Broadcasters letter - 1994

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Title:
Broadcasters letter - 1994
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Office of Communications
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, DC
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Radio in agriculture -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Television in agriculture -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Broadcasting -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Office of Communications.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Letter no. 2670 (July 15, 1994)-
General Note:
Title from caption.
Citation/Reference:
Picklist A21_34B

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001950703
oclc - 31030522
notis - AKC7245
lccn - sn 94028429
sobekcm - AA00007144_00001
System ID:
AA00007144:00001

Related Items

Preceded by:
Farm broadcasters letter

Full Text





United States DepartS Agriculture ice of Communications Washington, DC 20250-1300
Lete A.i7 / \OCT 0 7 I-O-
Letter No. 2670 &jIQ k 159 g July 15, 1994
EW LOOK o Th ,ekw f Florida
NEW LOOK -- Thi w ek you'll notice ew look an name for this newsletter. We'll
continue to highlight ews an ments, provide story tips, and tell you |ow to access
our regular broadcast s pe will broaden to cover the wide variety of information
that is part of USDA's missile g with farm and agricultural information, we'll include items
on food and consumer services, natural resources and environment, small community and rural
development, and science and education. That's why Farm Broadcasters Letter becomes
Broadcasters Letter with this issue.

ASSISTANCE TO SOUTHEAST FLOOD VICTIMS -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy joined
President Clinton in Georgia this week (July 13) to survey flood damage resulting from Tropical
Storm Alberto. Espy reviewed a range of USDA disaster assistance efforts underway. All states
have USDA food stocks on hand that can be used to help people immediately. Most food is
provided through disaster assistance agencies like the Red Cross. Emergency food stamps are
being issued in needed counties. USDA's Farmers Home Administration has opened several
disaster assistance centers to provide information on emergency loans. Espy said the
Emergency Watershed Protection Program will provide relief from imminent hazards to life and
property resulting from Alberto's effects. USDA estimates that more than 846,674 acres of
cropland have been affected by flooding. This includes peanut, cotton, corn, soybean and
pasture crops in Georgia, Florida and Alabama. USDA's Federal Crop Insurance Corporation
staff are visiting flooded areas to ensure that FCIC and private insurers are prepared to handle
claims for insured crop losses. Contact: Johna Pierce (202) 720-1691.

IMPROVED POULTRY INSPECTION -- On July 11, Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy announced
a poultry enhancement program that provides for a single, more stringent poultry inspection
system to replace multiple types currently used nationally in federally inspected poultry plants.
Secretary Espy says this proposal represents a zero tolerance standard plus many other
improvements for poultry inspection. Espy emphasized that this proposal is part of USDA's
ongoing efforts "to use the best available science in conjunction with good common sense to
improve the safety of our food supply." A USDA Task Force including input from two on-line
federal inspectors developed this proposal over the past year. A 90-day public comment period
began July 13. Contact: Patrick Collins (202) 720-0283.

EMPOWERMENT ZONES/ENTERPRISE COMMUNITIES -- More than 500 local communities
with their own visionary ideas for community revitalization have applied to be Empowerment
Zones and Enterprise Communities. Nine Empowerment Zones (six urban and three rural) and
95 Enterprise Communities (65 urban and 30 rural) will be designated through a nationwide
competition according to a joint announcement by Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy and Housing
and Urban Development Secretary Henry Cisneros. The program will help some of the most
impoverished communities across the country take control over their own destiny through
economic development. The designated Empowerment Zones and Enterprise Communities will
have access to up $3 billion of federal resources. Contact: Jim Brownlee (202) 720-2091.







NATIONAL RESOURCES INVENTORY -- USDA's Soil Conservation Service released a
comprehensive study of the condition and trends of the nation's soil, water and related
resources this week. Collected in 1992, data from this National Resources Inventory show that
average erosion rates on cropland nationwide are one-third lower than in 1982 and that
conversion of wetlands to agricultural use has decreased substantially. Issued every five years,
this report points out that rural and urban development continues to claim prime farmland.
Deputy Secretary of Agriculture Richard Rominger said the report shows that American
agriculture is making significant conservation progress while maintaining the world's most reliable
and abundant food supply. Contact: Diana Morse (202) 720-4772.

WHEAT IMPORT RESTRAINTS -- The United States International Trade Commission has found
that wheat imports are interfering with the domestic wheat program. All commissioners
recommended restraints on wheat imports. Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy said these
findings confirm USDA's view that imports from Cdnada are reducing prices for U.S. producers
and increasing budget costs of the wheat program. Secretary Espy pledged to pursue all
alternatives to restrain imports and seek remedies to the unfair practices of the Canadian Wheat
Board. Contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.

NEW GASOLINE RULE -- Environmental Protection Agency's reformulated gasoline regulation
is a big win for farmers and a step forward for the nation says Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy.
The rule requires 30 percent of oxygen added to reformulated gasoline be derived from
renewable resources. Increasing the U.S. ethanol market could substantially reduce America's
dependence on foreign oil. Studies show this new regulation will lessen the nation's dependence
on fossil energy and reduce emissions that damage the ozone layer. Contact: Maria Bynum
(202) 720-5192.

TIMBER SALE REPORT -- USDA's Forest Service has released its Fiscal Year 1993 Timber Sale
Program Information Reporting System annual report which highlights the substantial effect that
ecosystem management is having on the timber sale program. More sales are being designed
to enhance non-timber resources or achieve healthier ecological conditions. Contact: Barbara
Anderson (202) 205-1576.

AGRICULTURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT -- USDA's Soil Conservation Service is sponsoring
a series of eight public forums on natural resource issues throughout the nation. Theme of the
forums is "Agriculture and the Environment: Listening to the Grassroots." The first forum was
held July 14, in Spokane, WA. Other dates and sites are July 19, Springfield, IL; July 21,
Abilene, TX; July 25, Reading, PA; July 28, Sioux Falls, SD; August 2, Longmont, CO; August
4, Columbus, GA; and August 11, Sacramento, CA. Contact: Diana Morse (202) 720-4772.

SAFE COOKING AND HANDLING LABELS -- USDA regulations now mandate that safe
cooking and handling instructions appear on packaging of all raw poultry and meat products.
The mandatory labeling requirement went into effect July 6 and is part of a continuing effort to
improve the meat and poultry inspection systems. Contact: Jacque Knight (202) 720-9113.

HONORING FALLEN FIRE FIGHTERS -- Flags at Agriculture and Interior Department offices
nationwide were lowered to half-staff this week in memory of 14 fire fighters killed in a Colorado
wildfire July 6. In a joint statement, Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy and Interior Secretary Bruce
Babbitt praised the bravery of men and women who died in the South Canyon wildfire near
Glenwood Springs, Colorado.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1937 -- Search for new markets for farmers continues with introduction
of new consumer products from traditional/nontraditional crops and commodities. Gary
Crawford reports. (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME # 1418 -- Empowerment zone program in new phase; meat care labels;
making recreation possible for everyone; handling yard wastes; better poultry inspection in the
works. (Weekly cassette -- 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1928 -- Espy reports on a USDA customer survey; new natural
resources inventory released; USDA purchase of beef; what the weak dollar means for farm
exports; latest crop assessment calls for higher production, lower prices. (Weekly cassette --
news features.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wednesday, July 20, agricultural outlook;
Thursday, July 21, wheat outlook, agricultural outlook for Africa/Middle East; Friday, July 22,
cattle outlook, dairy outlook, U.S. farm trade update; Monday, July 25, poultry outlook; Tuesday,
July 26, rice outlook, crop/weather update; Wednesday, July 27, vegetable industry outlook;
Thursday, July 28, farm numbers report; Friday, July 29, agricultural prices update; oil crops
outlook. These are the USDA reports we know about in advance. Our Newsline carries
many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.



FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy on USDA's ongoing efforts to streamline
services to the public; Acting Assistant Secretary Patricia Jensen on the new Poultry
Improvement Plan; Deputy Secretary of Agriculture Richard Rominger, Assistant Secretary
James Lyons and Soil Conservation Service Chief Paul Johnson on USDA's latest National
Resources Inventory.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on Water Quality Research in West Virginia;
Lynn Wyvill reports on the Beagle Brigade.

On Satellite Galaxy 7, transponder 9, channel 9, audio 6.2 or 6.8, downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.:
Thursday 3:45 4:00 p.m., ET, Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., ET.

Comments or feedback from you are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 262 0813110977
4
OFF MIKE

CHANGES...are happening all. around us in the broadcasting industry and in the federal
workplace as well. We're expanding our horizons a bit and broadening our outreach to all radio
and television stations nationwide. This Broadcasters Letter will continue to help us in the
important task of communicating with you and your listeners about the many and varied
programs encompassed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Farm broadcasters continue to
provide a key link with both the producing and consuming publics and often fill a special role as
an interpreter for the public today. We value that contribution and the support it continues to
give to USDA. At the same time, we understand the powerful role that all radio and television
broadcasters have in helping the public understand the importance of Agriculture's programs
which today extend well beyond the farm. That's why we begin a new era with this issue.

FEEDBACK...about use of our recent feature on "Precision Farming" comes from Brad Hicks
(WGAL-TV, Lancaster, PA). Brad is among several who reported airing these reports telling how
computers and satellites can help apply farm chemicals and irrigation water more precisely--
cutting costs and risks to environment. If you missed the series and would like a tape, let us
know.

OKLAHOMA WHEAT HARVEST...yielded less than expected according to Carey Martin
(Oklahoma Agrinet, recently re-located from KVOO, Tulsa). I know one reason why. On a
recent visit to our family farm in Texas County, lIinessed devastating hail damage nearby to
wheat, corn and sorghum estimated4at $10 million inrerop losses from one night's storm. We
talked with Carey about radio public ~service announcements on food safety which are available.
There are some on Smokey Bear's 50th birthday, too Call if you'd like copies, too.



LARRY A. UINN, Chief
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center .


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










United States rtment of Agricult ,-. Office of Communic atil' Washington, DC 20250-1300
AUG 16 1994 OCT 0CT
Letter No. 2 7 July 22, 1994
0. Jversitt flofida
HEALTH CA RURA RICANS -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy said health
care reform is i health of rural Americans and the health of rural communities.
Espy added that if we to pass universal coverage, we will be short-changing many rural
families. Under the current health care system, rural Americans and farmers are struggling, Espy
said. Only one in five rural Americans have health insurance, including only 31 percent of
agricultural workers. Many face insurance discrimination and lack bargaining power. Secretary
Espy said, "The bottom line is that farmers and rural Americans are not being given a fair shake.
Universal coverage will give hard-working Americans the level playing field they deserve."
Contact: Mary Dixon (202) 720-4623.

1995 FARM BILL FORUMS -- USDA held two public forums in Washington July 20 to receive
recommendations on domestic marketing and promotion policy issues related to the 1995 Farm
Bill. Patricia Jensen, acting assistant secretary for marketing and inspection services, said
these forums were designed to let all interests--whether farmer, agribusiness, cooperatives or
consumer--provide input on programs and policies that will be considered during the 1995 Farm
Bill debate. One forum focused on assistance to agricultural and non-agricultural cooperatives
as well as other rural user organizations. The second forum discussed development of farmers'
markets, niche and specialty crop markets and industrial uses of agricultural products. Those
unable to attend, but wishing to comment, can send written statements to USDA's Agricultural
Marketing Service by July 31. Contact: Connie Crunkleton (202) 720-8998.

SAFE FOOD HANDLING STRESSED FOR SIX STATES -- USDA has stressed safe handling
and cooking of meat and poultry in six states where outbreaks of foodborne illness linked to E.
coli 0157:H7 bacterium are being reported. Reports have been made from Wisconsin,
Pennsylvania, New York, California, Vermont and Connecticut. USDA is working with state
health departments and urging that consumers follow safe handling instructions now appearing
on all raw meat and poultry packages. Also, USDA is working with local and state health officials
and having product recalled when appropriate. Consumers wishing additional information can
call the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline, 1-800-535-4555. Contact: Jacque Knight (202)
720-9113.

