Broadcasters letter - 1995

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Material Information

Title:
Broadcasters letter - 1995
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Office of Communications
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, DC
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Radio in agriculture -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Television in agriculture -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Broadcasting -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Office of Communications.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Letter no. 2670 (July 15, 1994)-
General Note:
Title from caption.
Citation/Reference:
Picklist A21_34B

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001950703
oclc - 31030522
notis - AKC7245
lccn - sn 94028429
sobekcm - AA00007144_00002
System ID:
AA00007144:00002

Related Items

Preceded by:
Farm broadcasters letter

Full Text





unied States cu ure tomm tns 1995 ashington, DC 20250-1300
Letter No. 2 January 6, 1995
SU university of Florida
USDA ALLOWS SO N PANTI H OI N FLEX ACRES Soybeans may be planted on
optional flexible acre 9tBuntrock, Executive Vice President of USDA's
Commodity Credit order current statutory provisions, soybeans may not be
plantedon optional flexible acreage if, on January 1, the estimated price for the 1995 crop is less
than 105 percent of the 1995 loan rate, which was announced on November 15 as $4.92 per
bushel." 1995 soybeen prices are expected to be well above that level. Producers who choose
to plant soybeans on optional flexible acres may receive price support, but deficiency payments
cannot be made if crops are planted on acres that aren't established as the crop acreage base
on that land. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

PROMOTING U.S. FLORALS USDA has established a national research and promotion order
covering fresh floral items effective December 29, 1994. Authorized by the Fresh Cut Rowers
and Fresh Cut Greens Promotion and Information Act of 1993, the order follows the
Departments review of comments received on three proposals. The order will maintain, develop
and expand markets for fresh cut flowers and fresh cut greens and the program will be financed
by assessments on handlers whose domestic sales are at least $750,000 annually. A
referendum wil be held within three years to determine if the industry supports continuation of
the program. Contact: Clarence Steinberg (202) 720-8998.
"STATE PARTICIPATION IN MARKET IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM USDA is inviting state
departments of agriculture and other state agencies to submit proposals under the Federal-State
Market Improvement Program (FSMIP). FSMIP grants address, a spectrum of marketing
objectives. Most are studies to: identify new crops, markets and marketing systems for
agricultural products, both domestically and internationally; improve marketing efficiency to
enhance competitiveness and profitability; maintain product quality through new handling,
processing ard distribution techniques; and provide marketing assistance to the specialty foods
industries. Awardees must match the government's contribution. If your organization is affiliated
with a state department of agriculture, you would apply through that department. Deadlines for
proposals are February 1 and June 1, 1995. Contact: Clarence Steinberg (202) 720-8998.
COMPLIANCE FIGURES FOR '94 ARP A total of 83.1 percent of farms were in compliance
with 1994 commodity production adjustment program requirements. USDA's Commodity Credit
Corporation announced (December 30) that 83.1 percent of the crop acreage bases established
for wheat feed grains, upland and extra-long staple (ELS) cotton, and rice were on farms of
producers who were in compliance with commodity program requirements. Under the
commodity program agreements, 1.5 million acres were designated as Acreage Conservation
Reserve, allin the upland and ELS cotton programs. Also, 11.3 million acres were idled under
the 0,50/85-92 provisions; 1.6 million acres were planted to minor oilseeds under the 0/85-92
provisions (wheat and feed grain program participants only); and 21,698 acres of industrial and
other crops were planted under the 0,50/85-92 provisions. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-
8206.







SUGAR MARKETING ALLOTMENTS REVISED The second quarter revision of sugar
marketing allotments and allocations for fiscal year 1995 have been announced (December 30).
In accordance with provisions of the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938, as amended, the
Secretary of Agriculture has re-estimated U.S. sugar consumption, stocks, production, and
imports, and determined that sugar marketing allotments should continue for fiscal year 1995.
Based on the current supply-demand-price situation, reasonable ending stocks are estimated
to total 1,172 thousand short tons, down 106,000 tons from the September estimate. This
results in the overall allotment quantity continuing unchanged at 7,889. Contact: Bruce Merkle
(202) 720-8206.

GLOBAL IMPORT QUOTA A limited global import quota will allow additional U.S. imports of
upland cotton, up to 426,887,727 pounds. This additional quantity is not subject to the over-
quota tariff rate. The quota will be in effect for 90 days, from January 6 through April 6, 1995.
In order to be counted against this quota, cotton must be imported within this time period. A
limited global import quota was in effect earlier this year from June 3 through August 31. Since
the 21-day supply is smaller than the quantity needed to increase supply to 130 percent of
demand, the quota is equal to 21 days of domestic mill consumption of upland cotton at the
seasonally-adjusted average rate for the period September through November 1994. Contact:
Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

PEANUT EXPORT PRICE SET USDA's Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) proposed
(January 3) a minimum sales price of $400 per short ton for the 1995 crop of peanuts for export
edible use. The CCC sales price is unchanged from the 1994 level. Contact: Bruce Merkle
(202) 720-8206.

USDA SETS TOBACCO ASSESSMENTS USDA's Commodity Credit Corporation announced
(December 30) the combined flue-cured tobacco no-net-cost and marketing assessments will
be 0.8 of a cent for producers and 1.8 cents for purchasers for epch pound of 1995-crop flue-
cured tobacco that is marketed. The Agricultural Act of 1949 was amended in 1986 to require
no-net-cost assessments be determined so that producers and purchasers share equally in
maintaining the no-net-cost account for 1985 and subsequent crops of flue-cured tobacco. In
addition to the no-net-cost assessment, producers and purchasers are required to pay a
tobacco marketing assessment. The marketing assessment amounted to 0.7985 cent per pound
for both producers and purchasers. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

NO EXTENSION FOR UPLAND COTTON LOANS Loan extensions will not be available on
outstanding Commodity Credit Corporation nonrecourse upland cotton loans that have a
maturity date of January 31, 1995. The Agricultural Act of 1949, as amended, provides that
upland cotton loans mature 10 months from the first day of the month in which the loans are
made. Producers may request an 8-month extension upon maturity of the loan. However, loan
extensions are prohibited whenever the average price for upland cotton (base quality) in
designated spot markets for the preceding month exceeds 130 percent of the average spot price
for base quality for the preceding 36 months. The December 1994 average spot market price
for base quality was 81.92 cents per pound, which is 136 percent of the December 1991 through
November 1994 average. Therefore, no extensions will be granted. Contact: Bruce Merkle
(202) 720-8206.





3
FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

ARICULTURE USA # 1982 On this edition of Agriculture USA, Lori Spiczka takes a look
at th empowerment Zone and Enterprise Community program. (Weekly cassette 13-1/2
minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1443 Pesticide safety at home; expanded weather warning system;
sheep produce more than wool and meat; feeding children in a day care setting; are your
holiday apshots fading away? (Weekly cassette 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1953 Export outlook a good one; North Dakota, an urban state?;
GAO riticizes GSM program; Farm Bill buzzwords; an alternate look at tobacco's importance;
planting soybeans on flex acres: an explanation. (Weekly cassette news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSUNE **Note to broadcasters** USDA's Economic
Research Service, (those who bring you the Outlook and Situation reports), are changing the
way they release their reports. Most of the crop outlooks will all be issued on one day of the
month, and all at 4:00 p.m. Eastern time rather than at 3:00 p.m. Some of the coverage of these
reports will be delayed until the next day. This system will make it very difficult to predict in this
newsletter what reports we wil air on what day. The following is our best guess. Wednesday,
January 11, cotton crop production. Thursday, January 12, we will change the line twice. At
10:30 a.m., world ag supply and demand, grain and rice stocks, winter wheat plantings. At 5:00
p.m. we will add coverage of the cotton and wool outlook. Friday, January 13, world grain ag
production update, oil crops outlook, feed outlook, rice outlook. (We will try to get all these on
for you on Friday's line to get you through the holiday weekend.) Tuesday, January 17,
crop/weather update, hog outlook, milk production. Wednesday, January 18, vegetable
production. Thursday, Jan 19, non-citrus fruit, nut production summary. These are USDA
reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which
are not lited in this lneup.

USDA RADIO NEWSUNES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURE Lynn Wyvill reports on USDA's Forest Service projects to make National Forest
recreation more accessible for everyone, including people with disabilities.

ACTUALITIES USDA meteorologist Bob Stefanski on the latest weather and crop conditions.

UPCOMING FEATURES Pat O'Leary reports on USDA's experimental "Dairy Barn of the
Future" in Beltsville, MD. (5-part series).

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Trarsponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 345 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 am., EDT.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFF MIKE 3126 08307978

POTATO SCHOOL..for Idaho producers is scheduled January 25-26 in Pocatello, reports Bob
Burtenshaw (KUPI, Idaho Falls, ID). This is the 27th annual event that features experts on all
aspects of potato production. Potato crop was excellent this year, and with more snow depth
than normal, farmers are encouraged that the drought situation is improving. Bob is on-the-air
for couple of hours in the mornings and also reports agricultural stores on KIFI-TV. In Idaho,
skiers love snow and farmers do, too, because snow melt is a major source of irrigation water.

MORE THAN 50 YEARS...in radio broadcasting, and Warren Nielson (KMTV, Omaha, NE) has
never been out of a job. He's in his 33rd year at KMTVI Warren began his radio career in
March, 1943.

CAREER CHOICES...conference for young teens (12-14 years) is scheduled February 17-18 in
Quincy, IL Vicki Ellers (WTAD, Quincy, IL) is among the scheduled speakers who will give 4-H
youth a look into the future. Her topic: "It's Not All Cows, Plows, Hicks and Chicks." Vicki
gained communications skills while a 4-H'er, was a farm radio intern, and became a farm
broadcaster after graduation two years ago from University of Illinois.

A LONGTIME FRIEND...to many broadcasters and others calling USDA's Office of the Secretary
retired December 31. Betty Stern will be honored in a retirement celebration January 18 from
2-4 p.m. on USDA's Patio. John Ochs, press secretary to former Secretary John Block, will
be master of ceremonies. Guests dating back to the administration of Secretary Orville
Freeman are expected to join in celebrating Betty's long years of service to the Secretary's
office at USDA.

TV FEATURE...inquiry came this week from Michelle Ryan (KTKA-TV, Topeka, KS) who had
seen listings in this letter. They have an hour-long "Good Morning" program for viewers in
northeast Kansas and have used USDA features in that program.


LARRY O QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United Salt Deparutet of Agricultus
Oic of Comnnuitalons
Room 1618-S
Washingn, DC 20250-1300
OmfICUL BUBM ESS
Phr for PieBUMS$000









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Letter No. 2696 M 1 "AR 08 199LJanuary 13, 1995

NEW DEFINITION FOR "FRESI ;Ahe Depa e of Aibitiltsjc .lillFinida a proposed rule
that would prohibit the use of the' ~ describe poultry that has been previously
frozen, says Richard Rominger, Actin ry f Agriculture. Under the proposed rule,
poultry could not be labeled "fresh" if it had ever been chilled below 26 degrees Fahrenheit, the
temperature at which poultry becomes hard to the touch. Also, poultry previously held at
temperatures between 0 and 26 degrees F would have to be labeled "previously frozen." This
would change the current policy, which allows raw poultry to be labeled as "fresh" if its internal
temperature is or has previously been between 0 and 40 degrees F. Rominger said,
"Consumers generally expect that a product labeled fresh has not been frozen. The proposed
change would ensure that previously frozen poultry products are not marketed as 'fresh' poultry,
and it would inform consumers when a soft poultry product they select has been previously
frozen." The Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) concluded the safety of poultry is not
jeopardized if it is kept at 40 degrees or below, based on their recent review of the scientific
literature. FSIS handles the federal inspection program to ensure meat and poultry products are
safe, wholesome and accurately labeled. Contact: Jacque Knight (202) 720-9113.

SHEEP AND WOOL PROMOTION PROPOSALS -- USDA is seeking proposals for a national
sheep and wool promotion, research, education and information order. An order is authorized
by the Sheep Promotion, Research and Information Act of 1994. Lon Hatamiya, Acting
Administrator of USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service, said an order would put the sheep and
wool program on the same self-funded, sustaining basis as similar commodity promotion,
research and information programs. USDA will publish a proposed order in a future issue of the
Federal Register based on proposals received. Contact: Connie Crunkleton (202) 720-8998.

NO WIDESPREAD CONTAMINATION OF '94 CORN -- A USDA pilot study of Iowa corn crop
quality found no widespread mycotoxin contamination, a condition which could pose a risk to
animal health. Mycotoxins are produced by fungi or molds and cause sickness in animals that
eat feed made from contaminated crops. Iowa was chosen for the sampling survey because
it is the largest corn producer in the U.S., making Iowa's mycotoxin results an indicator of the
general status of Midwestern grains. Lonnie King, acting administrator of USDA's Animal and
Plant Health Inspection Service, said, "Our Iowa study shows that its corn crop is free from
widespread mycotoxin contamination that can cause potential animal health problems. Findings
of the survey showed an extremely low incidence of significant levels of mycotoxins. Contact:
Kendra Pratt (301) 436-4898.

AARC CENTER NAMES NEW MEMBERS -- Acting Secretary of Agriculture Richard Rominger
announced (January 6) the appointment of six new members to the Board of Directors of the
Alternative Agricultural Research and Commercialization (AARC) Center. Created as part of the
1990 farm bill, AARC is dedicated to commercialization of industrial (nonfood, nonfeed) products
and new uses for agricultural and forestry materials. The AARC Center is governed by a nine
member board of directors. Contact: Ron Buckhalt (202) 690-1633.







2
NEW PLANT VARIETIES -- USDA has issued certificates of protection to developers of 44 new
varieties of seed reproduced plants including bean, bentgrass, bluegrass, celery, corn, cotton,
melon, peanut, rice, soybean, tobacco, triticale, vinca and wheat. Kenneth H. Evans, an official
with USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service, said developers of the new varieties will have the
exclusive right to reproduce, sell, import and export their products in the U.S. for 18 years.
Certificates of protection are granted after a review of the breeders' records and claims that each
new variety is novel, uniform and stable. USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service administers the
plant variety protection program which provides marketing protection to developers of new and
distinctive seed-reproduced plants ranging from farm crops to flowers. Contact: Alicia L. Ford
(202) 720-8998.

STUDY GUIDES OFFERED -- USDA's National Agricultural Library is now making available to
the public a comprehensive "Resource Guide to Aquaculture Information" and two popular
reference guides on the developing field of rural studies. The resource guide lists over 500
resources for information on all aspects of aquaculture. Included with the listing are addresses,
telephone numbers and, where available, e-mail addresses. NAL has updated two rural studies
guides: "A Rural Studies Bibliography," a listing of 215 books and articles related to all aspects
of rural studies, and "The Directory of Rural Studies Scholars and Educators," a listing of U.S.
scholars and educators in a range of disciplines involved in rural-issues teaching or research.
NAL's Aquaculture and Rural Information Centers are two of 11 information centers which NAL
established to keep abreast of current information on issues of critical importance to U.S.
agriculture. Contact: Brian Norris (301) 504-6778.

NEW FOOD SAFETY APPOINTMENTS -- Acting Under Secretary for Food Safety Michael R.
Taylor announced (January 9) the appointment of Dr. Bonnie Buntain to serve as the Director
of the Animal Production Food Safety Program within the Food Safety and Inspection Service
(FSIS). The program will target pathogenic microorganisms such as E. Coli 0157:H7 and
Salmonella. The USDA Reorganization Act of 1994 created the new position of under secretary
to oversee all USDA food safety responsibilities. That includes meat and poultry inspection,
animal production activities to reduce and control public health hazards such as pathogen
contamination of livestock and poultry, and egg products inspection. Dr. Buntain will join FSIS
January 22. Contact: Jacque Knight (202) 720-9113.

SPENCER NAMED INFOSHARE PROGRAM MANAGER -- Dorothy Spencer has been
selected as program manager of USDA's Infoshare Program, Acting Secretary of Agriculture
Richard Rominger announced (January 4). The Infoshare Program is a partnership between
natural resources, rural development, farm service agencies and the customers of USDA to
provide improved service at less cost, and where customers are served by one coordinated
USDA office. As director, Spencer is responsible for improving the delivery of services to
customers through business process re-engineering and information systems integration. She
will also be facilitating the implementation of new operating procedures for the recently created
USDA field service centers. Her appointment was effective January 3. Contact: Martha
Cashion (202) 720-3310.

USDA GOES INTERNET -- To access this document via Internet, point your gopher to
esusda.gov and a menu selection will appear or send an e-mail message to
almanac@esusda.gov. The single line message should read: send(space)USDA-
releases(space)help. Retrieval instructions and a list of documents currently available will
appear. Need more help? Contact: Maria Bynum (202) 720-5192.







3
FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1963 -- In this edition of Agriculture USA, Lori Spiczka reports on what
to do with your food when you lose power during a winter storm. (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2
minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1444 -- If it's lights out, throw it out; parents and their kids' sports;
strength training feasible for elderly; a new definition of fresh poultry; government reviewing fire
policies. (Weekly cassette -- 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1954 -- U.S. apples to Japan; trade potential with Vietnam; farm
work on West coast sliding; a small name for a big worry; new honey bee ailment. (Weekly
cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Monday, January 16, HOLIDAY. Tuesday,
January 17, crop/weather update, hog outlook, milk production. Wednesday, January 18,
vegetable production. Thursday, January 19, non-citrus fruit, nut production summary. Friday,
January 20, catfish processing, livestock slaughter. Monday, January 23, livestock, dairy and
poultry, ag trade update. Tuesday, January 24, weekly weather and crops. Friday, January 27,
cattle on feed report, sheep and goats. Tuesday, January 31, Agricultural Prices. These are
USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day
which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

A SPECIAL FIVE PART SERIES: "USDA'S Dairy Barn of the Future"

FEATURE -- Part One: An Overview. Patrick O'Leary reports on the
USDA's experimental dairy barn in Beltsville, MD. (2:20 minutes)

FEATURE Part Two: Manure Digester Reduces Odor. (2:03 minutes)

FEATURE -- Part Three: Dairy Cow Dietary Analysis. (1:59 minutes)

FEATURE -- Part Four: Barnyard Fly Control. (2:09 minutes)

FEATURE -- Part Five: Livestock Gender Selection. (1:52 minutes)

UPCOMING FEATURES -- U.S. Ambassador to Japan, Walter F. Mondale speaks to the
National Press Club about U.S. trade opportunities in the Pacific Rim.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., EDT.








OFF MIKE

FIELDS OF THE FUTURE...is a continuing education project that Colleen Callahan (WMBD,
Peoria, IL) has been involved in for five years. On January 24, planning begins for this year's
outdoor classroom for agriculture students. Community college students are involved in
planting, tilling and harvesting crop plots with the help of sponsoring agriculture companies
providing key ingredients like seed, fertilizer, etc. Toward the end of the project an Agronomy
Day is scheduled for July 6 which will be like a mini Farm Progress Show. Also, a Kids' Safety
program is planned the same day. Colleen spoke to us prior to heading for Denver where she
will cover the National Western Livestock Show next week.

STRANGE WEATHER...has hit several areas in recent weeks. Ray Forcier (KWKH, Shreveport,
LA) says 70 degree temperatures are quite a jump from 21 degrees last week. Ray was
covering the Louisiana Cattlemen's Association state convention this week and had the honor
of emceeing their Queen contest. Cotton farmers in his state will be voting on a Boll Weevil
Eradication Program in March.

TEXAS NEEDS RAIN...and California has some to spare. Bob Givens (KGNC, Amarillo, TX)
says wheat growers in his area need rain or snow. They ended '94 with a moisture deficit (not
having a major rain in the last six months). Texas long has been known as cattle country, but
it is quickly becoming hog country, too. Bob says one company is planning an 80,000 head
farrow-to-finish hog operation on 20,000 acres in the Texas Panhandle. Texas experienced a
15 percent increase in hog inventory in the past year and growth is expected to continue. Texas
cotton producers will grow more next year after good yields and quality in '94. Cotton market
prices reached their highest levels in years.

RADIO CASSETTE SERVICE...surveys are coming in, and we thank you for your responses.
We'll f you a survey form if you've misplaced yours. Call Lynn Wyvill at 202-720-9951.


LARRY A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Pdvate Use $300








United States Depatmerit of Agriculture office of CommunltatIOns Washington, DC 20250-1300
MAR 0o 7 1995
Letter No. 2697"i l aw o 'R 0 u January 20, 1995

FLOOD DAMAG I LALFlOiRNIA ing Secr~WtWr it..ifiKr9 Richard Rominger joined
federal and Califorr a=s (Jan ry to survey flood damage and ensureJUSDA is assisting
where it is needed fP '~:s said, "We are on site to evaluate thd situation and to
determine how we can he i s survive and recover from this disaster. We want to help now,
and we will be here for the long haul, to make sure flood victims can get back on their feet as
quickly as possible." Assessments of damages and needs will be updated continually as storm
systems and rains persist. When the rains stop and flood waters recede, damage assessments
will continue. USDA agencies are prepared to respond with assistance such as emergency food
assistance, emergency loans, and damage estimates. Contact: Johna Pierce (202) 720-1691.

E-COLI OUTBREAK ANNIVERSARY -- On the second anniversary of the West coast E-coli
outbreak that killed several people, the Under Secretary for Food Safety, Michael Taylor, issued
a statement expressing regret. He said, "The events of two years ago will be remembered
always by the families who suffered the excruciating and irreplaceable loss of a child or other
loved one or experienced serious illness as a result of ground beef contaminated with E.coli
0157:H7. Many Americans share that memory and the sense of regret and unnecessary loss
that the memory brings." He said the event provided the impetus for change needed in
detecting foodborne illnesses on our meat and poultry supply. He also said that while positive
steps have been taken, such as zero tolerance of contaminated ground beef, there is still more
to be done. He called for a "systematic, science-based prevention of harmful contamination into
the operation of every meat and poultry plant, and we must hold the industry accountable for
meeting its food safety responsibility." Contact: Jerry Redding (202) 720-6959.

TECHNOLOGY GAINS Research projects between Department of Agriculture laboratories
and private companies increased by 28 percent last year. Projects such as a spraying system
for poultry processing to reduce microbial contamination, and developing biodegradable, water
resistant coatings made from 100 percent potato or corn starch were among the 91 projects
partnered by USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS). That brings the total number of these
Cooperative Research and Development Agreements to more than 400 since the signing of the
1986 Technology Transfer Act 1986. ARS administrator R. Dean Plowman says, "These
partnerships are finding new uses for agricultural products, stimulating rural development and
national trade, and bringing solutions to problems faced by food and fiber producers." Contact:
Bruce Kinzel (301) 344-2781.

RECORD HOG PRODUCTION -- USDA economists are predicting record high pork production
for 1995. Expansion is expected to continue through the third quarter, and then drop slightly
as the March-May pig crop reaches slaughter weight. But fourth quarter production is expected
to be the second largest on record. While lower slaughter supplies in mid-December restored
prices to mid $30 per cwt, first quarter prices for 1995 are only expected to average near $36
due to large supplies. Imports of pork are expected to fall this year, and lower sales of pork to
Mexico are expected to result in lower pork export sales. Contact: Steve Reed (202)219-1285.








WINTER FOOD SAFETY Winter storms can pack enough of a punch to knock your lights
out. If you lose power during a winter storm, Bessie Berry, the acting director of USDA's Meat
and Poultry Hotline, says you should be very careful about food safety. Among the
recommendations are to keep your refrigerator or freezer closed. If the power comes back on
within four hours, your food should be safe. If it takes longer than four hours for power to
return, discard all refrigerated perishables such as meat and poultry, dairy products, eggs, soft
cheeses and mayonnaise, says Berry. In addition, she recommends throwing out anything
containing cooked meat or dairy products. She says butter and margarine, fresh fruits and
vegetables, and hard cheeses can be kept as long as they look and smell fine. Fruit juices
should be fine until they ferment, which usually takes a few days. If you have a free standing
freezer that's half full, you'll want to bunch the foods together to keep them colder longer. A well
stocked freezer will keep foods at a safe temperature for 48 hours. A half-full freezer may keep
items cold up to 24 hours. If the food in your freezer thaws, but is still cold, Berry says it's safe
to refreeze them. Call the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline with your food safety questions at
(800)535-4555. Contact: Bessie Berry (202)720-5604.

BEETLES QUARANTINED -- USDA has quarantined Adams and Jay counties in Indiana for
pine shoot beetles, bringing the total number of quarantined counties in the states of Michigan,
Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York to 118. Animal and Plant Health Inspection
Service's Deputy Administrator B. Glen Lee said, "This action is necessary on an emergency
basis to prevent the pine shoot beetle from spreading to non-infested areas of the United
States." Quarantine regulations restrict the movement of cut pine Christmas trees, pine nursery
stock, pine logs and lumber with bark attached, pine stumps and pine bark chips. Lumber and
logs without bark attached are not regulated. Adult pine shoot beetles feed on new shoots of
healthy pine trees, causing stunted and distorted growth, and they are carriers of several pine
tree diseases. Pine shoot beetle damage to trees can cause economic losses to the timber,
Christmas tree and nursery industries. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-3256.

DATE POSTPONED -- USDA is postponing the effective date of the final rule for packaging and
labeling of veterinary biological products. That date moves from February 21, 1995 to August
19, 1995. John Payne, acting director of the Biotechnology, Biologics and Environmental
Protection Staff said, "The final rule assures that the product is properly labelled by prohibiting
the repackaging and relabeling, for further sale or distribution, of final containers of product that
are imported or that are packaged at licensed establishments in cartons or other containers."
On April 28, 1993, USDA published a proposed rule on the packaging and labeling of veterinary
biologics. The final rule was published on August 24, 1994, with the effective date to have been
180 days after the date of its publication or February 21, 1995. Since the publication of the final
rule, APHIS has received in excess of 400 letters and inquiries. Based on the large number of
letters and inquiries, it was determined that additional time was necessary to allow business
arrangements to be formed between producers and distributors of veterinary biologics. Contact:
Cynthia A. Eck (301) 436-5931.

FAX -- You can obtain our radio and TV programming information and the Broadcasters Letter
through your facsimile machine by calling USDA's AgNewsFax. Use the telephone connected
to your FAX machine to call (202) 690-3944. At voice prompts press 1, press 4, then to receive
Broadcasters Letter, press 9200; radio newsline information, press 9250; TV contents billboard,
press 9260; TV scripts, press 9270. After all your selections, then press #, press 3, and press
the start button on your FAX machine.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE


AGRICULTURE USA # 1964 -- Finding common ground in Los Angeles is the focus of this
edition of Agriculture USA. Gary Crawford reports on small community gardens that are thriving
amidst neighborhoods torn apart by riots, earthquakes, poverty, crime and social upheaval.
(Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1445 -- Mild winter underway; strength training and bone density; zinc,
boron and our health; "el dente" wheat; urban gardens in Los Angeles; a "little boy" causes big
mischief in weather patterns. (Weekly cassette -- 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1955 -- Goat control; jellyfish gene transfer; state agricultural credit
programs on the rise; boom times for cotton; record hog production expected in 1995. (Weekly
cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wednesday, January 25, crop values.
Thursday, January 26, peanut stocks. Friday, January 27, cattle on feed. Monday, January 30,
poultry production. Tuesday, January 31, ag prices; crop and weather update; world tobacco
outlook. Wednesday, February 1, U.S. horticultural export situation; catfish production. These
are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries many stories every
day which are not listed in this lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545

Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.



FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE



FEATURE -- Feature, B-roll and actualities on California's recovery from the floods.

UPCOMING FEATURE -- Lynn Wyvill reports on ground beef food safety.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., EDT.


Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.




UN.VERSI. OF FLORIDA ----,


OFF MIKE

PORK CRUSADE DAY...was celebrated December 21 by Bob Quinn and Lee Kline (WHO, Des
Moines, IA) along with other radio station staff as a promotion to help the nation's hog producers
move some of the bountiful pork supply off supermarket shelves. For 12 hours, they talked
about the merits of pork through unsponsored public service messages, interviews and call-in
reports. One supermarket reported sales of 4,000 pounds of pork that day. Normally, they'd
sell 200 pounds. Herb Plambeck, a radio veteran for 59 years, reported that WHO's "Pork
Crusade" moved countless thousands of pounds of the "other white meat" into kitchens and
refrigerators of Midwest homes which otherwise might not have been sold.

ANNUAL AG EXPO AND FARM FORUM...was held in Spokane, WA this week, reports Wey
Simpson (KAQQ, Spokane, WA and KCLX, Colfax, WA). Wey said they've experienced
unseasonably mild winter weather thus far and are getting a lot of moisture for crops. Snowpack
is above normal for a change.

AG CO-OP EXPANSIONS...continue in Minnesota, according to Lynn Ketelsen (Linder Farm
Network, Willmar, MN). Minnesota Corn Processors is planning a $100 million expansion in their
operations using corn to make ethanol and corn sweeteners. Another ag co-op, Phoenix
Manufacturing,. is making wood substitutes out of soybeans and recycled newspapers. The
product looks like polished marble. Lynn has been helping ag cooperatives grow in his state
for many years. Also, he's been busy promoting the importance of Future Farmers of America
Chapters which seem to be on the rebound in .his state.

ENDING 30 YEARS...of Federal service, Will Pemble of USDA's Agricultural Research Service
plans to retire March 3. A reception is planned fdr March 2 from 2-4:00 p.m. in Beltsville, MD
to celebrate Will's significant and long-time contributions to the broadcasting community. You're
welcome to send letters, audio or videotapes honoring his career by February 24 to: Norma
Moore, 6303 Ivy Lane, Room 400, Greenbelt, MD 20770. Call (301) 344-2152 for details.


