cheyenne, Sentinel
and Woodward, Oklahoma, will join members of other organizations in Oklahoma City to plant
trees, present educational programs concerning conservation, and conduct cleanup and repair
activities at the Mark Twain Elementary School, a mile from the bombing site. The school was
slightly damaged by the explosion, but did not qualify for special funding for repairs available in
the wake of the bombing. On April 19, the actual anniversary of the explosion, AmeriCorps/USDA
members in Claremore, Oklahoma, participate in two treeplanting ceremonies at the Rogers State
College Conservation Reserve. Contact: LeRoy Tull (405) 742-1207.

DEPUTY UNDER SECRETARY APPOINTED -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced
the appointment of Mary Ann Keeffe as Deputy Under Secretary for Food, Nutrition and Consumer
Services. Keeffe most recently served as deputy administrator for special nutrition programs at
USDA's Food and Consumer Service where she was charged with overseeing child nutrition
programs, including the School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs; the Special Supplemental
Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children; the Commodity Distribution Programs; and
nutrition education and technical services activities. In her new role as Deputy Under Secretary,
Keeffe will be responsible for policy and program development for the Food and Consumer
Service's 15 food assistance programs. Keeffe also will help oversee Team Nutrition, USDA's
nationwide program designed to support schools in providing healthful school meals and to
educate children about good nutrition. Contact: Alicia Bambara (703) 305-2039.

FAX AND INTERNET -- Radio and TV programming information and Broadcasters Letter can
be obtained through USDA's AgNewsFax or from USDA's Home Page. FAX: Use fax phone to
call (202) 690-3944. At voice prompts, press 1, press 4, then to receive Broadcasters Letter,
press 9200; radio newsline information, press 9250; TV contents billboard, press 9260; TV scripts,
press 9270. After all selections, then press #, press 3, and press the start button on fax machine.
INTERNET: Address for this letter is http://www.usda.gov/news/bdcaster/bdcaster.htm.


EDITED BY LESLIE PARKER







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #2031 -- Americans have a love affair with fresh cut flowers in their homes.
However, more and more of those flowers are coming from outside the United States. Gary
Crawford has this story. (Weekly cassette -- five minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME #1508 -- A break on fresh vegetable prices. Will a nutrient help you to lose
weight? The great Mother's Day flower invasion. A nutrient that helps diabetics. Get to know
your good bugs. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE #2022 -- USDA announces 1996 Farm Program payment rates. A quick look at the
new crop payment rates from USDA. U.S. requests WTO action on beef ban. Agricultural trade
surplus still growing. Holding onto your crop insurance? Emergency help for cattle producers.
(Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Monday, May 13, feed outlook, oil crops outlook,
rice outlook, wheat outlook, cattle and sheep outlook, world agricultural production, world grain
trade and world oilseed trade. Tuesday, May 14, farm labor report and weekly weather and crop
outlook. Friday, May 17, poultry outlook and cattle on feed report. These are USDA reports we
know about in advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed
in this lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.



FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES: Patrick O'Leary reports on government help for cattle producers, announced this
week at the White House.

ACTUALITIES: Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman comments on drought conditions in Texas
and Kansas as well as government help for cattle producers. USDA Farm Service Agency official
Parks Shackelford describes grazing allowance on Conservation Reserve Program acres. USDA
Under Secretary Ellen Haas describes "Operation Trident," a food stamp fraud sweep in
Tidewater, Virginia, Jacksonville, Florida and Seattle, Washington.


**NEW SATELLITE COORDINATES: Effective May 2-September 26, the satellite newsfeed
coordinates are: Telstar 402R (89 degrees West), Transponder 20, Horizontal Polarity,
Downlink Frequency 4100 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

4 3
OFF MIKE

GREEN WEEK...in Germany features a large international food exhibit that is displayed in more
than 20 buildings. Lynn Ketelsen (Linder Farm Network, Willmar MN) was one of two U.S.
journalists officially invited to attend last month's celebration. Journalists from 40 countries were
there. Lynn joined with fellow farm broadcaster, Jack Crowner (Kentucky Ag Network, Louisville,
KY) who also attended, to take their own tour of farms and factories in the former East Germany
and northwest Germany. I expect their listeners are now hearing about their adventures. Also,
Lynn earned two awards recently. He became the first broadcaster to win the Friends of
Agriculture Award from Minnesota Corn Growers, and he received the top Service to Agriculture
Award from the University of Minnesota Waseca Alumni Association. A statewide poll of
graduates chose Lynn for the recognition.