SUMMER FOOD SERVICE TO "FREEDOM SCHOOLS" -- USDA's Summer Food Service
Program will play a key role in 17 "Freedom Schools" nationwide. The Children's Defense Fund
established these schools to deal with what Marian Wright Edelman has called the crisis of black
children in the 1990's. Through these schools, disadvantaged children will be provided a safe
haven, positive role models, academic stimulation and nourishing meals. Assistant Secretary of
Agriculture Ellen Haas said USDA's commitment to fighting childhood hunger is year-round.
Haas added that USDA is actively promoting the Summer Food Service Program and working
with the "Freedom Schools" offers an opportunity to reach children at 17 more sites. Contact:
Johna Pierce (202) 720-1691.








WETLANDS RESERVE SIGNUP -- Farmers and ranchers in 20 states will receive acceptance
soon for enrollment in USDA's Wetlands Reserve Program. Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy
said landowners are selling permanent easements to USDA's Agricultural Stabilization and
Conservation Service to restore cropland and other acreage to productive wetland habitat for
future generations. The 75,000 acres chosen from the 590,000 acres offered provided the
highest environmental benefits in the most cost-effective manner. This $66 million program
includes participants in Arkansas, California, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Minnesota,
Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, South Dakota, Tennessee,
Texas, Virginia, Washington and Wisconsin. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

HEALTH CARE NEWS CONFERENCE -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy joined Senators and
farm leaders at a news conference on Capitol Hill July 20 to highlight benefits of universal health
care to rural America. He was joined by Senators Tom Daschle of South Dakota, Tom Harkin
of Iowa, Paul Simon of Illinois and Carol Moseley-Braun of Illinois. Farm leaders participating
included Lee Swenson of the National Farmers Union, Kathy Ozer of the American Family Farm
Coalition, Gary Goldberg of the American Corn Growers Association, Frank Matheson of the
National Association of Farmer Elected Committeemen, and Tom Ashbridge of the American
Agriculture Movement. Contact: Julie Demeo (202) 720-4623.

BIOSAFETY SYMPOSIUM -- The Third International Symposium on the Biosafety Results of
Field Tests of Genetically Modified Plants and Microorganisms is scheduled for November 13-16
in Monterey, CA. Keynote address will focus on "Environmental and Social Impact of Genetically
Modified Organisms" and what has been learned in recent years. U.S. Department of Agriculture
is one of the symposium's co-sponsors. Contact: Al Young, (703) 235-4419.

EXPORT ENHANCEMENT INITIATIVES -- On July 18, Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy
announced a 1.179 million-metric-ton, multi-country package of initiatives under USDA's Export
Enhancement Program to boost sales of U.S. wheat flour during the 1994/95 international
marketing year. Contact: Lynn K. Goldsbrough (202) 720-3930.

BACKPACKERS: PRACTICE FOOD SAFETY -- Getting away and exploring the great outdoors
is a favorite American pastime. To some that means putting on a backpack and hiking far off
into the wilderness. Scenery is beautiful, air is clean, peace and quiet are refreshing, but what
do you eat? USDA's Meat and Poultry Hotline advises backpackers who carry meals with them
to plan their menus with food safety in mind. Consider other factors, too, such as weight of
food, preparation and trash disposal. Susan Conley, director of the Hotline, reminds hikers that
food poisoning bacteria grow rapidly at warm temperatures. Even a day hiking with perishable
foods stored improperly could result in foodborne illness. When planning a hiking trip menu,
many backpackers choose foods that do not require refrigeration. Canned meat, poultry and
fish--although heavy to carry--are good choices. Just remember to take the can opener!
Contact: Susan Conley (202) 720-5604.

FAX -- You can obtain our radio and TV programming information and the Broadcasters Letter
through your facsimile machine by calling USDA's AgNewsFax. Use the telephone connected
to your FAX machine to call (202) 690-3944. At voice prompts press 1, press 4, then to receive
Broadcasters Letter, press 9200; radio newsline information, press 9250; TV contents billboard,
press 9260; TV scripts, press 9270. After all your selections, then press #, press 3, and press
the start button on your FAX machine.









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1938 -- Brenda Curtis talks with the head of USDA's Meat and Poultry
Hotline Susan Conley about food safety and picnics. (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute
documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME # 1419 -- Picnic foods and food safety; safe picnicking; biodiesel; report
shows environmental successes; what is USDA? (Weekly cassette -- 2-1/2 to 3 minute
consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1929 -- GATT update; report shows soil erosion progress; feed grain
update; "bug" -- efficient ethanol producer; aflatoxin could rob vitamin E. (Weekly cassette --
news features.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Thursday, July 28, farm numbers report, land in
farms report; Friday, July 29, agriculture prices report, catfish production report, oil crops
outlook; Tuesday, August 2, weekly weather and crop report. These are USDA reports we
know about in advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed
in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.



FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE


ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy on health care reform and other issues.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports from Georgia on the flooding -- its effect on
agriculture and USDA efforts to assist victims; Patrick O'Leary reports on USDA's proposed
poultry inspection improvement plan, and on the federal "Empowerment Zones/Enterprise
Communities" program to revitalize U.S. communities.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., EDT.


Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.








OFF MIKE

GOLD AWARD...was earned by WNIX, Greenville, MS, from the Mississippi Association of
Broadcasters for its service to the farm community. Chuck Early is at the mike for their
Mississippi Farm Focus program.

AGRITALK...is a new nationally-distributed, call-in radio talk program for farmers and rural
residents that is a joint project of Ken Root, Rich Hull, and Mark Vail. Mark says it's not a
"How to Farm" show, but rather an agricultural and rural issues program. August 1 is start date.

40 YEARS...at the mike. That's the milestone Lee Kline has reached at WHO, Des Moines, IA.
Herb Plambeck, the one who hired Kline, reports that Lee was honored recently for his
outstanding service. Word is that Lee may unplug his mike in 1995.

NINE YEARS...that's the anniversary celebrated last month by AgriAmerica Network,
Indianapolis, IN. Gary Truitt developed the network which has grown to serving 60 radio
stations across Indiana with farm news and market programs.

AMERICA'S FORESTS...a video produced by our Center for the Forest Service, has been
selected for international distribution by the U.S. Information Agency.

PROUD MOM...is a new title for Lori Spiczka Holm of our radio team who is "off mike" for a
few weeks spending full-time with new son, Marcus Quintillian Holm.

CALL FROM ENGLAND...came recently from Andrew Waller who is exploring a video series
on U.S. government films made during World War II years. He asked about a USDA film done
in 1942 called, "Hemp for Victory." Back then, hemp was grown for rope-making.



iRRY A. QUINN, Chief
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


UnifedStates Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










United States Department of Agriculture


Letter No. 2672 J u a O l\oria July 29, 1994

NEW ADMINISTRATORS FOR F S AND FAS'9, tary of Agriculture Mike Espy
announced the appointments of Mic Taylor to h a the Food Safety and Inspection
Service and August Schumacher Jr. to e FrYe culturall Service. Taylor comes to
USDA from his current position as dep Tts er for policy at the Food and Drug
Administration. In addition, Taylor has worked as private attorney specializing in food and drug
law, and in the late 1970s, he was executive assistant to the Commissioner and in the general
counsel's office at FDA. Schumacher joins USDA from the agriculture group at The World Bank.
He also served as commissioner of Food and Agriculture for Massachusetts from 1985-90.
Taylor and Schumacher will begin their USDA jobs on August 15. Contact: Mary Dixon (202)
720-4623.

SAFE FOOD HANDLING STRESSED FOR TWO STATES -- USDA has stressed safe handling
and cooking for raw meat and poultry in New Jersey and Ohio where outbreaks of foodborne
illnesses linked to E.coli 0157:H7 bacterium are being reported. USDA is working with state
health departments and urging that consumers follow safe handling instructions that now appear
on all raw meat and poultry packages. Consumers wishing additional information can call the
USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline, 1-800-535-4555. Contact: Jacque Knight (202) 720-9113.

STEPS TO IMPROVE FOREIGN FOOD AID -- Grant Buntrock, Administrator of USDA's
Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service has announced that USDA is working with
private industry officials to better protect the quality of commodities provided under U.S. foreign
food assistance programs. The Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service will test a new
vessel-loading observation procedure in August. This procedure will minimize the amount of
damaged bags and commodities loaded on vessels and enhance the appearance of U.S.
agricultural commodities delivered overseas. Also, there will be more inspections by the Federal
Grain Inspection Service at millpoints to ensure that only damage-free commodities are delivered
to U.S. ports for export. Contact: Robert Feist (202) 720-6789.

FIRE ANT TREATMENT -- USDA has proposed to amend its imported fire ant quarantine by
adding tefluthrin to the list of authorized chemicals for the treatment of containerized nursery
stock moving from quarantined areas. Eleven southeastern states and Puerto Rico are
quarantined for imported fire ant. The quarantine regulations are designed to prevent the spread
of the fire ants on articles moving out of the infested area. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-3256.

AFRICANIZED HONEYBEES IN PUERTO RICO -- USDA has identified three swarms of
honeybees in Puerto Rico as Africanized. Additional swarm traps are being set to determine
if the bees are established in Puerto Rico. Africanized honeybees were recently detected on July
1 near San Juan. Africanized honeybees are currently established in southern Texas, New
Mexicoand Arizona. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-3256.


is 4M t, jIhington, DC 20250-1300









MARKETING AND INSPECTION FORUMS -- USDA will hold two public marketing and
inspection forums during August to receive recommendations on food safety and quality policy
issues relative to the 1995 Farm Bill. The forums are scheduled for August 3, in Chicago, IL and
August 19 in Philadelphia, PA. Patricia Jensen, Acting Assistant Secretary for Marketing and
Inspection Services, said these forums will provide valuable insight and input on food safety and
quality issues and help prepare for the 1995 Farm Bill debate. Contact: Jacque Knight (202)
720-9113.

AUGUST CROP SURVEYS TO BE EXPANDED -- August crop survey samples will be
expanded in the flooded areas of Georgia, Alabama, and Florida. USDA's National Agricultural
Statistics Service announced that several new questions will be incorporated covering all crops
affected to help determine losses from floods and torrential rains. Survey results will be included
in the Crop Production report scheduled for release August 11 at 8:30 a.m. EDT. The report will
provide estimates of acreage for harvest, yield, and production for corn, cotton, soybeans,
tobacco, peanuts, sorghum and hay. Contact: Ray Halley (202) 720-3843.

IMPORTED MEXICAN CATTLE RESTRICTED -- USDA has reopened the comment period for
proposed requirements on certain Mexican steers and spayed heifers. Cattle imported from
Mexico that are not being shipped immediately to slaughter would be defined as "restricted
status cattle." Under the proposed rule, the cattle must be imported to a quarantined feedlot or
pasture or be held at a quarantined holding facility for a 60-day post-entry tuberculin test. The
comment period was reopened at commenters' request on July 18 for 60 days. Contact:
Kendra Pratt (301) 436-4898.

TUBERCULOSIS-FREE STATUS -- USDA has raised the status of Louisiana to "accredited-
free" in the national eradication program for bovine tuberculosis. Currently, 43 states including
Louisiana have "accredited-free status." "Accredited-free" status is attained by a state that is free
of cases of tuberculosis in cattle or bison for at least five years. Contact: Kendra Pratt (301)
436-4898.

SEARCH FOR NEW ORCHID COLORS -- A corn gene gives USDA researchers a jump start
in verifying what the color of a new flower will be. Robert J. Griesbach, plant geneticist for
USDA's Agricultural Research Service, said they have found a corn gene that will give results on
the color of new hybrids in just three days. That gene regulates the pigment in corn plants. The
genetic technique involves coating the corn DNA on microscopic gold pellets that are propelled
by a particle gun into orchid flower petals. This process screens for genetic flaws in the parent
plants crossed to breed new hybrids. This genetic screening could result in a broader range of
color in orchids and other ornamental plants. Griesbach said the technique could be a boon to
breeders of orchids because usually the plant industry now waits three years until a bloom
appears. Contact: Hank Becker,(301) 344-2769.