LARRY K. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300









py Washington, DC 20250-1300


NEW FOOD SAFETY P -'ADA pro ns(-tpf sipr'lA) sweeping changes in
federal meat and poultry ins tia a system b8sed primarily on sight, topch and smell to
one incorporating scientific testing and systematic prevention of contamination. \cting Secretary
Richard Rominger said, "These reforms demonstrate this administration's strong commitment to
making meat and poultry safer for consumers." The proposals would require the nation's nearly
6,200 federally inspected meat and poultry slaughter and processing plants to adopt science-
based process control systems, called Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP).
The HACCP systems would identify potential food safety hazards arising in slaughter and
processing plants and build in science-based preventive controls. Food Safety and Inspection
Service is the agency responsible for designing and carrying out USDA's food safety program,
and will review each plant's records and conduct other in-plant inspection activities. Contact:
Jacque Knight (202) 720-9113.

'95 FARM PROGRAM SIGN-UP -- The sign-up period for producers wishing to participate in
the 1995 commodity production adjustment and price support programs will be January 30
through April 28, at county offices of the USDA's Consolidated Farm Service Agency. Purchase
of crop insurance is required for 1995 program participation, and the deadlines for purchasing
crop insurance are earlier than program sign-up deadlines. Contact: Paula Thomasson (202)
254-9344.

FOODBORNE ILLNESS PREVENTION -- USDA's National Agricultural Library has initiated a
new service which provides information on foodborne illness prevention. The new service, called
the Foodborne Illness Education Information Center, is designed for educators, trainers and
organizations developing education and training materials for food workers and consumers. The
center is a joint program of USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service and the Food and Drug
Administration. The reports are free and available by modem via the Internet from the gopher
of NAL's Food and Nutrition Information Center. Contact: Brian Norris (301) 504-6778.

U.S AND CANADIAN JOINT COMMISSION -- The U.S. and Canadian Joint Commission on
Grains concluded their third meeting after reviewing fundamental elements of the two countries'
grain production and trading systems. James Miller, U.S. Co-chair said, "We continue to make
progress towards getting a better understanding of how each of our grain handling systems
operate." The Joint Commission reviewed the global economic outlook, and domestic and
export programs of both countries. The next meeting of the Joint Commission will be held in
Vancouver, British Columbia, on February 9-11. Contact: Wayne Baggett (202) 720-2032.

POTATO EXPORTS Acting Secretary Richard Rominger announced (January 30) that U.S.
fresh potatoes and processed potato product exports reached a record high of $485 million last
year, nearly double the $250 million of just 5 years ago. The potential for fresh potato exports
is limited due to restrictive phytosanitary controls in many countries. Contact: Donald
Washington (202) 720-3101.









END-USE CERTIFICATE REGULATIONS -- The North American Free Trade Agreement
Implementation Act requires end-use certificates for wheat and barley imported into the U.S. from
any foreign country that requires end-use certificates for imports to the U.S. Gene Moos, under
secretary for USDA's Farm and Foreign Agricultural Services, announced (January 26) the final
regulations governing USDA's end-use certificate program. This program is designed to track
the importation of Canadian-produced wheat into the U.S. and its end use. The final rule
requires U.S. importers of Canadian-produced wheat to store it separately to preserve its identity
as Canadian-produced wheat. Importation of Canadian-produced wheat for purposes of resale
is permitted, and the end-use of the wheat is not restricted. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-
8206.

NONINDIGENOUS SPECIES -- USDA has proposed regulating the importation, interstate
movement and release into the environment of nonindigenous organisms. B. Glen Lee, deputy
administrator for plant protection and quarantine with USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection
Service said, 'This action appears necessary because current regulations do not adequately
address the introduction of nonindigenous organisms that may have a significant effect on
American agriculture and the environment." Because nonindigenous organisms can be used at
times to control exotic pest outbreaks in the U.S., the proposed regulations would provide a
means of screening them prior to their introduction to determine the potential plant pest risk
associated with them. An organism is considered to be nonindigenous if it is beyond its
established range. This means that an organism does not have to be from another country to
be considered nonindigenous. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-3256.

INTENTIONS TO PURCHASE TOBACCO U.S. cigarette manufacturers plan to purchase 385
million pounds of 1995-crop burley tobacco, 61 million pounds more than 1994-crop purchase
intentions. Major domestic cigarette manufacturers are required by statute to report annually to
USDA their intended purchases of burley tobacco from U.S. auction markets and producers, and
to report actual purchases at the conclusion of the marketing year. The Agricultural Adjustment
Act of 1938, as amended, requires each major cigarette manufacturer to purchase at least 90
percent of its purchase intentions to avoid the assessment of a penalty. Contact: Bruce
Merkle (202) 720-8206.

TOBACCO REFERENDUM RESULTS Preliminary results from a mail referendum held
January 9-12 indicate flue-cured tobacco growers voted to continue acreage-poundage
marketing quotas for their crops for the 1995, 1996, and 1997 marketing years. A vote of at
least two-thirds in favor was necessary to continue acreage-poundage marketing quotas, and
98.7% of voting producers voted yes. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

SUGAR LOAN RATES The national price-support loan rates for the 1994 crop of domestically
grown sugarcane and sugar beets will be 18 cents per pound for raw cane sugar and 23.43
cents per pound for refined beet sugar. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

REVISED RELEASE DATES USDA's Foreign Agricultural Service is revising four of its 1995
release dates for the Cotton: World Markets and Trade report. The new release dates for FAS'
cotton reports are February 10, March 10, April 11 and December 12. All other FAS circular
release dates remain the same. Contact: Linda Habenstreit (202) 720-9442.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1966 Minerals and our health is the topic for this week's edition of
Agriculture USA. Brenda Curtis talks with a health expert about the latest research on the impact
of minerals on our overall health. (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1447 New meat safety program proposed; low fat meat and blood
cholesterol; helping hands in California flood; minerals and your health; tracking minority nutrition
needs. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1958 Is it too early to think about spring planting?; California
agriculture affected by flood; California agriculture tries to recover; 1994 rice ARP final; dairy
outlook. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE Monday, February 13, feed outlook; oil crops
outlook; rice outlook, world ag grain production. Tuesday, February 140, weekly weather and
crops; cattle and sheep outlook; farm labor. Wednesday, February 15, ag income and finance.
Thursday, February 16, milk production. Friday, February 17, cattle on feed, honey production.
Monday, February 21, HOLIDAY. Tuesday, February 21, ag outlook; crop and weather update.
Wednesday, February 22, ag trade update; ag exports. Friday, February 24, livestock, dairy and
poultry outlooks. Note: The Agricultural Outlook Forum will be held on February 22 and 23, and
the USDA Radio Newsline will feature stories from that forum on those days. These are USDA
reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which
are not listed in this lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., ET, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

ACTUALITIES Acting Secretary of Agriculture Richard Rominger announces food safety
regulations. U.S. Ambassador to Japan, Walter F. Mondale, talks about U.S. agricultural exports
to the Pacific Rim. Grant Buntrock, CFSA Administrator, talks about sign-up dates and
requirements for crop insurance.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Patrick O'Leary reports from California on USDA and Americorps
working together to protect California resources.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Thursday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, Galaxy 4, Channel 12 (C-band), audio 6.2 and 6.8,
downlink frequency 3940 MHz. Monday, 11:00-11:15 a.m. ET, Telstar 302, Channel 6
(Transponder 3H), (C-band), audio 6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3820 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Lany A Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.





4 3 1262 08307 968 0

OFF MIKE

FARM PROFIT '95...is a one-day conference scheduled for Kansas farmers and ranchers on
February 15, according to Kelly Lenz (WIBW, Topeka, KS). Kelly says his station is organizing
the event which will focus on crop insurance reform and the return of El Niio and how it will
affect weather patterns. Farmers in his area are showing a lot of uncertainty about what crops
to plant this year due to soybean price outlook and higher costs of production for corn. Despite
the uncertainty, Kelly says farmers are feeling cautiously optimistic.

CHANGES...in farm program sign-up and crop insurance are key topics for Iowa farmers, says
Lauri Struve (KGRA, Jefferson, IA) news director and operations manager. Lauri is filling in for
farm director Kathleen Erickson this week. Lauri notes that they use USDA's radio newsline
in reporting farm news four times a day.qn their station.

ON FARMERS' MINDS...in northeast-Arkansas are crop insurance and workers protection
standards, reports James Guthrie (KFIN-FM, Jonesboro, AR). A 10-year veteran at the station,
James voices five shows throughout the day covering farm news and row crops like cotton, rice
and soybeans. Arkansas post i'ecord yields in all three of those crops in 1994.

EXPANDED COVERAGE...of farm news and agriculture will result from the boost in power to
25,000 watts for KSIR (Fort Morgan, CO), reports Larry Patrick, station manager. The station
serves northeast Colorado. Howard Hale is their farm director.

URBAN GARDENING...feature done recently by our Gary Crawford stimulated several calls
from listeners of WHAS in Louisville, KY, reports Fred Wiche. Gary reported on a successful
Los Angeles project supported by USDA that inspired response by a Louisville group to renew
its efforts for an urban garden project for a particularly troubled inner city area. The group
requested a copy of the radio feature to help them get started.



LARRYi. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penaly for Pivate Use $300








United States Dep tnt of Agriculture \' office of ynrQi Washington, DC 20250-1300

Letter No. 270 February 10, 1995
d c jo' University of Florida
1996 BUDGET ECTS SAVINfi( The proposed FY 1996 budget for USDA proposes
saving hundreds of. r rough reorganization while making investments in our
country's future. Thd .3 million in outlays for FY 1996 is al the same level as the
current estimate for FY 19 acting Secretary Richard Rominger said, "USDA is at the forefront
of the Administration's commitment to a more responsible government, a government that works
better and costs less." USDA's reorganization and streamlining efforts add up to $535 million
in savings for FY 1996. The Department's total savings are expected to reach $4.1 billion and
reduce staffing by more than 13,000 by 1999. The budget reflects reduced commodity program
spending, new export sales opportunities, increased funding for conservation programs and
commits to improving the nation's meat and poultry inspection system. Contact: Tom
Amontree (202) 720-4623.

PRODUCERS, TAXPAYERS BENEFIT FROM PRICES -- Higher prices for upland cotton, up
14 cents per pound from a year ago, means increased income for producers and savings for
the taxpayer. Strong world-wide cotton demand and poor crops in competing foreign countries,
have caused upland cotton prices to rise in a relatively short period of time. Advance payments
of 6.45 cents per pound were made to eligible producers requesting advance payments.
Refunds of 1994-crop deficiency overpayments are due at the end of the marketing year, which
ends on July 31, 1995. Producers who received overpayments have the option of offsetting the
refund against other program payments due prior to the end of the marketing year. Contact:
Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

A CASE OF AVIAN INFLUENZA USDA is alerting poultry producers to increase biosecurity
measures following official reports of an outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza in central
Mexico. USDA received notification from Mexican federal authorities that highly pathogenic H5N2
strains of avian influenza have been isolated from flocks on three related egg-laying operations
in Tehuacan, Mexico. Mexican animal health officials believe that the highly pathogenic Al virus
may have been introduced into commercial poultry by migratory waterfowl. A plan has been
developed to control spread of this virus through surveillance, quarantine and vaccination of
flocks in the areas surrounding the outbreak. Contact: Kendra Pratt (301) 436-4898.

FIRST GARLIC FROM TRUE SEED -- The first garlic produced from true seed in the U.S. has
been grown by a USDA researcher in Madison, Wisconsin. Typically reproduced by planting
individual cloves, garlic was thought to be sexually sterile. But plant geneticist Philipp W. Simon
of USDA's Agricultural Research Service said, "I found numerous European and Asian domestic
garlic and a wild ancestor that produce flowers, the first step of sexual reproduction. Of those
plants producing flowers, only a small number produce seed." Garlic plants that produce flowers
are rare in most U.S. varieties. Producing garlic from true seed could shorten the growing
season and cut production costs because the seed are smaller than cloves and are easier to
handle, store and transport. Contact: Linda Cooke (309) 681-6530.








QUARANTINE REMOVED -- USDA has removed a quarantine requirement for horses imported
from Mexico. The quarantine was instituted as a precautionary measure after an outbreak of
Venezuela equine encephalomyelitis (VEE) was reported in 1993 in Mexico. This removes the
USDA requirement that horses from Mexico be quarantined for seven days to prevent the entry
of insects and other potential disease vectors prior to importation into the U.S. Contact:
Kendra Pratt (301) 436-4898.

PRICING FORMULA CHANGES FOR MILK -- USDA has replaced the current pricing series
for milk sold under federal milk orders. USDA will implement the new pay price series after
approval by producers, who will vote on the amended orders. The decision is based on a June
1992 hearing, and supports the replacement of the current Minnesota-Wisconsin (M-W) price
series with a "base-month" price series. The new price series is statistically more reliable than
the current M-W price, but is not expected to be a long-term solution. The base-month M-W
price, available on or before the fifth of each month, would be used to represent pay prices for
the second preceding month. Also, Class II milk prices will be computed by adding a fixed
differential of 30 cents to the M-W price for the second preceding month. The Class II pricing
changes are scheduled to take effect March 1. Contact: Becky Unkenholz (202) 720-8998.

POULTRY GRADE STANDARDS -- To reflect advancements within the poultry industry and
changes in consumer preferences, USDA is updating voluntary poultry grade standards. The
last time poultry grade standards were amended was in June of 1986. Those changes
established a standard for quality of raw, boneless, skinless poultry products and clarified the
tolerance for exposed flesh and discoloration in ready-to-cook carcasses. The current revisions
amend existing regulations with regard to discolorations, the definition of exposed flesh and
procurement grades, and establish new grading criteria for large poultry parts. These changes
will affect all processors who request voluntary poultry grading services. Contact: Gil High
(202) 720-8998.

NO EXTENSION FOR COTTON LOANS -- Loan extensions will not be available on outstanding
CCC recourse upland cotton price support loans maturing February 28, 1995. Extensions are
not available when the average price for upland cotton in designated spot markets for the
preceding month exceeds 130 percent of the average spot price for base quality for the
preceding 36 months. The January, 1995 average spot market price was 88.11 cents per
pound, which is 145 percent of the January, 1992 through December, 1994 average price.
Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

FINAL RICE ARP -- The acreage reduction requirement for the 1995 crop of rice will be 5
percent, with an established target price of $10.71 per hundredweight. The national average
support rate will be $6.50 per hundredweight. The deficiency payment rate will be based on the
lower of the 1995 calendar-year price or the average price for the August through December
period, adjusted by an amount that is fair and reasonable in relation to wheat and feed grains.
The adjustment to the 5-month price is $.27 per hundredweight, the same amount as for the
1994 crop. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

ELISA TEST APPROVED -- USDA has proposed adding the GPI ELISA test to the list of official
tests approved for use in the cooperative pseudorabies eradication program. Allowing the GPI
ELISA test to be used for an official pseudorabies test would relieve some restrictions on the
interstate movement of certain swine herds that have been given gene-altered pseudorabies
vaccines. Contact: Kendra Pratt (301) 436-4898.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1967 The proposed budget for USDA in 1996 is the topic of this
week's Agriculture USA. Brenda Curtis talks with several USDA officials about what's in the
plans for next year's spending allowance. (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1448 -- 1996 budget increases spending for USDA feeding programs;
U.S. exporting sweetness; weight loss and bone loss; an early spring?; resetting your biological
clock. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1959 -- Proposed USDA budget keeps farm program spending
stable; dairy barn of the future; farmers benefitting from candy export boom; poultry outlook;
new honey bee ailment. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE Monday, February 27, dairy outlook. Tuesday,
February 28, ag prices; poultry outlook; weekly weather and crops; dairy markets and trade;
tobacco markets and trade. Wednesday, March 1, world horticultural trade and export
opportunities. Thursday, March 9, world ag supply and demand for cotton. Friday, March 10,
world agricultural supply and demand; cotton and wool outlook. These are USDA reports we
know about in advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed
in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., ET, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

NOTE: This week's feed runs a total of 30 minutes.

FEATURES -- Patrick O'Leary reports on USDA's proposed budget for 1996, and on California's
continuing recovery from floods (3 stories: crops, urban flood control structures, AmeriCorps
offers help).

ACTUALITIES -- Acting USDA Secretary Richard Rominger and USDA Budget Director Stephen
Dewhurst on the proposed 1996 budget.

UPCOMING FEATURE -- USDA scientists try to control whiteflies with a natural fungus.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Thursday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, Telstar 302, Channel 6 (Transponder 3H), (C-band), audio
6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3820 MHz. Monday, 11:00-11:15 a.m. ET, Galaxy 4, Channel
12 (C-band), audio 6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3940 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.





UNIVERSfIrOF FLORIDA


OFF MIKE I

RADIO NEWSLINE SURVEY...is underway. We'd like to hear from all broadcasters who call
and use our dial-up, daily radio newsline service. Describe how you use the service. Tell us if
you use the newsline daily, weekly, monthly, occasionally, or not all and why. Do you prefer
stories or actualities, or do you use both? Include information about size of station's listening
audience and number of stations on networks. Please FAX your responses immediately to 202-
720-5773. This is part of our review and evaluation of all broadcast services we provide.

NEW AGRIBUSINESS DIRECTOR...at WIBC Radio in Indianapolis, IN, is Lew Middleton who
was previously with Agri-America Network there. Lew says he broadcasts farm news and
markets throughout weekdays and anchors a Saturday program from 5-6:00 a.m. Corn
producers in his area are watching the price and supply situation of nitrogen fertilizers as they
plan this year's crop.

SPRING PLANTING TV SPECIAL...is in the planning stages by Dale Hansen (KWWL-TV,
Waterloo, IA). He says the program will air in prime time from 6:30-7 p.m. on April 1. Dale is
finishing 21 years as an agricultural reporter for Channel 7. He has regular farm news and
market reports on between 6-7 a.m. and at noon. Also, he frequently covers agricultural stories
for their evening news programs.

OUTSTANDING FARM WOMAN...search is on in three counties of Wisconsin, reports Grace
Kirchner (WFCL/WJMQ, Clintonville, WI). Nominations from Waupaca, Outagamie, and
Shawano counties are due by the end of the month. Winners will be announced in mid-March,
and an overall winner will be chosen. More than $500 in gifts will be awarded. Candidates must
have their main source of income from the farm and be active in family and community projects.
Also, Grace notes that she has done several news features about reorganization and relocation
of USDA offices in her area.


LA Y.QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penty for Prva Use $300





___ L l_ Marston Scienc





United States Depart e o. ire o* of Communications Washington, DC 20250-1300 a

Letter No. 2701 February 17, 1995

PILOT OPTIONS PR T1 F NG -- USDA's Pilot Options Program will continue in
1995, with the addition of se ties in Nebraska and Ohio. Authorized by the 1990 farm
bill, it provides federal support for commodities through the purchasing of options contracts.
Participants receive an incentive payment of 5 cents per bushel to cover transaction fees and
other costs. Enrollment is taking place at the county offices of USDA's Consolidated Farm
Service Agency through April 28. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

WATER WORKS -- USDA will provide $12.2 million in financial and technical assistance to
farmers and ranchers participating in Water Quality Incentive Projects. Through 65 projects in
28 states, water quality is improved by reducing the source of agricultural pollutants. Incentive
payments are made to producers to reduce agricultural nonpoint source pollution while
maintaining an efficient and economical farm operation. Projects include pesticide and nutrient
management, animal waste application reduction and improved irrigation water management.
Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

FARM PROGRAM PROVISIONS -- The final farm program provisions for the 1995 crops of
wheat, feed grains, upland cotton and rice were announced (February 9). Based on public
comments, the final provisions call for producers to receive 50 percent of their estimated
deficiency payments in advance, the same crops as before will be prohibited on flex acres, and
the harvesting of oats on acreage under the Acreage Conservation Reserve will not be allowed.
For more information about the 1995 provisions, contact your local Consolidated Farm Service
Agency office. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

PESTICIDE RECORDKEEPING CHANGES -- What, where, when and how much are the
questions pesticide users will have to answer beginning on May 11, 1995. That's the date USDA
has set for pesticide users to comply with amendments to the federal pesticide recordkeeping
regulations. These requirements apply to all applicators using or supervising the use of
restricted-use pesticides. Major changes include a shortened time frame for making records,
a requirement for more specific spot application records and the availability of information for
medical treatment. Contact: Connie Crunkleton (202) 720-8998.

MORE WHEAT FOR CHINA -- China is eligible for an additional 1,000,000 metric tons of wheat
under USDA's Export Enhancement Program, says USDA Acting Secretary Richard Rominger
(February 7). Sales of wheat will made to buyers in China through normal commercial channels
at competitive world prices. Contact: Lynn K. Goldsbrough (202) 720-3930.

HOT MEXICAN FRUIT -- USDA will now allow the use of high-temperature forced air as a
commodity treatment for grapefruit and mangoes imported from Mexico. Boxes of fruit are
placed into sealed chambers with heated air until the fruit's core reaches 118 degrees
Fahrenheit. These treatments were developed by USDA's Agricultural Research Service and are
effective against several fruit flies. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-3256.








NEW VACCINE TO SLOW RABIES -- USDA is announcing the approval of a field test for an
oral rabies vaccine on coyotes in Texas. USDA's Animal Damage-Control (ADC) goal is to
create a buffer zone of immunized coyotes to try and prevent the further spread of canine rabies
across Texas into more heavily populated areas of the state. Because of the danger to humans
and pets from rabid wildlife, ADC is helping to find solutions to threats to public health and
safety. Contact: Robin Porter (301) 734-6573.

NEVADA ERADICATES PSEUDORABIES -- USDA has declared Nevada free of pseudorabies,
a destructive viral disease of livestock. Nevada is the fourteenth state to achieve Stage V or
"Free" status in the state-federal-industry cooperative pseudorabies eradication program. Stage
V, pseudorabies-free status, is achieved if a state goes for one year without finding a swine herd
infected with pseudorabies. The goal of this national eradication program is to eradicate
pseudorabies from all U.S. domestic swine herds and U.S. territories by the year 2000. Contact:
Kendra Pratt (301) 436-4898.

USDA AMENDS LIME ORDER -- USDA has amended the Lime Research, Promotion and
Consumer Information Order to reflect amendments made by Congress in late 1993. The order
revises the definition of the term "lime" to cover seedless rather than seeded limes, increases the
exemption level, requires the initial referendum to be conducted no later than 30 months after
assessments begin and makes changes to the regulating board. Contact: Gil High (202) 720-
8998.

GREEN AND WAX BEANS -- USDA is proposing to revise the standards for grades of frozen
green and wax beans. Grade standards would be converted to statistically-based individual
attributes standards similar to revised standards for canned green and wax beans. This would
also establish acceptable quality levels and acceptance numbers based on specified sample size.
Contact: Gil High (202) 720-8998.

ONION STANDARDS -- USDA is seeking comments on a proposal to revise the U.S. grade
standards for onions. A 20 pound minimum sample size would be established for consumer
packages and establish a "U.S. No. 1 Peeled" grade. A "Colossal" size designation also would
be established and export size designations would be eliminated. Contact: Gil High (202) 720-
8998.

RECORD HIGH PEAR EXPORTS -- U.S. pear exports reached their highest level ever last year,
increasing 39 percent from the 1992/93 marketing season to $73 million. Exports for the
1994/95 season are already up an additional 38 percent, an increase USDA officials attribute to
the Market Promotion Program. Contact: Donald Washington (202) 720-3101.

NASS ADMINISTRATOR NAMED Donald Bay has been selected as administrator of USDA's
National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS). Bay had been serving as acting administrator for
NASS since April 1992 because of the extended illness and subsequent death of the previous
administrator, Charles Caudill. Bay is responsible for the agency's efforts to collect and report
statistical data on crop and livestock production, inventories, prices and other agricultural
economic indicators. Contact: Dixie Lee (202) 690-2146.

DAIRY REPORT CHANGES DATE -- The release date for the Dairy: World Markets and Trade
report will change from February 28 to March 28, 1995. The second 1995 edition of the dairy
report will be released on July 31. Contact: Donald Washington (202) 720-3101.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1968 The Government's efforts to expand the NOAA weather radio
system is the topic of this week's Agriculture USA. Gary Crawford visits a weather radio station
and forecast center to find out about plans to bring weather radios into every Amercian home
and gathering place. (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1449 -- Higher cattle inventories mean lower beef prices; cattle as bird
feed?; copper deficiency and heart disease; getting nuisance birds to fly away; is weather radio
for you? (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1960 China's trading practices; China outlook; corn export
prospects steady despite recent events; 1995 farm program provisions; manure digester reduces
odor. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Monday, March 13, feed outlook; wheat outlook;
rice outlook; oil crops update; oilseeds markets and trade. Tuesday, March 14, livestock
slaughter; weekly weather and crops. Wednesday, March 15, milk production report;
aquaculture update. Friday, March 17, cattle on feed report; sheep outlook; sugar and
sweetners update. Monday, March 20, ag outlook. Tuesday, March 21, weekly weather and
crops. Wednesday, March 22, Agricultural Outlook Forum. We will bring you reports from the
Agricultural Outlook Forum on Wednesday and Thursday. Thursday, March 23, outlook forum
reports; catfish processing; livestock, dairy and poultry report. Friday, March 24, ag trade
update; livestock slaughter. These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our
newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., ET, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE


FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on crop insurance sign-up deadlines and Eric Parsons reports
on the final 1995 farm program provisions.

ACTUALITIES USDA meteorologist Norton Strommen on the latest weather and crop
conditions.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Thursday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, Telstar 302, Channel 6 (Transponder 3H), (C-band), audio
6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3820 MHz. Monday, 11:00-11:15 a.m. ET, Galaxy 4, Channel
12 (C-band), audio 6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3940 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA



OFF MIKE

DOUBLE DUTY REPORTING...Max Armstrong (WGN, Chicago, IL) was in Japan covering a
major agricultural story about that country's first importation of U.S. apples when a tragic
earthquake hit several hundred miles away. Max was dispatched to handle quake reports for
WGN and ABC radio. Also, he was interviewed on TV news shows in Chicago and Los Angeles.

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE...to Agriculture in the Empire State Award was presented recently
to Ed Slusarczyk (Ag Radio Network, Utica, NY) by the New York Farm Bureau. Ed founded
the Ag Radio Network which today provides farm and consumer news to 136 radio stations in
New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, Vermont and Maine.

NEW FARM DIRECTOR...at WIMA/WIMT (Lima, OH), is Gary Jackson. Formerly assistant
farm director at WRFD (Columbus, OH), Gary replaces Bob Ziegler. Farmers in his area are
exploring increased use of conservation tillage and are concerned about property rights issues.
Gary uses our daily radio newsline to capsulize reports on several agricultural topics.

BOOT HEEL OF MISSOURI...had such a good cotton crop last year that farmers are getting
eager to plant this year's crop especially with continued good prices, reports Hugh Robinson
(KTMO, Kennett, MO). Last year was a good one for their crops of watermelons, peaches and
cantaloupes, too. Hugh voices five minutes of news and markets every hour from 6:45 a.m. to
2:45 p.m. and finds our newsline useful in those broadcasts.

MILK STORIES...for broadcasters are offered through a National Milk Audio Service that is
operated by Thorn Wilborn, formerly Associated Press agricultural reporter, who is now with the
National Milk Producers Federation. More information is available from Thom at 703-243-6111.

THANKS...to those who have reported to us about how you use our services. It helps us plan
for the fuure.

LARR A. Q0INN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300









of Communicati on Washington, DC 20250-1300
iMAY 0 195


U' .l w, F _;1 University of Florida
RECORD EXPORTS FY 95. US. cultural exports are expected to reach a record
$48.5 billion in fiscal y 5. Agricult port value is projected to increase $5 billion from
the $43.5 billion estimate c` r l4. Export volume is forecast to increase 29 million
metric tons to 156.6 million. xpif eected to be bolstered by expanding foreign demand
for U.S. bulk commodities, as well as meats, fruits, vegetables and other high-value consumer
foods. Acting Secretary of Agriculture Richard Rominger said, "The rising export numbers
directly translate into new jobs and greater opportunities for producers and rural communities
in virtually every state and region of the country."

COMMITMENT TO PACA -- The Clinton administration is reaffirming its commitment to the
Perishable Agricultural Commodities Act pacaA). Acting Secretary of Agriculture Richard
Rominger said, "While the U.S. Department of Agriculture recognizes that areas of PACA could
be improved, the administration will vigorously oppose any legislative effort to eliminate this
critically important act. Without the protections the PACA affords, our nation's fruit and vegetable
industry would lose millions of dollars each year from unfair trade practices." The PACA
remedies delinquent payment problems between the various commercial links from field to retail
counters. Rominger stated that in it's current form, the PACA is economical, self-supporting
through license fees and saves the industry millions of dollars in litigation costs. Contact: Jerry
Redding (202) 720-6959.

JOINT COMMISSION ON GRAINS -- The Canada-U.S. Joint Commission on Grains (JCG) held
its fourth meeting in Vancouver from February 9 to 11. Focusing on the work of its
subcommittees, members looked into transportation quality and grading. A discussion on the
examination of domestic and export programs in Canada and the U.S. was continued from their
last meeting. Among the other issues debated were the differences in grain grading standards
in the two countries, end-use certificates, and the differences in handling, storage, and
transportation activities. Members also looked at the Export Enhancement Program, the
Canadian Wheat Board, and the domestic support programs in both countries. The next
meeting of the Commission will take place in New Orleans. Contact: Wayne Baggett (202)
720-2032.

DEFICIENCY PAYMENTS FOR RICE -- Nearly $575 million will be paid to eligible rice
producers in the form of deficiency payments for the 1994 crop of rice. The total payment rate
is based on the difference between the established target price and the higher of the national
average loan rate for the crop, or a selected market price. The national average loan rate is
$6.50. The national average market prices received are $6.65 per hundredweight for the August
through December, 1994 period and $7.98 per hundredweight for the 1994 calendar year.
Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.