MICHIGAN EVENTS...getting coverage Jast- week by Rod Zamarron (Michigan Farm Radio
Network, Lansing, MI) included Michigan State University's Agriculture and Natural Resources
Week, the Michigan FFA Convention and the Great Lakes Peach Conference. Rod says that
Michigan State Cooperative Extension Service is joining with Purdue University on March 21 to
produce a satellite broadcast to county extension offices on the Farm Bill. Rod joined the 25-year-
old Michigan Farm Radio Network in 1993.

39 YEARS...in radio, 11 as a farm director is the benchmark that Neil Trobak (KCIM/KKRL,
Carroll, IA) passes this year. Neil says farmers are waiting for spring, but have enjoyed good hog
and grain prices. Beef producers are not doing as well with losses of several dollars per head in
fed cattle marketing. Neil was planning some special promotions related to National Agriculture
Week and Agriculture Day, March 20.

TV SURVEY IS DUE...by March 22 from those of you who use our weekly satellite services. Fax
number return bc y of survey is (202)-720-5773.


LA RYA UINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #2024 -- Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is becoming a popular
management tool for America's farmers. Brenda Curtis reports on IPM from both the scientists'
and farmers' viewpoints. (Weekly cassette -- five minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME #1502 -- The silent epidemic. The house eaters. Weeds into flowers. The
incredible edible egg. Lamb a red meat alternative. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE #2016 -- Rapid response to "Kamal Bunt" discovery. An analysis of the Farm Bills.
The future of CRP. USDA testing new forms of crop insurance. The economic benefits of IPM.
(Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thursday, March 21, dairy outlook. Friday, March
22, U.S. agricultural trade update. Monday, March 25, livestock, dairy and poultry outlook.
Tuesday, March 26, weekly weather and crop outlook. Wednesday, March 27, fruit and tree nut
report. These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries many
stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE


FEATURES: Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman talks with a multi-generational farm family in
Ohio about the past and future of American agriculture in this video special intended for use
during National Agriculture Week.

ACTUALITIES: Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman comments on how USDA is dealing with
the fungal disease called karnal bunt that has been found in durum wheat seed in Arizona and
what impact it will have on trade.

UPCOMING FEATURES: Lynn Wyvill reports on a research and education program in
Washington state to control emissions of very fine particles of dust called PM10.


SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS: Thursday from 3:45 to 4:00 p.m. ET,
Telstar 402R (located at 89 degrees West), Transponder 13, Vertical Polarity, Downlink
Frequency 3960 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Interet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 2019 High grain prices of the 1970's meant plowing every available acre
of land and planting a crop. However, farmers living in the Mississippi Delta are still suffering the
environmental and economic consequences of planting fence row to fence row. In this edition,
Brenda Curtis travels to the Mississippi Delta to get a firsthand look at the consequences of "over
farming." (Weekly cassette -- five minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1498 -- Is smoking on the rise again? Record cold threatens yard/garden
plants. Can you trust the groundhog? Farming on a few acres. More jobs than people. (Weekly
cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE # 2011 The FCRS is "The" farm survey. A low profile tobacco program. How much
production from CAP early out? Canadian/US farm trade troubles. Food wheat security grain to
go for food aid. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE Friday, February 16, poultry outlook, milk production
report and agricultural income and finance. Monday, February 19, Federal Holiday. Tuesday,
February 20, weekly weather and crop and agricultural outlook. Wednesday, February 21,
agricultural exports. NOTE: Wednesday and Thursday, February 21 and 22, are the dates for the
AG OUTLOOK FORUM. USDA RADIO will provide coverage of the forum on the.5:00 p.m. daily
newsline feed. Be sure to call 202-488-8358 for all the latest economic outlook reports. These
are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day
which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5:00 p.m., ET, each working day and 10:30 a.m. on crop report days.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES: "U.S. Cattle to Turkey" Thanks to falling European export subsidies and
competitive U.S. prices, new markets are opening up for U.S. cattle exports. A recent sale of 5,700
head of dairy cows to Turkey could be a good sign for U.S. exporters and producers. Pat O'Leary
reports from the Port of Richmond, Virginia.