HONEYBEE IMPORTATION PROPOSAL -- USDA is reopening and extending the comment
period for a proposal that would allow honeybees and honeybee semen to be imported from
New Zealand to the U.S. nonstop. Comments received on or before Aug. 17 will be considered.
Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-3256.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1939 -- Oats was once a big U.S. agricultural enterprise, but now this
country is having to import oats in large quantities. John Snyder explores what's happening with
this important food and feed crop. (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME # 1420 -- E.coli outbreaks prompt warnings; details on how to safely grill
burgers; never too late to lift weight; volunteers more important than ever; beef bargains this
summer. (Weekly cassette -- 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1930 -- A new project to improve quality of food aid shipments; new
rice outlook; pesticide reform may not happen this year; major broiler expansion; small scale
agriculture is also diverse agriculture. (Weekly cassette -- news features.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE. These are USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Tuesday, August 8, crop/weather update; Thursday, August 11, U.S. crop report and world
supply and demand (we will change our line at 10:30 a.m. to include these reports and again
at 3:00 p.m. for cotton and citrus information); Friday, August 12, world grain/crop-production,
world oilseed, world cotton, U.S. cattle outlook; Monday, August 15, feed update; Tuesday,
August 16, farm labor, milk production, crop/weather update.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES: Lynn Wyvill has two reports on Georgia flooding. First story is about a USDA Soil
Conservation Service pond design that withstood the flood. The second story relates SCS'
efforts to cleanup the waterway at Montezuma, GA. Pat O'Leary reports on USDA's "Youth
Enterprise in Agriculture" which gives city kids a farm experience for the summer.

ACTUALITIES: USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen describes the latest weather and
crop conditions.

UPCOMING FEATURES: Pat O'Leary reports on the upcoming 50th birthday of Smokey Bear
and on USDA Forest Service's summer youth camp. Lynn Wyvill reports on the National
Agricultural Library's program to ship surplus books and journals to Central Europe and on food
safety tips for sending children of any age back to school.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 am.; EDT.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.







4
OFF MIKE

WELCOME CALL...from Jerry Lyons (WVSC, Somerset, PA) who reports using many USDA
radio features on his station. Jerry has 20 years' broadcasting experience with a Master's in
journalism. He often serves as a Washington, D.C. tourguide for visitors from his state.

CARDS...are welcome to cheer recuperation of farm broadcaster Art Sechrest (WJBC,
Bloomington, IL) who recently suffered a stroke and initially was unable to speak. Address cards
to: Community Hospital East, Hooks Rehab, 1500 N. Ritter Street, Indianapolis, IN 46219.

NEW TALK SHOW...is on-the-air from 10-11:00 a.m. on Brownfield Network with host Derry
Brownfield entertaining listeners tuned to 35 affiliates in seven states. Cindy Zimmerman,
show's assistant producer, called with the news.

ASSISTANT FAIR MANAGER...of the Illinois State Fair is the new title for Peg Fish
(WCVS/WFMB, Springfield, IL) who goes "off mike" July 29 to assume duties full-time after doing
both jobs for a couple of weeks.

ALABAMA PUBLIC TV...staffer, Mary Gaines, who until recently worked on their program,
"From These Fields," now works as a public affairs specialist for USDA's Forest Service in
Montgomery, AL.

SALAD BOWL OF THE WORLD...that's what the call letters of KSBW-TV (Salina, CA) stand for,
reminded Jim Adamson in a call to our TV team recently. He plans to use our story about a
new CD-ROM on gardening from the National Agricultural Library on a computer show that he
does once a week, in addition to his ag programming.




LARRY A. QUINN, Chief
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300









Office of Communications0CT T1a5j n, DC 20250-1300


Letter No. 26/ August 5, 1994
99 \University of Florida
NATIONAL RURt -- President Clinton has announced that he will lead a first-
ever National Rural Con the future of America's rural communities on December 1 in
Iowa. The conference will bring together Administration officials, members of Congress and
those living and working in rural America for a discussion of farm policy and the challenges
facing rural America. The conference will be moderated by the President and will link
communities from North Carolina, Illinois, Iowa and California via satellite. Agriculture Secretary
Mike Espy will join the President to discuss a wide range of issues, including job creation,
business development, education, infrastructure, agriculture, health care and the environment.
Contact: Jim Brownlee (202) 720-2091.

U.S./CANADA WHEAT TRADE AGREEMENT -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy and U.S
Trade Representative Mickey Kantor announced August 2 that the U.S. reached an
understanding regarding wheat trade with Canada. The agreement is the result of more than
a year of continuous negotiations. Secretary Espy says this agreement will benefit U.S. farmers
by providing relief from the large volume of wheat being imported from Canada. The agreement
contains three elements: U.S. and Canada have agreed to establish a Joint Commission on
Grains; it will specify limitations on imports into the U.S. of Canadian wheat for a period of one
year; and it includes a "peace clause" for the next 12 months to assure there will be no additional
restrictions or countermeasures, whereby both countries commit not to take action inconsistent
with the NAFTA or GATT. Contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.

RUNNING WATER IN RURAL HOMES -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy will host a rural
water roundtable Wednesday, August 10, at USDA's Jefferson Auditorium in Washington, DC.
The roundtable will launch "Water 2000 A Faucet in Every Home," an Administration initiative
to provide clean, drinkable tap water for every rural household by the year 2000. Water quality
experts and others around the nation will identify issues and solutions associated with supplying
water to rural areas. Morning sessions of the roundtable will be telecast live via satellite from
8:30 11:15 a.m. EDT. (Test signal will be available at 7:30 a.m. EDT.) For west coast
locations, a taped-delay telecast will begin at 11:30 a.m. (Satellite coordinates: Galaxy 7-K (KU-
Band), Transponder 21 Vertical, Downlink frequency 12110 mhz, Audio 6.2/6.8 or Galaxy 6 (C-
Band), Transponder 12 Vertical, Downlink frequency 3940 mhz, Audio 6.2/6.8.) Contact: Jim
Brownlee (202) 720-2091.

BOLL WEEVIL CONTROL -- Boll weevils could face a bleak sex life, if a USDA insect scientist
can garble that cotton pest's chemical language of love. USDA's Agricultural Research Service
entomologist Joseph Dickens says, the key to sabotaging the pest may be several groups of
nerve cells inside tiny hairs on the weevil's nose. It's these cells that detect certain odors that
tell boll weevils when a mate or food is nearby. Dickens' goal is to reproduce chemicals in the
weevil's sex scent and in certain cotton plant odors to control how the cells "cancel-out" weevil
mating and other behaviors. Contact: Jan Suszkiw (301) 344-2815.


United States D


nent


I i








$12.2 MILLION LOAN TO RURAL ALZHEIMER'S CENTER -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy
announced a $12.2 million community facilities direct and guaranteed loan to the Alzheimer's
Disease Alliance of Western Pennsylvania in Robinson Township, PA. The loan, made by the
USDA's Rural Development Administration, will enable the Alzheimer's Disease Alliance of
Western Pennsylvania to construct a 168-bed care and research center. Contact: Julie Demeo
(202) 720-0622.

WHEAT ACREAGE REMAINS AT ZERO -- USDA announced August 1 that the previously
issued zero-percent acreage reduction program level for the 1995 wheat crop remains the same.
Agriculture Secretary is authorized to adjust the 1995 acreage reduction program if wheat levels
change significantly. Wheat supplies for 1995 are up about 1 percent, thus no adjustment has
been made in the acreage reduction program. Contact: John Carlin Ryan (202) 720-8207.

CHANGES TO MILKFAT REQUIREMENTS -- USDA has proposed changes in the regulations
governing the manufacture of anhydrous milkfat, allowing butter to be used as an ingredient.
USDA's Administrator for Agricultural Marketing Service Lon Hatamiya says the proposed
changes will enable domestic manufacturers to compete better with manufacturers from other
exporting countries. Current USDA requirements prohibit butter from being used as an
ingredient. Contact: Gil High (202) 720-8998.

FEE INCREASES FOR GRADING -- USDA proposes to increase service fees for certain grading
and inspection services for eggs, poultry, rabbits and egg products. USDA's Administrator for
Agricultural Marketing Service Lon Hatamiya says the increases would affect all processors who
request grading services. Grading services administered by USDA are made available upon
request and paid for by the users. Current fees have been in affect since November 1993.
Hatamiya says major factors contributing to the increases are Congressionally mandated salary
increases for federal employees. Contact: Gil High (202) 720-8998.

EGG RESEARCH AND PROMOTION ORDER -- USDA is amending the Egg Research and
Promotion Order to exempt more small-scale egg producers from assessment and to provide
research project funding. USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service Administrator Lon Hatamiya
says that under these amendments, producers owning 75,000 or fewer laying hens will now be
exempt from paying assessments to the American Egg Board. These changes are mandated by
recent Congressional amendments to the 1974 Egg Research and Consumer Information Act.
Contact: Alicia L. Ford (202) 720-8998.

DAIRY SURPLUS ESTIMATES FOR 1995 -- USDA's Commodity Credit Corporation announced
that no further reduction in milk prices paid to producers will be necessary in 1995 if current
estimates hold throughout the remainder of the year. This announcement is based on the
estimate of surplus dairy products to be removed from the commercial market. Since the
surplus is less than 7 billion pounds, no additional reduction would be required. Contact:
Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

EXPORT ENHANCEMENT PROGRAM FOR WHEAT FLOUR -- Under Secretary for
International Affairs and Commodity Programs Eugene Moos announced a 400,000-metric ton
allocation of wheat flour to Yemen under USDA's Export Enhancement Program. This allocation
will boost sales of U.S. wheat flour to Yemen during the 1994/95 international marketing year.
Sales of wheat flour will be made to buyers in Yemen through normal commercial channels at
competitive world prices. Contact: Lynn K. Goldsbrough (202) 720-3930.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1940 -- Is your vegetable garden everything you hoped it to be? Well,
if not, two experts will help identify those summertime lawn and garden problems.
(Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME # 1421 -- Insect crime detection and other "bug"-aboos; Catfacing on
tomatoes; Youth 4-H camps; Squash vine borer; Pepper plant pests. (Weekly cassette -- 2-1/2
to 3 minute consumer features.)


AGRITAPE FEATURES #1931 -- U.S./Canada wheat deal; Managing corn inputs; Farm
numbers still declining; Nutrient management; Wheat Acreage Reduction Program (ARP).
(Weekly cassette -- news features.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE. These are USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
-- Wednesday, August 11, China outlook; Friday, August 19, cattle on feed; livestock slaughter
report; agriculture outlook report; Monday, August 22, livestock, dairy and poultry outlook; U.S.
agriculture trade update.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.8

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Patrick O'Leary reports on Smokey Bear's 50th birthday celebration, to be held
August 9th in Washington, D.C. A traveling Smokey exhibit opens at USDA the same day.
Patrick O'Leary reports on the "Youth Forest Camps" program, sponsored by the nonprofit
National Forest Foundation in cooperation with the USDA Forest Service. The camps give
summer jobs to "at-risk" teenagers.

ACTUALITIES -- James Lyons, USDA Assistant Secretary for Natural Resources and
Environment, talks about Smokey Bear's nationwide birthday observance. Jack Ward Thomas,
USDA Forest Service Chief, on the ongoing importance of the fire prevention message, and this
season's fire fighting efforts. Mike Espy, Secretary of Agriculture, and Mickey Kantor, U.S.
Trade Representative, comment on the agreement between the U.S. and Canada over wheat
trade.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., EDT.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
4
OFF MIKE 31262083080027

QUICK RESPONSE...was offered to consumer reporter Asa Arrons (WNBC-TV, New York) who
needed information about E.Coli due to recent outbreaks in New Jersey. Within 30 minutes, our
center arranged a live, satellite interview with Susan Conley, Director of USDA's Meat & Poultry
Hotline, from USDA's TV studio. After a 3:30 p.m interview, we uplinked food safety video
features to conclude the 15-minute satellite feed. WNBC-TV included Susan and this footage
in their 6:00 p.m. evening newscast. Stations needing food safety video can call us.