BEEFED UP RESULTS USDA's Cattle on Feed Evaluation (COFE) shows the beef industry
is taking an active role in changing management practices to assure the quality and safety of
their products. In this initial portion of the COFE evaluation, small and large capacity feedlot
producers responded to a USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service's survey-about the
management and health of their cattle. The evaluation showed that beef producers have
responded to increased concerns about food safety, product quality and the environment by
improving management practices through voluntary quality assurance and environmental
monitoring programs. Contact: Kendra Pratt (301) 734-6573.

1995 NATIONAL SWINE STUDY -- Beginning in June, USDA's Animal and Plant Health
Inspection Service will launch a national swine study for 1995. The survey will focus on the
priority animal health and management information needs of the pork industry. The objectives
of this Swine '95: Grower/Finisher study are to provide information on the production and health
levels of the U.S. population of swine herds and assess how this information affects export
markets and disease control programs. Contact: Kendra Pratt (301) 436-4898.

TURN YOUR YELLOW PAGES GREEN -- Phone books, newspapers and other waste papers
can be recycled into pellets that work as "green manure" and ground cover for various crops.
Researchers at USDA's Agricultural Research Service have found that soybeans do as well on
soil that have the pellets mixed in as they do on soil mixed with winter wheat crop for green
manure. The pellets also save the expense of tearing up the cover crop and could even replace
herbicides. Weeds are eradicated by smothering them with the mulch, combining chemical
compounds with the paper, or both! Researchers are now working on a way to use longer
pellets to hold down highly erodible soil. Contact: J.H. Edwards, Jr. (205) 844-3979.

WHAT DO BABY FOOD, BEER AND BIOFUELS HAVE IN COMMON? They could all be
produced in a fraction of the time currently required. Starch from corn, barley and other grains
is used as a key ingredient in the making of these products. Now, thanks to USDA researchers
at the Agricultural Research Service, starch can be broken down up to ten times faster with the
use of a natural enzyme. Alpha glucosidase was discovered two years ago, but it may have
been used by Egyptians as early as 3500 B.C. to malt barley. Researchers are now working on
a way to combine the enzyme for quicker, more efficient commercial production of starch
derivatives. Contact: Cynthia A. Henson (608) 262-0377.

TASTE BUDS FOOLED -- Trained panelists couldn't tell the difference between chocolates with
a whipped cream filling and those with half the cream replaced by an Oatrim gel. Oatrim is a
fat substitute developed by USDA scientists using modified oat flour that is high in soluble fiber.
When all the cream was replaced with Oatrim in the taste test, only a slight decrease in creamy
flavor and texture was detected. Contact: George E. Inglett (309) 681-6363.

LET THE SEEDS COME IN! -- True potato seeds from Chile can now enter the United States
under certain conditions. USDA announced (February 17) true potato seed can now be
imported into the U.S. from Chile's Tenth Region as long as the seed originates from certified
U.S. virus-free plants, is produced under the supervision of Chilean plant protection authorities
and is tested for seedborne viruses prior to being imported. This ruling will enable U.S.
producers to use "true" potato seed not seed potatoes- to produce potato varieties not
currently grown in this country. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 734-3256.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1969 -- An in-depth look at China and its potential when it comes to
U.S. farm imports is the topic of this week's Agriculture USA with Brenda Curtis. (Weekly
cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1449 Gardening angels; food from ethanol; kids and competition;
deicers and your lawn; water rights and the National Forest System. (Weekly cassette --
consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1961 -- China's huge expanding market; cattle outlook not bright;
dairy barn of the future; an alternate look at tobacco's importance; three-pronged weed control.
(Weekly cassette -- news features),

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tuesday, March 7, weekly weather and crop
outlook. Thursday, March 9, world ag supply and demand for cotton; crop production for cotton
and citrus. Friday, March 10, crop production; world ag supply and demand; cotton and wool
outlook. These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries many
stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., ET, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE


ACTUALITIES Excerpts from the opening of USDA's Agricultural Outlook Forum include
comments from Acting Secretary of Agriculture Richard Rominger, National Economic Council
Chair Laura D'Andrea Tyson and USDA Acting Chief Economist Keith Collins. Excerpts from
White House news conference on proposal to replace federal nutrition and feeding programs
with block grants include comments from USDA Under Secretary for Food, Nutrition and
Consumer Services Ellen Haas.

FEATURE Eric Parsons reports on the 1995 farm program and crop insurance sign-up
deadlines.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Thursday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, Telstar 302, Channel 6 (Transponder 3H), (C-band), audio
6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3820 MHz. Monday, 11:00-11:15 a.m. ET, Galaxy 4, Channel
12 (C-band), audio 6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3940 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
4 91
OFF MIKE J

PRODUCER ATTITUDESpare good in Wisconsin after a bountiful crop last year, and they
are in the mood to consider new farm equipment, reports Pam Jahnke-Welch (WTSO, Madison,
WI). Pam is off:to,.the Southwest this week to interview farmers in Arizona and New Mexico
about the expanding daiJry industry there. Wisconsin farmers are interested in this development
andrhtowit affects overall market for dairy products. WTSO has just added another 45 minutes
to their daily farm hies programming which is scheduled from 5 a.m. to 2 p.m. Urban listeners
calling in have responded well to this increase in farm news.

SOUTH OF THE BORDER...down Mexico way...went a Texas team of 35 cow-calf producers,
feedlot operators, retailers, Texas Beef Council and Texas Department of Agriculture
representatives and broadcaster Lee McCoy (Texas State Networks, Arlington, TX). The
February 7-10 tour was sponsored by the Texas-Mexico Agricultural Alliance for the purpose of
improving trade relations. Lee says the Mexican cattlemen were very hospitable during their
visits to three progressive ranches where they saw lots of improved pasture and well-managed
operations. Lee reports agricultural and market news for Texas State Networks that serve 45
radio stations throughout the state.

WHEAT ON KANSAS PLAINS...is breaking dormancy early due to warmer than usual weather
the past few days, according to wheat farmer and broadcaster John Morris (KSAL, Salina, KS).
John says that Kansas farmers are talking a lot about the Farm Bill with many concerned that
farm supports may be eliminated too quickly. With KSAL for six years, John does eight news
segments from 5:30-9 a.m. and host a half-hour program at noon.

NEW HOUR TV PROGRAM...on agriculture has been initiated, reports Jim Adamson (KSBW-
TV, Salinas, CA) who called to verify current satellite coordinates for the weekly USDA Satellite
TV Newsfeed. Thanks to stations who are telling us how they use the TV features and
actualiti es.


LARRY A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Peaty for Piate Use $300










united states u rr ent T Agriculture ) ice of communications LWaslinflton, DC 20250-1300
SIMAY 08 1995

Letter No. 2703 University of FloridYlarch 3, 1995

IT'S NOT TOO LATE FORFf P INSURANCE USDA will allow late applications for some
crop insurance coverage and sign-up procedures are being streamlined. Late applications apply
to this year only. There are strict conditions attached to late applications: producers must
certify the condition of the crop, crops are subject to field inspections and insurance will not
attach until 10 days after the application. Late applications are accepted only when the
producers is required to obtain coverage to participate in USDA farm programs. Because of
these additional constraints, producers are encouraged to contact local USDA offices to find out
when the applicable deadlines are. Contact: Jim Petterson (202) 720-4623.

DON'T LET GREEN FOODS TURN YOU GREEN ON ST. PATRICK'S DAY -- Green is a color
you might wear -- but don't want to BE -- on St. Patrick's Day. In past years, people have
gotten foodborne illnesses from eating improperly cooked or handled corned beef and other
foods. Foods typically served on March 17 need safe cooking and handling to ensure
foodborne bacteria doesn't crash the celebration. Acting Director Bessie Berry of USDA's Meat
and Poultry Hotline says, "Keep the product refrigerated or frozen; thaw in the refrigerator or the
microwave (if you thaw in the microwave remember to cook the meat or poultry immediately);
keep raw meat and poultry separate from other foods; wash working surfaces, utensils and
hands after touching raw meat and poultry; cook thoroughly; keep hot foods hot and refrigerate
all leftovers immediately or discard." Contact: Sara Beck (202) 720-5604.

NO HOLDS ON MEXICAN CATTLE -- USDA is withdrawing a proposed rule requiring certain
steers and spayed heifers imported into the U.S. from Mexico to be sent to a quarantined
pasture or feedlot for finishing feeding or to a holding facility for quarantine and a 60-day
tuberculin test. USDA is also withdrawing a proposed rule to amend regulations requiring all
Mexican-origin cattle moved in interstate commerce be accompanied by a certificate on which
each animal is individually identified. Contact: Cynthia A. Eck (301) 734-5931.

LOWER COTTON FEES PROPOSED -- USDA is proposing to lower the cotton classing fee
charged to cotton growers for the 1995 crop. Beginning July 1, the fee would be reduced from
the current $1.80 to $1.60 per bale. Cotton classing fees are set by a formula in the Uniform
Cotton Classing Fees Act of 1987. Fees for other cotton classification services offered by the
Cotton Division would remain unchanged. Contact: Becky Unkenholz (202) 720-8998.

USDA GOES INTERNET -- To access this document via Internet, point your gopher to
esusda.gov and a menu selection will appear or send an e-mail message to
almanac@esusda.gov. The single line message should read: send(space)USDA-
releases(space)help. Retrieval instructions and a list of documents currently available will
appear. Need more help? Contact: Maria Bynum (202) 720-5192.








GENETICALLY ENGINEERED COTTON -- USDA is asking the public for comments on a
petition for a determination of non-regulated status for cotton lines genetically engineered for
insect resistance. Monsanto Co. wants to produce its genetically engineered cotton lines
trademarked by Monsanto as "BollgardTM Cotton Lines" without securing further USDA permits
or acknowledged notifications. The cotton line contains gene sequences derived from plant
pathogens and USDA has the responsibility to assure that in releasing any bioengineered plant,
no plant pest risk is presented. Contact: Cynthia A. Eck (301) 734-5931.

PORK ASSESSMENTS -- USDA is proposing to increase assessments on live hogs and
imported pork and pork products from .35 to .45 percent of the market value, as recommended
by the National Pork Producers Delegate Body. Increasing the rate of assessment would raise
the funding for the National Research and Promotion Program for pork which was authorized
by the 1985 Pork Promotion, Research and Consumer Information Act. The assessments are
levied on the market value of live hogs when sold, and on imported hogs, pork and pork
products. Contact: Becky Unkenholz (202) 720-8998.

TOBACCO OPERATES AT NO COST TO TAXPAYERS -- USDA's Commodity Credit
Corporation announced (February 27) a no-net-cost assessment of .275 cent per pound for the
1995 crop of burley tobacco. Funds in the no-net-cost tobacco account ensure the price
support program for burley tobacco will operate at no cost to taxpayers. In addition, producers
and purchasers must pay a tobacco marketing assessment of 0.8625 cent per pound. The no-
net-cost assessment also applies to imported tobacco that enters the U.S. during the 1995-96
marketing year. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

CORN STANDARDS REVISED -- USDA wants to amend the U.S. Standards for Corn. USDA
is proposing to: report test weight to the nearest tenth of a pound; eliminate the count limit on
stones and reduce the U.S. Sample grade aggregate weight tolerance from more than 0.2
percent by weight to more than 0.1 percent by weight and offer stress crack testing as official
criteria. Contact: Dana Stewart (202) 720-5091.

AMENDING BEAN STANDARDS -- USDA is considering amending the official U.S. States
Standards for Beans. USDA is proposing to eliminate the factor "clean-cut weevil-bored" from
the grade requirements for the class Blackeye beans and change the grade limits for the factors
"total defects," "blistered, wrinkled and/or broken beans," and "splits" for the class Baby Lima
beans. Contact: Dana Stewart (202) 720-5091.

PILOTING A GRAIN INSPECTION PROGRAM -- USDA is seeking comments on the need for
official grain inspection services in the South Texas region and requesting application for
designation to provide official service in this area under a pilot program. USDA's Grain
Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) is requesting comments on the need
for official inspection services in South Texas, including estimates of the number of official
inspections by carrier, type of service and kind of grain. Under the pilot, GIPSA would allow
more than one official agency to provide services to any grain firm located in the South Texas
area. The pilot will allow GIPSA to evaluate the feasibility and impact of allowing more than one
official agency to provide official services within a single geographic area. GIPSA will not
designate any applicants unless there is sufficient need for official services in South Texas.
Contact: Dana Stewart (202) 720-5091.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1970 -- The Department of Agriculture's first ever Economic Outlook
Forum is the focus of this week's edition of Agriculture USA. The forces driving the farm
economy in the next decade are explored. (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1450 USDA fights food stamp fraud; food price outlook; cars made
from farm products; weather forecasting going high tech; changes proposed in school lunch
program. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1962 -- Will farm programs survive?; U.S. farm exports forecast at
record levels; income outlook for farmers; a crop insurance safety net; 1995 farm program sign-
up reminder. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Monday, March 13, feed outlook; oil crops
update; rice outlook; wheat outlook. Tuesday, March 14, annual livestock slaughter report;
weekly weather and crops. Wednesday, March 15, milk production; aquaculture update. Friday,
March 17, cattle on feed report; sheep production; sugar and sweeteners update. Monday,
March 20, agricultural outlook. Tuesday, March 21, weekly weather and crops. Thursday,
March 23, livestock, dairy and poultry outlook; catfish processing. Friday, March 24, livestock
slaughter; ag trade update. These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our
newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., ET, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE


ACTUALITIES -- Acting Agriculture Secretary Richard Rominger and USDA Under Secretary
for Food, Nutrition & Consumer Services Ellen Haas on efforts to prevent food stamp fraud and
on federal feeding programs (with B-roll); USDA Crop Insurance official Ken Ackerman on the
late application procedure for crop insurance sign-up (with B-roll); USDA Chief Meteorologist
Norton Strommen with his weekly weather and crop update.

UPCOMING -- Coverage of 1995 Farm Bill Congressional hearings.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Thursday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, Telstar 302, Channel 6 (Transponder 3H), (C-band), audio
6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3820 MHz. Monday, 11:00-11:15 a.m. ET, Galaxy 4, Channel
12 (C-band), audio 6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3940 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
41Ill ll! 11 Wrll rlIE WE I
OFF MIKE 31262083079748 i
OFF MIKE

INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTERS...from 13 countries spent time with us this week as part
of a six week study tour to look at radio broadcasting in the U.S. We had the opportunity to
explain USDA's radio programming to representatives from Mozambique, Nigeria, Tanzania,
Zaire, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Barbados, Botswana, Costa Rica, Egypt, Estonia, Israel, and
Kazakhstan. The international visitors will divide into teams and leave Washington to visit radio
operations in North Carolina, Tennessee, Missouri, Ohio, New Mexico, Colorado, Oregon and
California. Their project is sponsored by the U.S. Information Agency.

PEOPLES RADIO NETWORK...uses USDA Consumer Time and Agritape features for news
programming that they provide for 300 mostly small-market stations, reports Wyatt Cox. The
network originates its broadcasts for three hours on weekday mornings, and they have one hour
segments on Saturday morning and evening that originate from White Springs, FL.

WHY DO YOU READ THIS LETTER?...From nearly 160 respondents to our recent readership
survey, we learned that our "news summaries" and "off mike" pages are the most popular, rating
4.3 on a 5-point scale (58 percent always read the news items and 67 percent always read "off
mike"). Seventy percent said the primary reason for reading the letter was for the news while
51 percent listed this column. Ratings for interest in all the subject categories covered in the
news were evenly spread with none rating lower than 3.7 on the 1-5 scale. Eighty-five percent
use news items as background, and 28 percent use them as copy to read on-air.

YOUR COMMENTS...Many of you consider this letter a good source of information on
agriculture, USDA and other broadcasters. Several noted that the letter contained information
they can't get anywhere else. You've given us ideas for improvements that we are considering.
We appreciated hearing from you and hope you'll continue to give us feedback and interesting
information. If you have news we can share through this column, fax us at 202-720-5773 or
drop us a note.


LARY QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Prvate Use $300









United States Department of A e Office o unications Washington, DC 20250-1300
rn o tsLM


C i P fl


Ic '^ Library
MAY 0 8 1995
Letter No. 2704 March 10, 1995
University of Florida
FIGHTING FOOD STAMP FRA S nching a three-part plain to combat fraud in
the $27 billion food stamp program. Acting Agriculture Secretary Richard Rominger says the....
proposal is the result of a collaborative effort between the Department's Food, Nutrition and
Consumer Services, which oversees the program, and the USDA's Office of Inspector General,
which is responsible for investigating program violations. The comprehensive three-tier attack
on trafficking involves pre-authorization screening, post-authorization controls and stiffer
penalties. Contact: Neal Flieger (703) 305-2039.

BUDGET CUTS TARGET RURAL HOUSING -- A Congressional rescission proposal, targeting
$240 million in USDA programs, includes a $115.5 million cut in rural housing. The Rural Rental
Housing Direct Loan Program, called the 515 Program, is the largest federal rental housing
program in rural America. Currently, more than $1.5 billion in eligible applications are waiting
for approval. Contact: Steve Hart (202) 720-6903.

BUDGET CUTS TARGET WIC A Congressional proposal, targeting $240 million in USDA
rescissions, includes a $25 million cut in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women,
Infants, and Children (WIC). If approved, that would mean a cut of nearly 50,000 recipients from
the program. More than 6.4 million people receive WIC benefits each month. WIC is expected
to serve 7.2 million people per month in 1995. Contact: Neal Flieger (703) 305-2039.

$44 MILLION RETURNED TO PRODUCERS -- Members of the U.S. produce industry received
nearly $44 million in reparation awards last year under the Perishable Agricultural Commodities
Act pacaA). Nearly 4,000 complaints about unfair trading practices were filed under PACA by
members of the produce industry. More than 70 percent of these complaints were settled
through informal arbitration. The purpose of PACA is to reduce the vulnerability of fruit and
vegetable producers to unfair trading practices due to the perishability of their products. Over
the past decade, USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service has handled nearly 40,000 PACA
complaints, a steady rise from 2,596 complaints valued at $15 million in 1984 to 3,733 complaints
valued at $44 million in 1994. Contact: Connie Crunkleton (202) 720-8998.

NO EXTENSION ON COTTON LOANS Loan extensions will not be available on outstanding
Commodity Credit Corporation's nonrecourse upland cotton price support loans maturing on
March 31, 1995. Upland cotton loans mature 10 months from the first day of the month in which
the loan is made. Producers may request an 8-month extension if the average price for upland
cotton in designated spot markets for the preceding month doesn't exceed 130 percent of the
average price for the past 36 months. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.





2
ON THE LOOKOUT FOR POULTRY VIRUS USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection
Service is increasing disease surveillance activities to protect the U.S. poultry industry from the
highly pathogenic avian influenza virus present in commercial poultry flocks in Mexico. USDA
will increase slaughter and farm disease surveillance activities for poultry in states bordering
Mexico and other areas of the U.S. which might be at risk due to movement of equipment,
personnel or waterfowl. Contact: Kendra Pratt (301) 734-6573.

CHICKEN WATER USDA will now monitor and evaluate in-plant trials of the useof the
antimicrobial compound chlorine dioxide in poultry processing water. The Food and Drug
Administration approved (March 3) the compound as a food additive for such purposes.
Associate Administrator Thomas J. Billy of Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) said,
"FDA's approval of chlorine dioxide clears the way for the FSIS to work with companies wishing
to conduct in-plant trial tests of the compound to determine the efficiency and safety of this new
technology under approved conditions of use." In-plant trials are the next step to provide the
basis to evaluate the utility of chlorine dioxide under commercial conditions. Contact: Jacque
Knight (202) 720-9113.

GENETICALLY ENGINEERED CORN USDA is asking the public for comments on a petition
for a determination of nonregulated status for "Event 176 Corn" that is genetically engineered for
insect resistance. Ciba Seeds, a division of Ciba-Geigy Corporation, has asked to produce its
genetically engineered corn without securing further USDA permits or acknowledged
notifications. The corn is currently regulated because it is genetically engineered with a synthetic
gene that codes for an insecticidal protein. Contact: Cynthia A. Eck (301) 734-5931.

SPAIN FREE OF HORSE SICKNESS USDA has declared Spain free of African horse
sickness. This reduces the quarantine requirements for imported horses and removes Spain
from USDA's list of countries where African horse sickness is known to exist. USDA importation
requirements for horses are stringent to prevent this exotic disease from being introduced into
the U.S. horse population. USDA made the decision after evaluating information provided by
Spanish animal health officials and visiting their facilities. Contact: Kendra Pratt (301) 734-
6573.

GROUND TURKEY RECALLED Hudson Foods of Springfield, Missouri, is implementing a
voluntary recall of one pound and ten pound packages of ground turkey. Small pieces of bones
were found in the product "Delightful Farms Finely Ground Turkey" distributed to retail food
stores in the following states: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Illinois,
Kansas, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey,
North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia. All packages
covered under the recall will have "Est. P-7249" inside the circular USDA inspection seal on the
label. USDA learned of the problem after two consumers in Minnesota reported finding bone
in the ground turkey. No other Delightful Farms food product is affected by the recall. Contact:
Stephen Lombardi (202) 720-9113.

FAX For radio and TV programming information and the Broadcasters Letter through your
facsimile machine, call USDA's AgNewsFax. Use the telephone connected to your FAX machine
to call (202) 690-3944. At voice prompts press 1, press 4, then to receive Broadcasters Letter,
press 9200; radio newsline information, press 9250; TV contents billboard, press 9260; TV
scripts, press 9270. After all your selections, then press #, press 3, and press the start button
on your FAX machine.







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1971 In this week's edition of Agriculture USA, John Snyder takes a
look at a new nationwide study on Integrated Pest Management. (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2
minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1451 Minerals and your health; strawberries are a "berry" big success
story; copper deficiency and your health; food and drug intervention; sticky semolina. (Weekly
cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1962 Drought in the forecast for the Southeast; controlling potato
sprouts; a new way to keep track of pesticide use; dairy cow dietary analysis; crop reporting
dates; producers help produce this survey. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE. Monday, March 20, ag outlook. Tuesday, March
21, chemical usage; weekly weather and crops. Thursday, March 23, catfish processing;
livestock, dairy and poultry. Friday, March 24, livestock slaughter; trade update. Tuesday,
March 28, weekly weather and crops. Thursday, March 30, ag prices; tobacco world markets
and trade. Friday, March 31, grain stocks; rice stocks; prospective planting; hogs and pigs;
livestock and poultry markets and trade. These are USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE


FEATURES -- Eric Parsons reports on crop reporting dates.

ACTUALITIES -- Includes excerpts from Acting Secretary of Agriculture Richard Rominger's
speech to the National Farmers Union, highlights from Soil & Water Conservation Society's press
conference and USDA meteorologist Norton Strommen on the latest weather and crop
conditions.


SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Thursday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, Telstar 302, Channel 6 (Transponder 3H), (C-band), audio
6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3820 MHz. Monday, 11:00-11:15 a.m. ET, Galaxy 4, Channel
12 (C-Band), audio 6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3940 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Cal Larry A. Quinn, (202) 720-072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.






4
OFF MIKE

"TALL" TEXANS...are young adults, 25-40 years of age, chosen for a two-year curriculum of the
Texas Agricultural Lifetime Leadership (TALL) Program. Roddy Peeples (Voice of Southwest
Agriculture Network, San Angelo, TX) has served on TALLs advisory council since the program
began several years ago. Rene Stewart of Roddy's network team is a participant. She was in
California last week for one of several 3-day visits scheduled during the program. Rene will have
a week-long session in Washington and an overseas visit before completing the course. Former
Texas Governor Dolph Briscoe, Jr., who established TALL, was recipient this week of the
Distinguished Texan in Agriculture Award given by Texas A&M University's College of Agricultural
Sciences.

USDA BROADCASTER RETIRES...after more than 30 years' service. Will Pemble,
broadcaster, producer and writer for our Agricultural Research Service, retired March 3. Will
produced ARS video news releases for more than 20 years and previously served as
host/producer for USDA TV programs, Across the Fence and Down to Earth. More than 100
friends and colleagues attended his farewell last week at Beltsville, MD. Hubert Kelly, retired
Director of ARS Information, hosted the celebration. Robert Norton, current Director of ARS
Information, highlighted Will's talents as did other colleagues. Dr. K. D. Murrell spoke for the
many scientists that Will assisted over the years. We promoted him to the first-ever title of
Producer Emeritus with our Center.

SENSE OF HUMOR...do you have one? Veteran broadcaster Bob Brown (WLBK/WDEK,
DeKalb, IL) entertains audiences with talks about importance of humor (when he's not busy
broadcasting). At 76 years young, Bob began broadcasting in 1947 as a news director and after
several different roles began farm broadcasting in 1967. Today, he is on-the-air just over two
hours a day with primary program times of 5:45-6 a.m. and 12-1:00 p.m. Winter's not over in
Illinois. Bob reported freezing rain and snow of 1-3 inches this week. A favorite topic among
farmers there is whether and/or how much farm program budgets should be cut.


LARRYA. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 202501300
OFCIAL BUSINESS
Peanry for P i e use $300








science
Ty


ce of Communications Washington, DC


'o "T'. ? :/ .U iversitv of F rida
AMERICANS UR "GET t NECTED!" -- The Clinton Administration isauncrfingoida
public education car fericans to get on the information superhighway. The
announcement was ma conferences linked via satellite in Washington, DC and
Southern California with Secretary of Commerce Ronald Brown and Acting Secretary of
Agriculture Richard Rominger. The campaign will demonstrate how access to the National
Information Infrastructure (NII), also known as the information superhighway, can help all
Americans improve their daily lives. The Clinton Administration's Nil initiative seeks to accelerate
the development of our nation's information infrastructure and to ensure access to it by all
Americans. Students and schools are connecting to some of the best learning institutions in the
world, people are receiving medical advice via video technology and some workers are using
computers to telecommute. Networks are allowing citizens to obtain helpful information from
their local, state and Federal governments. Contact: Jim Brownlee (202) 720-2091.

CROP DEFICIENCY PAYMENTS -- Deficiency payments are being made to eligible corn and
grain sorghum producers who participated in the 1994 USDA farm programs. Just under $1.4
billion will be paid to producers through county Consolidated Farm Service Agency offices. The
five month deficiency payment rate for corn is .4275 cents, with those producers who received
the advance payment rate of .20 cents receiving .2275 cents per bushel. The grain sorghum
deficiency payment rate is set at .4425 cents per bushel, with those producers who received the
advance payment of .23 cents receiving a payment of .2125 cents per bushel. Any additional
deficiency payments will be made in October 1995. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS LICENSES -- USDA is proposing to amend its regulations
concerning the manufacture of biological products by clarifying certain provisions concerning
licenses, inspections, records and reports. A USDA spokesperson says the purpose is to make
sure licensees know that when licenses are issued, it is on the condition that inspection of
establishments, products and records is permitted and that one product license must be held
in order to maintain a valid establishment license. USDA also proposes to require that detailed
records and reports concerning biological products be maintained at the establishment in which
the products are produced. Contact: Cynthia A. Eck (301) 734-5931.

OPTIONS PILOT PROGRAM -- The target rate strike prices for wheat and corn for the 1995
Options Pilot Program will be $4.20 and $2.90 per bushel, the same rates established for the
1994 program. Price support strike prices will be announced at a later date. Participants may
purchase put options at either the target rate strike price or the price support equivalent strike
price and will be reimbursed for the cost of the premium. Target price users forego deficiency
payments and price support benefits on the bushels enrolled in the program. Those using the
price support forego price support program benefits. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.








MORE TIME TO ISSUE HEALTH DOCUMENTS -- USDA is proposing to allow accredited
veterinarians to issue official health documents up to 30 days after inspecting herds or flocks that
are under regular health maintenance programs. For animals not under such programs, the
proposed regulations would add three additional days to the seven days currently allowed
between the inspection and the issuance of official health documents. Currently, accredited
veterinarians are required to have conducted the inspection of all flocks and herds within seven
days prior to issuing any official health documents. A "regular health maintenance program"
would be defined as an arrangement between an accredited veterinarian and a livestock
producer to ensure that the veterinarian inspects every animal on each premises once every 30
days. Contact: Kendra Pratt (301) 734-6573.

VETERINARY BIOLOGICS USDA is proposing to amend its regulation concerning state-
federal licensing of veterinary biological products. This would have the effect of not allowing a
federally licensed establishment to produce the same veterinary biological product under both
a state and federal product license. Autogenous biologics would not be subject to the same
requirement, in that a federally licensed establishment could hold both State and Federal product
licenses for autogenous biologics but must choose to produce each specific serial of such
biologic under either a state or federal product license. However, no autogenous biologic could
be produced at the same time under both a federal and state license. Contact: Cynthia A. Eck
(301) 734-5931.

OFFICIAL AGENCY PILOT PROGRAM -- USDA's Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards
Administration is proposing pilot programs to allow more than one agency to inspect or weigh
grain in a geographic area. Currently, only one agency may provide service in a specified area.
Authorized in the 1993 Amendments to the U.S. Grain Standards Act, the pilot programs will
provide data on the effect of allowing more than one agency to inspect or weigh grain in a single
area. USDA is considering two options and is requesting comments from the public. Contact:
Dana Stewart (202) 720-5091.

USDA'S BEAGLE BRIGADE -- Canine members of the Department of Agriculture's Beagle
Brigade gathered at USDA headquarters to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the program.
"USDA's Beagle Brigade" is a group of dogs trained to detect prohibited plants, fruits and meat
that could contain plants and pests that compromise the safety of U.S. agricultural products.
USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service uses the brigade to augment its Plant
Protection and Quarantine officers who inspect passenger baggage, mail and cargo at all U.S.
ports of entry. The program started with one dog ten years ago, and has expanded to include
more than 30 dogs at 19 airports across the United States. All dogs are adopted from animal
shelters or through private donation. Contact: Jerry Redding (202) 720-6959.