"(JSDA Supports Livestock Exports" With promising prospects for U.S. cattle exports this year,
producers and exporters are gearing up for the market. Part of that preparation involves working
with USDA experts, on everything from caring for animals to financial arrangements. Pat O'Leary
reports.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS: Thursday, 3:45-4:00 p.m. ET on Telstar
402R, Transponder 13 (Vertical), Downlink Frequency 3960 MHz (89 degrees West), Audio,
6.2/6.8.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry Quinn, (202)720-6072,
or write to: Room 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300. Internet E-mail: LQuinn@USDA.GOV.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
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TEXAS FIRES...burned an estimated 181,000 acres last week, reports Blair Stewart (Texas State
Networks, Arlington, TX). Smoke is clearing after some rain, but fires due to the extended drought
moved into Oklahoma and Kansas, too. Blair and his father, Jim Stewart (KFYO, Lubbock, TX)
co-anchor a morning Lone Star Farm and Ranch Show that is carried by 56 affiliate radio stations.

MANAGEMENT AFTER WILDFIRE...workshops are scheduled next week in the South Central
Kansas counties of Meade and Barber. Hap Larson (KBUF, Garden City, KS) said fences,
outbuildings and some cattle were lost in grass fires last week. Local producers are seeking
alternative feeds or hay to replace the burned-out grazing lands. Local range management
specialists are suggesting that straw or manure be spread on some unprotected sandy soils.
Highway visibility was reduced in affected areas by smoke or blowing ashes.

SNOW...has been abundant in the mountains, but lack of moisture is a concern for the wheat crop
in eastern Colorado, reports Colleen Martin (Martin Agri-Country Network, Deer Trail, CO).
Colleen grew up in agriculture and has been in broadcasting for 18 years. She is the former
owner of the local radio station, but now produces a twice-daily agricultural network radio program
carried by eight stations throughout the state. She covers current agricultural news, futures
markets and Denver cash markets in her reports. Colleen called us to inquire about our daily
radio newsline and weekly cassette service.

COTTON ACREAGE...in parts of Louisiana will be switched to corn this year because it is
cheaper to grow and because farmers suffered significant cotton crop losses last year due to
insect damage. Don Molino (Louisiana Agri-News Network, Baton Rouge, LA) reports that one
parish expects to double its corn acreage. Don will be hosting the Southern Regional Meeting of
the National Association of Farm Broadcasters in New Orleans, March 28-30.



LARRY A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

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KANSAS FARMERS...can tune their tractor and pickup radios to the Kansas City Royals network
(Topeka, KS) for a two-hour Farm Bill interactive discussion on Saturday, April 20, 5:00-7:00 p.m.,
reports Sam Knipp, manager of radio programs for the Kansas Farm Bureau, who will host the
broadcast. He explains that this will be a "nuts and bolts" session about the Farm Bill featuring
on-air guests: Greg Frazier, Chief of Staff, U.S. Department of Agriculture; Gary Mitchell, House
Agriculture Committee staff; and Chuck Conner, Senate Agriculture Committee staff. Sam
anticipates that some farmers who still may be planting corn at that time of day will call in from
their tractor cellular phones to participate along with others having questions and comments.
Kansas did get some needed snow and rain over last weekend, but Sam says he's heard reports
that the state's leading wheat county of Sumner has plowed up 90 percent of its acreage because
of lack of moisture.

CATTLE MARKET...has affected many of the South Dakota listeners who tune in Don Wick and
Judy Stratman (WNAX, Yankton, SD). Don says the cow-calf producers are having a tough time,
and other cattle producers are experiencing high feed grain costs. Even though there was
snowfall within the last few days, planting is expected to begin by the end of the week. Don and
Judy are on-the-air 30-35 hours per week with five-state weather information, auction market
reports and general news for their wheat, corn, soybean and livestock producers. Don assumed
the farm director position at WNAX last August and is currently President-Elect of the National
Association of Farm Broadcasters (NAFB). He's already busy planning the program for NAFB's
annual conference in November.

HALL OF FAME...has a new member. On April 12, Orion Samuelson (WGN, Chicago, IL) was
inducted into the Chicago Journalism Hall of Fame. Congratulations, Orion!




LARRY A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-6
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
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