MARKETING COORDINATOR...for the National Farm Broadcast Service (NFBS) is the new title
for Randy Rasmussen (KMA, Shenandoah, IA). NFBS is operated by the National Association
of Farm Broadcasters (NAFB). Randy will be handling customer service for existing clients and
marketing the service to prospective clients. Tom Beavers will move up to KMA's farm director
position, and Tom Brand, formerly of Brownfield Network (Jefferson City, MO), is Beavers' new
assistant.

RICE HARVEST...is starting and corn, soybean and cotton crops are looking good in Louisiana
reports Don Molino (Louisiana Agri-News Network, Baton Rouge, LA). Don reports agricultural
news for about an hour each day. His first report is at 5 a.m., and his final one is at 4:35 p.m.

PRESIDENT-ELECT...Joe Comely (WRFD, Columbus, OH) of the National Association of Farm
Broadcasters is busy with final details for their national meeting in Kansas City, MO, November
9-13. As the next NAFB President, Joe's been on the road attending all regional meetings

NEW NETWORK...covering agriculture in Florida and southeast U.S. is under development by
Gary Cooper and Robin Loftin. Plans are to be "on-the-air" the first week of September.
They're building new offices and studios in Kenansville, FL -- central to Florida's citrus, vegetable
and cattle industries.


LARRY A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










Swasnington, Uu 20250-1300


WATER 2000 ticulture Mike t i that USDA would create a
strategic national pla the goal of bringing running water to all rural homes by the year
2000. Espy and Under Secretary Bob Nash held a day-long roundtable August 10 to discuss
how to meet that goal. The roundtable was a first step in bringing together federal, state, and
local governments and the private sector to provide solutions to the challenge of putting clean,
safe running water in every home in rural America. Opening session of the roundtable was
broadcast nationwide live via satellite from USDA. Contact: Jim Brownlee (202) 720-2091.

ESPY TURNS WATER ON IN FALLS MILLS, VA. -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy and U.S.
Representative Rick Boucher celebrated the hooking up of clean, running water in homes
throughout Falls Mills, VA on August 5. Espy and Boucher visited a home where the family had
been hauling water into their home and a day care center where the community's new water
system was connected. The Falls Mills water system will serve about 250 connections.
Currently about 120 connections are complete. Funding comes from several sources: Rural
Development Administration loans and grants, local money and from the Appalachian Regional
Commission. Contact: Jim Brownlee (202) 720-2091.

GROUND BEEF AND HAMBURGER NUTRITION LABELING -- In a response to a request from
the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CPSI), a consumer interest group, the comment
period on a proposal that expands the options for labeling of the percentage of lean and fat in
ground beef and hamburger has been extended to August 22. Acting Assistant Secretary of
Agriculture Patricia Jensen said the extension will provide CSPI, as well as others, an opportunity
to gather further consumer and industry input and will ensure that we have a full comment from
all concerned parties. Contact: Jacque Knight (202) 720-9113.

WHAT'S "COOKING" ON CAMPUS? -- USDA's Meat and Poultry Hotline gets many calls from
parents and students with questions about handling and storage of dorm foods. The Hotline
offers a few tips on college cooking: when grocery shopping, put perishable foods in your cart
last and always take them home immediately; if you're using a microwave in the dorm, follow
product directions and check the temperature of the food; leftovers should be refrigerated as
soon as possible, perishable foods-should never be unrefrigerated more than 2 hours; never
store foods on the window ledge even if the weather is cold; and check contents of "care
packages" from home to see if any cans or packages must be stored in the refrigerator before
or after opening. The Hotline is available weekdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Eastern time (1-800-
535-4555). Contact: Susan Conley (202) 720-5604.

STARCH-BASED PLASTIC CUTLERY -- USDA and industry researchers have found a way to
lower the cost of making biodegradable plastic cutlery by adding nearly one-third more
environmentally safe cornstarch. USDA's Agricultural Research Service chemist J.L. Willett says
this will reduce environmental problems while expanding markets for Midwestern corn. Plastic
cutlery production costs were cut by 40 percent. Contact: Linda Cooke (309) 681-6530.








TRIBUTE TO FALLEN FIREFIGHTERS -- Vice President Al Gore joined Agriculture Secretary
Mike Espy, Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt and Colorado Governor Roy Roemer August 8 at
a memorial service to honor fallen wildland firefighters and those who continue to risk their lives
on the fire line. Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy said, "We are only midway through the fire
season and already we have a loss of life which is unprecedented." Espy added, "All USDA
employees wish to express their sympathy for those who have sacrificed their lives in the line
of duty and their gratitude for the many brave men and women who continue to battle fires."
USDA employees wore purple ribbons August 8-12 in honor of all firefighters. Contact: Tom
Amontree (202) 720-4623.

FEDERAL CROP INSURANCE REFORM ACT -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy said the vote
on August 5 by the U.S. House of Representatives for final passage of the Federal Crop
Insurance Reform Act is a big step forward for our nation's farmers and taxpayers. All of rural
America, and every American, benefits from this successful effort for an effective crop insurance
program. Contact: Paula Thomasson (202) 254-8399.

FOOD SAFETY AFTER SCHOOL -- Tips for kids for after school snacking: throw away
perishable sandwiches or other "refrigerator-type" foods you may have brought home; place your
books or bookbags on the floor, not on eating counters so that you don't spread outside germs
on eating surfaces; wash your hands before you make or eat a snack; wash fruits and
vegetables with water before eating them; and do not leave cold items, like milk, lunchmeat,
hardcooked eggs, or yogurt, out on the counter at room temperature. For other information
about safe snacks after school, call USDA's toll free Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-800-535-4555.
Contact: Susan Conley (202) 720-5604.

CHANGES IN COTTON ASSESSMENTS -- USDA is proposing to amend the assessment
provisions of the Cotton Research and Promotion Program rules and regulations. USDA's
Administrator for Agricultural Marketing and Inspection Service Lon Hatamiya said the proposed
change is an annual update of the value of imported cotton and reflects the recent average
annual price received by U.S. farmers for Upland cotton. Contact: Alicia Ford (202) 720-8998.

GLOBAL CHANGE DATABASE AVAILABLE -- A sample database of global change information
is now available at USDA's National Agricultural Library and over the Internet. The database is
an effort by the U.S. Global Change Research Program to make global change data and:
information more accessible to researchers and others. The sample database contains over
10,000 documents related to global change. Contact: Brian Norris (301) 504-6778.

1992/94 TARIFF-RATE QUOTA PERIOD FOR SUGAR -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy
announced that the quota period for the 1992/94 U.S. tariff-rate quota for sugar will be changed
from October 1, 1992 September 30, 1994 to October 1, 1992 July 31, 1994. The sugar
quota level for August 1, 1994 September 30, 1995 will be 1,322,978 metric tons. Contact:
Eric Van Chantfort (202) 720-9443.

ILLINOIS COMPANY PAYS PENALTY -- Chebanese Grain and Lumber, Chebanese,
IL, agreed to pay a $15,000 civil penalty, but neither admitted nor denied the charge of violating
the U.S. Grain Standards Act. Acting Administrator for Federal Grain Inspection Service David
Shipman said it was alleged that the company attempted to cause the issuance of false official
grain inspection certificates by adding vanilla extract to thirty carloads of corn to mask odor.
Contact: Dana Stewart (202) 720-5091.









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1941 -- As scientists try to find the solution to a sheep disease that
causes major losses, they also may find clues to curing or preventing diseases in other animals
and humans. Jim Henry reports. (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME # 1422 -- How to handle those nasty bagworms on your shrubs and trees;
food safety for college students; a complex summer disease of lawns may have a simple
solution; volunteering is good for you; environmentally "friendly" plastic utensils.
(Weekly cassette -- 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1932 -- Scientists finding solution to a costly sheep disease; a
turnaround for turkey; first official crop projections; water for all; livestock judging is more than
meets the eye; dairy surplus estimates have bearing on prices. (Weekly cassette -- news
features.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE. These are USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
-- Wednesday, August 17, agriculture outlook for China; Thursday, August 18, mushroom
production; Friday, August 19, cattle on feed, general agriculture outlook; Monday, August 22,
livestock outlook, agriculture trade update; Tuesday, August 23, fruit industry outlook,
crop/weather update; Thursday, August 25, cotton/wool outlook; Friday, August 26, agriculture
export outlook.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on Running Water for Rural America; Will Pemble takes a
look at New Plant Bioregulators.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy and Under Secretary for Small Community
and Rural Development Bob Nash launch "Water 2000 A Faucet in Every Home,"an initiative
to provide drinkable tap water in every rural household by the year 2000.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on Natural Access for Groundwater
Research.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m:, EDT.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
4
OFF MIKE 43 122

FATHER AND SON TEAM...is forming at the Tobacco Radio Network (TRN). Dan Wilkinson,
formerly director of broadcast services for the North Carolina Farm Bureau (NCFB), has joined
TRN where veteran farm broadcaster Ray Wilkinson, his father, continues to fill the airwaves.
Dan will serve as director of agricultural productions. Bob Ellison replaces Dan in broadcast
duties for NCFB.

THE DUTCH GARDENER...is the name of a six-day-a-week radio feature that is produced by
Dick DeLano of Grand Rapids, MI. Ninety-second segments are mostly used in "drive time"
by 25-30 stations in Michigan, Tennessee and Georgia. Dick says about 80 percent of his
listeners are not gardeners, but they like interesting facts about flowers, plants, trees and shrubs.

HUMORIST...is one of the titles claimed by John Philpot of Little Rock, AR these days. Now,
on the podium frequently as a guest speaker or teaching others about communications, John
has been on the air for many years in Arkansas covering agriculture and the outdoors for
commercial stations and for the University of Arkansas.

CHICAGO FARM REPORT...editor in the 1960s, George M. Menard, 82, died late last month.
George was WBBM's radio and TV farm director for 20 years, and he pioneered a TV news
show for children.

HAVING A NAME THAT FITS...is Lee Mielke (KLYN, Lynden, WA) who operates "Dairyline,"
a syndicated, five-day-a-week radio feature carried by 100 stations in 26 states. He estimates
that there are 800 dairy farms in his own prime coverage area. Lee is the "milk" (Mielke) and
his listeners are the "milkers."



LARRY A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300








U o I I o N I W


United State rtment of Agri Office of Communibations Washington, DC 20250-1300

Letter No. ,5p T $ August 19, 1994
i'A r~i of Florida
USDA AN ,PA SIGN A MENT Agric-9iM secretary Mike Espy and U.S.
Environment section /ey Administrator Carol Browner signed a Memorandum of
Understanding~ hitting their agencies to providing the agricultural community with
pest management ues and tools that reduce pesticide risks to public health and the
environment, while ensuring economically sound agricultural production. Agriculture Secretary
Espy said this agreement will enable EPA to speedup the registration process for pesticide
alternatives developed by USDA. Espy emphasized that this is good news for producers,
consumers and the environment. The agreement establishes a joint USDA and EPA process
to identify where pest control alternatives are limited and loss of a material through regulatory
action will leave producers without adequate means to control important pests. For those
situations, USDA will conduct research and technology transfer efforts to develop new materials.
EPA will then expedite registration to ensure that producers have materials available for field use.
Contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.

30 NEW PLANT VARIETIES -- USDA has issued certificates of protection to developers of 30
new varieties of seed-reproduced plants including barley, corn, cotton, hard fescue, tall fescue,
muskmelon, fodder radish, rice, vinca, buffalograss, tobacco, wheat and durum wheat. USDA's
Agricultural Marketing Service commissioner of the Plant Variety Protection Office Kenneth Evans
said developers of the new varieties will have the exclusive right to reproduce, sell, import and
export their products in the U.S. for 18 years. Certificates of protection are granted after a
review of the breeders' records and claims that each new variety is novel, uniform and stable.
Contact: Alicia Ford (202) 720-8998.

FORMER SOVIET UNION ELIGIBLE FOR MORE BUTTERFAT -- Agriculture Secretary Mike
Espy announced August 17 that the Former Soviet Union is eligible for an additional 5,000 metric
tons of butterfat under USDA's Dairy Export Incentive Program. Sales of butterfat will be made
to buyers within the Former Soviet Union or to third-country buyers through commercial
channels at competitive world prices. Contact: Lynn Goldsbrough (202) 720-3930.