ANIMAL DAMAGE CONTROL DECISION -- Copies are available of USDA's decision on the
final environmental impact statement for it's animal damage control program. The decision was
reached after extensive analysis by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), the
Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service, using data on the effects of the APHIS
animal damage control program on wildlife. Copies of the final environmental impact statement
document can be obtained by writing USDA's Animal Damage Control, 4700 River Road, Unit
87, Riverdale, MD 20737-1228. Contact: Jerry Redding (202) 720-6959.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1972 Going to bat for bats is the subject of this week's Agriculture
USA. Gary Crawford talks with experts about bats, their place in our nightmares and their real
place in our worlds. (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary). **Note to broadcasters:
Beginning with programs aired the week of April 17, Agriculture USA will switch to a
shorter, five minute format. See explanation on the last page of this letter.

CONSUMER TIME # 1451 -- President Clinton goes back to school for lunch. Changes on the
farm are helping the environment. In search of the Easter egg. USDA celebrates 10th
anniversary of the "Beagle Brigade." (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1963 -- A dairy cow dietary analysis. Conservation compliance is
working. The sheep outlook for the next year. Sunflower pests. Corn and grain sorghum
deficiency payments. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWS LINE -- Tuesday, March 28, weekly weather and crops.
Wednesday, March 29, wool and mohair. Thursday, March 30, ag prices. Friday, March 31,
prospective plantings; hogs and pigs. Monday, April 3, horticultural trade and export
opportunities. Tuesday, April 4, weekly weather and crops; poultry slaughter. Thursday, April
6, dairy products. These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our NEWS LINE
carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWS LINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., ET, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

ACTUALITIES -- Acting Secretary of Agriculture Richard Rominger and USDA economist Keith
Collins speaking at the Alabama Farmers Federation in Washington, D.C. on the Overview and
Outlook for Agriculture. APHIS Deputy Administrator B. Glen Lee and Acting Secretary for
Marketing and Regulatory Program Patricia Jensen honoring USDA's Beagle Brigade program.

FEATURE -- Eric Parsons. reports on 1994 corn and grain sorghum deficiency payments.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on USDA and Americorps working together to
protect California resources.


SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Thursday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, Telstar 302, Channel 6 (Transponder 3H), (C-band), audio
6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3820 MHZ. Monday, 11:00-11:15 a.m. ET, Galaxy 4, Channel
12 (C-band), audio 6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3940 MHZ.







4 31
OFF MIKE

AGRICULTURE USA...our weekly 13:30 minute documentary, will change to a five minute format
beginning the week of April 17. Our recent survey of radio stations using our weekly cassette
services indicated that nearly 50 percent of stations not programming Agriculture USA listed
length as the primary reason. Several respondents suggested a five minute length. Fifty-four
percent of 260 stations responding reported using this program, but many indicated they
excerpted it and did not use the complete program. Yet, many stations wanted us to continue
Agriculture USA at a shorter length. Thank you for your use of our programs. We hope the new
format will be more compatible with your programming needs.

NEW STATION, NEW NAME...Farm Director Kim Spiczka is moving to KNOX in Grand Forks,
ND, from WYRQ in Little Falls, MN. Her new air name will be Kim Douglas.

CROP INSURANCE DEADLINE...was a lead story this week in Indiana, reports Darrin
Johnston (AgriAmerica Network, Indianapolis, IN). Darrin has moved from network sales work
to join Gary Truitt in full-time on-the-air duties for the network which serves 70 Indiana radio
stations with newscasts at five minutes before the hour beginning at 4:55 a.m. and continuing
until 5:55 p.m. AgriAmerica Network is planning a big celebration soon for their 10th
Anniversary. Early planning is underway for their 30-50 county fair visits. Besides news
coverage of county and state fairs, they present belt buckles to champion livestock exhibitors
in their state.

SPRING IS COMING...and Dave Andrews (KZEN, Central City, NE) says with 60 degree
temperatures after last week's snowstorm there are signs of green (just in time for St. Patrick's
Day). Dave was substituting for Gary Wulf who was "under the weather" this week. Gary
usually does three agricultural newscasts a day (8:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m.).



LARRV. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










United States Department of /


unications Washington, DC 20250-1300: ---l


'f7 J/^ ^s ,^ton Sc ience
\L library .k
Letter No. 2706 : March 24 995

CONFIRMATION HEARINGS B D -- President Clinton's choiceUfviK tflfilorida
Agriculture Department, Dan Glickman told the Senate Agriculture Committee, if confirmed, he
would fulfill his mandate of being an advocate for agriculture. He said be will oppose mai._
spending cuts which would disturb the economic stability of agriculture and that he intends to
vigorously implement both GATT and NAFTA. Glickman said the EEP program should not be
eliminated and that commodity programs should give farmers the freedom and flexibility to
respond to market signals. Reorganizing USDA was another priority Glickman discussed before
the Agriculture Committee. When asked about the Administration's farm bill recommendations,
Glickman said he would reveal them "in a timely fashion" if confirmed. Glickman also offered
his views on rural development, saying it's a high priority for President Clinton and himself. On
the conservation programs up for debate during the farm bill discussions, Glickman said he
intends to make sure a rule of reason and fair play is implemented. He says he is also
supportive of the anti-fraud food stamp proposals recently laid out by the Department, while
recognizing the importance these programs play in meeting the nutrition requirements of
American citizens. In summary, Glickman says his focus will be "advocacy agriculture" if he is
confirmed as the next Secretary.

"FRESH" OR "FROZEN" -- To ensure consideration of all issues and scientific concerns, the
USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced (March 17) an extension of the
public comment period on a proposed rule to prohibit the use of the term "fresh" to describe
poultry that has been previously frozen. FSIS is soliciting public comments on options for
reconciling one element of its "fresh" proposal with existing regulations for labeling poultry as
"frozen." Under the proposal, poultry would be labeled "previously frozen" if its internal
temperature has ever been below 26 degrees Fahrenheit. The extension of the comment period
will also allow time for public comment on a recently completed Agricultural Research Service
evaluation of raw poultry products that have been held at temperatures between 0 and 40
Fahrenheit. Contact: Jacque Knight (202) 720-9113.

FIRST GRANT TO EZ/EC -- USDA has given out the first award under the Empowerment
Zone/Enterprise Community (EZ/EC) program. The grant is a $75,000 award to Lock Haven,
PA, one of President Clinton's EZ/EC designated areas. The award was made to the Central
Intermediate Unit in West Decatur, PA., to establish a technology center in downtown Lock
Haven. The center will provide technology training to local businesses, industries and
individuals. It will also assist local companies and educational institutions to work together to
meet changing workplace technology needs. The Rural Business Enterprise Grant of $75,000
will be used to purchase computers and will leverage $154,900 in operating funds from local
government and business partners in the Lock Haven area. Steve Hart (202) 720-6903.






2
NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SALUTED Agriculture's role in natural resources
conservation was praised in a speech to the leadership of one of the nation's largest
environmental organizations, the National Wildlife Federation. Acting Agriculture Secretary
Richard Rominger said farmers are committed to environmental stewardship because of their
stake in healthy water, soils, and air. In light of the upcoming debate on the 1995 farm bill,
Rominger outlined the important contributions USDA's conservation programs have made to
the health of the nation's natural landscape through the Conservation Compliance-Program, the
wetland/swampbuster provisions of the 1985 farm bill and the Conservation Reserve Program.
He said research was necessary to help farmers produce efficiently and economically, while
sustaining the natural resource base. Contact: Nina Tracy (202) 720-7033.

TAKING A QUICK LOOK AT SNOWFLAKES -- Sneaking a peek at snowflakes before they melt
could help forecasters make accurate predictions about water supplies from expected mountain
snow melt. But how to keep a snowflake from melting before images of the flake's crystals can
be captured? USDA scientists have solved the problem by deep freezing the flakes at minus
320 degrees Fahrenheit, adding a thin metal coating and then zapping it with an electron beam
inside a scanning electron microscope. The close-ups of the snowflakes offer new data on the
size, shape and melting properties of snow crystals, allowing computer forecasts of expected
water supplies. In addition to determining the amount of water in snowpacks based on the size
and shape of the crystals, it also enables scientists to identify pollutants in the crystals.
Contact: Maria Bynum (202)720-5192.

HAM RECALLED FROM 15 STATES -- A Dubuque, Iowa food processing firm is recalling
almost 9,000 hams because some may contain small pieces of glass. FDL Foods, Inc. is
recalling all 3-pound cans of its "Dubuque Royal Buffet Ham, Water Added" with the code 2234D
or 2234N embossed on the label side of the can. The product was mainly distributed to retail
food stores in Arizona, Illinois, Iowa and Wisconsin, but small amounts of the product may have
been distributed in other states. If consumers have purchased a canned ham they think may
be affected, they can call FDL Foods at their toll-free consumer inquiry number: 1-800-922-
3122. Contact: USDA's Meat and Poultry Hotline (800)535-4555.

AN EEP PACKAGE FOR POULTRY -- USDA officials have put together a multi-country package
of initiatives to encourage sales of U.S. poultry. Under Secretary of Agriculture for Farm and
Foreign Agricultural Services Eugene Moos announced (March 17) the initiatives under USDA's
Export Enhancement Program to encourage sales of 20,500 metric tons of U.S. frozen poultry.
Sales of frozen poultry will be made to buyers through normal commercial channels at
competitive world prices in all countries. That means total sales to all destinations may not
exceed 20,500 metric tons. The export sales will be facilitated with cash bonus payments to
enable U.S. exporters to compete at prevailing prices in these markets. These allocations will
be valid until June 30, 1995. Contact: Priscilla B. Glynn (202) 720-3329.

EEP FOR RICE -- Increasing sales of U.S. rice is the intent of an Export Enhancement Program
(EEP) package offered by the Department of Agriculture. Under Secretary of Agriculture for
Farm and Foreign Agricultural Services Eugene Moos announced (March 17) a 220,000 metric
ton, multi-regional package of initiatives under EEP to boost sales of U.S. rice during the 1995
marketing year. Sales of rice will be made to buyers in all countries announced through normal
commercial channels at competitive world prices. Cash bonus payments to U.S. exporters
should help sales at competitive prevailing prices in these markets. The allocations will be valid
until June 30, 1995. Contact: Priscilla B. Glynn (202) 720-3329.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1973 Get ready for tornado season! In this edition of Agriculture
USA, Lori Spiczka talks with weather experts on the origins of the tornado, what to do if one
strikes and how new weather equipment will help notify people sooner of an impending tornado.
(Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary). **Note to broadcasters: Beginning with
programs aired the week of April 17, Agriculture USA will switch to a shorter, five minute
format.

CONSUMER TIME # 1452 Get connected: a look at a computer education program. Instant
bloom! Early spring lawn care. It's bunny time again Easter egg safety. (Weekly cassette -
consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1964 City dwellers receiving farm payments. Spring is in the air.
Study shows that conservation tillage pays. '95 wheat and feed grain loan rate. (Weekly
cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWS LINE -- Monday, April 3, world horticultural trade and
U.S. exports. Tuesday, April 4, weekly weather and crops. Thursday, April 6, dairy products.
Monday, April 10, world supply and demand for cotton. Tuesday, April 11, world ag supply and
demand; cotton and wool outlook; crop production; world cotton; weekly weather and crops.
Wednesday, April 12, world ag production; world grains trade; world oilseeds trade. Thursday,
April 13, hog outlook. Friday, April 14, milk production. These are USDA reports we know
about in advance. Our NEWS LINE carries many stories every day which are not listed in
this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWS LINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., ET, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

ACTUALITIES Dan Glickman, Agriculture Secretary Designate, appears before Senate
Agriculture Committee in confirmation hearings. USDA Chief Meteorologist Norton Strommen
updates crop and weather conditions nationwide.

UPCOMING FEATURES Lynn Wyvill reports on Easter egg safety. Patrick O'Leary reports
on fighting whiteflies with fungus. Eric Parsons reports on 1995 wheat and feed grain loan
rates.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Thursday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, Telstar 302, Channel 6 (Transponder 3H), (C-band), audio
6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3820 MHZ. Monday, 11:00-11:15 a.m. ET, Galaxy 4, Channel
12 (C-band), audio 6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3940 MHZ.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call Larry
A. Quinn (202)720-6072 or write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 202050-1300.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
34 i|1l68307 47!
OFF MIKE !

CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURIST...honored with the 1995 Distinguished Award was Robert
Mondavi for his outstanding work in viticulture development in the Napa Valley. Walt Shaw
(KHTK, Sacramento, CA) says the Califomia Chapter of Farm Managers and Rural Appraisers
presented the award this week during their Agricultural Outlook Conference. Last year's
recipient was former Secretary of Agriculture Richard Lyng.

EMUS...are big birds that are smaller than ostriches, but lay eggs longer. Hal Hanna (KXEL,
Waterloo, IA) says this week's Hawkeye Farm Show in Cedar Falls, IA, had a booth on emus.
About a dozen Iowa farmers are raising them primarily as a breeding project to increase
availability of these birds. Emus are raised for meat, feathers and oil. Corn growers there are
excited about a new product from corn that is an ethanol-based windshield washer solvent. Hal
was broadcasting live from the show when activity in nearby booths overloaded electrical
circuits temporarily interrupting his coverage. The joys of remote broadcasting!

DAIRY FUTURES...are drawing interest from Wisconsin farmers. Bob Meyer (Goetz Farm
Radio Network, Marshfield, WI) reports that futures contracting began last year on nonfat dry
milk and cheddar cheese through the Coffee, Sugar and Cocoa Exchange in New York. Only
five months can be considered for futures contracting: February, May, July, September and
November. Spring fever has arrived, Bob says, although they experienced a deep frost this
year because of low snowfall. He broadcasts on 45 Wisconsin stations with a 5-6 a.m. live
program and a variety of other agricultural features available via satellite throughout the day.

AGRICULTURE DAY...was celebrated in Minnesota Where 150 farmers were fed breakfast
before a drawing was held for a grand prize that provided all the seed, chemicals and fuel
sufficient to plant 40 acres of corn and 40 acres of soybeans. Value was $6,000, and the winner
was Clair Drescher, a young hog farmer. Al Carstens (KATE, Albert Lea, MN) said farmers
had to register several weeks ahead and 45 other prizes valued from $100-$300 were given.
Al js~ecame grandpa for the second time-first grandson.

LARY INN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communicatlons
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFRFICAL BUSINESS
PrtforPM en lU 30oo









United States Department g fue of Communiatlibs' n ashington, DC 20250-1300


Letter No. 2707 M rch 31,1995
GLICKMAN CONFIR S NEWA LTURE SECRETARY Dan Glickman was
GLICKMAN CONFIRM AS NEW AGRIULTURE SECRETARY Dan Glickman was
confirmed by the Senate b~thaenext iecrtary of Agriculture and then sworn in at the
Department of Agriculture by t tI l reta Richard Rominger. Nominated on December
28 to be the 26th Secretary of Agriculture by President Clinton, Glickman had previously served
for 18 years as a Representative in the U.S. House for the state of Kansas. In his confirmation
hearings, Glickman said he would place a high priority on the upcoming farm bill, the continuing
reorganization of the Department, and "fair play" in the implementation of conservation programs.
Contact: Jim Petterson (202)720-4623.

USDA STEAMS UP FOR TRIAL TESTS A trial run on a steam process to remove
contamination from meat carcasses in slaughter plants was approved by USDA's Food Safety
and Inspection Service. The patented steam vacuum process involves a hot water spray that's
maintained at 180 degrees Fahrenheit. The water is sprayed on to a carcass, which kills some
bacteria and loosens contamination and then the water is vacuumed off. Bacterial samples will
be collected at sites of both vacuuming and trimming procedures to compare the effectiveness
of both methods. Contact: Jacque Knight (202) 720-9113.

TIGHTENED SECURITY IS NEEDED AT CHICKEN COOPS Increased biosecurity and
disease surveillance procedures are being called for by the Department of Agriculture to prevent
the highly pathogenic avian influenza outbreak in Mexico from crossing the border. The recently
formed USDA Avian Influenza Working Group has recommended the immediate reporting of any
flocks with clinical signs of the influenza to state and federal personnel. They also suggest
increased blood sampling and hen monitoring of commercial flocks.. Contact: Kendra Pratt
(301) 734-6573.

WHAT DO YOU EAT, AMERICA? That's the question interviewers will be asking some 6,000
Americans, from young children to the elderly. The survey takes about thirty minutes and the
information will be used for many purposes. The U.S. Department of Agriculture will use the
information for evaluating nutrition programs, predicting demand of agricultural products,
assessing how diets are changing and determining how well Americans are using and
understanding nutrition labels. Contact: Dianne Odland (301) 344-2111.

POTATO GENES DON'T POSE A RISK A line of genetically engineered russet potatoes will
not be regulated by the Department of Agriculture. Determining that the seven Russet Burbank
potato lines of the Monsanto Company don't pose a plant pest risk, USDA won't regulate them
anymore. The potatoes were engineered for resistance to the Colorado potato beetle, the
predominant insect pest of U.S. potatoes. Contact: Cynthia A. Eck (301) 734-5931.








SPECIAL FOODS NEED SPECIAL CARE Whether you're eating, cooking or handling special
foods this holiday, you should pay special attention to their handling needs. USDA's Meat and
Poultry Hotline is open to answer your questions about your Easter or Passover foods. Acting
Director of the hotline, Bessie Berry, has some tips for safe food handling this holiday season.
Be sure to store uncooked lamb, beef and pork in the refrigerator for only three-to five days.
Uncooked poultry, fish and liver will only stay safe for one or two days. Meat should be roasted
at no lower than 325 degrees F. If you purchase pre-cooked foods, make sure the food is hot
when you purchase it, and either refrigerate or eat it immediately. Cold foods should be
refrigerated within two hours. For more Information about food safety, contact USDA's Meat
and Poultry Hotline at 1-800-535-4555.

A LIST FOR THE ORGANICALLY GROWN If you have any suggestions for substances that
should be included on the Department of Agriculture's National List section of the National
Organic Program, USDA would like to hear them. USDA will be accepting recommendations of
possible substances for inclusion in the list until May 29. This list would include approved
synthetic and prohibited natural substances and information about the environmental impact of
either their production or use. Contact: Becky Unkenholz (202) 720-8998.

USDA TOUGHENING LICENSE RENEWALS Renewing an animal welfare license will now
depend on compliance with animal welfare regulations. The Department of Agriculture is
amending it's regulations to require animal dealers, exhibitors and operators of auction sales to
certify that they are in compliance with animal welfare regulations before they can apply for a
license renewal. But USDA will make recordkeeping easier by allowing a variance for a
computerized recordkeeping system. Contact: Cynthia Eck (301) 734-5931.

NAFTA COMPLIANCE CHANGES THE WAY CATTLE ARE IMPORTED -- In order to comply
with provisions of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), duties and bonds on
cattle imported from Mexico have been discontinued. This primarily affects cattle imported from
Mexico into the United States for feeding and returned to Mexico for slaughter. USDA officials
predict that with the new rule in effect, the possible dissemination of animal disease by cattle
remaining in the United States in violation of the regulations would be eliminated. Comments
on the proposal will be accepted until May 15. Contact: Cynthia Eck (301) 734-5931.

A GRAND OPENING IN TEXAS A new plant inspection station opened in Los Indios, Texas.
The Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service opened its fifteenth
station in the United States to help prevent plants carrying pests and diseases from entering the
United States. Each year, around 460 million plants are inspected at these stations around the
country. Contact: Anne Sutton (301) 734-7255.

WEEDING OUT NOXIOUS WEEDS Two weeds would be added to the list of the Department
of Agriculture's noxious weeds if the Department's proposal is approved. Tropical soda apple
and duck lettuce (known as Solanum viarum and Ottelia alismoides, respectively), would be
added to the list. Tropical soda apple causes reduction in usable cattle forage and poses a
significant threat to the cattle industry. The aquatic weed known as duck lettuce threatens the
natural ecosystems of the United States. USDA is also proposing to expand the Federal Seed
Act to include the seeds of all the noxious weeds listed in the Federal Noxious Weed regulations.
If you'd like to comment on either of these proposals, you must do so by April 24. Contact:
Ed Curlett (301) 734-33256.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1974 A safer haven for youngsters at risk is the topic of this week's
Agriculture USA. Gary Crawford travels to low income housing projects in inner cities to find out
about a unique after-school activity program designed to protect and enrich these children.
(Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary). **Note to broadcasters: Beginning with
programs aired the week of April 17, Agriculture USA will switch to a shorter, five minute
format.

CONSUMER TIME # 1453 A new food safety tool for poultry processors. A new look at
snowflakes. The "Dust Bowl" revisited. Steam cleaning the beef. Egg safety. (Weekly cassette
-- consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1985 Snowflake predictions. The new farm bill and dairy.
Controlling the sugar beet maggot. A standing invitation to disease. Fencing in cows could
bring more profit. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWS LINE Monday, April 10, world supply and demand for
cotton. Tuesday, April 11, world ag supply and demand; cotton and wool outlook; crop
production; world cotton; weekly weather and crops. Wednesday, April 12, world ag production;
world grains trade; world oilseeds trade. Thursday, April 13, hog outlook. Friday, April 14, milk
production. Wednesday, April 19, agricultural outlook. Friday, April 21, livestock dairy and
poultry; cattle on feed; livestock slaughter; agricultural trade update. These are USDA reports
we know about in advance. Our NEWS LINE carries many stories every day which are not
listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWS LINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., ET, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES Pat O'Leary reports on new Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman and Lynn
Wyvill reports on food safety tips for handling Easter eggs.

UPCOMING FEATURES Eric Parsons reports on 1995 wheat/feed grains loan rates.

ACTUALITIES USDA meteorologist Norton Strommen on weather and crops and USDA
economist Tom Capehart on U.S. agricultural trade.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Thursday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, Telstar 302, Channel 6 (Transponder 3H), (C-band), audio
6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3820 MHZ. Monday, 11:00-11:15 a.m. ET, Galaxy 4, Channel
12 (C-band), audio 6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3940 MHZ.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn (202)720-6072 or write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFF MIKE .

NEW RADIO CENTER...opens this weekend at USDA. Customized studio, control room and
offices for our radio team of Gary Crawford, Brenda Curtis-Helken and Lori Spiczka Holm
will be operational next week. We'll maintain our daily newsline and continue weekly programs
on schedule. Center is located adjacent to our TV studio in the South Agriculture Building.

TRIVIA WINNERS...got certificates for beef, pork and mid-Illinois farm products last week from
WSMI-FM (Litchfield, IL). Rita Frazer, farm director, asked questions and listeners were
rewarded for the right answers. Also, Rita did interviews with farmers and agribusinesses
throughout February that she used in a special Farmers Appreciation Month campaign on her
station. Eager farmers in her area already had started planting corn last week.

NEW FARM DIRECTOR...for WYRQ (Little Falls, MN) is Sue Morrison. She replaces Kim
Spiczka. Sue is a broadcast journalism graduate from University of Wisconsin-River Falls where
she was farm broadcaster for their college station. Sue and her husband also manage a farm
with more than 200 sheep, beef and diversified crop (corn, soybean, wheat and barley)
operation. Sue also used a trivia contest during Agriculture Week. She developed a series of
30-second agriculture vignettes which included answers to 27 trivia questions asked later in the
day. Winners earned 108-slice packs of Wisconsin cheese. Listener response proved it was
a good way to reach out to non-farm listeners.

SOUTH DAKOTA WINTER...ranked in the top 10 of mildest winters, reports Jim Thoreson
(KWAT, Watertown, SD), but farmers are anxious about spring anyway and optimistic because
of good carryover subsoil moisture from fall rains. Jim has a daily agricultural information hour
from 11 a.m. to noon. "No-till" farming was a topic he was featuring last week because it's
become quite popular in his area. Spring wheat planting should be halfway completed by mid-
April, and corn planting will start in late April.



LARRY A. rUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center



Room 1618S
1hIgno DC 20W501300
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United States Department of Agriculture ug~e Rft nications WM ilAtbn, DC 20250-1300


MAY 311995

Letter No. 2708 1 ersity of Floridpri 7, 1995

"I DON'T LIKE TO MUCK AROU N THE MIDD A CROP YEAR" USDA' new
Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman td at was the he didn't change the corn acreage
reduction percentage from 7.5%. Du conference from the new USDA radio
studio, Glickman talked about his priorities culture Secretary, the farm bill timetable
and the importance of export programs. He says his priorities are to preserve the basic
commodity programs, to keep the export programs in place and to keep the food nutrition
programs working. He also wants to balance the environmental needs of the country with those
of its people. Glickman said he and his staff are working on farm bill proposals right now and
he expects to present them to Congress in the next 30 days. He said he expects those
proposals to make it through the committees in June, to be on the floor before the August
congressional recess and finished by September 30. As to the future of U.S. agricultural
programs, Glickman says that lies in the sale of value-added and bulk commodities, and
continuing the Export Enhancement Program. Contact: Jim Petterson (202) 720-4623.

CHICKEN DINNERS RECALLED FROM 29 STATES -- The presence of pieces of hard plastic
in some chicken dinners is the reason for the Campbell Soup Company to recall all 9-ounce
packages of its "Swanson Kids Fun Feast Chompin' Chicken Drumlets." The dinners were
distributed in 29 states around the country and feature breaded chicken nugget patties, mashed
potatoes, corn and a brownie. The recall was prompted when 3 people in three different states
found hard plastic in the product. The decision was made to recall all 62,000 dinners from a full
day of production. Consumers are urged to return the product to the place they purchased it
from, or contact either the Swanson Frozen Foods inquiry line at 1-800-637-7698 or USDA's
Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-800-535-4555. Contact: Stephen Lombardi (202) 720-9113.

PLANTING THAT IS AS LIGHT AS A FEATHER Now farmers can determine just how hard
or how soft they want their ground tamped down after planting. An attachment was developed
by Agriculture Research Service Engineer Lyle Carter that allows growers to plant their seeds
at the right depth and the right pressure for compacting the soil. The attachment, which is
bolted to a tractor's tool bar frame, could boost seedling survival. The hydraulically controlled
tool is the only one of its kind that allows growers to set the controls for each of these two
functions. Carter says, "It can give you as much force as you need to cut a slot for seeds in
hard, dry soil...But it can be feather light-if necessary-when covering the newly planted seed."
The hydraulics on the device automatically readjust depth and pressure to the preset levels as
the tractor moves across the field. Conventional depth-control devices can't be easily readjusted
on the go. Having adjustable depth control could boost the seedling survival rate since
emerging seedlings that are buried too deep may die before they reach sunlight because they
use up all their food reserves. Contact: Lyle M. Carter (805) 746-6391.







2
ON THE ROAD TO THE WHITE HOUSE Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman will host six
rural forums around the country to discuss the issues facing rural families and communities.
Glickman will be on hand at each of the forums to be held in California, Texas, Pennsylvania,
Georgia, North Dakota and Illinois. He will be joined by President Bill Clintorrat the National
Rural Conference April 25 to be held in Ames, Iowa. Contact: Jim Petterson (202) 720-4623.

WOOL AND MOHAIR PRICE SUPPORT RATES ANNOUNCED Price support payments to
wool and mohair producers are set to be issued in mid-April. USDA announced the 1994
marketing year price support payment rates for shorn wool, wool on unshorn lambs (pulled
wool) and mohair. The shorn wool support payment of 167.9 percent brings the 1994 average
wool price of $.78 per pound up to the support level of $2.09 per pound. The payment rate for
wool on unshorn lambs is set at $5.24 per hundredweight. The mohair support price for the
1994 marketing year is $4.739 per pound and the payment rate is 85.1 percent. Price support
payments won't be made to producers who received more than four times the national average
price. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

LEGS AND DRUMSTICKS MAY JOIN THE FLOCK A test is underway to see if chicken legs
and drumsticks should be graded the same way boneless poultry breasts, thighs and
tenderloins, and skinless carcasses and parts are. USDA received grading requests from
processors who market these ungraded products. The processors feel there is an advantage
to marketing grade-identified poultry products since consumers rely on the USDA grade mark
as an assurance of quality. Poultry grading is a voluntary program provided on a fee-for-service
basis. The test period will end April 1, 1996. Contact: Gil High (202) 720-8998.

DAN GLICKMAN BECAME THE 26TH SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE ON MARCH 30.


U.S. Secretaries of Agriculture
Name Dates in Office
Norman Jay Coleman Feb. 15, 1889 March 6, 1889
Jeremiah McLain Rusk March 6, 1889 March 6, 1893
Julius Sterling Morton March 7, 1893 March 5, 1897
James Wilson March 6, 1897 March 5, 1913
David Franklin Houston March 6, 1913 Feb. 2, 1920
Edwin Thomas Meredith Feb. 2, 1920 March 4, 1921
Henry Cantwell Wallace March 5, 1921 Oct. 25, 1924
Howard Mason Gore Nov. 22, 1924- March4, 1925'
William Marion Jardine March 5, 1925 March 4, 1929
Arthur Mastick Hyde March 6, 1929 March 4, 1933
Henry Agard Wallace March 4, 1933 Sept. 4, 1940
Claude Raymond Wickard Sept. 5, 1940 June 29, 1945
Clinton Presbe Anderson June 30, 1945 May 10, 1948
Charles Franklin Brannan June 2, 1948 Jan. 20. 1953
Ezra Taft Benson Jan. 21, 1953 Jan. 20, 1961
Orville Lothrop Freeman Jan. 21, 1961 Jan. 20, 1969
Clifford Morris Hardin Jan. 21, 1969 Nov. 17, 1971
Earl Lauer Butz Dec. 2, 1971 Oct. 4, 1976
John Albert Knebel Nov. 4, 1976 Jan. 20, 1977
Bob Bergland Jan. 23, 1977 Jan. 20, 1981
John Rusling Block Jan. 23, 1981 Feb. 14, 1986
Richard Edmund Lyng March 7, 1986 Jan. 21, 1989
Clayton Yeutter Feb. 16, 1989 March 1, 1991
Edward Rell Madigan Mar. 12, 1991 Jan. 20, 1993
Mike Espy Jan. 22, 1993 Dec. 31, 1994


Home State
Missouri
Wisconsin
Nebraska
Iowa
Missouri
Iowa
Iowa
W. Virginia
Kansas
Missouri
Iowa
Indiana
New Mexico
Colorado
Utah
Minnesota
Nebraska
Indiana
Virginia
Minnesota
Illinois
California
Nebraska
Illinois
Mississippi








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1975 A conversation with the new Agriculture Secretary Dan
Glickman is the focus of this week's edition of Agriculture USA. **Note to broadcasters:
Beginning with programs aired the week of April 17, Agriculture USA will switch to a
shorter, five minute format.