USDA AND USTR SEEK PUBLIC CANDIDATES -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
and the Office of U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) request applications from members of the
public wishing to serve on the Joint Commission on Grains. Three to five individuals will be
selected to represent the U.S. on the commission. The Canadian Government will select an
equal number to represent Canada. A Joint Commission on Grains will be established to
examine all aspects of the two countries' respective marketing and support systems for all grains
and the effect of those systems on the Canadian and U.S. markets and on competition between
the two countries in third country markets. Objective of this commission will be to make
recommendations to assist the U.S. and Canadian governments in reaching long-term solutions
to problems in the grains sector. Applications must be received by August 25. Members of the
commission will be named September 1, 1994. Contact: Henry Schmick (202) 720-1336.


- 1 1;-








FINAL DECISION ON FEDERAL MILK ORDERS -- USDA has issued an amplified final decision
on proposed amendments to the federal milk order for New England and other marketing areas.
This amplified decision more fully explains why USDA chose not to change the Class I milk
pricing structure in its March 1993 decision. Class I milk, used exclusively for drinking purposes,
is the highest valued milk price under marketing orders. The amplification is in response to a
U.S. District Court order issued in April. The court's opinion held that the March 1993 final
decision failed to consider the statutory pricing factors required by the Agricultural Marketing
Agreement Act. The court took no position on whether the Class I milk pricing system must be
changed, but observed that the final decision needed further clarification. The amplified final
decision was published as a final rule in the August 17 Federal Register. Contact: Connie
Crunkleton (202) 720-8998.

SERVICE FEES INCREASED ON FRUITS AND VEGETABLES -- USDA has announced that
it is increasing service fees for certain voluntary inspection, grading and certification of processed
fruits and vegetables. USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service Administrator Lon Hatamiya said
the major factor contributing to the increased fees is congressionally-mandated salary increases
for federal employees. The increases will affect all processors of fruits and vegetables who
request grading services, including those who have signed term contracts. Contact: Gil High
(202) 720-8998.

ROUNDTABLE LAUNCHES "WATER 2000" -- More than one-half million rural American
households still lack quality plumbing in their homes, said Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy as
he launched his "Water 2000" goal at an August 10 water roundtable hosted by USDA in
Washington, DC. "Such conditions are deplorable," Espy said. "It is this administration's goal
to have running water in every rural home by the year 2000." Contact: Jim Brownlee (202)
720-2091.

ALGERIA ELIGIBLE FOR MORE BARLEY -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy announced that
Algeria is eligible for an additional 200,000 metric tons of barley under USDA's Export
Enhancement Program. This barley allocation will be valid until September 30, 1994. Contact:
Marlene Phillips (202) 720-2061.

REFINED BEET SUGAR -- USDA's Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) has sold 13.6 million
pounds of CCC-owned refined beet sugar at 24.75 cents per pound. The sugar was sold to
Sweetener Products Company under a recent announcement issued by CCC for competitive
offers to purchase all of the sugar in CCC's inventory. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

VENEZUELA ELIGIBLE FOR MORE MILK POWDER -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy
announced that Venezuela is eligible for an additional 2,500 metric tons of milk powder, limited
to non-fat dry milk powder only, under USDA's Dairy Export Incentive Program. Sales of non-fat
dry milk powder will be made to buyers in Venezuela through commercial channels at
competitive world prices. Contact: Lynn Goldsbrough (202) 720-3930.

FAX -- You can obtain our radio and TV programming information and the Broadcasters Letter
through your facsimile machine by calling USDA's AgNewsFax. Use the telephone connected
to your FAX machine to call (202) 690-3944. At voice prompts press 1, press 4, then to receive
Broadcasters Letter, press 9200; radio newsline information, press 9250; TV contents billboard,
press 9260; TV scripts, press 9270. After all your selections, then press #, press 3, and press
the start button on your FAX machine.









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1942 -- In this edition, Gary Crawford helps all of us celebrate Smokey
Bear's 50th birthday! (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME # 1423 -- Food safety for back-to-school; Smokey's 50!; new food safety
tests; propagating your own shrubs; sheep virus model for Aids research. (Weekly cassette --
2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1933 -- USDA/EPA sign agreement of cooperation; feed grain
comments; big cotton surprise; oats imports; nutrient management. (Weekly cassette -- news
features.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE. These are USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Tuesday, August 30, poultry outlook; weekly weather and crop outlook; Wednesday, August 31,
agriculture prices outlook; rice stocks report; Tuesday, September 6, weekly weather and crop
outlook; Wednesday, September 7, agriculture income and finance.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.



FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill has a package of three back-to-school food safety features food
safety tips for packing bottles and food for young children, packing a safe lunch for school
children and a food safety quiz for college students living in dormitories.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen on the impact of hot dry weather
in the West and the latest 30 day weather outlook.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on USDA's new schedule for releasing Crop
Reports and Lynn Wyvill reports on a USDA National Agricultural Library special collection of
posters that illustrate the role of agriculture during World War I.


SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., EDT.


Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

4 3 1262 08307991 2
OFF MIKE

HALL OF FAME...for the national agricultural fraternity, Alpha Gamma Rho (AGR), inducted a
new member August 10 -- Herb Plambeck. Herb is a veteran Iowa farm broadcaster and
agricultural writer who was a special assistant to the Secretary of Agriculture when I arrived at
USDA 20 years ago. AGR, which has close to 50,000 members, presented the prestigious Hall
of Fame honor to Herb in Scottsdale, AZ.

IT'S FAIR TIME...and many broadcasters are entertaining their listeners with live coverage of
county and state events. Orion Samuelson and Max Armstrong of WGN (Chicago, IL) are on
the fair circuit having broadcast from the Wisconsin State Fair, Carroll County, (IL) Fair, and the
Indiana State Fair. Orion and Max are broadcasting all this week from the Illinois State Fair
where Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy is a guest speaker on August 19.

DROUGHT-LIKE CONDITIONS...are having a serious effect on northeast Colorado crops
reports Tom Riter (KFKA, Greeley, CO), but diversity of crops is helping farmers survive.
Dryland farmers are just "trying to weather it," Tom says, but farmers with irrigation are having
a good year. Pinto beans are doing well, pickles are being harvested and onions are nearing
harvest. Tom likes our "Agriculture USA" radio program and uses it every weekend.

SATELLITES AND COMPUTER TERMINALS...that's the way many broadcasts make it to air
these days. Gary Claus (Northwest Ag News Network) works with Gary Stewart (Newberg,
OR) and Bob Hoff (Spokane, WA) in serving 50 stations in Oregon, Washington and Idaho. Five
programs are featured through their network: The Northwest Report, Line on Agriculture,
Northwest Grain Report, Northwest Livestock Report, and Northwest Fruit and Vegetable Report.
Their programs are taped in a conventional analog format, transferred to computer, digitized and
sent by modem for uplinking to satellite, and their affiliate stations download the programs to
their o n station computers. Perhaps these features should be called "sound bytes."


LARRY A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300










United States Dela 'ent of Agriculturet, Office of Communicatid6is 'a Washington, DC 20250-1300
D ette OCTM 13i92e
Letter No. 26 I August 26,1994

CONSERVATIO RSERVE M ATION --SecretaryA ri&Aflte Mike Espy announced
August 24 that p uc conservation Reserve Program (CRP) contracts expiring
September 30, 1995 option to modify their contracts to extend the expiration date
for a period of one year. All participants with 1986 CRP contracts will be notified by their local
Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service (ASCS) office of the dates when they may
apply for their contract modifications, Espy said. About 2 million acres of cropland were enrolled
in the 1986 CRP contracts. This action will enable producers whose contracts would have
expired in 1995 to continue to keep this highly erodible and other environmentally sensitive
cropland out of production. Espy announced his decision now so that producers can consider
this extension option while making long-term decisions concerning this land. Contact: Robert
Feist (202) 720-6789.

NONCITRUS FRUIT EXPORTS BOOMING -- U.S. exports of apples, grapes, pears, and other
noncitrus fruits are booming in 1994. Total U.S. noncitrus fruit exports in 1994 could be 25-30
percent over last year, a new record thanks to reduced trade barriers, improving economic
conditions and plentiful supplies of export-quality fruit. The North American Free Trade
Agreement (NAFTA) reduced Mexico's tariffs on imports of fresh apples, pears, grapes,
strawberries and other fruits from the U.S. Canada remains a major market for U.S. peaches,
nectarines, grapes, and strawberries, despite the rapid growth of shipments to other countries.
Contact: Diane Bertelsen (202) 219-0887.

MIDWEST GOVERNORS CONFERENCE -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy addressed a
conference of Midwestern Governors August 22 to discuss the challenges in crafting a farm bill
for the 21st Century. Espy outlined the process underway to define the issues that will frame
the 1995 farm bill. Secretary Espy said, "What comes out of this debate is more important to
everyone than many of our suburban constituents may think at first. Although less than two
percent of the nation's population lives on farms, the food and fiber system generates about
$950 billion per year in economic activity and employs one in seven Americans." Espy also
discussed farm prices, global trade, ethanol and the use of electronic benefits transfer
technology in the Food Stamp Program. Contact: Jim Loftus (202) 720-4623.

TREATMENT ADDED FOR GRAPEFRUIT -- USDA is adding a high-temperature forced air
treatment as an alternative treatment for grapefruit moving from areas in Texas and California
that are regulated for Mexican fruit fly. B. Glen Lee, deputy administrator for plant protection and
quarantine in USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, said this high-temperature
forced-air treatment was developed by USDA's Agricultural Research Service as an effective
treatment against the Mexican fruit fly in grapefruit. Regulations to prevent the spread of
Mexican fruit fly from infested areas require that regulated articles must be from a grove found
free of fruit flies or be treated in a prescribed manner that will kill the pest before movement out
of these areas. Adding this treatment facilitates the interstate movement of grapefruit grown in
regulated areas. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-3256.








RURAL HEALTH CARE AMENDMENT-- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy applauded Senator
Tom Daschle's rural health care amendment which passed the Senate on a vote of 94-4.
Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy said, "The overwhelming passage of this amendment clearly
shows support for overall health care reform. The amendment enhances an already strong bill
for farmers and rural Americans." The amendment will encourage doctors, nurse practitioners
and physician assistants to practice in underserved areas; ensure that financial and other
assistance is available to help rural facilities adjust to the changing health care environment; and
assist rural providers in forming their own health care networks. Contact: Julie Demeo (202)
720-4623.

BENEFICIAL FLY MAY HELP THWART GYPSY MOTH -- A fuzzy, half-inch-long fly may prove
to be a potent new weapon against gypsy moths that attack more than 300 different kinds of
trees and shrubs in this country, USDA scientists report. Agricultural Research Service (ARS)
scientist Robert W. Pemberton says, "We expect the Blepharipa schineri fly to take a place
among other imported natural enemies of the gypsy moth." While working in South Korea,
Pemberton and other ARS scientists determined that the beneficial fly was the third best gypsy
moth parasite in that country's forests. The fly might be released into American woodlands as
early as 1995, Pemberton said. Contact: Marcia Wood (510) 559-6070.

PINE SHOOT BEETLE QUARANTINE -- USDA is quarantining an additional 18 counties for pine
shoot beetles, bringing the total to 110 counties quarantined in the states of Michigan, Illinois,
Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York. B. Glen Lee, USDA's Animal and Plant Health
Inspection Service deputy administrator for plant protection and quarantine, said quarantines are
being placed because of beetle detections in those counties. Quarantine regulations restrict the
movement of cut pine Christmas trees, pine nursery stock, pine logs and lumber with bark
attached, pine stumps and pine bark chips. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-3256.

DUNCAN NAMED HEAD OF TOBACCO DIVISION -- John P. Duncan has been named national
director of the Tobacco Division of USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service. As division director,
Duncan heads the USDA group that inspects and grades domestic and imported tobacco and
that provides market news on domestic tobacco. Duncan comes to AMS from the Animal and
Plant Health Inspection Service where he was director of Legislative and Public Affairs. Contact:
Gil High (202) 720-8998.

FUJI APPLES FROM JAPAN AND KOREA -- USDA announced that it will allow importation of
Fuji variety apples from Japan and Korea if they are cold treated and fumigated for injurious
insects in those countries. The apples must also be inspected by USDA's Animal and Plant
Health Inspection Service (APHIS) prior to export. B. Glen Lee, APHIS deputy administrator for
plant protection and quarantine, said this action relieves restrictions on the importation of the
apples without presenting a significant risk of introducing exotic insects that could injure U.S.
agriculture. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-3256.

COLD TREATMENT OF IMPORTED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES -- USDA is changing its
regulation to allow cold treatment of imported fruits and vegetables after arrival at the port of
Wilmington, N.C. B. Glen Lee, USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service deputy
administrator for plant protection and quarantine, said cold treatment of imported fruits and
vegetables by sustained refrigeration prevents injurious insects, such as fruit flies, from entering
and becoming established in the U.S. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-3256.







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1943 -- Brenda Curtis tours Maryland demonstration gardens and finds
that most home gardeners can do much of their pest control without pesticides.
(Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME # 1424 -- The deadliest fire; sending foods to college; signs of trouble for
your shrubs; oats and nutrition; special program makes home gardeners environmentally
sensitive. (Weekly cassette -- 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1934 -- Rural health care discussed; farm bill hearings begin;
conservation reserve--what's next?; wheat test weight controversy; new shipping fever vaccine.
(Weekly cassette -- news features.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE. These are USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
August 31, agriculture prices; September 1, coverage of press event on healthy school lunches,
horticultural export update; September 6, crop/weather update; September 7, agriculture finance
and income outlook. No other scheduled reports until September 12, U.S. crop production,
world agricultural supply and demand. (September 12 newsline changes at 10:30 a.m. ET for
crop report stories and changes again at 5:00 p.m. for cotton reports and other daily releases.
USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m. EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Patrick O'Leary reports on pilot program to release some market-sensitive USDA
crop reports at 8:30 a.m., instead of 3:00 p.m. release time. One year trial will change the way
farmers and commodity traders do business. Lynn Wyvill reports on rare USDA collection of
World War I posters enlisting agricultural aid of everyday citizens to help war effort. Chris
Larson reports on new partnership by USDA's Soil Conservation Service, called "Know Your
Watershed."

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy speaks at Illinois State Fair in Springfield,
August 19. Topics: ethanol, agricultural trade, USDA reorganization and accomplishments
(w/cutaway B-roll). Mike Espy speaks to Midwest Governor's Association in Lincoln, NE.
Topics: USDA reorganization, rural development, farm income and trade (w/cutaway B-roll).

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Patrick O'Leary reports on dairy barn of the future; Lynn Wyvill
reports on USDA's exchange of agricultural literature with Eastern Europe's emerging
democracies; and DeBoria Janifer reports on USDA water quality research.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:
Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., EDT.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.




Ui].vEiS O F FL O-tDA

OFF MIKE 134 680 96

FLY MYSTERY...got a few more clues from a listener in Albert Lea, MN, who had heard our
Gary Crawford's recent feature about an entomologist who specializes in insect identification
(sometimes the expertise comes in handy in solving crimes). It seems the entomologist reported
trying to solve a mystery of small flying insects invading a hospital operating room. Listener
Roger Fink heard the story, got our number from the local FM station and offered his answer
to the mystery. Seems he'd had a similar problem in his bathroom and traced the problem to
the sink basin's overflow system where flies were breeding. Who needs Sherlock Holmes when
we have Gary's listeners?

CROP WATCHING...is what they're doing in Iowa right now. Rich Balvanz (WMT, Cedar
Rapids, IA) reports that both corn and soybeans look very good. He's not sure if they will match
the 1992 crop, but it should be a good year if weather and transportation systems cooperate.
Rich was very pleased with recent audience research including his station and other farm
broadcast stations in the Midwest which proves that farmers depend on radio as a primary
source for their information. Results showed radio topping other media in reaching farmer
audiences.

OUR FAIR COVERAGE...got a boost last week from former farm broadcaster Peggy Kaye Fish,
now an official with the Illinois State Fair who assisted with details of Agriculture Secretary Mike
Espy's visit and from WGN (Chicago, IL) who fed us actualities of the Secretary's remarks.

CONSERVATION RESERVE...stories about extension of this USDA program as announced this
week by Secretary Espy drew a lot of interest on our daily radio newsline and prompted
requests for us to do several special feeds, one to NBC radio.

HIS SPIRITS ARE VERY HIGH...said station personnel about farm broadcaster Art Sechrest
(WJBC, Bloomington, IL) who is now at home recovering from a recent stroke. Art's condition
is looki up" as he undergoes periodic outpatient therapy.


LARRY A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300








Ih II


United States Department of,


* otice


r4 vi Washington, DC 20250-1300


Letter No. 2677 I OCT 2 7 1994 September 2,1994

RAPID MICROBIAL TEST MEAT AND P TWylTlversLAVflaSecretary Mike Espy
announced August 25 the dev ent of a rap j robial test that can detect generic bacteria
on poultry, pork and beef. The t, i I u escence technology, takes five minutes and
can be used in commercial plants. secretary Mike Espy said, "I have instructed the
Food Safety and Inspection Service and the Agricultural Research Service to immediately begin
work together to develop a plan on how to best incorporate this new test into the inspection
system." The method and approach used to validate the test were reviewed by scientists in
government, academia and industry. It has been tested in four beef plants on more than 1,000
beef carcasses, in five poultry plants on more than 500 poultry carcasses and in three pork
plants on more than 300 carcasses. Studies show that the rapid test is as accurate and
repeatable as the standard 48-hour plate culture for determining high levels of generic bacteria.
Contact: Mary Dixon (202) 720-4623.

U.S. AGRICULTURAL EXPORTS PROJECTED AT NEAR-RECORD $43 BILLION --Agriculture
Secretary Mike Espy announced August 26 that U.S. agricultural exports are expected to reach
a near-record $43 billion in fiscal year 1995, the highest level in 14 years. Secretary Espy said,
"The projected gains in value and volume for 1995 are good news for American farmers, food
processors, and the U.S. economy. Export growth means higher incomes for farmers and rural
communities." The department's first agricultural trade projections for fiscal year 1995, which
begins October 1, were released jointly by the Foreign Agricultural Service, the Economic
Research Service and the World Agricultural Outlook Board. Exports are expected to be
bolstered by expanding foreign demand for U.S. meats, fruits, vegetables, and other high-value
consumer foods. Contact: Eric Von Chantfort (202) 720-9443.

IMPORTATION OF PREVIOUSLY PROHIBITED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES -- USDA is now
allowing the importation of a number of previously prohibited fruits and vegetables. B. Glen Lee,
deputy administrator for the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service's plant protection and
quarantine program, said as a condition of entry, all of these fruits and vegetables are subject
to inspection, disinfection, or both at the port of first arrival as required by regulations of APHIS.
In addition, some of the fruits and vegetables are required to undergo prescribed treatments for
fruit flies or other pests that pose a danger to American agriculture. This action provides the
U.S. with additional kinds of fruits and vegetables while continuing to protect American
agriculture against introduction of exotic plant pests. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-3256.

KEENEY NAMED HEAD OF FRUIT AND VEGETABLE DIVISION -- Robert Keeney has been
named national director of the Agricultural Marketing Service's Fruit and Vegetable Division. As
division director, Keeney heads the USDA group responsible for activities as diverse as certifying
the quality of America's fruit and vegetables, annually purchasing over $300 million in
commodities for domestic food assistance programs such as the School Lunch Program, and
ensuring fair trading practices in the marketing of fresh and frozen produce through enforcement
of the Perishable Agricultural Commodities Act. Contact: Gil High (202) 720-8998.







2
RESPECT FOR THESE TWO BEES -- Bumblebees and carpenter bees get a bad rap. A USDA
bee expert Stephen L. Buchmann says these bees are due respect for pollinating food crops.
These two bees rate attention for pollinating crops that domestic honey bees normally ignore,
such as tomatoes, or barely touch, such as cranberries. He says they may do the job quicker
than honey bees. Buchmann's studies are aimed at finding the best bees for pollinating crops
to insure fruit and vegetable production. Contact: Dennis Senft (510) 559-6068.

ATIENZA NAMED HEAD OF COTTON DIVISION -- Mary Atienza has been named national
director of the Agricultural Marketing Service's Cotton Division. As division director, Atienza
heads USDA's group that establishes cotton quality standards, and classes, grades and tests
foreign and domestic cotton. The division also provides market news information on domestic
cotton, enforces marketing regulations and has oversight responsibilities for the Cotton Research
and Promotion Program. Contact: Gil High (202) 720-8998.

APPOINTEES NAMED TO SERVE ON COTTON BOARD -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy
has appointed two members and one alternate member to the Cotton Board. The board
administers a national cotton research and promotion program. The appointees are: James M.
Davine Jr., Burnsville, MN; Julia K. Hughes, Silver Spring, MD; and alternate Laura E. Jones,
New York, NY. The appointees will serve the remaining portion of a 3-year term ending
December 31, 1995. Contact: Alicia Ford (202) 720-8998.

CHANGING CLASS II MILK PRICING METHOD RECOMMENDED -- USDA is recommending
changes in how the Class II milk price is determined monthly in all federal milk marketing orders.
Lon Hatamiya, administrator for USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service Lon Hatamiya said the
new Class II milk pricing method will use the Minnesota-Wisconsin price for the second
preceding month and add a fixed differential of 30 cents. This price will be announced at the
same time as the Class I milk price. Changing the pricing method for Class II milk will
coordinate the value of products used in the manufacture of Class II dairy products with higher
Class I fluid milk prices. Hatamiya said that using the recommended pricing method would
simplify the pricing procedure and assure that Class I and Class II prices fluctuate in the same
direction. Contact: Connie Crunkleton (202) 720-8998.

MCKEE NAMED HEAD OF DAIRY DIVISION -- Richard M. McKee has been named national
director of the Agricultural Marketing Service's Dairy Division. As division director, McKee heads
USDA's group that oversees administration of the national dairy promotion program and 38
federal milk orders throughout the U.S., covering 70 percent of U.S. milk production. The
division also provides market news and information on dairy production, and develops and
implements official grade standards for the industry. Contact: Gil High (202) 720-8998.

NATIONAL ORGANIC STANDARDS BOARD NOMINATIONS -- USDA is seeking nominations
for possible appointment to the National Organic Standards Board. USDA's Agricultural
Marketing Service administers the National Organic Standards Program. Terms of four current
board members will expire January 24, 1995. Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy will appoint
members to fill these vacancies from nominations submitted. USDA is seeking nominees to
represent farmers, handlers or processors, retailers and environmentalists. USDA will select
members based on: demonstrated experience and interest in organic; commodity and
geographic representation; endorsed support of industry organizations; demonstrated experience
with environmental concerns; and other factors appropriate for specific positions. Contact:
Connie Crunkleton (202) 720-8998.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1944 -- On this edition, Gary Crawford talks to USDA'S top economist
Keith Collins about the upcoming 1995 Farm Bill debate. (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute
documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME # 1425 -- Integrated Pest Management for home gardeners; tomato horned
worm; health insurance counseling for seniors; invisible trail; rapid test to detect bacteria on
carcasses. (Weekly cassette -- 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1935 -- The budget and the Farm Bill; bigger export year coming; dust
and a farm disease; poultry outlook; 90-day weather forecast. (Weekly cassette -- news
features.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE. These are USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Monday, September 12, (Newsline changes at 10:30 a.m. EDT for crop report stories and
changes again at 5:00 p.m. for cotton reports and other daily releases.) U.S. crop report, world
agricultural supply and demand; Tuesday, September 13, weekly weather and crop outlook,
world agricultural production, world grain production, world oilseed production, world cotton
production and world tobacco production; Wednesday, September 14, feed update, oil crops
update; Thursday, September 15, milk production, tobacco outlook, Europe outlook; Friday,
September 16, cattle on feed.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE


FEATURES -- Patrick O'Leary reports on early release times for USDA Crop Reports.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy on the 1995 Farm Bill; Ellen Haas, Assistant
Secretary for Food and Consumer Services, unveils USDA's new parent guide for healthful
school meals.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on natural access for groundwater research.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., EDT.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFF MIKE 4

WEATHER MODIFICATION...practices seem to be paying off in southwestern Kansas. Hap
Larson (KBUF, Garden City, KS) says that 12 counties are investing in weather modification
projects to help increase rainfall and to suppress hail damage to crops. Dollars invested are
paying off in crop savings. Work began as local projects, but now the state water office is
participating. Because of concern for ground water supply, farmers and researchers in the area
are looking at good dryland farming practices to minimize water needed for crops. Hap
mentioned one experiment near Holcomb, KS, that is placing underground irrigation systems
right at the plant root level. Water is a critical subject which Hap covers daily in his broadcasts.