CONSUMER TIME # 1454 The new Agriculture Secretary talks about the Forest Service.
Safety testing for new veterinary drugs. Help for rural communities. Landscaping with annuals
and perennials. Potato trends. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1966 The new Agriculture Secretary outlines his new farm policy.
Plans for planting. Pesta pasta packs a parasite. Reducing risk by diversifying. China, a giant
of a market. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWS LINE Wednesday, April 19, agricultural outlook.
Friday, April 21, livestock, dairy and poultry; cattle on feed; livestock slaughter; agricultural trade
update. Tuesday, April 25, weather and crops. Wednesday, April 26, floriculture. Thursday,
April 27, tobacco markets and trade. Friday, April 28, agricultural prices; catfish production.
These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our NEWS LINE carries many stories
every day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWS LINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., ET, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES Eric Parsons reports on 1995 wheat/feed grains loan rates.

UPCOMING FEATURES Patrick O'Leary reports on USDA research on controlling white flies
with natural fungus.

ACTUALITIES Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman sworn in at the White House, April 5.
USDA Economist Tom Capehart on the U.S. agricultural trade surplus. USDA Under Secretary
for Natural Resources and Environment, James Lyons, announces interim USDA wetlands
delineation policy.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Thursday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, Telstar 302, Channel 6 (Transponder 3H), (C-band), audio
6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3820 MHZ. Monday, 11:00-11:15 a.m. ET, Galaxy 4, Channel
12 (C-band), audio 6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3940 MHZ.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn (202)720-6072 or write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 202050-1300.






4 3
OFF MIKE 1

SECRETARY GLICKMAN...was the first studio guest in our new radio center. The entire move
of studio and office equipment was completed and technical transition was done between 5:00
p.m. last Friday and 11:00 a.m. Tuesday morning when Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman
held a news conference from the new location via our teleconference bridge with farm
broadcasters around the country. Brenda Curtis-Heiken, Lori Spiczka Holm and Gary
Crawford spent many of their weekend hours here helping us to settle in to the new home for
our radio team. We moved from the Administration Building to a location adjacent to our TV
studio in the South Agriculture Building.

TV INTERVIEWS...with Secretary Glickman were done live via satellite from our TV studio last
Friday with 11 TV stations. This was at the end of the Secretary's second day in office. In his
interviews, Glickman said he would be traveling to six regional Rural Forum sites this month in
Texas, North Dakota, Georgia, California, Pennsylvania and Illinois. Secretary Glickman will join
President Clinton for a National Rural Forum in Ames, IA on April 25.

VISITORS THIS WEEK...included Al Pell, news anchor, and Don Greene, producer for Ag Day
Television Network (South Bend, IN) who were here to interview Secretary Glickman and
videotaped the first live event from our radio studio. Last week, Pam Jahnke-Welch (WTSO,
Madison, WI) witnessed Secretary Glickman's welcome by USDA employees and caught him for
an interview after the ceremony.

AGRICULTURE HEARING...will be held in Dodge City, KS, on April 26, reports Rex Childs
(KFDI-AM/FM, Wichita, KS). This is one of four meetings the full House Agriculture Committee
is conducting around the country in preparation for 1995 Farm Bill discussions. Rex says 73-
degree temperatures this week were making the wheat crop look great with some plants already
reaching the "jointin stage.



LARRY QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Pelly for Priva Use $300










United States Department of Agriculture munications Washington, DC 20251300


( Marston Science
MAY 17 1995 y 11
Letter No. 2709 MA April 14 1995

COMING SOON TO A TOWN N A gul e Segeqaitpd ift Aman will host six
regional forums to hear about the street of America's rural roots. The firtt forum
will be held on April 17 in Davis, California. other will follow in Abilene, Texas on April 18;
Leesport, Pennsylvania on April 19; Fort Valley, Georgi on April 20; Bismarck, North Dakota on
April 21 and Edwardsville, Illinois oh. April 24. The forums lead up to the National Rural
Conference at Iowa State University on April 25 in Ames, Iowa. Glickman is hoping to gather
ideas to help him advise President Clinton on several issues, among them the writing of the 1995
farm bill. These forums are open to the public. Contact: Jim Petterson (202) 720-4623.

NO MARKETING QUOTA FOR 1996 WHEAT Until new farm legislation is enacted, the
Department of Agriculture cannot offer a marketing quota for the 1996 wheat crop. The
amendment to the 1949 Agricultural Act authorized price support and production adjustments
for the 1991 through 1995 crops of wheat. Until the new farm bill is enacted, USDA officials must
follow the provisions of the 1938 Act, requiring no marketing quota for the 1996 wheat crop
unless the total supply of crop would be excessive without it. Given current supply and demand
projections, no quota could be issued. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

COTTON STOCKS TIGHTER, WHEAT STOCKS HIGHER The outlook for cotton is a little
tighter than previously thought, but consumption is also lower. In their latest report on
agricultural world supply and demand, USDA officials predict ending stocks of two million bales,
a drop of five percent from last month. Ending stocks of wheat are projected at 10 million
bushels higher than last month, well below the carrying level. Wheat exports are down, but feed
and residual use is up. Food use continues to trail expectations, but prices remain unchanged
at $3.40 to $3.50 per bushel. Corn stocks are expected to be down 22 million bushels from last
month, with imports and exports both up. The price range for corn is forecast at $2.20 to $2.30
per bushel. Oats and barley exports are also projected to be higher, but sorghum looks to be
down 10 million bushels. The forecast for soybean ending stocks was lowered, but still remain
above normal commercial needs. Contact: Gerald Bange (202) 720-8651.

TASK FORCE TO BE FORMED An apparent conflict of interest caught his eye during his
confirmation hearings, and that's the reason Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman asked for a task
force to evaluate the Forest Service. Glickman asked Under Secretary for Natural Resources
and Environment Jim Lyons to establish a task force to evaluate the statutes, regulations and
policies guiding the activities of the Forest Service. Glickman wants recommendations for
streamlining, reducing conflicts and redundancy, and improving cost efficiency. A full report is
expected by June 1, 1995. Contact: Jim Petterson (202) 720-4623.








CROP REPORTS SURFING THE INTERNET -- More than 400 USDA reports will be placed on
the Internet each year, within three hours of their release by the department. USDA is working
with Cornell University to make crop estimates and economic forecasts available worldwide,
providing direct access for millions of people. Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman says this
helps level the playing field for market participants. USDA will continue to issue reports by
various other electronic means. For e-mail addresses, contact Jim Horsfield at (202) 219-0698.
Also joining the information superhighway is a database that allows better assessment of the
water pollution potential of 230 of the most widely used pesticides. That could help farmers,
pesticide companies, water resource managers and environmental groups get a better
understanding of how and where pesticides may threaten water quality. Contact: Maria
Bynum (202) 720-9152.

THE 1995 PEANUT CROP GETS SUPPORT -- The average support levels for the '95 crop of
peanuts were announced by the Department of Agriculture. The support levels are divided by
type, quality and location of the crop, and are based on the national price support level of
$678.36 per short ton for quota peanuts and $132 per short ton of additional peanuts. The
quota support levels for each type are: $673.99 for Virginia and Southwest Valencia; $636.45
for Spanish and other Valencias; $682.74 for Runner peanuts. The loan value for additional
peanuts is 19.46% of the quota support level. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

SUGAR MARKETING ALLOTMENTS WILL CONTINUE After looking at how much sugar
Americans consume, produce, import and how many stocks are on hand, Agriculture Secretary
Dan Glickman has determined that sugar marketing allotments should continue for fiscal year
1995. Based on current supply, demand and prices, reasonable ending stocks were forecast.
Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

USDA SETS THE DATE The Department of Agriculture will poll soybean producers on July
26 to see if they want to conduct a referendum on whether refunds of soybean assessments
should be continued. The assessments are used to support soybean research and promotion
efforts. If results indicate a referendum is not supported, refunds will be discontinued when
USDA announces the poll results. Polling will be conducted at Consolidated Farm Service
Agency (CFSA) county offices (formerly known as Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation
Service), and only those producers who support holding a refund referendum are asked to
participate. Absentee forms are available through the mail, or in person, between June 19
through July 14 from CFSA offices. These forms must be postmarked or returned no later than
July 14. If at least 20 percent of the soybean producers participate in the poll, a refund
referendum will be held. If that is mandated, refunds will continue until the referendum is held.
Contact: Becky Unkenholz (202) 720-8998.

NO SOUR GRAPES HERE -- It's a scientific first scored by USDA scientists working on
seedless grapes. The scientists are now able to insert a new gene into Thompson Seedless
grapes, hopefully giving them built-in protection against a common grape virus, Tomato ringspot.
That could ultimately decrease economic losses in the industry and reduce the amount of
chemicals put into the environment. After the appropriate clearances from USDA's Animal and
Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA scientists plan to screen the new gene-carrying
grapevines for resistance to the virus in greenhouse and field tests later this year. The
genetically transformed grapevines may eventually be placed in other grape varieties, and could
pave the way for plant breeders to improve the disease and insect resistance of all major grape
varieties. Contact: Maria Bynum (202) 720-5192.









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE


AGRICULTURE USDA #1976 Look out, here comes baby In this edition of Agriculture USA,
Lori Spiczka talks with experts about the dangers to children in our homes and how to go about
child-proofing your home. **Note to broadcasters: This is the last Installment of
Agriculture USA to run 13:30. Beginning with next week's tape, the feature will switch to
its new length of 5 minutes.

CONSUMER TIME #1455 A less costly grilling season. W.I.C. works. It brings tears to your
eyes: pollen counts are higher this year. A Native American sunflower. Under the counter
birds. (Weekly consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1967 -- Wetlands delineations are on hold for a while. Beef export
outlook'~ood. A tight cotton situation. A changing Russian market. Farmers and bats. (Weekly
agriculture features).

UPCOMING ON USDA'S RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tuesday, April 25, weather and crops.
Wednesday, April 26, floriculture. Thursday, April 27, tobacco markets and trade. Friday, April
28, agricultural prices; catfish production. Monday, May 1, world horticultural trade and U.S.
export opportunities. Tuesday, May 2, weekly weather and crops updates; poultry production
and value. Friday, May 5, dairy products update. These are the USDA reports we know
about in advance. Our NEWSLINE carries many stories every day which are not listed in
this lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or (202) 720-8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m. ET each working day.



FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE


ACTUALITIES Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman talks about his upcoming regional and
national rural conferences. USDA Acting Under Secretary for RECD Michael Dunn on the rural
conferences and USDA's role in rural revitalization. Norton Strommen with weekly weather and
crop update.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:
Thursday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, Telstar 302, C-band, Channel 6 (Transponder 3H), audio
6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3820 MHz. Monday, 11:00-11:15 a.m. ET, Galaxy 4, Channel
12 (C-band), audio 6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3940 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast programming. Call
Larry A. Quinn (202) 720-6072 or write USDA 1618-S, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.








4
OFF MIKE

A BIT OF BROADCAST HISTORY...came this week in a postcard from Layne Beaty, former
USDA Radio/TV Chief. Our weekly documentary, Agriculture USA, will be streamlined from 13-
1/2 minutes to 5 minutes beginning this week based on broadcasters comments in our recent
surveys. Layne says that the program was already going in January 1955 when he arrived at
USDA so it survived more than 40 years at that length. It all began after President Eisenhower
met with representatives of the Clear Channel Broadcasting Service (CCBS) and gained his
blessing for a joint USDA-CCBS service. Jack Towers was the original producer with help from
Hollis Seavey of the CCBS. We hope Agriculture USA will enjoy another 40 years of useful
service at the new length.

FARM BROADCASTER NEWS TEAM...of 10-15 reporters will be covering the series of six
National Rural Forums hosted by Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman starting next week,
reports Gary Wergin (KFEQ, St. Joseph, MO). They will cover the National Rural Conference,
April 25, in Ames, IA with President Clinton and Secretary Glickman and upcoming on-location
hearings of House and Senate Agriculture Committees as well for their Farm Broadcaster News
Service. Our USDA Radio and TV news teams will be busy providing coverage of the rural
forums as well for our daily radio newsline and weekly TV satellite newsfeeds.

NEW LOCATION...and an expansion of radio and TV services were reported by Bill Whittom
(Farm Times Broadcasting, Sagle, ID). His programming now goes to 49 radio stations and nine
TV stations. He tells the agriculture story in Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Nevada, Utah,
Washington and California. With his partner, Evan Slack (Evan Slack Network, Denver, CO),
Bill covers an area from the Mississippi River west to nearly the Pacific Ocean. Bill once was a
USDA public information specialist here in Washington and now is actively involved in his own
cattle business in his spare time.



LiARRY, QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculure
Office of Communications
Room 1618-
Washinton, DC 20250-1300
ORM CLBUSINESS
PnMayforPrisalUt$300









United States Department of


y:Bniversity of Florida
SEVEN STATES IN NINE DAYS Th agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman has
to keep as he tours the country for six regi stp rums. The trek started in Davjs, California
on April 17, and ends with the National Rural Conference in Ames, Iowa on April 26. Stops on
the way to the national conference include Abilene, Texas, where the Secretary expects topics
to include general agriculture and trade. Leesport, Pennsylvania is the third stop on the tour,
where topics include nutrition and conservation. Fort Dodge, Georgia was the fourth stop, where
issues include rural development and education. The stop in Bismarck, North Dakota focuses
on production agriculture, family farms, commodity programs and Native American issues. The
last stop before the national conference is in Edwardsville, Illinois. Topics on the agenda include
rural development and general agricultural issues. Once Secretary Glickman reaches the
National Rural Conference at Iowa State University, he will be joined by President Clinton.
Contact: Jim Petterson (202) 720-4623.

MILK PRODUCERS VOTED FOR A CHANGE The way milk is priced will change on June
1st. Milk producers around the country voted for a change in the way their milk marketing
orders are priced. Patricia Jensen, the acting assistant secretary for USDA's Marketing and
Regulatory Programs, says the new pricing series should provide a more reliable basic price
formula that reflects the actual price paid for Grade B milk. The current Minnesota-Wisconsin
(M-W) price series will be replaced with a "base-month" M-W price series. That would base the
price on a survey of more than 160 plants that purchase more than 300 million pounds of Grade
B milk. That also makes it statistically more reliable than the current price. The pay-price series
will use an updating formula to adjust for changes in butter, dry milk powder and cheese
products and should reflect more current marketing conditions. However, Jensen doesn't expect
this to be a long term solution. Contact: Becky Unkenholz (202) 720-8998.

PROTECTING SEEDS OF PROGRESS Developers of 23 new varieties of seed-reproduced
plants received certificates of protection from the Department of Agriculture. New plants include
barley, bluegrass, corn, muskmelon, peas, pepper, rice, soybean and wheat. The developers
now have exclusive rights in the United States to reproduce, sell, import and export their
products for 18 years. USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service administers the plant variety and
protection program which provides marketing protection to developers of new seed-reproduced
plants ranging from farm crops to flowers. Contact: Alicia L. Ford (202) 720-8998.

AgNewsFax -- You can get USDA radio and TV programming information and the Broadcasters
Letter through your fax machine. Use your fax telephone to call (202) 690-3944. At voice
prompts press 1, then 4. For Broadcasters Letter, press 9200; radio newsline information, press
9250; TV contents, press 9260. Then press #, 3 and the start button on your FAX machine.


. I








NOTHING SWEETER THAN 3000 YEAR OLD HONEY BEES Museum curators hovered as
a USDA scientist removed pieces of 3,000-year-old honey bees imbedded in beeswax. The
beeswax was among the priceless artifacts at the Egyptian Museum in Torino, Italy. USDA
scientist Steve Sheppard brought fragments back from the museum to the Agricultural Research
Service Laboratory in Beltsville, Maryland, hoping they will help shed light on the honey bee's
evolution. The goal is to see if a genetic fingerprint is there in the form of DNA, or
deoxyribonucleic acid. If it is found, Sheppard will then compare that centuries old sequence
with that of the same honey bee races today. That could help scientists determine the rate of
genetic material change and how the honey bee diversified into the 25 known races. Scientists
are also hoping this research leads to taking out of circulation such crop destroying pests as
Mediterranean fruit flies, corn earworms, mosquitoes, sweetpotato whiteflies, biting midges,
Indianmeal moths and potato leafhoppers. Contact: Sean Adams (301) 344-2514.

A WAR OF THE WORMS A war is on against three types of worms: the corn earworm,
cotton bollworm or tomato fruitworm, known in the scientific world as Heliocoverpa zea.
Entomologists with USDA's Agricultural Research Service are working out of their Areawide Pest
Management Research Unit in College Station, Texas. When they hear that their enemy is on
the move, they hit them with their computer-equipped vans, radar, weather balloons and aircraft
to track the invaders. They gather information about their strength and capabilities, hoping their
research will lead to timely alarms for potential victims, and eventually, foiling their plans all
together. Peter Lngren is one of the entomologists on the research team. He says corn and
cotton are not the only crops these pests go after. He estimates that annual losses of more than
$125 million worth of horticultural crops can be credited to this worm. Lingren's mission right
now is to find out what the adult worms like to eat and then replace that with a deadly artificial
substitute. He says for every female adult that is stopped, the potential for 1,000 more worms
is eliminated. Contact: Sandy Miller Hays (301) 344-2514.

SOY INK HAS COME A LONG WAY Just seven years ago, the Agricultural Research Service
(ARS) began developing soy inks to help newspaper publishers. When the Newspaper
Association of America teamed up with the American Soybean Association, they asked for help
from ARS. They wanted a soybean-based ink to reduce reliance on petroleum based inks, they
wanted more environmentally friendly inks and they wanted an ink that was cost-competitive.
ARS delivered a soy ink that wasn't 100 percent degradable, but better than the alternative.
Since then, USDA chemists have developed soy ink formulas that use more oil, less pigment,
making it more degradable and more desirable. This could even make compliance with the
Clean Air Act easier for printers. In 1994 tests, it was found that the new ink is five times as
degradable as petroleum based commercial inks, degrading 80 percent in just 25 days. Only
16 percent of a petroleum based ink degraded in the allotted 25 days. Various ink formulations
are now being tested for biodegradability. Contact: Linda Cooke (301) 344-2514.

USDA IS UP ON THE INTERNET You can now access this, and many other USDA
documents, through the Internet information system. To access this document via Internet, all
you need to do is point your gopher to esusda.gov and a menu selection will appear, or you can
send an e-mail message to almanac@esusda.gov. The single line message should read:
send(space)USDA-releases(space)help. Retrieval instructions and a list of documents currently
available will appear. If you need more help, you can contact Maria Bynum at (202) 720-
5192.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1977 In this edition of Agriculture USA, Brenda Curtis looks at a
landscaping technique that is becoming more and more popular--xeriscaping. (Weekly 5:00
documentary feature).

CONSUMER TIME #1456 Keeping National Forests alive. Higher clothing costs on the
way? Municipal water and sewer versus well and septic tank systems. Food and drug
interactions. Landscaping for the environment. (Weekly consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1968 Manure digester reduces odor. Farmers and bats. Success
and challenges for the strawberry industry. A food export supermarket. Cotton prices and
quotas. (Weekly agriculture features).

UPCOMING ON USDA'S RADIO NEWSLINE Monday, May 1, world horticultural trade and
U.S. export opportunities. Tuesday, May 2, weekly weather and crops updates; poultry
production and value. Friday, May 5, dairy products update. Tuesday, May 9, weekly weather
and crops. Wednesday, May 10, world agricultural supply and demand for cotton. Thursday,
May 11, world agricultural supply and demand; cotton and wool outlook; crop production report.
Friday, May 12, world agricultural production; grains and oilseeds world markets and trade; feed
outlook; oil crops outlook; rice outlook; wheat outlook. These are the USDA reports we know
about in advance. Our NEWSLINE carries many stories every day which are not listed in
this lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or (202) 720-8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m. ET each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES Lynn Wyvill reports on making National Forests accessible for everyone. (Repeat
without narration).

ACTUALITIES USDA Secretary Dan Glickman listens to Americans at regional forums. USDA
World Board Chairman Gerald Bange on the corn and soybean outlook.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Thursday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, Telstar 302, C-band, Channel 6 (Transponder 3H), audio
6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3820 MHz. Monday, 11:00-11:15 a.m. ET, Galaxy 4, Channel
12 (C-band), audio 6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3940 MHz.





SUNIViOF LORIA


OFF MIKE

BIKING AND REPORTING...is on Von Ketelsen's (KOEL, Oelwein, IA) schedule May 6 when
he will broadcast live reports during a 75-mile bike ride near the small Iowa town of Hawkeye.
He says the day will conclude with German food, polkas, folks and fun. On April 25, Von plans
to join broadcasters covering the National Rural Conference with President Clinton, Vice
President Gore and Secretary Glickman in Ames, IA. Von has been on-the-air for KOEL for more
than six years.

COLD DAMAGE TO WHEAT...in southwest Kansas may affect an estimated 2-6 million acres,
reports Lory Williams (KGNO/KOLS-FM, Dodge City, KS). Cold spell two weeks ago inflicted
the damage, and weather this week continues cool and damp so full effect is not yet known.
One of the largest agricultural shows in the nation is scheduled in Garden City, KS, April 27-29.
It's the "3-i Show" which stands for irrigation, industry and implements and is sponsored by the
Western Kansas Manufacturing Association. More than 700 booths are expected. The show
alternates between this year's location and Great Bend, KS. Lory is a 25-year broadcasting
veteran who's been the KGNO Agriculture Director for the past 1-1/2 years.

RETURNING TO ILLINOIS...from a three-year broadcasting stint in Wisconsin is Mike Perrine
(WKAN, Kankakee, IL) who became their Farm Service Director April 3. Mike held a similar
position at WIBU in Poynette, WI. Previously, he worked for WLDS and WJIL in Jacksonville, IL,
and was an associate farm service director with Tribune Radio Networks. Mike's phone number
is 815-935-9561.

HONOR ROLL..status has been earned by Hugh Robinson (KTMO/KBOA, Kennett, MO).
Recently, Hugh was added to the Extension Leader's Honor Roll by the President of University
of Missouri for "helping develop and carry out local extension programs."



LARRY QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agrculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFRFCL BUSINESS
Paly for Prie Use $300










United States Department of A


NATIONAL RURAL CONFERE o LD p IN I g sPof forums around the
country, Agriculture Secretary Dan ian ji President Bill Clinton for a Nhtional Rural
Conference in Ames, Iowa. Secretary 6 Said key messages they received were needs
for greater flexibility in farm programs and advice that the administration can't adopt a "one size
fits all" approach when writing the 1995 farm bill. President Clinton laid out eight principles he
will use in writing that farm bill. They include maintaining the foundation of the farm economy,
expanding markets and rural economic opportunity, promoting stewardship of America's
resources, science and research, ensuring a safe food supply, healthy diets and marketing
American agriculture. Glickman is hopeful farm bill proposals will be before Congress in a few
weeks. Contact: Jim Petterson (202) 720-4623.

CONSERVATION RESERVE PROGRAM CHANGES -- Saying he hopes it will give farmers
more flexibility, Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman announced three major changes in the
Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). Producers whose CRP contracts expire on September
30, 1995 will have the option of extending that contract for one year. Secondly, if producers
choose not to extend and want to plant on that CRP land, USDA will modify program
requirements covering it for fall seeding preparation. The third change will give farmers a one-
time chance to remove all or part of their acreage from the program. Released acreage will be
replaced with land having higher environmental quality. For more information about these CRP
changes, contact the nearest Consolidated Farm Service Agency office. Contact: Bryce
Merkle (202) 720-8206.

USDA AND CANADIAN GRAIN COMMISSION SIGN AGREEMENT -- The U.S. Department
of Agriculture and the Canadian Grain Commission (CGC) signed an agreement authorizing CGC
to inspect and weigh U.S. grain in Canada on USDA's behalf. USDA hopes this will further
contain the cost of official services by eliminating the need to maintain a staff in Canada. Among
other services, the CGC will provide grain sampling, stowage examination, grain inspection and
grain weighing. USDA will oversee and issue official certificates. Contact: Dana Stewart (202)
720-5091.

THEY CAN'T WORM THEIR WAY OUT OF THIS ONE! -- An environmentally friendly way to
get rid of not-so-friendly corn earworms has been developed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture
entomologist. The corn earworm damages a variety of crops, mostly corn and cotton. But a
newly discovered virus causing sterility in corn earworms could help save those crops. Ashok
Raina with USDA's Agricultural Research Service, found the virus that infects only the moth's
reproductive system and sterilizes 70 to 80 percent of the corn earworm population to which it
is introduced. Those moths with low level infections that are still able to reproduce pass on the
virus. Scientists are hoping the virus causes sterility in related pests like the legume podborer,
tobacco budworm and fall armyworm. Contact: Sean Adams (301) 344-2723.








REVISED PL-480 ALLOCATIONS FOR 1995 -- The Department of Agriculture officials revised
their fiscal year 1995 Public Law 480 country allocations, reflecting a proposed cut of $60.2
million in program level and $50 million in budget authority for the year. Since the original
announcement in January, allocations have been eliminated for. lbania, El Salvador, Guatemala,
Morocco and Yemen. Reductions were made for the former Yugoslavia Republic of Macedonia
and the Philippines. Congressional action is required to approve the revised appropriations.
Contact: Glenn Kaup (202) 720-3329.

THIRD TIME A CHARM? -- For thethird time, high cotton priceq have triggered a special import
quota to permit importing cotton equaling one week's worth-bf domestic mill use. The quota
applies to upland cotton purchased not later July 24, 1995 and in the U.S. no later than October
22, 1995. Cotton imported under this special quota is not subject to the over-quota tariff rate.
This special import quota will permit 103,082,657 pounds of upland cotton to be imported.
Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

BACKGROUND FOR FARM BILL DEBATE -- The first of 12 background reports on the 1995
farm bill were released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Outlining the likely parameters
of the farm bill debate, these reports offer policy options, policy history and the current state of
a particular commodity. The first four reports released by USDA deal with tobacco, peanuts,
dairy and honey. Coming are reports on federal marketing orders, commodities such as cotton,
sugar, wheat, rice, feed grains, and oilseeds, and on the agricultural export programs. Reports
can be ordered by calling 1-800-999-6779. Cost of reports varies depending on length.
Contact: Linda Hatcher (202) 219-0519.

NEW USES FOR AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS -- What does diesel fuel made from vegetables,
windshield washer fluid made from corn and tree-free paper have in common? They are just a
few of the things made from agricultural products displayed by USDA's Alternative Agricultural
Research and Commercialization (AARC) Center during a recent Earth Month display. Created
by Congress in 1990, the purpose of the AARC Center is to expedite development and market
penetration of industrial products made from agricultural and forestry products and animal by-
products. The center helps the private sector to bridge the gap between research and
commercialization. Preference is given to projects that benefit rural communities and are
environmentally friendly. Other products on display included low value wool used to absorb
waste oil, milkweed floss used in pillows and comforters and various products used in building
materials. Contact: Ron Buckhalt (202) 690-1624.

UPDATING EGG AND EGG PRODUCT INSPECTIONS -- A proposal to clarify and update egg
and egg products inspection regulations is being offered by USDA.. This should bring
inspections in line with new technology and current production and processing practices. The
proposed revisions would redefine dirty eggs, define washed eggs and clarify facilities and
equipment to be provided to graders and inspectors. Also, labeling requirements for imported
eggs and egg products would be clarified, and it would provide for less than quarterly visits to
hatcheries. The Egg Products Inspection Act requires continuous USDA inspection of any plant
that processes egg products. No egg products processor may operate without the inspection
service assuring consumers of wholesome, unadulterated and properly labeled and packaged
eggs and egg products. Comments on this proposal need to be submitted to the appropriate
office by June 23. Contact: Becky Unkenholz (202) 720-8998.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1978 The National Rural Conference held in Iowa is the topic of this
week's Agriculture USA. Gary Crawford highlights the concerns rural Americans talked about
with President Bill Clinton, Vice President Al Gore and Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman.
(Weekly 5:00 documentary feature).

CONSUMER TIME #1457 -- Mice problems. Turning green into black. A recycled new home.
Chemicals and your lawn. Transforming rural health care. (Weekly consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1969 Major changes in the Conservation Reserve Program.
Looking at the inner-workings of a livestock auction. Getting ready for the 1995 farm bill. USDA
is looking for a producer to help make a filler and bulking agent known as "Alternan." Hog
sector concerns. Looking at the what concerns those in the hog sector. (Weekly agriculture
features).

UPCOMING ON USDA'S RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tuesday, May 9, weekly weather and crops.
Wednesday, May 10, world agricultural supply and demand for cotton. Thursday, May 11, world
agricultural supply and demand; cotton and wool outlook; crop production report. Friday, May
12, world agricultural production; grains and oilseeds world markets and trade; feed outlook; oil
crops outlook; rice outlook; wheat outlook. Monday, May 15, cattle and sheep outlook.
Tuesday, May 16, farm labor; milk production and income; poultry outlook; weekly weather and
crops. Friday, May 19, agricultural outlook; cattle on feed; livestock slaughter. These are the
USDA reports we know about in advance. Our NEWSLINE carries many stories every day
which are not listed in this lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or (202) 720-8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m. ET each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE


ACTUALITIES Agriculture Secretary speaks with farmers at various rural forums. President
Clinton, Vice President Al Gore and Secretary Glickman attend National Rural Conference. Paul
Johnson, Chief of the Natural Resources and Conservation Service talks about changes in the
Conservation Reserve Program.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Thursday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, Telstar 302, C-band, Channel 6 (Transponder 3H), audio
6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3820 MHz. Monday, 11:00-11:15 a.m. ET, Galaxy 4, Channel
12 (C-band), audio 6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3940 MHz.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
4 3
OFF MIKE

48 YEARS IN BROADCASTING...45 of those in the Black Hills of South Dakota will be the
milestone reached May 1 by Verne Sheppard (KTOQ\KICK, Rapid City, SD) as he discontinues
his morning radio and farm/ranch TV reports. Verne does plan to do some radio work from
time to time later on KTOQ. His station will continue use of our weekly radio feature, Agriculture
USA.

FARM SERIES IN THE NEWS...is a new feature that Vicki Eilers (WTAD, Quincy, IL) is
producing in cooperation with her radio news director. This week's story advised the public on
safety tips they should practice during this active, spring planting season when farmers are
moving equipment on the roads. Features are 1-2 minutes in length and run during a 5-7 minute
local newscast. Vicki said farmers are getting anxious for the rain to quit so they can complete
spring planting.

RECORD COTTON PLANTINGS...are planned in Mississippi. John Winfield (Mississippi
Network, Jackson, MS) says 1.5 million acres are expected to be planted, up 200,000 from last
year. Statewide this week, rainfall measured 3-16 inches with only 10 percent of the crop already
planted. Mississippi Farmer of the Year was named April 6. He is Danny Ross Ingram, a cattle
and cotton farmer. John says he's the 10th farmer to be recognized in this annual awards
program.

POULTRY EXPANSION...is underway in Western Kentucky, reports Jeff Nalley (WOMI/WBKR,
Owensboro, KY). He says two major firms will be building complete poultry processing facilities
that each will handle one million birds pet week. A constant supply of corn, good labor
resources and good water sources are reasons why this expansion is underway. Farmers will
be building poultry houses to raise birds that will be contract-produced for these new plants.
The first house will open in early May with first processing anticipated in early 1996. Despite 2-5
inch rainfall this week, corn is more than 50 percent planted in Kentucky.



LA RY A.QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penary for Pvae Use $300




Marston Science
Libr




United States Department' riculture Off 0i communications Washington, DC 20250-1300


Letter No. 2712 May 5, 1995

MORE WHEAT FOR CHIN e ent of Agriculture has opened the door for China
to purchase more wheat from the ttes. Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman announced
a 1 million metric ton reallocation of wheat within the Export Enhancement Program (EEP). This
reallocation means a reduction .for four program areas: the Former Soviet Union, Pakistan,
Jordan and Sub-Saharan Africa. Associate Administrator for the Foreign Agricultural Service, Tim
Galvin says this will probably mean an increase of 1 million tons of wheat being sold since
allotments were taken from countries who weren't likely to purchase their full wheat allotment.
Allocations will be valid until June 30, 1995. Contact: Glenn Kaup (202) 720-3329.

DAIRY FARMERS WHO PRODUCED LESS, GET MORE Dairy farmers who cut back or
didn't increase milk production last year can check their mail for a refund check. Refunds of
dairy assessments totaling $72.8 million dollars were sent out to farmers who either reduced or
did not increase their 1994 milk marketing from their 1993 level. All milk marketed during 1994
was assessed a milk marketing assessment ranging from 10.12 cents in February, March and
April, to 19.28 cents from May through December. To compensate for the 1994 marketing year
refunds, the current assessment of 11.25 cents per hundredweight will be raised almost seven
cents to 18.25 cents. That rate will remain in effect for the rest of 1995. Contact: Bruce
Merkle (202) 720-8206.

USDA REACTS TO ETHANOL RULING -- "I am disappointed," said Agriculture Secretary Dan
Glickman in response to a Court of Appeals ruling striking down a requirement for ethanol to be
included in reformulated gasoline. The Environmental Protection Agency's Renewable
Oxygenate Requirement for Reformulated Gasoline was struck down April 28, 1995. Secretary
Glickman said the agency thought they had the authority to issue the regulation and that it would
increase economic activity in rural America while promoting clean air. Glickman said, "The
Administration will keep fighting for ethanol and will continue to ensure ethanol has a role in the
nation's energy future. At a time when we are importing over half of our oil, we need a growing
domestic renewable energy industry more than ever." Contact: Jim Petterson (202) 720-4623.

COUNTY LOAN RATES ANNOUNCED Wheat, barley, oats and rye county loan and purchase
rates were set for the 1995 crops. U.S. Department of Agriculture announced the rates, based
on changes in the national average price support rates. Some county rates were adjusted
because of location and transportation costs, but were limited to a three percent change in
addition to the national average price support rate from the 1994 crop. To find out specific
county loan rates, contact local Consolidated Farm Service Agency offices. For a complete copy
of the rate schedule, write USDA/CFSA, P.O. Box 2415, Washington, D.C. 20013-2415.
Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.









ITS THE PITS FOR CANNED PEACHES For the last eight years, exporters of U.S. canned
peaches have lost both share and volume in Canadian, Japanese and Mexican markets in spite
of imports that doubled in those countries. USDA analysts say increased shipments of heavily
subsidized Greek produce since 1991 is the primary reason for the displacement. In 1994, U.S.
exports to those countries dropped to about half the levels of just five years ago. As for 1995
prospects, analysts are looking at a mixed outlook, due to Mexico's financial problems and
Greece's enormous export supplies. Contact: Ross G. Kreamer (202) 720-9903.

ONIONS AREN'T BAD FOR SHEEP As long as they're in a balanced diet, onions can be fed
safely to sheep and still provide as much weight gain as high-quality sorghum does. That's what
animal scientists with USDA's Agricultural Research Service found out when they fed sheep
either onions or a mixture of onions, alfalfa and sorghum. Weight gains for those getting the
onions were comparable to those for sheep that were fed mixtures of sorghum and alfalfa. In
an industry where whole fields of products could go unused because of high output and low
profits, this provides an avenue for onion producers to unload excess produce. Growers face
the problem of getting rid of excess onions since some landfill operators won't accept them. If
they are simply left in the field, onions can cause diseases that affect the next crop. Scientists
caution that sheep being fed onions have to get a high-quality protein from either alfalfa or other
feeds in order to gain weight and avoid illness. Contact: Rick Estell or Ed Frederickson
(505)646-5889.

BLIGHT CUTS YIELDS FOR CHICKPEA GROWERS -- The worst chickpea disease can wipe
out entire crops, reduce yields and affect seed quality. The blight known as Ascochyta can drop
yields of 2,200 pounds of chickpeas per acre to less than 400, as Was the case for an Idaho
farmer in 1985. USDA plant pathologists are fighting back by introducing three Agricultural
Research Service chickpea varieties that resist the fungus. Two of the new varieties are similar
to the type most often seen in salad bars, the creamy-white kabuli chickpeas Dwelley and
Sanford. The third type is Myles, a small, dark type used to make popular Indian, Pakistani and
Ethiopian dishes. All three varieties made it through rigorous testing and production trials and
are now available for production. Acreage devoted to chickpea production dropped from 11,000
in 1987 to 4,000 in 1994 but is expected to rise in light of the new varieties. Contact: Walter
J. Kaiser (509) 335-6654 or Frederick Muehlbauer (509) 335-9521.

CATTLE TICK DIPPING BECOMES MORE ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY Before cattle
can cross the border from Mexico into the United States, they have to take a dip in a tick-killing
solution. A.million Mexican cattle a year cross the border by first being submerged and then
swimming through a 5,000 gallon mixture of coumaphos and water. Neither the vats nor the
cattle are the problem, but what goes in them and on them is. The used pesticide dip needs
to be replaced at least every two years which presents a challenge to USDA microbiologists.
But now, by adding iron and magnesium salts, scientists are able to break down the insecticide
into carbon dioxide and water. This works either directly on the dip or on land that is
contaminated by dip disposal permitting more environmentally friendly disposal. Since 1935,
USDA tick eradication officials have been supervising the operation of vats on both sides of the
U.S.-Mexican border. Ticks are a prevalent Mexican cattle problem and can cause cattle fever.
This prospect once nearly destroyed the entire southern cattle industry because northern farmers
didn't want to run the risk of buying infected cattle. Contact: Jeffrey S. Karns or Walter W.
Mulbry (301) 504-6582.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1979 A new hit series playing in rural health care facilities is
something called Telemedicine. Lori Spiczka reports on this new method of bringing health care
to rural areas by using telecommunications. (Weekly 5:00 documentary feature).

CONSUMER TIME #1458 Kids are nature's little environmentalists. Taking care of septic
tanks. The battered bat. New uses for wood. It's the season for ticks. (Weekly consumer
features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1970 Looking at what concerns those in the hog sector.
Environmental rules and the farmer reaction. USDA is looking for a producer of a filler and
bulking agent known as "alternan." More wheat sales to China? Big crunch for crop insurance.
(Weekly agriculture features).

UPCOMING ON USDA'S RADIO NEWSLINE Monday, May 15, cattle and sheep outlook.
Tuesday, May 16, farm labor; milk production and income; poultry outlook; weekly weather and
crops. Friday, May 19, agricultural outlook; cattle on feed; livestock slaughter. Monday, May
22, agricultural trade update. Tuesday, May 23, NAFTA report; livestock, dairy and poultry;
weekly weather and crops; catfish processing. These are the USDA reports we know about
in advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this
lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or (202) 720-8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m. ET each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES Eric Parsons reports on cotton supply and demand, as USDA estimates indicate
record highs in several categories; Brenda Curtis reports on a Native American Heritage garden
on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

ACTUALITIES Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman and U.S. Trade Representative Mickey
Kantor talk to farm broadcasters in Washington, D.C. Topics include USDA budget cuts, farm
programs and rural economic development and U.S.-Canadian wheat trade dispute.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Thursday, 3:45 p.m: to 4:00 p.m. ET, Telstar 302, C-band, Channel 6 (Transponder 3H), audio
6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3820 MHz. Monday, 11:00-11:15 a.m. ET, Galaxy 4, Channel
12 (C-band), audio 6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3940 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call
Larry A. Quinn at (202)720-6072 or 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 202050-1300.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


OFF MIKE

RIBBON-CUTTING...to officially open our new Radio Center was done by Secretary of
Agriculture Dan Glickman on Monday morning, May 1. Joe Comely (WRFD, Columbus, OH),
president of the National Association of Farm Broadcasters (NAFB), joined me in the ceremony
with the Secretary and our radio team (Gary Crawford, Lori Spiczka and Brenda Curtis). Fifty
farm broadcasters here to attend their annual Washington Ag Watch Conference witnessed this
historic event. Secretary Glickman told the audience that he'd already used the radio center
before he cut the ribbon. It was a special honor for us to have two of our key clients -- the
Agriculture Secretary and farm broadcasters -- with us to dedicate our new facilities.
USDA radio services date back to the late 1920's when the first Farm and Home Hour began.
Come see us in our new facilities during your next visit to Washington.

USDA HOSTS BROADCASTERS...for a half-day, informational program May 1 before those
attending went to the White House for briefings by Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman, U.S.
Trade Ambassador Mickey Kantor, Deputy Domestic Policy Advisor William Galston and White
House Press Secretary Mike McCurry.

FARM NEWSREEL...was a 15-minute filmed TV show that began nearly 40 years ago in the fall
of 1958 by Hearst Metrotone News. Martin Andrews, editor and writer for the series, writes to
say that it appeared on 65 TV stations from coast to coast for 26 weeks. It featured stories from
the U.S. and abroad, and each issue ended with a popular 3-5 minute section called "Farmer
of the Week." These were outstanding farmers or ranchers, always from a different state,
selected by a local TV farm director or by a USDA Extension agent. Martin says "Farm
Newsreel" was one of the earliest nationally televised farm shows in America.

NATIVE OKLAHOMAN RETURNS...to become the new farm director of KECO Radio in Elk City,
OK. Lee McCoy, formerly with Texas State Network in Arlington, TX, says he is on-the-air from
6:30-7 a.m. and 12:30-1 p.m. with agricultural news and features. Lee's phone number is (405)
225-9696.

LARRY A. QUI N, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United Slates Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington. DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penaly for Privlate Use $00







H II-


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UL; 2UZbu-1 3U


Letter No. 2713 c ." / May 12, 1995

U.S. AND CANADA AGREE ON SUPPORT FO Y- F the rules established by
the U.S.-Canada Free Trade Agreement, the two c'l ed ge he producer support levels
for barley. The support level helps determine whether import licensing restrictions on
barley and its products will be eliminated. When the U.S. support level fo rleys equal to or
less than the level in Canada, then Canada will remove its requirement fod4nporyJicenses for
barley and barley products. The support level is determined by computing percentage of
the producer's income that comes from the government's barley support.',~or the U.S. in
1992/93 and 1993/94, that level was 56.40 percent while in Canada it was 21.81 .ercent. After
August 1 of this year, Canada will no longer require import licenses for barley and barley
products and will enter under a tariff-rate quota as agreed to under the General Abreement on
Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organization (WTO). Contact: Jim Vertrees
(202) 720-8148.

EARLY OUT SIGN-UP IS UNDERWAY Producers enrolled in the Conservation Reserve (CRP)
Program have a one-time chance to get out of their contracts, even if they aren't expiring this
year. The Department of Agriculture will offer producers with acreage under contract in the CRP
the opportunity to request release from the terms and conditions of that contract from May 15
to June 2. During that same time frame, producers can extend for one year contracts that expire
in September. Sign-up for extensions or early-outs will take place at local Consolidated Farm
Service Agency offices. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

OH, HOW SWEET IT IS FOR CHERRIES AND APPLES -- Apples and sweet cherries could
be on their way to China. Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman says exports of apples from
Oregon and Idaho and sweet cherries from Washington state could soon be exported to China.
The Chinese market for these products was opened when new protocols were signed on April
20. An earlier agreement allowing imports of Washington state apples was expanded to include
apples from Oregon and Idaho. China also agreed to new procedures that would allow the U.S.
to export fresh sweet cherries from Washington state. 'These agreements represent a further
opening of the Chinese market to U.S. fruits and are another important step in expanding
agricultural trade opportunities for U.S. producers," said Glickman. "We intend to continue
working with China to build on this latest progress and gain approval for other products and
other fruit-producing areas of the United States." Contact: Jerry Redding (202) 720-6959.

USDA GOES INTERNET To access this document via Internet, point your gopher to
esusda.gov and a menu selection will appear or send an e-mail message to
almanac@esusda.gov. The single line message should read: send(space)USDA-
releases(space)help. Retrieval instructions and a list of documents currently available will
appear. Need more help? Contact: Maria Bynum (202) 720-5192.


II M I II w l ^;








MERGING MILK ORDERS The U.S. Department of Agriculture has made the decision to
merge five federal milk orders in the southern U.S. The Georgia, Alabama-West Florida, Greater
Louisiana, New Orleans-Mississippi and Central Arkansas marketing areas will combine-into the
"Southeast" marketing area. USDA also expanded the base-forming months of the base and
excess plan from October through November to July through December. Only the highest four
production months for each producer will determine the producer's base. Producers will be able
to vote on the order when USDA sends them a ballot in the near future. Contact: Becky
Unkenholz (202) 720-8998.

USDA IS ON THE MENU The 1995 U.S. Food Export Showcase opened in Chicago (May 7),
with over 5,000 international food buyers from over 100 countries. Sponsored by the National
Association of State Departments of Agriculture along with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's
Foreign Agricultural Service, the showcase offers small to mid-size manufacturers of U.S. high
value food products a chance to exhibit their wares before an international audience of buyers.
Deputy Secretary of Agriculture Richard Rominger was on hand for the ribbon cutting. He said
taking into account U.S. consumer food exports reached an all-time high in 1994, 'The export
market is where the action is and the key to a healthy U.S. food and agricultural industry now
and in the future." Contact: Donald Washington (202) 720-3101.

USDA ISSUES THE FINAL WORD The final rule to amend the Export Enhancement Program
(EEP) and the Dairy Export Incentive Program (DEIP) was issued by the U.S. Department of
Agriculture. The regulations are amended to eliminate the requirement for exporters to have
experience in order to participate in the two programs. Removing this requirement allows more
companies to participate in the EEP and DEIP. The regulation will also establish when new
program participants would be eligible for bonus payments. EEP and DEIP help U.S. agricultural
producers, processors and exporters gain access to foreign markets and makes possible the
sale of products that otherwise were not possible because of subsidized prices offered by
competing countries. Contact: Glenn Kaup (202) 720-3329.

1995 CROP COTTON DIFFERENTIALS Borrowing a page from 1994, the U.S. Department
of Agriculture announced the availability of differential schedules for the 1995 crops of upland
and extra long staple (ELS) cotton. Based on last year's procedures, the differentials apply to
the Commodity Credit Corporation price support loan rate of 51.92 cents per bushel for upland
cotton, and 79.65 cents for ELS cotton. Tables of upland and ELS cotton differentials and a
schedule of loan rates are available from the Price Support Division of USDA's CFSA, P.O. Box
2415, Washington, D.C. 20013. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

WANTED: A FEW GOOD EXHIBITORS The U.S. Department of Agriculture is looking for
United States companies to exhibit their wares at the world's largest food and beverage show.
ANUGA '95 will be held in Cologne, Germany from September 30 through October 5, 1995.
USDA's Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) is looking for exhibitors in the bi-annual show which
attracts almost 200,000 exhibitors from 132 countries. At the last show held in 1993, U.S.
exhibitors averaged new sales of $350,000. Popular products include health foods, edible nuts
and seeds, microwaveable foods, ethnic foods and ingredients, snack foods, exotic fresh fruits
and beverages, such as wine and soft drinks. If you're interested, contact the USDA Trade
Show office at (202) 690-1182. The participation fee is $9,000. Contact: Priscilla B. Glynn
(202) 720-9441.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE


AGRICULTURE USA #1980 -- The importance of Native American plants is explored in this
edition of Agriculture USA as Brenda Curtis looks at the new Native American Heritage Garden
on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. (Weekly 5:00 documentary feature).

CONSUMER TIME #1458 Help for kids at risk. Terminating the termites. Fighting the fat.
Feeding babies bottled water. A national heritage garden. (Weekly consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1970 Russian import tariffs. Conservation Reserve Program early
out sign up. More chickens, lower prices. The word on herd management. The latest details
on the changes in the Conservation Reserve Program. (Weekly agriculture features).

UPCOMING ON USDA'S RADIO NEWSLINE Monday, May 22, agricultural trade update.
Tuesday, May 23, NAFTA report; livestock, dairy and poultry; weekly weather and crops; catfish
processing. Monday, May 29, HOLIDAY. Tuesday, May 30, weekly weather and crops.
Wednesday, May 31, agricultural exports; tobacco world markets and trade. Thursday, June 1,
world horticultural trade; sugar markets and trade. These are the USDA reports we know
about in advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this
lineup.



USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or (202) 720-8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m. ET each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE


FEATURES Lynn Wyvill reports on biopulping.


ACTUALITIES Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman on the Farm Bill (if available), USDA
chief meteorologist Norton Strommen on the latest weather and crop conditions.


SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Thursday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, Telstar 302, C-band, Channel 6 (Transponder 3H), audio
6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3820 MHz. Monday, 11:00-11:15 a.m. ET, Galaxy 4, Channel
12 (C-band), audio 6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3940 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call
Larry A. Quinn at (202)720-6072 or 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 202050-1300.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFF MIKE 31262 08307 975 5

41 YEARS OF BROADCASTING...on the same station comes to a close May 31 for Lee Kline
(WHO, Des Moines, IA) who is retiring from his day-to-day responsibilities. Friends, associates
and colleagues of Lee's honored him with a special celebration May 10. There were letters from
the Governor, Mayor, Congressmen, Senators and many of his broadcast friends. Lee will be
available "on call" and will host some travel tours for WHO. Keith Kirkpatrick and Herb
Plambeck, both WHO retirees, were among special guests. Herb was on-the-air in recent days
as a guest reflecting on his years as a World War II correspondent in Europe as the world
observes the 50th Anniversary of the Victory in Europe signing ceremony.

STORMY WEATHER...continued this week on the High Plains with tornados early Sunday
morning, but at least storms brought welcome rain, reports Larry De Sha (KGNC, Amarillo, TX).
It was so dry, though, that dust was blowing later the same day. Larry reports extensive
damage to winter wheat in the Texas and Oklahoma Panhandles and feels that some surveyors
have underestimated the impact. Cotton has been one of the bright spots for High Plains
farmers, but there is increased concern about falling cattle prices.

TOO MUCH RAIN...and April snows that dropped up to 30 inches in central South Dakota are
making farmers anxious to plant. If spring wheat or oats are not already planted, farmers
are switching to corn and soybeans, reports Robert Uehling (KXRB/KKLS/KIKN, Sioux Falls,
SD). Planted crops are experiencing flooding in some areas. Rob does a daily 3-1/2 minute
feature on his station at 12:50 p.m. called "In Touch with Agriculture." He has regular news and
market reports on from 6:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

NEWS VETERAN...who grew up listening to her station became the agribusiness news director
January 1. She is Kathi Millard (WKTY, La Crdsse, WI) who replaced retired Earl Hunter. Ten
years experience in radio news and as WKBT-TV news anchor give Kathi unique skills for
covering agriculture. Soon she'll be covering "dairy breakfasts" on host farms in each county
on atrday mornigs from 6-10 where 2-3,000 from the community will be fed.

LARRY A. UINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penaiy for Pivate Use $300











ot communications wasnington, uu 20250-1300


TWO GOALS BEHI I'FRRM BILL AP OSALS -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman
unveiled the Departmeri ul s nd on the 1995 farm bill. He says the two goals for
the legislation that will drive ~ for the next five years is empowering U.S. agriculture
and sustaining rural America. combining the needs of the American farmer with the safety of
American consumers is the balance they are striving for, says Glickman. He says they will work
to "sustain the farm and food programs that have produced history's ost abundant, most
affordable and most wholesome food supply." More farm program f l'bility, limiting farm
payments to individuals who earn less than $100,000 a year in off-farm in' ne, opening and
expanding export markets and supporting research are among his goals.,Contact: Jim
Petterson (202) 720-4623.

USDA TAKES ACTION ON UNFAIR TRADE -- A new team whose mission is to identify and
respond to countries seeking unfair trade advantages over the United States is in place at USDA.
Trade distorting sanitary and phytosanitary measures are being used more and more by
countries to restrict imports, says Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman. Lost trade estimates are
placed at $700 million annually as U.S. exporters face measures which are not scientifically
justified. That prompted forming the action team which includes members of the Foreign
Agricultural Service, the Agricultural Research Service, the Food Safety and Inspection Service
and the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Contact: Wayne Baggett (202) 720-2032.

RECORDKEEPING REGULATIONS DELAYED -- A regulation requiring changes in how
farmers keep track of pesticides was supposed to go into effect on May 11, 1995. That date has
now been moved to August 1 to allow more time for people to adjust to the changes. Lon
Hatamiya, administrator of USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service, says the busy planting season
doesn't give farmers enough time to learn the new requirements. Amendments to the pesticide
recordkeeping regulations include reducing to 14 days the time farmers have to write down when
a restricted use pesticide is used, changing how spot application locations are recorded, and
making it easier to release records for medical records. Contact: Connie Crunkleton (202)
720-8998.

WETLANDS RESERVE PROGRAM SIGN-UP -- For the first time, a nationwide sign-up for the
Wetlands Reserve Program (WRP) is set to begin. Running from May 30 through June 30,
almost 120,000 acres are expected to be enrolled in the $92 million program. The owner will not
be paid more than the value of the land, but hunting, fishing and grazing rights are usually
allowed. Protecting and restoring wetland areas to furnish habitat for wildlife, purifying water and
absorbing flood waters are the main goals of the WRP. For more information, or to sign up for
the Wetlands Reserve Program, contact the local office of the Natural Resources Conservation
Service. Contact: Diana Morse (202) 720-4772.








HIGHER FEES FOR TOBACCO INSPECTION PROPOSED In order to maintain an adequate
operating reserve and provide the level of services needed, the U.S. Department of Agriculture
is proposing an increase in the fee for mandatory inspection of tobacco. Sold at designated
auction markets, each hundred pounds of tobacco is inspected for the current fee of 70 cents.
That fee would increase to 83 cents per hundred pounds if the proposal is approved. To
comment, write the Director of AMS, USDA Tobacco Division, P.O. Box 96456, Room .502 Annex,
Washington, D.C. 20090-6456. Contact: Alicia L. Ford (202) 720-8998.

FINAL COTTON DEFICIENCY PAYMENT RATE Producers of extra-long-staple cotton who
,participated in the 1994 price support and production adjustment programs could receive
deficiency payments. The final rate is set at 1.3 cents a pound, which means producers who
received the advance payment of 8.485 cents will have to refund 7.185 cents per pound to the
Commodity Credit Corporation. If producers need help repaying that amount by the end of the
marketing year (July 31, 1995), they can contact their local Consolidated Farm Service Agency
office. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

NEW IMPORT REQUIREMENTS FOR SHEEP AND GOATS? A continuing threat from scrapie
is the reason USDA officials are proposing a change in the requirements for importing sheep and
goats. Scrapie is a progressively.degenerative disease of the nervous system that can take 42
months to incubate. Under the new regulations, sheep and goats originating in countries not
declared free of scrapie would have to be placed in a U.S. flock or herd that participates in a
Scrapie Flock Certification Program. That is an industry program certifying flock and herds as
"scrapie-free" after five years of surveillance. Australia, New Zealand and Canada are the only
countries that would be exempt from this requirement. To comment on the proposal, send an
original and three copies to: APHIS Policy and Program Development, Regulatory Analysis, 4700
River Road, Unit 118, Riverdale, MD 20737. Contact: Kendra Pratt (301) 734-6573.

SPAIN IS FREE Spain has been declared free of swine vesicular disease. That relieves some
Prohibitions and restrictions on imported swine and pork products. But that country is now
added to the list of countries subject to restrictions on pork and pork products imported into the
U.S. because African swine fever still exists in Spain. These changes become effective May 26,
1995. Contact: Kathy Bonner (301) 734-8563.

BETTER FRUIT FROM HEALTHIER TREES Almost all fruit producers now spray their apple
and pear trees with a spray yielding fruit higher in calcium and trees with less disease, thanks
to USDA scientists. The cost-efficient technique of spraying the trees with calcium chloride and
calcium nitrate was developed by USDA's Agricultural Research Service scientists in Wenatchee,
Washington. On Delicious and Golden Delicious apples, the sprays reduced the incidence of
bitter pit, scald and internal breakdown, three disorders that render some apples unmarketable.
Spraying pear trees increased yields by 13 percent and reduced the incidence of cork spot,
which reduces flavor intensity. The disorders are caused by low fruit calcium that develops after
excessively warm or cold temperatures, irrigation, dormant pruning or nitrogen fertilization. More
careful application of fertilizer and water, and summer pruning can reduce some of the damage,
but the calcium sprays have had a dramatic impact. Until the field trials; pear growers were
reluctant to spray trees with calcium, fearing it would cause blemishes on the more sensitive
pears. Several different formulations of calcium chloride.and calcium nitrate are available, with
specific label recommendations for various fruit crops. Contact: Stephen R. Drake (509) 664-
2280.







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE
AGRICULTURE USA #1981 How farmers deal with all the environmental rules they are faced
with is the subject of this week's documentary. Gary Crawford presents the opinions of experts
trying to learn what causes farmers to resist some rules and embrace others. (Weekly 5:00
documentary feature).

CONSUMER TIME #1458 How to manage stress in the 1990's. Therapeutic horse riding
for the physically challenged. Lower meat prices at the grocery store. Dangerous mower
blades. Helping senior citizens work. (Weekly consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1970 Export outlook for cattle. Cattle outlook calls for higher
production and consumption, but lower prices. USDA moves to collect on defaulted loans.
Weather dampens spring planting plans. More chickens, lower prices. (Weekly agriculture
features).

UPCOMING ON USDA'S RADIO NEWSLINE Monday, May 29, HOLIDAY. Tuesday, May
30, weekly weather and crops. Wednesday, May 31, agricultural exports; tobacco world markets
and trade. Thursday, June 1, world horticultural trade; sugar markets and trade. Tuesday, June
6, weekly weather and crops. Friday, June 9, world supply and demand for cotton. These are
the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries many stories every
day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or (202) 720-8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m. ET each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES Eric Parsons reports on Conservation Reserve Program buy-outs. Patrick O'Leary
reports on USDA research on using a natural fungus to control white flies.

ACTUALITIES USDA Acting Under Secretary for Rural Economic and Community
Development Michael Dunn on rural development proposals before Congress.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service celebrates 60 years
of protecting soil and water.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Thursday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, Telstar 302, C-band, Channel 6 (Transponder 3H), audio
6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3820 MHz. Monday, 11:00-11:15 a.m. ET, Galaxy 4, Channel
12 (C-band), audio 6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3940 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call
Larry A. Quinn at (202)720-6072 or 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 202050-1300.







4
OFF MIKE 307 970 6

HEADING FOR THE HILLS...of Tennessee will be Norton Strommen, USDA's chief
meteorologist who has been a regular spokesman on USDA radio and TV programs for several
years. Norton will retire June 2 with 40 years of federal service, serving at USDA since 1980.
Although he has spent most of his time forecasting weather, he's been involved in researching,
developing and implementing new applications for weather data. Results of this work at USDA
have yielded a forecasting model used around the country. Broadcasters who would like to
contribute to an audio tribute we're planning for Norton should call Gary Crawford at 202-720-
7068 by May 31.