RURAL/URBAN BARBECUE...that's the way both walks of life get together in Kankakee County
to share in the productivity of agriculture. Maria Behrends (WKAN, Kankakee, IL) says the 30th
annual event is being held this year with local growers donating melons, potatoes and cole slaw
ingredients. Proceeds of this community get-together go toward a local 4-H scholarship fund.
Maria has just finished broadcast coverage of five county fairs. Her three teenagers have been
exhibitors in hog shows at some of those fairs claiming Grand Champion honors in both junior
and open competition at the Will County Fair.

RICE HARVEST...is underway in Arkansas and the milling quality is good, says Stewart Doan
(ARN Agriculture, Little Rock, AR). Early soybeans are ripening. Cotton benefitted earlier from
wet conditions, but current dry spell may cut crop expectations. Boll weevils have been the most
serious insect pest this summer. Arkansas growers will be voting whether to participate in a Boll
Weevil Eradication Program this year.

STILL DRY IN TEXAS...reports Curt Lancaster (VSA Radio Network, San Angelo, TX). Only
8 of the 18-22 inches of annual West Texas rainfall have been received and the cotton there is
suffering. As current president of the National Association of Farm Broadcasters (NAFB), Curt
has seen a lot of U.S. agriculture this year in his travels to broadcaster meetings nationwide.
Cu ill preside t the 50th Anniversary meeting of NAFB in Kansas City, November 9-13.

LARRY A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300






31


k1 I ;I


United States Department


N -I (


* Washington, DC 20250-1300


'r OCT 2 7 1994
Letter No. 2678 t* T T2 J September 9, 1994

PUBLIC HEARINGS ON F "FRESH"p Ai i* ILS -- USDA's Food Safety
and Inspection Service (FSSI Sc t will hold three public hearings in September on
the use of the term "fresh" on th raw poultry products. The hearings are scheduled
for Sept. 12 in Modesto, CA; Sept. 16 in Atlanta, GA; and Sept. 20 in Washington, DC. Each
hearing will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. local time. FSIS Administrator Michael Taylor says
"Proper use of the term 'fresh' on raw poultry labels is an important issue and we want to hear
from all interested parties as we reexamine our policy." Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy
directed FSIS to reexamine the current policy to ensure it "is reasonable and meets today's
consumer expectations and to make sure any policy change does not open the door to problems
like the growth of bacteria that can cause foodborne illness." Contact: Patrick Collins (202) 720-
7943.

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK FORUM IN FEBRUARY -- USDA will hold its first
agricultural economic outlook forum on February 22 and 23, 1995 in Washington, DC. The forum
will replace the 70-year-old outlook conference that USDA traditionally held each December.
Based on feedback from conference participants and users of the information, the conference is
being redesigned to add a new longer term focus that will help farmers, agribusiness and policy
officials make strategic decisions for the future. Contact: Raymond Bridge (202)720-5447.

OVER $16 MILLION IN EWP FUNDS TO FLOODED SOUTHERN STATES -- USDA will provide
over $16 million in Emergency Watershed Protection (EWP) program funds to Alabama, Florida,
and Georgia as a result of flooding and excessive rainfall from Tropical Storm Alberto. USDA's
Soil Conservation Service (SCS) administers the program. EWP provides assistance to local
governments for the removal of imminent hazards to life and property from floods and the
products of erosion caused by natural disasters. Contact: Brad Fisher (202) 720-4024.

NEW PARENT'S GUIDE FOR HEALTHY SCHOOL MEALS -- USDA released its Parent's Guide
for Healthy School Meals, a back-to-school checklist for parents to help their children make sound
food choices in the school cafeteria. USDA's Food and Consumer Services Assistant Secretary
Ellen Haas says, "USDA wants to give parents some back-to-school supplies. We want children
to get the same nutrition message at the kitchen table at home that they do in the lunchroom at
school." The Parent's Guide is part of USDA's efforts to promote the health of children by
improving the National School Meals Programs. Contact: Phil Shanholtzer (703) 305-2286.

RECORD SALES YEAR FOR FARMER COOPERATIVES -- Higher prices for livestock and
poultry, and increased sales of grains, oilseeds and farm supplies helped U.S. farmer cooperatives
set a new, net business volume record of nearly $83 billion in 1993. Record sales levels were
attained despite a drop in the number of U.S. farmer cooperatives. While sales volume was up,
net income for cooperatives declined for the second straight year. Contact Dan Campbell (202)
720-6483.









NOSB FORWARDS NATIONAL ORGANIC STANDARDS RECOMMENDATIONS --The National
Organic Standards Board (NOSB) has forwarded most of its recommended standards for the
National Organic Program to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. USDA's Agricultural Marketing
Service Administrator Lon Hatamiya says, "These recommendations will be used as a foundation
for developing the national program." The board's recommendations include an organic farm plan
for both crop and livestock producers and an organic handling plan for handlers and processors.
Contact: Connie Crunkleton (202) 720-8998.

USDA HELPS FEEDLOT INDUSTRY FOCUS ON FOOD SAFETY -- With the help of feedlot
operators, the U.S. Department of Agriculture is researching the presence of Escherichia coli
0157:H7 and Salmonella in U.S. feedlot cattle. For the primary study this fall, named the Cattle
on Feed Evaluation (COFE), USDA and state veterinarians will collect approximately 12,000 fecal
samples from 100 feedlots in 13 states to test for the presence of 0157. About 4,000 samples will
be collected for Salmonella testing. The goals are to estimate the prevalence of 0157 and
salmonella in feedlot cattle and to identify management factors associated them. Contact:
Margaret Webb (301) 436-7799.

USDA NAMES TWO FOOD SAFETY OFFICIALS -- Two nationally-recognized food safety experts
have been named to senior positions in USDA. Michael Taylor, administrator of USDA's Food
Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) made the announcement September 1. Thomas J. Billy will
serve as Associate Administrator of FSIS. Billy was the Director of the Office of Seafood, Center
for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition at the Food and Drug Administration. Dr. J. Glenn Morris,
Jr., a physician, medical professor, and expert on foodborne disease and prevention, has been
named to head a new Health Affairs Staff within FSIS. Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy said,
"These appointments reflect this Administration's commitment to building the strongest possible
food safety program." Contact: Patrick Collins (202) 720-7943.

STUDENTS ARE GOING BACK TO SCHOOL WITH A FOOD SAFETY MESSAGE -- An
overwhelming number of requests has sparked the printing of an additional 3 million postcards
from the USDA which includes this simple message: "Recipe for a Safe and Delicious Hamburger-
-No matter how you top it...Before you take a bite, make sure it's brown in the middle." USDA,
in cooperation with the National Association of School Nurses, began distributing these postcards
in May to educate children and their parents about the need to eat only thoroughly cooked
hamburgers. However, requests by school nurses depleted the original printing of two million
cards, which led to the reprinting of an additional 3 million cards over the summer. The cards are
available in English and Spanish. Contact: Mary Ann Parmley (202) 690-0351.

USDA PROHIBITS CERTAIN PLANT IMPORTS -- USDA is taking action to prevent the
introduction of several exotic plant diseases into the U.S. by prohibiting the import of certain
plants. Deputy Administrator for USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection's plant protection
and quarantine B. Glen Lee says, "We are prohibiting the importation of strawberry plants from
all countries except Canada and Israel, the import of currant plants from New Zealand, and the
import of both species of sentry palm from everywhere except Lord Howe Island, Australia." The
prohibition against imports of these plants will help prevent diseases that can damage or kill plants
and reduce fruit production. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-3256.









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1945 -- It's called the "Farm Bill" and every five years Congress renews
this piece of legislation that now contains billions of dollars of programs like Food Stamps, School
Lunch, environmental issues and more. Gary Crawford takes an in depth look at the consumer
side of this bill. (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME # 1426 -- Fall vegetable garden; the "farm" bill could be a consumer bill; an
environmentally correct garden for children; tips for healthy school meals; 4-H and non-farm kids.
(Weekly cassette -- 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1936 -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy visits Russia; the budget and
the Farm Bill; China and export grain credits?; the greyingg" of U.S. farming; 1994 wheat deficiency
payments. (Weekly cassette -- news features.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE. These are USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
-- Monday, September 19, sugar and sweeteners outlook; Tuesday, September 20, ag outlook;
weekly weather and crop outlook; Thursday, September 22, livestock, dairy and poultry outlook;
U.S. ag trade update.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.



FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE


FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on U.S. agricultural research to Central Europe; Pat O'Leary
reports on Jefferson Letters found at USDA Library.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA meteorologist Norton Strommen on weather and crops; excerpts and
B-roll from Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy's recent visit to agricultural co-ops in Moscow.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on natural access for groundwater research.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., EDT.


Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFF MIKE II
OFF MIKE3 1262 08307 971 4

WHAT A HAM!...that's the best way to describe the one that sold in Kentucky recently for
$57,683 -- $3,700 a pound. Jack Crowner (Kentucky Agriculture Network, Louisville, KY) was
the auctioneer getting this record price for the Grand Champion ham at the Kentucky Ham
Contest. Jack says the previous record was $2,500 a pound. Proceeds from the sale go to the
highest bidder's favorite charity. At this year's event, 1,800 enjoyed a country ham breakfast. In
addition to his farm broadcasting duties, Jack has been auctioneering for 31 years.

TOTALLY DIGITAL...is the way Mississippi Network (Jackson, MS) has been operating since
August 29. John Winfield says the transformation is complete and that he is recording most of
his stories directly into a computer. He admits to using a reel-to-reel tape recorder for some of
those longer interviews. John says there are many options for digital operations at a single
station, but there were a few challenges to overcome in the transition for their entire network. He
reports that Mississippi is experiencing a good crop year for cotton, soybeans and corn. John
is this year's vice president of the National Association of Farm Broadcasters.

NEW RADIO STUDIO CONSTRUCTION...is underway here at USDA. Renovation has begun on
the new location for USDA's radio operations. These facilities are being constructed adjacent to
our TV studio operations in the South Agriculture Building. Once completed, we will have more
customized space for our radio staff to continue producing our daily newsline and weekly features,
and we'll have new areas that will help us respond to specific interview requests from
broadcasters. The co-location of radio and TV operations will enhance our joint coverage of many
news events and establish a Broadcast Center where we can more efficiently share equipment
and capabilities.

FEEDBACK...is not something you want to hear during a live broadcast (as a squeal or technical
problem), but it is something I would like to hear from you regarding the radio and TV services
that we offer to broadcasters. Also, I am anxious to share experiences you are having in covering
food and agriculture and to report on new directions you may be taking in your broadcast work.
We'd like to hear from you!


LARRY A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300







I1rI


-AiIU4


United States Department of Agricul Office of Co ications Washington, DC 20250-1300
SOCiT rston Science
Letter No. 2679 t Lirv September 16, 1994
0 OCT 2 7 1994
PATHOGEN REDUCTION IN MEA agriculture Secretary Mike Espy and U.S.
Senator Tom Daschle unveiled legisla berUrlnvevtvitbFlrid nificantly reform and
improve the meat and poultry inspection systems by mandating microbial testing and setting
levels of pathogens that constitute a threat tO public health. The proposed legislation, the
Pathogen Reduction Act, will target the harmful bacteria or pathogens, like E.coli 0157:H7
and Salmonella, that are responsible for thousands of deaths and illnesses annually.
Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy said, "this legislation would build into our nation's food
safety laws the commitment we are making at the Department of Agriculture to target
microbial pathogens in meat and poultry products and to take serious steps to reduce the risk
of foodborne illness." The proposed Pathogen Reduction Act is the latest in a series of food
safety and public health initiatives. Contact: Mary Dixon (202) 720-4623.