PLANTING DELAYS CONTINUE...in Iowa'and only one-third of the state's corn is planted,
reports Dennis Morrice (KICD, Spencer, IA). Many areas are more than two weeks behind and
farmers are remembering the weather effects of 1993. Few have finished crop planting. Dennis
reminds that county fair season is rapidly approaching. He usually covers 14 local fairs from
July 4 to late September.

MORE SUNFLOWERS...will likely replace canola in North Dakota fields this year because wet
weather is causing farmers to choose alternative crops that can be planted later. Al Gustin
(KFYR, Bismarck, ND) says he's been offering management suggestions to help farmers cope
with wet conditions. Also, he's been talking with farmers about recent USDA announcements
concerning the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). Al is a farmer, too, but at the moment
he has more time for radio because of the lack of sunshine.

RAISED ON A DAIRY FARM...and selected as Minnesota's 1989 State Dairy Princess are two
credentials that equip Katie Scott (KJJK, Fergus Falls, MN) to discuss dairy prices and concerns
of local farmers about whether they'll be able to pass on their farms to the next generation.
Katie's home county is the second largest dairy producer in her state, but she says they are
losing lot of dai es. June Dairy Month will get a lot of attention at her station.


ARRY '.QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington. DC 20250-1300
OmRC BUSINESS
Penany for Prvatse U$300










United States Department of Agri ult ice of Communication Washington, DC 20250-1300



PROTECTING UNINSUE CR Sp- rh6plant unisured crops can rest easier.
Agriculture Secretary Da ickman ann l he I insured Crop Disaster Assistance
Program (NAP), part of the ral Crop Insur Reformfigislation enacted by Congress last
year. Under NAP, crops t t u ~~urable willinow have protection for weather-
related losses. NAP protection aE to provided under catastrophic crop insurance. To
be eligible for protection, farmers m port their acreage to local Consolidated Farm Service
Agency offices shortly after planting.' Contact: Eric Edgington (202) 254-8440.

FOOD STAMP REFORMS FIGHT FRAUD Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman presented
guidelines to reform the food stamp program as part of the 1995 farm bill package. The anti-
food stamp fraud plan is a three pronged approach. The first part calls for pre-authorization
screening controls tightening retailer requirements to keep illegitimate stores from becoming
certified. Secondly, enhanced monitoring methods would be in place to control post-
authorization fraud. The third prong would involve stiffening penalties for retailers and recipients
who violate the public trust. Contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.

SUSTAINING RURAL DEVELOPMENT IS KEY Stimulating investment in rural America is a
cornerstone of the farm bill proposals presented to Congress by Agriculture Secretary Dan
Glickman. He says, "The greatest needs are for new and innovative sources of capital and credit
to boost economic development and help revitalize rural America. Current public policies provide
neither enough tools nor the right mix of tools to get the job done." To solve the problem, an
interagency working group to make specific recommendations for legislative changes is in place.
The Rural Performance Partnership Initiative proposal would move funding for 14 different rural
development programs into three broad categories. This should help the people who need it
most, said Glickman, and it should direct a high proportion of assistance toward communities
that are economically distressed. Recommendations from the working group are expected within
45 days. Contact: Jim Brownlee (202) 720-2091.

EXCUSE ME, COULD I SEE YOUR ID? -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture wants to change
the way cattle and bison are identified in programs to control and eradicate brucellosis and
tuberculosis in the U.S. By moving branding from the jaw to the hip, cattle and bison would still
be identifiable to aid in disease control and eradication without causing undue distress to these
animals. USDA currently requires cattle exposed to tuberculosis or brucellosis be identified with
a hot-iron letter brand on the jaw or high on the hip near the tailhead. Hot-iron letter branding
is also allowed on the jaw for cattle or bison immunized against brucellosis.- To comment on the
new identification methods which would move branding from the jaw to the hip, send your
comments before June 16 to USDA's APHIS, Suite 3C03, 4700 River Road Unit 118, Riverdale,
MD 20737-1238. Contact: Kendra Pratt (301) 734-6573.







CELEBRATION OF THE LAND The "Dust Bowl" of 60 years ago prompted the Department
of Agriculture to take an active role in natural resource conservation. Agriculture Secretary Dan
Glickman thanked farmers, ranchers and USDA employees who helped make it possible to
change the dust bowl into fertile fields. At a national "Celebration of the Land," Glickman spoke
about the conservation priorities of the 1995 farm bill. Those are implementing common sense
approaches to conservation by letting local and state officials make more of the decisions, by
using a comprehensive approach to conservation through watershed plans and by increased
community involvement in the conservation effort. Contact: Carol Hollingsworth (202) 720-
5798.

ONE MILLION HOURS LATER Through the USDA AmeriCorps projects, nearly 1 million
hours of service were performed by 1200 AmeriCorps members. Serving in 38 states, the
members who put in the million hours also have recruited unpaid volunteers to donate almost
30,000 hours of their time. AmeriCorps, President Clinton's national service program, engages
20,000 Americans of different backgrounds to perform service meeting critical community needs
in return for awards that can be used for college, job training or to pay back student loans.
Contact: Joel Berg (202) 720-6350.

MORE FEEDBACK SOUGHT ON MEAT INSPECTION -- There's more time for people to
comment on the Department of Agriculture's proposal for meat and poultry plants to implement
changes to reduce contamination. A science-based Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point
(HACCP) system would require meat and poultry plants to adopt wide-ranging changes to
reduce contamination causing foodborne illnesses. Consumers have until July 5 to comment
on the HACCP proposal. Send those comments to: USDA's Diane Moore, FSIS, Room 4352-S,
Washington, D.C. 20250. Contact: Jacque Knight (202) 720-9113.

SHOULD THEY BE ALLOWED IN? -- Some prohibited fruits and vegetables could be allowed
into the United States if a new USDA proposal is approved. The forbidden fruits and vegetables
include papaya from Belize, cantaloupe from Brazil, pears from China, lettuce from Israel, grapes
from India, and apricots, nectarines, peaches and plums from Zimbabwe. Ecuadorian and El
Salvadorian basil, chives and dill from Israel are also on the list. The fruits and vegetables would
only be allowed entry after meeting the requirements to prevent the introduction of fruit flies and
other pests into the U.S. Additionally, some of the fruits and vegetables would have to undergo
treatment for pests that pose a danger to American agriculture. Send comments to Regulatory
and Analysis Division of USDA's APHIS, Suite 3C03, 4700 River Road Unit 118, Riverdale, MD
20737-1238. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 734-3256.

ITS FAST AND ITS FREE You can now receive widely used USDA statistical and economic
reports through electronic mail. Subscribers to USDA's crop, livestock and economic reports
can now receive them within hours of the scheduled release time. This addition to USDA's
existing Internet service is another step toward making USDA information available at minimal
cost. Contact: Jim Horsfield (202) 219-0698.

FOR FASTER RADIO SERVICE -- You can call the radio personnel directly if you need to get
in touch for feed or news information. Here are their direct numbers: Gary Crawford (202) 720-
7068; Brenda Curtis (202) 720-7079; Lori Spiczka Holm (202) 720-8688.


Edited by: Lori Spiczka Holm







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1982 The "Dust Bowl" of 60 years ago is remembered in this edition
of Agriculture USA. Those who contributed most to turning the dust into fertile fields are paid
tribute. (Weekly 5:00 documentary feature).

CONSUMER TIME #1458 Large scale composting makes money for a city. More money,
more jobs, more product is the way to revitalize rural America. Helping low income senior
citizens who want to find work. Stopping water pollution at home. Nutrition proposals for the
1995 farm bill. (Weekly consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1970 -- Remembering the "Dust Bowl." New approach improves virus.
Feed grains and the farm bill. Protecting uninsurable crops. Wet weather has farmers asking,
"Is it 1993 all over again?" (Weekly agriculture features).

UPCOMING ON USDA'S RADIO NEWSLINE Tuesday, June 6, weekly weather and crops.
Friday, June 9, world supply and demand for cotton. Monday, June 12, world markets and trade
for cotton. Tuesday, June 13, world agricultural production; feed update; oil crops outlook; rice
outlook; wheat outlook; grain markets and trade; weekly weather and crops; world oilseeds
markets and trade. Friday, June 16, cattle on feed. These are the USDA reports we know
about in advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this
lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or (202) 720-8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m. ET each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES Patrick O'Leary reports on 60 years of protecting farmland through conservation
programs.

ACTUALITIES Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman testifies before Congress on nutrition
proposals for the 1995 farm bill. Under Secretary for Research, Education and Economics, Dr.
Karl Stauber talks about research proposals for the 1995 farm bill. Ken Ackerman, Consolidated
Farm Service Agency, talks about protecting noninsurable crops.

UPCOMING FEATURES Lynn Wyvill reports on protecting uninsurable crops and the sign-up
for the Wetlands Reserve Program.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Thursday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, Telstar 302, C-band, Channel 6 (Transponder 3H), audio
6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3820 MHz. Monday, 11:00-11:15 a.m. ET, Galaxy 4, Channel
12 (C-band), audio 6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3940 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call
Larry A. Quinn at (202)720-6072 or 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 202050-1300.





43
OFF MIKE 3126

ROLLING RADIO STUDIO...is the way Bill Ray (Agrinet Farm Radio Network, Elizabeth City,
NC) describes his new satellite truck for originating radio remote broadcasts. This is the second
one in their fleet and is fondly referred to as "Bushwhacker" because the truck's side mirrors
seem to be always beating the bushes. Bill's been a farm broadcaster for more than 25 years,
and he's a station owner, too. His radio network reaches from southern New Jersey through
Delaware, Maryland, Virginia and North Carolina. Also, he provides a special newsfeed for
Pennsylvania.

WASHINGTON VISITOR...last week to our USDA Radio Center was Skip Davis (WASK/WKOA,
Lafayette, IN). He was here to cover a conference presented by the Conservation Technology
Information Center and the special 60th Anniversary celebration of the Natural Resources
Conservation Service (formerly Soil Conservation Service). Skip mentioned that he appreciates
our special Comrex capability on our daily newsline which enhances overall audio quality. Corn
is in the three-leaf stage on some farms in his area with soybean planting underway. Farmers
there are increasingly using satellite technology to increase precision in their farming efforts.

SADNESS...fills the halls of Voice of Southwest Agriculture (VSA) Network (San Angelo, TX)
because of the death of Rene Stewart from an auto accident May 12. Rene, 25, was a magna
cum laude graduate of Texas A&M who joined VSA two years ago first as an intern before
joining their staff full time. She was selected earlier as a participant in the Texas Agricultural
Lifetime Leadership (TALL) Program which had met in Washington just a few days before the
accident. Curt Lancaster of VSA says this is a "great personal and professional loss."

NEW LOCATION...but with the same station is reported by Ron Powers (WOWO, Ft. Wayne,
IN). His station has moved to more of a "country" location from downtown. Ron and his wife
Sandy were honored here a few weeks ago by the American Sheep Industry. Ron received the
Shepherd's Voice Broadcast Award and Sandy, who is Executive Director of the Indiana Sheep
Breedes Associ ion, received an award for best state publication.

LARRY A/QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penaky for Pfrate Use $300









United States Department of Agriculture Office ofopmmunications Washington, DC 20250-1300

Letter No. 2716 J^, June 2, 1995

AGRICULTURAL EXPORTS HIT RECJD HIGH,~- Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman
announced (May 31) that U.S. agricultural sports arrojected to reach a record high of $51.5
billion in fiscal year 1995 (Oct. 1994-Sept. 199,/ The latest USDA forecast reflects an upward
revision of $3 billion since a February forecast : realized, the fiscal 1995 projection would
represent a significant increase over the exgrt lekel of $43.5 billion recorded in fiscal 1994.
Secretary Glickman said, "This record repre e a tremendous achievement for U.S. agriculture
across the board, from the farm gate to ed in our processing and export industries.
All categories of U.S. agricultural 'roi' dding large gains at the same time."
Glickman added, "While oversea^ s s of cons oods and semi-processed products
continue to grow impressively, tt n w export numb g lso reflect a continued surge in our
exports of bulk commodities as ellr' "IUL

NEW CROP PLANTING DATES help farmers pl d with wet fields and delayed spring
planting, the U.S. Department of A 'c re has relay de' final planting dates for the 1995 crop
year in affected areas. Final planting s ne 5 for all states in the region, with an
additional 25 days (June 30) to plant surance guarantees. States affected are
Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North
Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin. Farmers should contact their local Farm Service
Agency office for more details. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

COUNTY PRICE SUPPORT RATES ANNOUNCED -- Loan and purchase rates for each county
are available in local Farm Service Agency offices. USDA has announced the latest county price
support loan and purchase rates for 1995 crop corn, grain sorghum and soybeans. Determined
in accordance with the amended Agricultural Act of 1949, rates reflect changes in the national
average price support rates. Some county rates were adjusted to reflect location and
transportation costs. Except for soybeans, adjusted rates are limited to a three percent change
from 1994 levels. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

USDA REMEMBERS EMPLOYEES KILLED IN OKLAHOMA -- Seven employees of the U.S.
Department of Agriculture were among those killed in the explosion of the Alfred P. Murrah
federal building in Oklahoma City. Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman took part in a memorial
service to remember USDA workers from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service who
died on April 19, 1995. Three APHIS employees who survived the blast were present to pay
tribute to co-workers Olen Bloomer, James Everett Boles, Margaret Louise Clark, Richard Leroy
Cummins, Doris Adele Higginbottom, Carol Sue Khalil and Rheta Long. Glickman said, "We are
here...to honor seven fallen colleagues, seven public servants, seven true patriots, men and
women who made contributions to their country -- contributions which ultimately cost them their
lives. Their deaths were senseless and inexplicable. But they will live on in our memories for
the work they did and the family and friends they left." Glickman added, "We mourn their
passing. We will miss them and their country will miss them." Contact: Tom Amontree (202)
720-4623.


I I







MARKET PROMOTION PROGRAM ALLOCATIONS FOR 1995 -- Allocations of $85.3 million
were made under the Market Promotion Program (MPP) for Fiscal Year 1995. The Department
of Agriculture allocated the funds for use by 63 U.S. nonprofit commodity groups and regional
trade organizations for promotion and market expansion of agricultural products in foreign
markets. Administered by USDA, MPP helps U.S. producers, exporters and trade organizations
promote U.S. agricultural exports. Contact: Donald Washington (202) 720-2375.

NEW UNDER SECRETARY -- In a unanimous decision, the Senate voted to confirm Dr. Karl
Stauber as the new Under Secretary for Research, Education and Economics at the U.S.
Department of Agriculture. This newly created position combines the former position of Assistant
Secretary for Science and Education with the Assistant Secretary of Economics. Dr. Stauber will
manage USDA's science, technology and education activities relating to food and agriculture.
Prior to joining USDA, Stauber served as the Vice President of the Northwest Area Foundation
in St. Paul, Minnesota. Contact: Maria Bynum (202) 720-5192.

NEW FEES FOR IMPORT AND EXPORT SERVICES -- To help cover the rising cost of carrying
out federal animal quarantine laws, the U.S. Department of Agriculture is proposing an increase
in user fees for the program. USDA provides services facilitating the import and export of birds,
animals and animal products and byproducts. The 1990 Farm Bill authorized the collection of
fees to reimburse the U.S. government for the cost of carrying out the provisions of the law.
That makes it possible to endorse export certificates for animals, provide quarantine services for
imported animals, conduct veterinary inspections outside the U.S. and provide some veterinary
diagnostic services. To comment on the proposed fee increase, send responses by July 25 to:
USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 4700 River Road, Unit 118, Riverdale, MD,
20737-1238. Contact: Kendra Pratt (301) 734-6573.

HOW MUCH WOOD WOULD WE NEED? -- A changing national and world economy is
affecting the way wood is being imported. That is in turn increasing the risk of introducing plant
pests into the United States. That's how Alfred Elder sees it. He's the acting deputy
administrator for plant protection and quarantine at the Department of Agriculture. Elder says
changing importation patterns call for comprehensive regulations on importing unmanufactured
wood articles like logs, lumber, bark chips, wood chips and some wood packing materials.
These new rules become effective August 23, 1995. Contact: Anne Sutton (301) 734-7255.

QUARANTINE AND INSPECTION SERVICE FEES NEED ADJUSTING --The U.S. Department
of Agriculture is proposing an adjustment in their fee schedule -- lowering inspection fees for
aircraft and raising export certification fees for plant products. The change would reflect the
actual cost of providing these services. Services include inspecting aircraft arriving into the
United States to make sure they aren't carrying any harmful exotic pests or animal diseases and
issuing certificates accompanying exports of plants and plant products to certify they are free
of plant pests. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-3256.

ELISA TEST ADDED TO THE LIST -- The gpl Elisa test has been added to the list of official
tests approved for use to eradicate pseudorabies. This move relieves some of the restrictions
on the interstate movement of swine given gene-altered pseudorabies vaccines. Previously,
vaccinated swine that were not from qualified-negative gene-altered herds could not be moved
across state lines unless they were shipped directly to slaughter or quarantined herd or feedlot.
Contact: Kendra Pratt (301) 734-6573.
Edited by: Lori Spiczka Holm








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1983 -- The new Under Secretary for Research, Education and
Economics is in place at the Department of Agriculture. In this edition of Agriculture USA, Lori
Spiczka talks with Dr. Karl Stauber. (Weekly 5:00 documentary feature).

CONSUMER TIME #1458 -- Terminating termites. Help for kids at risk. Research has a major
role in the 1995 farm bill. Managing severe stress. Grilling summer foods safely. (Weekly
consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1970 -- Wheat in the 1995 farm bill. The latest U.S. agricultural export
figures. A new approach to farm pollution programs. The latest word on herd management.
Delayed crop planting shifts crop calendar and crop planting plans. (Weekly agriculture
features).

UPCOMING ON USDA'S RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tuesday, June 6, weekly weather and crops.
Friday, June 9, world supply and demand for cotton. Monday, June 12, world agricultural supply
and demand; cotton and wool outlook. Tuesday, June 13, feed update; oil crops outlook; rice
outlook; wheat outlook; world markets and trade for grains and oilseeds; weekly weather and
crops. Thursday, June 15, milk production. Friday, June 16, cattle on feed. These are the
USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day
which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or (202) 720-8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m. ET each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES Lynn Wyvill reports on the Wetlands Reserve Program sign-up and the Non-
insured Crop Disaster Assistance program.

ACTUALITIES -- Tim Galvin, associate administrator, Foreign Agricultural Service; Ken
Ackerman, acting deputy administrator, Consolidated Farm Service Agency, on acreage
reporting requirements for crop insurance. Norton Strommen, USDA chief meteorologist, on the
latest crop and weather developments.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on the most common food safety mistakes
during the summer.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Thursday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, Telstar 302, C-band, Channel 6 (Transponder 3H), audio
6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3820 MHz. Monday, 11:00-11:15 a.m. ET, Galaxy 4, Channel
12 (C-band), audio 6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3940 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call
Larry A. Quinn at (202)720-6072 or 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 202050-1300.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
F4 M E1111111 IIIMIIIII I I
OFF MIKE 3 1262 08135 9019

FIRST DAY OVER 100...degrees was recorded in Yuma, AZ, this week which is much later than
normal, says George Gatley (Western Agri-Radio Networks). Usually, the temperature breaks
the century mark by early April. Fruit and vegetable yields were lowered by spring warming
followed by cooler than normal temperatures, but Arizona farmers are growing a lot of cotton
this year due to heavy world demand. George has resigned from KBLU Radio after 18 years
to affiliate with KEZC in Yuma. He continues to use our USDA TV features on his daily, early
morning show on KSWT-TV.

EARLY HARVEST...is anticipated in the Northwest for fruit crops like cherries, reports Gary
Claus (Northwest Ag News Network, Newberg, OR). Strawberry harvesting begins next week.
Key environmental concerns are on the minds of their listeners with public hearings underway
on the Endangered Species Act, discussion of salvage timber harvesting, and interest in the
Clean Water Act, livestock grazing on public lands and pesticide regulations.

TWIN CITY SWITCH...is underway by Tom Rothman (Minnesota Farm Network) who is moving
from St. Paul to new facilities in downtown Minneapolis. Aside from living out of boxes, Tom
reports that Minnesota farmers are getting back into their fields to finish planting due to great
weather. In spite of late planting, corn and soybeans are almost on schedule, but spring wheat
and barley are a real concern. Some farmers are planting sunflowers as an alternative.

OVER A MILLION ACRES...of North Dakota farmland will not be planted this spring due to wet
weather, reports Mike Hergert (KKXL, Grand Forks, ND). About 3/4 of those 1.1 million acres
would have been planted to small grains. Mike says this is the latest spring wheat planting since
1974. Good weather lately spurred farmers' progress in completing planting. Only some
soybeans, sunflowers and other row crops remain to be planted. Ironically, farmers without
flooding are doing well and would even like a little rain, but they aren't saying that out loud.



LARRY A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penay for Prvate Use $300










United States Department of Agriculture Office of Communicatioi&: Washington, DC 20250-1300

Letter No. 2717 '. June 9, 1995

AN INCREASE IN PORK ASSESSMENTS -- To keepup wit, flation, the Department of
Agriculture is increasing the assessment rate for hogs am ~ork by one tenth of a percent,
raising it from .35 percent to .45 percent. Domestic and impolte.hogs, pork and pork products
will be affected beginning September 3, 1995. Importer assessnmnts will also be adjusted and
the combination of the two rates. "Iean an additional $10-$12 million each year to the National
Pork Research and Promoj $40 million budget. Assessments are levied when live
hogs are sold and on i rrk products. This is only the second increase in the
assessment rate since tI s establish| 1986. Contact: Gil High (202) 720-8998.

NO EXTENSIONS COTTO LNN pland cotton loans maturing June 30 will not be
extended beyond th d te. A on the r rements of the amended Agricultural Act of 1949,
loan extensions won available on out ta ing Commodity Credit Corporation nonrecourse
upland cotton price s loans mat in n June 30, 1995. These 10-month loans can be
extended for eight mon .b e average price for upland cotton for the preceding
month exceeds 130 perce age spot price for the preceding 36 months. The May,
1995 average spot market price was 105.38 cents per pound, 160 percent of the May, 1992
through April, 1995 average price. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

USDA WANTS INPUT INTO SHEEP AND WOOL ORDER -- Should the U.S. Department of
Agriculture establish a sheep and wool promotion, research, education and information
program? That's the question USDA officials are asking, and they would like your response.
The program is authorized by the Sheep Promotion, Research and Information Act of 1994 and
would include a 120 member board of producers, feeders and importers. Funding for the
program would come from a mandatory assessment on domestic sheep producers, feeders and
exporters. The rate would be one cent per pound on live sheep sold and 2 cents per pound on
greasy wool sold. Importers would pay one cent per pound on live sheep and sheep products
and two cents per pound on degreased wool and wool products. Imported raw wool would be
exempt from the assessments. To comment on the proposal, send your comments by July 17
to USDA's AMS, Room 2624-S, P.O. Box 96456, Washington, D.C. 20090-6456. Contact:
Becky Unkenholz (202) 720-8998.

SPECIAL EGG INSPECTION TRANSFERRED -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food
Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) began inspecting plants producing liquid, frozen and dried
egg products at 81 plants around the country. The duties were transferred from USDA's
Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) to FSIS. These new duties will add to FSIS's overall
responsibility of inspecting all meat and poultry sold in retail commerce. Almost 160 inspectors,
supervisors and staff transferred from AMS to FSIS to make the transition as smooth as
possible. Contact: Jacque Knight (202) 720-9113.








RULES FOR NEWLY FORMED DIVISION -- The newly formed National Appeals Division of the
U.S. Department of Agriculture is establishing its operating rules. Created as part of the
reorganization of USDA, this division consolidates several agency appeals units into one
independent organization reporting directly to the Secretary of Agriculture. Proposed appeals
procedures would apply to adverse decisions relating to denial of participation in USDA
programs, compliance with program requirements, payments to participants and the amount of
benefits to participants. The National Appeals Division will hear appeals of adverse decisions
by the Consolidated Farm Service Agency, the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation, the Natural
Resources Conservation Service, the Rural Business and Cooperative Development Service, the
Rural Housing and Community Development Service and any other agencies so designated by
the Secretary of Agriculture. A copy of the proposed regulations is published in the May 22
Federal Register. Contact: Martha Cashion (202) 720-3310.

BIOTECHNOLOGY PERMITS ON INTERNET -- To provide the public with fast, easy access
to timely data about permit applications and the issuance of biotechnology permits, the U.S.
Department of Agriculture will list this information on Internet. Information concerning receipt of
permit applications and the issuance of permits by USDA's Animal Plant and Health Inspection
Service (APHIS) for environmental releases of some genetically engineered organisms is now
available on the Internet. The Internet address for APHIS biotechnology permits on the World
Wide Web is http://www.aphis.usda.gov/BBEP/BP/. If you need help accessing the APHIS
Biotechnology Permits Home Page, call Arnold Foudin at (301) 734-7612. Foudin can also
provide information about environmental releases conducted under permit in hard copy form.
Contact: Cynthia A. Eck (301) 734-5931.

WHO SHOULD BE ON THE COMMITTEE? -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture is looking for
nominations to fill appointments to the newly formed Fresh Products Shipping Inspection
Program Advisory Committee. USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service administers the Fresh
Products Shipping Point Inspection Program, which the committee will review in terms of its
administration, operations and funding. USDA is seeking nominees from all sectors of the fruit
and vegetable industry, including growers, shippers, receivers and processors. Send
nominations by June 19 to USDA's AMS, Fresh Products Branch, P.O. Box 96456, Room 2056-
S, Washington, D.C. 20090-6456. Contact: Becky Unkenholz (202) 720-8998.

FIRST USDA GRADUATE FELLOWS -- The first participants in the U.S. Department of.
Agriculture/Woodrow Wilson Foundation graduate fellowship program were selected. Eight
students from 1890's land-grant institutions were chosen for the fellowship based on superior
academic achievements, leadership qualities, strong character and their involvement in
community and university activities. Established in February, the fellowship program is based
on a partnership with the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, a non-profit educational foundation
designed to assist American students in achieving their higher education goals and the 1890
institutions. This helps graduates prepare for careers at USDA and affords USDA/1890 scholars
the opportunity to earn advanced degrees in the areas important to the mission of USDA. For
every year of the fellowship, the students agree to one year of service to USDA. For more
information about the graduate fellowship program or the selected participants, contact Richard
LaPointe at (202) 720-2611. Contact: Martha Cashion (202) 720-3310.


Edited by: Lori Spiczka Holm








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1983 -- How we track the weather has changed a lot since recently
retired USDA Meteorologist Norton Strommen began forecasting. In this edition of Agriculture
USA, Brenda Curtis talks with Dr. Strommen about the changes he has seen. (Weekly 5:00
documentary feature).

CONSUMER TIME #1458 -- Good news for all -- soaring farm exports. Tracking the weather
through the years. New study on alcohol and weight gain. How to properly care for azaleas.
Azalea insect and disease problems. (Weekly consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1970 -- A friendly fungus helps corn and soybean farmers battle a
costly crop disease. Making conservation compliance farmer friendly. Rains are fostering farmer
frustration. A program to promote sheep and wool? The beef hormone issue heats up.
(Weekly agriculture features).

UPCOMING ON USDA'S RADIO NEWSLINE -- Monday, June 12, world agricultural supply
and demand; cotton and wool outlook. Tuesday, June 13, feed update; oil crops outlook; rice
outlook; wheat outlook; world markets and trade for grains and oilseeds; weekly weather and
crops. Thursday, June 15, milk production. Friday, June 16, cattle on feed. Tuesday, June 20,
weekly weather and crops; agricultural outlook; agricultural income and finance. Thursday, June
22, catfish processing. Friday, June 23, livestock, dairy and poultry outlook; U.S. agricultural
trade update; livestock slaughter. These are the USDA reports we know about in advance.
Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or (202) 720-8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m. ET each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE


FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on USDA's participation in the National Home Ownership
Strategy.

ACTUALITIES -- Forest Service Chief Jack Ward Thomas on Forest Service Re-invention.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Thursday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, Telstar 302, C-band, Channel 6 (Transponder 3H), audio
6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3820 MHz. Monday, 11:00-11:15 a.m. ET, Galaxy 4, Channel
12 (C-band), audio 6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3940 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call
Larry A. Quinn at (202)720-6072 or 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 202050-1300.




OF FLORIDA

4 312620811r35 906II8
OFF MIKE

INDIANA FARM TOUR...drew broadcasters like Lew Middleton (WIBC, Indianapolis, IN), Skip
Davis (WASK/WKOA, Lafayette, IN), Ron Powers (WOWO, Ft. Wayne, IN) and Darmin Johnston
(AgriAmerica Network, Indianapolis, IN) for a media preview day this week. One of the most
interesting of five northwest Indiana farms visited was Rose Acre Farm which boasts 1.2 million
laying hens. Lew says they observed egg gathering, processing, grading and toured an egg
cracking facility where liquid products are prepared. Southern Indiana farmers are still struggling
to get corn and soybeans planted which is 18 days behind average planting time.

ALL WET...still describes conditions in Missouri, reports Jim Coyle (KRES, Moberly, MO).
Northern third of the state still has virtually nothing planted. Jim has done 25 on-farm interviews
in 17 counties since mid-May as part of is his "Farmer Appreciation Days" series which continues
through mid-June. He says in all his travels he's not seen a single tractor moving in the fields,
except mowing lawns by the homesteads. This flood of '95 is being declared by some locally
as worse than the flood of '93 in economic impact. Crops were planted in '93, but nothing much
was planted in '95. Jim's on-farm interviews have covered everything from livestock, crops,
emus, mules, and even a "worm farm."

HURRICANE ALLISON...dumped 4-5 inches of rain in Everett Griner's (Southeast Ag Net,
Moultrie, GA) area. Cotton about 10-12 inches high needed the rain, but wind knocked over
cornstalks in many fields. Farmers won't be getting in the fields anytime soon.

FATHER/SON TEAM...covers agriculture for Texas State Network (TSN). Jim Stewart (KFYO,
Lubbock, TX) connects long distance with his son, Blair Stewart (TSN, Arlington, TX) for daily
statewide broadcasts from 5:30-6 a.m. Jim continues with Ag Producers Radio Network reports
from 6-6:30 a.m. and has an hour-long noon program. On the southern Texas plains, weather
effects have limited dryland cotton planting to 15% completion (45% of cotton acreage is non-
irrigated there). With cotton demand high, many planting attempts will be made in the next 8-10
da ter thataternatives of soybeans, grain sorghum and sunflowers will be considered.

LARRY QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300









United States Department of Agriculture Office of Communications.
Letter No. 2718 e 0o June 16, 1995

FOREST SERVICE REINVENTION UNDERWAY -- When the plaordfully implemented, the U.S.
Department of Agriculture's Forest Service Reinvention will save U.S.payers $1.3 billion. The
agency has already reduced its 42,000 member staff by 4,000 since 1992, with plans to eliminate
another 3,000 positions by 1999. After putting forth a proposal to reorganize the agency, public
input provided impetus for creation of nine guiding initiatives. Chief Jack Ward Thomas says
initiatives include downsizing Washington, regional and station headquarters, strengthening
accountability measures, Umgphaing customer service and capitalizing on new technologies.
They also include cr g S~~~ dership teams, reengineering work processes, creating
internal enterprise/ a and inivesg in employees. Implementation is set to begin
immediately. Cof. : Alan Polk (2 05-1134.

DOORS ARE C INjN~QgEDI.D -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture is about 20
percent through isljS t of over 1200 off`c to be closed, and that is right on schedule. More
than 900 offices ar on track for clsirs by the year 1997. In addition to closing field offices,
administrative mana fuenjtip h'e been consolidated and county-based field offices are
being realigned into fi t rs. Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman is estimating a
five-year savings of $4.1 bi contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.

JOINT GRAIN COMMISSION REPORT DELAYED -- The interim report due from the U.S.-
Canada Joint Commission on Grains will be delayed slightly. The original due date of June 12
has passed, and commissioners expect a one week delay while they work out complications in
finalizing the report text. Commissioners reached substantive agreement at their latest meeting
in Winnipeg on June 1 and 2. Commission Co-chair James Miller of the U.S. says there was no
disagreement in the substance of the report, but five working days was not enough time to
coordinate the final text review by ten commissioners who are in two countries across four time
zones. Contact: Wayne Baggett (202) 720-2032.

CHANGING SUGAR ALLOTMENTS -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture is predicting five
countries will fall short of meeting their tariff rate quota for sugar, making it possible for other
countries in the program to make up the difference. Barbados, Congo, Gabon, Papua New
Guinea, and St. Kitts and Nevis face the 92,427 metric ton shortage. While this doesn't mean
a change in the overall tariff-rate quota announced in August 1994, it does mean that other
countries will have an opportunity to buy up the sugar. Contact: Glenn Kaup (202) 720-3329.

EGYPT ELIGIBLE FOR MORE WHEAT -- A reallocation within the Export Enhancement
Program has made it possible for Egypt to buy more U.S. wheat. A transfer of 500,000 metric
tons from the Former Soviet Union and Yemen to Egypt makes this possible. While the
reallocation does not change the total 1994/1995 global allocation of wheat, it does make it
possible for Egypt to use up the quota. Contact: Glenn Kaup (202) 720-3329.








LOAN RATES FOR MINOR OILSEEDS -- County price support loan rates for 1995 crops of
mustard seed, safflower seed and sunflower seed are among those announced by the U.S.
Department of Agriculture. Determined in accordance with the amended Agricultural Act of 1949,
these rates reflect the national average price support rate of $8.70 per hundredweight for each
type of oilseed. For a rate schedule, contact Thomas Fink of USDA's Consolidated Farm Service
Agency at (202) 720-8701. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

HOW MANY COMPLIED? -- The latest figures from the U.S. Department of Agriculture indicate
just over 83 percent of participants in the 1994 Acreage Reduction Program complied with
program requirements. Of total crop acreage bases established for wheat, feed grains, cotton
and rice, 83.1 percent were on farms where producers were in final compliance with the 1994
commodity production adjustment program requirements. Producers must be in compliance
with program requirements to be eligible to participate in USDA programs. Consolidated Farm
Service Agency offices have state-by-state compliance rates. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202)
720-8206.

FLUE-CURED TOBACCO RATES ARE IN -- The 1995 flue-cured tobacco rates are just two
cents different than last year. The 1995 flue-cured tobacco grade loan rates range from $1.05
to $1.92 per pound, compared with the 1994 range of $1.03 to $1.92 per pound. The 1995 rate
is based on the price support level of $1.597 per pound. The Flue-Cured Tobacco Cooperative
Stabilization Corporation will deduct one cent a pound from the loan rates to cover their
administrative and overhead costs. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

CLEANING TOXIC WATER WITH CROPS -- Farm crop wastes can be turned into toxic
wastewater cleaners. U.S. Department of Agriculture scientist Wayne Marshall discovered crop
waste can be turned into granules which remove toxic metals from industrial wastewater. Water
cleaning granules, like those found in fish tanks, can be made from the hulls of soybeans,
cottonseed and rice. Soybean hulls ranked the highest in field tests, removing up to 100 percent
of zinc, copper and nickel from wastewater. Marshall says granulated activated carbons solve
two problems: how to get rid of agricultural waste and how to get rid of potentially toxic metals
in water. In 1994, the food processing industry produced about 9 billion pounds of soybean
hulls, 3.3 billion pounds each of cottonseed and rice hulls and 22 billion pounds of sugarcane
bagasse--the fibers left after the sweet juices are extracted. These granular activated carbons,
or GAC's, work because of the large number of tiny pores and channels formed when heated
to a high temperature in a special furnace. To make the GAC's, researchers grind the hulls or
bagasse, add black molasses as a binding agent and cook them over 900 degrees to remove
any unstable waste material, which leaves true charcoal behind. It's that charcoal that contains
all the tiny pits, pores and channels that prove invaluable in taking the waste out of wastewater.
Contact: Lisa Spurlock (301) 344-2824.

ON THE INTERNET -- To access this document via Internet, point your gopher to esusda.gov
and a menu selection will appear or send an e-mail message to almanac@esusda.gov. The
single line message should read: send(space)USDA-releases(space)help. Retrieval instructions
and a list of documents currently available will appear. Need more help? Contact: Maria
Bynum (202) 720-5192.


Edited by: Lori Spiczka Holm







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA #1984 -- As the temperatures heat up, people head outdoors to eat. In
this edition of Agriculture USA, Lori Spiczka talks with the Acting Director of USDA's Meat and
Poultry Hotline about how to make summer eating safe. (Weekly 5:00 documentary feature).

CONSUMER TIME #1459 -- Packing a safe picnic basket. A new nutrition program. Consumer
concerns about pesticides. Reinvention of USDA's Forest Service is underway. Nutrition help
for new people entering the United States. (Weekly consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1971 -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman talks about the future of
farm programs. New approach improves a weapon against bollworms and budworms.
Alternative crops and uses are gaining momentum. A farmer friendly fungus helps cotton and
soybean producers. Weather puts a damper on crop prospects. (Weekly agriculture
features).

UPCOMING ON USDA'S RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tuesday, June 20, weekly weather and crops;
agricultural outlook; agricultural income and finance. Thursday, June 22, catfish processing.
Friday, June 23, livestock, dairy and poultry outlook; U.S. agricultural trade update; livestock
slaughter. Tuesday, June 27, agricultural chemical usage for vegetables; weekly weather and
crops. Thursday, June 29, agricultural prices; tobacco markets and trade. Friday, June 30,
tropical products report. These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our
newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or (202) 720-8359
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m. ET each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE


FEATURES -- Patrick O'Leary reports on USDA's "Team Nutrition" initiative to teach kids about
healthy eating.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA Secretary Dan Glickman testifies on commodities and farm bill issues
before a Senate committee; First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, Secretary Dan Glickman and
Under Secretary Ellen Haas introduce "Team Nutrition.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Thursday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, Telstar 302, C-band, Channel 6 (Transponder 3H), audio
6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3820 MHz. Monday, 11:00-11:15 a.m. ET, Galaxy 4, Channel
12 (C-band); audio 6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3940 MHz.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services. Call
Larry A. Quinn at (202)720-6072 or 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 202050-1300.




IVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFF MIKE 4

RECORD MEMBERSHIP...in the National Association of Farm Broadcasters (NAFB) is being
reported by Don Wick (KWOA, Worthington, MN), who is NAFB Vice President. Don says the
organization boasts 192 voting members, highest since 1988, and close to 400 associate
members. Don and other NAFB officers are involved now in strategic and long-range planning.
For his station, Don is already working on advance details for on-site coverage of an August
celebration called Farm Fest to be held in Redwood Falls, MN. It's a three-day event and Don
will be originating live broadcasts from there.

CITRUS CROP PROSPECTS...appear excellent in Florida because of changes farmers made
after freezes in the 1980s knocked out many older trees, reports Gary Cooper (Southeast
AgNet, Kenansville, FL). Thicker plantings are possible because of advances in mist or drip
irrigation systems. There are 120-140 trees per acre now compared to 75-80 per acre before.
Also, farmers are trimming trees to enhance productivity. A lot of the new orchards are
beginning to come into production so ideal growing conditions could mean large expansion in
production. Major citrus growing region also has shifted further south near the Gulf of Mexico
after freeze losses in the 80's.

FANTASTIC...is how Mike Austin (WGEE, Green Bay, WI) described this year's alfalfa crop in
northeast Wisconsin. Since the month began, Mike has covered 28 events related to June Dairy
Month celebration. At one on-farm breakfast/brunch near Appleton, WI, 8,112 people were
served dairy products from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.

KEEPING THE ATTITUDES UP...is what Judy Stratman and Gene Williams (WNAX, Yankton,
SD) are doing. Judy spoke to farmers at Willow Lake, SD, this week and emphasized the need
for older farmers to encourage young ones during this year when crop setbacks have been
caused by unusually wet weather. "Who knows? Next year, we may need to draw on this
moisture supply," Judy reminded. Disease problems are appearing in wheat due to high
moisture, and soybean acreage is up because of inability to plant corn.

LARRY AU UINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300











United States Department of Agriculture Office of Communications Washington, DC 20250-1300

Letter No. 2719 June 23, 1995

IT'S FARMING, TO BE MORE PRECISE -- On a field trip to look at precisely how precision
farming works, Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman noted technology originally developed for
the military is now helping farmers. "Technology that allows a military rescue team to find
Captain Scott O'Grady in the middle of a Bosnian forest... within yards of his position and pluck
him out of harm's way...ca .e a tractor through a 500-acre field to the precise locations of
insect infestation, or t st plant nutrient levels are below average." Through the use
of satellites, remote aTrn am ters, farmers can target specific areas of their fields for
better pest and eK management ~veloped by USDA's Agricultural Research Service,
precision agricul uses tractor-mo l, computers and satellite connections to measure
yields and anticil fertll' evprB)es i e needs within 2 to 6 feet of the tractor. This also
reduces farmers c sts hen they c t wn on the use of chemicals and keeps excess
chemicals out of environment. C 'ct: Maria Bynum (202) 720-5192.

EN ROUTE TO THE S ATION -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman is joining
Vice President Al Gore a cabinet members on a trip to Russia. They're taking part
in the fifth session of the Gore-Chernomyrdin Commission, a bilateral commission chaired by
Gore and Russian Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin. Glickman said, "The committee will
provide a venue for discussion between our two countries to explore issues and resolve
problems of mutual interest." Glickman will also visit several agricultural projects, including an
agricultural training and education center, a sawmill and a daify.:, Contact: Lynn K.
Goldsbrough (202) 720-3930.

RESEARCH INVESTMENTS PAY BACK -- USDA's invTetmehti throughi~tthe Alternative
Agricultural Research and Commercialization (AARC) CenteieLae startingto beipaid back by
another company. The Natural Fibers Corporations (NFC) ',Nebraws@- received start-up
support from AARC to make comforters and pillows out of goosde? wn and milkweed floss.
NFC's president said their business is growing so rapidly farmers e,,having to grow more
milkweed for the floss market. The AARC Center makes repayable investments in private firms
to commercialize new industrial uses for agricultural and forestry materials. AARC Center's
Director, W. Bruce Crain, said these repayments are a "promising sign and demonstrate the
program is working as Congress intended." The AARC Center was created as a result of the
1990 Farm Bill. Contact: Ron Buckhalt (202) 690-1624.

STATES SHARE IN THE PROFITS -- Money collected from land-use fees and sales of National
Forest resources are being shared among 43 states and Puerto. Rico. Federal law requires
states to use their share of these receipts for public schools and roads. Oregon receives the
largest share of the $271.4 million, with a payment of just under $110 million from Forest
Service receipts. North Dakota receives just $70.67, but tops the list in payments from land use
fees at $1.8 million. Contact: Marty Longan (202) 205-1777.









EARLY CONGRATULATIONS ON 2002 OLYMPICS -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman
congratulated Salt Lake City, Utah leaders for winning the bid to host-the Winter Olympics in
2002. The Secretary pledged Forest Service support to make the venture successful and
environmentally sound. Part of the Wastch-Cache National Forest, Snowbasin Ski Resort will
be the site of the men's and women's Downhill and Super Giant Slalom events. Ice skating,
ice hockey and luge are among the other winter events to be held throughout the Salt Lake
Valley and in Ogden. The Forest Service worked with the Salt Lake City Bid Committee to help
address environmental concerns in hosting the event. An environmental advisory committee,
which included Forest Service representatives, encouraged use of mass transit among the
venues, recycling of all materials and a variety of environmental programs during the Olympics.
Glickman says he expects this will provide an increase in activities in the Wastch-Cache National
Forest as ski teams come to Utah to train for the 2002 Olympics. Contact: Bob Swindford
(801) 625-5347.

RATE CHANGES FOR TOBACCO -- There are new rates for assessments on imported
unmanufactured tobacco. Required by the Omnibus Reconciliation Act of 1993, marketing and
no-net-cost assessments are made on imported tobacco. Marketing assessments apply to all
tobacco, while no-net assessments apply to burley and flue-cured tobacco and are charged on
each pound of tobacco imported for consumption into U.S. The Budget Deficit Marketing
Assessment begins July 1 at 1.6555 cents per pound. On October 1, the rate changes to 1.661
cents per pound. The Importer No-Net-Cost Assessments will be 1.003 cents per pound for flue
cured tobacco and remain in effect through June 30, 1996. For burley tobacco, the rate will be
7.386 cents per pound and will decrease on October 1, 1995 to..275 cents per pound. If a tariff
rate quota is proclaimed, these rates are subject to change. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202)
720-8206.

FARM INCOME DECLINE PREDICTED -- In their latest Agricultural Income and Finance report,
USDA financial analysts are predicting net farm income for 1995 at $38 to $48 billion. That
number is down from the $50 billion projected in 1994. Net cash income is expected to range
from $48 to $58 billion in 1995, compared to $54 billion forecast for 1994. On the up side,
average farm household income is expected to increase slightly in 1994 and remain steady
through 1995. USDA analysts say net cash income could decline the most on farms
specializing in red meat production, due in part to large U.S. beef production and cattle prices
that could drop as much as 13 percent. Spring planting delayed by wet weather could lead to
a wide disparity in farm income for Midwest and Northern Plains farmers and financial stress
for farmers who haven't fully recovered from the 1993 floods. But despite tight credit markets,
lenders continue to aggressively pursue qualified borrowers and competition for loans will
continue to intensify in 1995. Contact: Mitchell Morehart (202) 219-0801.

VEGETABLE REPORT DELAYED -- National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) had to
reschedule delivery of its June 27 report, "Agricultural Chemical Usage--Vegetables." Delays
were encountered during summarization and review of all information, making the
postponement of the report necessary. Release of the report has been rescheduled for
Tuesday, July 18 at 3 p.m. Contact: Dixie Lee (202) 720-5863.


EDITED BY LORI SPICZKA HOLM






3
FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1986 -- Farmers are getting more and more precise as satellites,
remote sensors and combines with computers are becoming more common. In this edition of
Agriculture USA, Lori Spiczka gets help explaining this new technology from Agriculture
Secretary Dan Glickman. (Weekly cassette -- 5 minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1465 -- A cheap food policy. Making farming more precise helps
everyone. Colored cukes carry carotene. Personal mosquito control. Integrated Pest
Management at the National Arboretum. (Weekly cassette -- consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1978 -- Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman visits Russia. U.S.
agricultural exports are looking good. USDA field office closings on track. New farm income
forecast. To be more precise, it's farming. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tuesday, June 27, agricultural chemical usage
for vegetables; weekly weather and crops. Thursday, June 29, agricultural prices; tobacco
markets and trade. Friday, June 30, tropical products report. Monday, July 3, world
horticultural trade and U.S. export opportunities; poultry slaughter. Tuesday, July 4, HOLIDAY.
Friday, July 7, dairy products; annual noncitrus fruits and nuts. These are USDA reports we
know about in advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed
in this lineup.
USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359. COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., ET, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

***Note: Newsfeeds are 15 minutes longer this week to accommodate more stories.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman on the farm bill debate and his
participation in the Clinton administration trip to Russia. USDA CFSA Acting Deputy
Administrator Kenneth Ackerman on crop insurance changes to aid Midwest farmers who.were
prevented from normal planting. Ken Ackerman on fast approaching deadline for noninsured
crop assistance program. USDA NRCS Chief Paul Johnson on the Wetlands Reserve Program
sign-up deadline.

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on USDA's Precision Agriculture Field Day, Lynn Wyvill
reports on summer food safety tips and on how to safely cook ground beef. Lynn Wyvill also
reports on conservation compliance plan variances.

UPCOMING -- Lynn Wyvill reports on Secretary Glickman's message to cook hamburgers
thoroughly during the summer grilling season. Pat O'Leary reports on insect detectives.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Thursday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. ET, Telstar 302, Channel 6 (Transponder 3H), (C-band), audio
6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3820 MHz. Monday, 11:00-11:30 a.m. ET, Galaxy 4, Channel
12 (C-band), audio 6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3940 MHz.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

4 3 1262 08135 916 7
OFF MIKE

ON THE ROAD...to visit 55 radio stations in 42 cities covering three states in 14 days. That's
the plan that Taylor Brown, Rick Haines, and Lee Lemke (Northern Ag Network, Billings, MT)
have to celebrate the 20th Anniversary of Northern Broadcasting Systems in mid-July. The trio
plans to take their entire staff in a caravan through Montana, Wyoming and South Dakota
spending two hours at each station for local celebrations with stations' staff and their radio
listeners. Taylor has owned the network for the past 10 years. It was founded by former farm
broadcaster, Conrad Burns, now a U.S. Senator from Montana.

COLORADO HAY DAYS...and the 73rd Annual Greeley Independence Stampede are gaining
attention this week, reports Tom Riter (KFKA Radio, Greeley, CO). The stampede boasts the
largest 4th of July Rodeo in the world and has events that started June 17 and continue through
July 4. Grand Marshall for their.parade is Paul Hoshiko, a local farmer/rancher, who became
a 4-H member in 1938 and has continued his 4-H participation as a member and leader for 57
years. Tom says half of their yearly rainfall came in May with 10 days of rain that created
problems for fruit and vegetable harvesting. Wheat harvest is now underway. Half of the dairies
in Colorado are located near Greeley.

WHEAT YIELDS DOWN...in Oklahoma as they near the completion of this year's harvest,
reports Carey Martin (Oklahoma Agrinet, Oklahoma City, OK). This is due to a variety of
weather effects such as mild winter, dry spring and wet right before harvest causing root rot and
other diseases. Some areas were reporting yields 10-15 bushels per acre lower than usual.
Cow-calf producers are looking into "retained ownership" this year due to low calf prices.
Producers are considering partnering with feedlots rather than selling. Carey and colleague,
Ron Hays, recently moved into new studios. New phone number:(405) 858-1400 Ext. 297.

LOW POWER TV...is serving an increasing number of rural communities nationwide. There are
nearly 1,600 stations that participate in a Community Broadcasting Association that is planning
its anal meetingbere in Washington, November 11-14.

LARRY A. UINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Prvate Use $300









\I I 1IL


United States Dep


Letter No. 2720


* Washington, DC 20250-1300


June 30, 1995


MORE HELP FOR WEATHER WEAFWl ew more changes in farm programs
should help producers in areas where we s caused delays in planting. Agriculture
Secretary Dan Glickman announced the changes which included waiving a cover crop
requirement on weather affected acreage in the Acreage Conservation Reserve. Variances in
conservation plans for highly erodible land will be granted if bad weather prevented farmers
from meeting plan requirements. Crop insurance has also been streamlined to determine
prevented-planting losses. Insurance providers will now pay prevented-planting losses on acres
designated by producers, rather than using the complex calculation previously established.
Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

OPEN FIELDS FOR HAYING AND GRAZING -- In counties where weather has caused feed
shortages, emergency haying and grazing of Conservation Reserve Program acreage will be
allowed. Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman made the announcement, saying rules for
emergency haying and grazing are there to help livestock producers through a critical situation
while preserving wildlife habitats. Qualifying producers are those living in counties determined
to have suffered a 40 percent loss in hay and pasture production, where precipitation levels are
above 140 percent (or below 40 percent) of normal and have been approved for early release
from the program. Producers must decide whether they will hay or graze the land, but are not
allowed to do both. Grazing can begin immediately upon approval, but haying must wait until
July 15, 1995. Contact: Bruce Merkle (301) 720-8206.

JOINT COMMISSION ISSUES REPORT -- "This report is unique in that it takes a forward-
looking, long term approach to move both countries away from the immediate trade disputes,"
said Jim Miller, the co-chair of the Canada-U.S. Joint Commission on Grains. Following an early
June meeting, the Commission released a report including short and long-term initiatives. One
recommendation is to establish an industry-led committee to monitor ongoing trade and provide
suggestions on preventing or managing short-term cross-border issues. Long-term suggestions
include eliminating the Export Enhancement Program for cereals and placing the Canadian
Wheat Board more at risk of profit or loss in the marketplace. The Commission of five
Americans and five Canadians will make final recommendations to both governments in
September. Contact: Wayne Baggett (202) 720-2032.

OPTING OUT OF THE CRP -- More than half a million acres have been approved for early
removal from the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). Producers had the chance to ask for
release from terms and conditions of their CRP contracts, and early figures indicate 651,342
acres have been approved. Not all acreage in the CRP was eligible for the early departure.
Among acreage excluded from early release are existing CRP acres functioning as filterstrips,
waterways and some timber establishments. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.


^I
ii


; 6


HlI;-;l








CHANGES FOR THE F-O-R Rapidly shifting market conditions have prompted a change in
the Farmer-Owned Reserve (FOR). USDA will require producers to repay 1994-crop feed grain
FOR loans and the FOR will be closed to entry of 1994-crop feed grains pledged as collateral
for nine-month price support loans. For those producers who had already stated their intentions
to enter the FOR and those already enrolled, a four-month loan extension will be granted. Grain
in the FOR is affected when grain supplies are required to meet domestic or international needs.
Market conditions have changed a lot since feed grains were allowed into the reserve. For
example, corn supply and demand have tightened significantly, one of the reasons for the
change. Producers needing to repay their FOR loans will be notified by their Farm Service
Agency Office. Also, storage payments have stopped for corn and oats pledged as collateral
on FOR loans. This will continue until prices have been below the stop-storage-payment level
for more than 90 consecutive days. Contacts Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

A BETTER WAY TO PUT OUT FIRES -- Finding a better way to put out fires was the goal of
a team of fire management experts from the Interior and Agriculture Departments. Following
one of the most intense wildland fire seasons since the early 1900's, the Secretaries of
Agriculture and Interior formed a group to look at current federal fire policies and come up with
suggestions for improvement. The committee has done that and is now asking for public input.
Recommendations include a uniform policy for all agencies dealing with fire, an emphasis on
accountability for fire management and interagency cooperation. One of the co-chairs of the
team, Dr. Charles Philpot of USDA's Forest Service says, "The foundation for managing wildland
fires is safety for the public and firefighters." For a copy of the report, call the Bureau of Land
Management in Boise, Idaho at (208) 387-5150 or (208) 387-5457. Comments on the proposed
fire management strategies must be received by July 24, 1995 to be included in the analysis.
Contact: Janet Sledge (202) 720-2065.

AWARD WINNING USDA SCIENTISTS A insect and soil helped a chemist and two engineers
win top technology transfer awards from USDA. Chemist James Oliver invented a way to test
the effectiveness of a chemical attractant used to trap gypsy moths. A simple and much less
expensive lab test could help federal and state agencies make sure the attractant has the right
chemical composition to make it effective. That would replace a time-consuming and expensive
field test. The engineering team of George Foster and Kenneth Renard won for their work to
develop an updated system for measuring soil erosion and runoff. All three scientists work for
USDA's Agricultural Research Service and will receive the 1995 Technology Transfer Awards
this fall. Contact: Sean Adams (301) 344-2723.

1995 FARM PROGRAM ENROLLMENT -- Just over 167 million acres are slated to be in USDA
programs this year. Crops covered by the 1995 farm programs include wheat, corn, grain
sorghum, barley, oats, cotton and rice. Corn producers taking part in the 1995 programs
agreed to reduce their plantings by at least 7.5 percent from established crop acreage bases.
Extra-long-staple cotton producers agreed to reduce plantings by 10 percent, while participating
rice producers agreed to a 5 percent reduction. Reductions were not required for wheat,
sorghum, barley, oats and upland cotton producers. Those taking part in 1995 farm programs
must purchase crop insurance to qualify for USDA program benefits. Contact: Bruce Merkle
(202) 720-8206.


EDITED BY LORI SPICZKA HOLM






3
FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1987 New products for your home, your automobile and even your
grill are coming to soon to a store near you, thanks to American farmers. In this edition of
Agriculture USA, Gary Crawford looks at a special product development program that is making
new uses for farm crops blossom. (Weekly cassette 5 minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1466 The other white meat. Meat bargains this summer. Beneficial
bugs. One set of fire guidelines. New meat inspection process put on hold by Congress.
(Weekly cassette consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1979 Rice market continues to be hot. A report from the
U.S./Canadian Grains Commission. Cleaning up manure spills. More changes for crop
insurance. Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman discusses trade outlook for Russia. (Weekly
cassette news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Monday, July 3, world horticultural trade and U.S.
export opportunities; poultry slaughter. Tuesday, July 4, HOLIDAY. Wednesday, July 5, weekly
weather and crops. Friday, July 7, dairy products; annual noncitrus fruits and nuts. Tuesday,
July 11, world agricultural supply and demand for cotton; weekly weather and crops.
Wednesday, July 12, world agricultural supply and demand; cotton and wool outlook; cotton
world markets and trade; Thursday, July 13, feed outlook; oil crops outlook; rice outlook; wheat
outlook; hog outlook; world agricultural production; grain world markets and trade; oilseeds
world market and trade; tobacco world markets and trade. Friday, July 14, agricultural prices;
milk production. These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries
many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359. COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., ET, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

ACTUALITIES Ken Ackerman, Federal Crop Insurance Corporation, talks about additional
crop insurance adjustments to help weather challenged farmers. Bob Stephenson, Farm
Service Agency, talks about emergency haying and grazing to help producers affected by
adverse weather. Mike Taylor, Administrator of Food Safety and Inspection Service, says
administration is disappointed by House Committee ruling which could delay new meat and
poultry inspection.


SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Thursday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. ET, Telstar302, Channel 6 (Transponder 3H), (C-band), audio
6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3820 MHz. Monday, 11:00-11:30 a.m. ET, Galaxy 4, Channel
12 (C-band), audio 6.2 and 6.8, downlink frequency 3940 MHz.


Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

4OE 31262 08i35 921 7
OFF MIKE

NEW FARM DIRECTOR...for WCUB, Manitowoc, WI as of June 12 is Lauri Struve who had
been serving as news and part-time farm director at KGRA in Jefferson, Iowa. A native Iowan,
Lauri has been in broadcasting eight years and graduated from Wayne State College in Wayne,
NE with a broadcast communications degree. In her new role, she broadcasts about 10
minutes of news and 10 minutes of farm markets throughout the day.

FARMERS ARE FEELING GOOD...about crops, but they're not as happy with livestock prices,
reports John Everly (KDTH, Dubuque, IA). Plentiful May rainfall has helped crops, but late
planting means crop development is behind. Although hog prices have improved, some
farmers are selling hog herds to concentrate fully on crop production. John says he checks
our radio newsline daily for breaking news. (Our number is 202-488-8358.)

27 YEARS ON-THE-AIR...is the milestone Roger Flemmer (KFAB, Omaha, NE) will reach in
September 14 of those years, he's been their farm broadcaster. Roger hits the air shortly
after 5 a.m. daily with periodic reports from 5-6 a.m., hourly reports till mid-moring and four
reports during the noon hour. From too wet to too hot, Roger says irrigation systems were
back in use on some cornfields last week. Corn, soybeans and sorghum are planted, and
winter wheat is developing well, but late. Wheat harvest there is still three weeks away.

SEED IMPROVEMENT...for navy beans and sugarbeets is being achieved in Michigan by using
certified seed from Idaho. Terry Henne (WSGW, Saginaw, MI) is planning a five-day August
trip to see where the seed is grown and develop features for his local farmers. Local seed was
found unreliable, and outside sources are being used to re-establish quality sources for planting
seed. Other crops are beginning to show some heat stress because of a 3-4 inch moisture
deficit. Terry will mark his 25th year at WSGW next year and his 20th of farm broadcasting
there. Michigan's cherry growing region is preparing for its annual festival during Fourth of July
week.


LARRY A. QINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300