USDA/AMERICORPS MEMBERS JOIN LAUNCH OF NATIONAL SERVICE -- USDA inaugurated
its AmeriCorps national service program--largest in the federal government--as part of
ceremonies nationwide on September 12 to launch President Clinton's domestic Peace
Corps. USDA/AmeriCorps members will join other AmeriCorps participants in sites across
the country and at the White House to be sworn in. They will perform full-time service to
meet environmental and human needs in return for an educational voucher that may be used
for college or vocational school. Members in the 42 urban and rural programs to be run by
USDA will be part of anti-hunger, public lands and environment, and rural development
teams in 32 states. Contact: Joel Berg (202) 720-6350.

USDA AND STATE AGRICULTURE OFFICIALS PROMOTE NEW USES FOR AG PRODUCTS -
- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy announced September 13 an expanded national approach
to benefit farm income, bring new jobs to rural communities and expand alternative markets
for agricultural products through an agreement between USDA and the National Association
of the State Departments of Agriculture (NASDA). Under the agreement, USDA's Alternative
Agricultural Research and Commercialization Center (AARC) and NASDA will design and
create a national program to educate the public and NASDA leaders in all 50 states on the
benefits of commercializing new industrial uses from agricultural materials. Each state will
have representatives who can help entrepreneurs develop and market their new use.
Contact: Jim Brownlee (202) 720-2091.

USDA PROVIDES EWP FUNDS FOR COLORADO FOREST FIRES -- USDA is providing
$324,000 in Emergency Watershed Protection (EWP) funds to assist in the recovery of three
Colorado counties struck by this summer's forest fires. USDA's Soil Conservation Service
administers the EWP program. Funded EWP activities will include building structures for
debris and sediment collection and for seeding. Contact: Brad Fisher (202) 720-4024.


I I








TICK FEEDING CHAMBER ADVANCES -- USDA's Agricultural Research Service
entomologists David Stiller and Michael Coan are the first scientists to use a tick feeding
chamber in conjunction with genetic probes to study Anaplasma and Babesia blood parasites
that ticks transmit to cattle. ARS entomologists report that the new tick feeding chamber
mimics the skin of a cow, tricking the finicky ticks into feeding as they do on animals. The
tick feeding chamber was developed by Kenyan scientist Samuel Waladde. Contact:
Kathryn Barry Stelljes (510) 559-6069.

USDA PROTECTS 24 NEW PLANT VARIETIES -- USDA has issued certificates of protection
to developers of 24 new varieties of seed-reproduced plants including alfalfa, barley, corn,
tall fescue, meadowfoam, soybean, vinca and wheat. Kenneth H. Evans, commissioner of
the Plant Variety Protection Office in USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service, said developers
of the new varieties will have the exclusive right to reproduce, sell, import and export their
products in the United States for 18 years. Contact: Alicia Ford (202) 720-8998.

USDA PROPOSES TO IMPORT TRUE POTATO SEED -- USDA is asking the public for
comments on its proposal to allow, under certain conditions, the importation of true potato
seed from Chile. The potato seed would have to originate from certified virus-free parent
material, be produced under the supervision of Chilean plant protection authorities, and be
tested for seedborne viruses prior to being offered for entry into the U.S. Comments will be
considered if received on or before October 11. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-3256.

REFERENDUM ON WATERMELON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN ANNOUNCED --
USDA is announcing a referendum on the Watermelon Research and Promotion Plan. The
referendum is scheduled for Nov. 1 through Nov. 30. Known eligible producers, handlers
and importers will receive ballots by mail. Administrator for USDA's Agricultural Marketing
Service says, eligible voters will consider the elimination of assessment refunds, assessments
on watermelon imports and the inclusion of importer members on the National Watermelon
Board. Contact: Gil High (202) 720-8998.

FINAL RULE TO REMOVE PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE -- USDA made final an interim
rule that removes several areas from the pink bollworm quarantine. B.Glen Lee, deputy
administrator for plant protection and quarantine in USDA's Animal and Plant Health
Inspection Service said the rule has been finalized because pink bollworm has been
successfully eradicated from these areas, thanks to cooperating state departments of
agriculture. Removed from the list of suppressive areas are Craighead, Cross, Greene,
Monroe, Poinsett and St. Francis counties in Arkansas; Concordia Parish in Louisiana and
Washington County in Mississippi. Louisiana and Mississippi have been removed from the
list of states quarantined because of pink bollworm. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-3256.

FAX -- You can obtain our radio and TV programming information and the Broadcasters
Letter through your facsimile machine by calling USDA's AgNewsFax. Use the telephone
connected to your FAX machine to call (202) 690-3944. At voice prompts press 1, press
4, then to receive Broadcasters Letter, press 9200; radio newsline information, press 9250;
TV contents billboard, press 9260; TV scripts, press 9270. After all your selections, then
press #, press 3, and press the start button on your FAX machine.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1946-- China is one of the world's fastest growing economies and
could have a big effect on what crops we grow and sell in this country. Brenda Curtis talks
with three top experts on China.

CONSUMER TIME # 1427-- A new food safety package proposed; lawn care for fall;
research looks into blood clots and stroke; health insurance tips for seniors; National service
program underway in a big way.

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1937-- Price prospects slightly better than first expected; farmers
and the new meat inspection proposal; developing ideas for the Farm Bill; how widespread
are Integrated Pest Management practices?; researchers working on mildew resistant melons.

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE. These are USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Thursday, September 22, livestock industry outlook, agricultural trade update; Friday,
September 23, poultry situation; Tuesday, September 27, weekly weather and crop outlook;
Wednesday, September 28, fruit outlook; Thursday, September 29, grain stocks, world
tobacco situation; Friday, September 30, agriculture prices update, trout production.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.



FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Patrick O'Leary reports on the EFNEP program, celebrating 25 years of food
assistance for the needy.

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy speaks to the National Association of
State Departments of Agriculture in New Orleans, La., and at a Capitol Hill news conference
on pathogen reduction in meat inspection.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Patrick O'Leary reports on the dairy barn of the future (5 part
series).

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., EDT.


Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.






4
OFF MIKE 16 976 3

WATER...too much, too little, too little appreciated...until. we see the pictures
of floods, of forest fires, of headlines about city water systems shut down for
contamination...until we see what a few drops dripping from a truck in a Rwandan
refugee camp can mean to life...until it comes home to us that it must be shared and
conserved and managed very carefully for it is another precious and finite
resource. This is the theme of World Food Day worldwide, and Sharing Water: Farms,
Cities and Ecosystems will be the topic of the 11th annual World Food Day
teleconference on Friday, October 14. Expert panelists Jose Alfaro, Sandra Postel,
Rita Schmidt Sudman, and Hans Wolter will discuss these issues and respond to
questions from sites. Moderator will be Alex Chadwick.

INTERNATIONAL COVERAGE...is planned by AgDay (South Bend, IN) in November of
the World's Largest Equipment Show in Italy, reports Larry Lyle. This coverage will
be carried by 152 stations who use the AgDay program five days a week. Some
stations air the 30-minute program six days a week.

INNOVATION AND DIVERSIFICATION...may best describe an operation in southwest
Kansas that produces ethanol and uses warm water generated for fish production and
mash created for feedlot consumption. Hap Larson (KBUF, Garden City, KS) also
reports that a local company that was manufacturing cattle handling equipment got
interested in elephants and developed a large animal restraining device. Then
came a request from a sheik, asking the company to develop a "camel holder" for use in
doctoring camels.

NEWSLETTER SURVEY...is planned soon. We'd like know how well we're doing in providing
useful information, telling you features that are available for broadcasters, or in sharing updates
about the broadcast industry. If you have suggestions now, we'll take them, but we'll value your
reon s later ur upcoming survey.

LARY A. UINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300









CeNashington, DC 20250-1300


JAPAN'S APPLE MARKE --fecretary of Aritgie.tJike EsD announced September 21 that
final approval from Japan fo l .S appoleweodF&k shortly. Espy said, "The
market prospect for U.S. apple very promising." Secretary Espy estimates that
apple exports to Japan could reach $10 to 15 million in the first year, with growth projected to
reach over $75 million within five years. While this year's program applies only to qualified
production from the state of Washington, Espy is optimistic that with the continued cooperation
of Japanese authorities, the apple industry, and the USDA that other U.S. apple-producing areas
can be approved to export in the future. Contact: Don Washington (202) 720-3101.

PUBLIC HEARING ON USE OF TERM "FRESH" -- USDA held a public hearing in Washington,
D.C. on September 20 concerning the use of the term "fresh" on the labeling of raw poultry
products. Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy has directed USDA's Food Safety and Inspection
Service to reexamine the current policy to ensure it "is reasonable and meets today's consumer
expectations." Also, Espy has directed FSIS to "make sure that any policy change does not
open the door to problems like the growth of bacteria that could cause foodborne illness."
Contact: Jacque Knight (202) 720-9113.

COMMENTS ON 1995 RICE PROGRAM -- USDA's Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) is
requesting comments on provisions of the 1995 rice program, according to Grant Buntrock,
executive vice president of CCC. Comments are specifically requested regarding: whether an
acreage reduction program should be implemented for the 1995 rice crop and, if so, the
percentage reduction; the levels of premiums and discounts appropriate for different grades of
rice; and an appropriate difference between price support rates for milled whole kernels of long
grain and medium/short grain rice. Comments must be received by October 24 and may be
faxed to (202) 690-1346. Contact: Robert Feist (202) 720-6789.

ALGERIA ELIGIBLE FOR MORE BUTTERFAT--Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy announced
that Algeria is eligible for an additional 5,000 metric tons of butterfat under the USDA's Dairy
Export Incentive Program. Sales of butterfat will be made to buyers within Algeria through
commercial channels at competitive world prices. Sales will be facilitated through the payment
of bonuses by USDA's Commodity Credit Corporation. Contact: Marleen Stinson (202) 720-
2061.

COMMENTS ON WOOL AND MOHAIR SUPPORT PRICES -- USDA's Commodity Credit
Corporation (CCC) has asked for public comment on the support prices for pulled wool and
mohair for the 1995 marketing year. As required by the National Wool Act of 1954, as amended,
the two-year phaseout of the wool and mohair programs began with the 1994 marketing year.
Producer payments for the 1995 marketing year will be calculated using the support prices
covered by this proposed rule, but will then be reduced by 50 percent in accordance with the
Wool Act. The Wool Act is in effect through December 31, 1995. Contact: Bruce Merkle
(202) 720-8206.


United States Department c








ESPY AND DASCHLE UNVEIL LEGISLATION FOR MEAT AND POULTRY -- Agriculture
Secretary Mike Espy and U.S. Senator Tom Daschle unveiled legislation last week that would
significantly reform and improve the meat and poultry inspection systems by mandating microbial
testing and setting levels of pathogens that constitute a threat to public health. Agriculture
Secretary Mike Espy said, "This legislation would build into our nation's food safety laws the
commitment we are making at the Department of Agriculture to target microbial pathogens in
meat and poultry products and to take serious steps to reduce the risk of foodborne illness."
Espy and Daschle unveiled the legislation during a September 14 news conference on Capitol
Hill. Contact: Patrick Collins (202) 720-7943.

MIAMI FRUIT GROWER CHARGED WITH BRIBERY -- A Miami, Florida federal grand jury has
returned a three count indictment charging a Miami fruit grower with bribery of public officials.
USDA's Acting Inspector General Charles Gillum said the September 9 indictment charged Franz
A. Arango, 59, with offering bribes to USDA employees in exchange for disaster relief payments
through USDA's Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service. According to the indictment,
Arango approached a USDA official and offered a kickback if the official would help Arango
receive an ASCS disaster payment. The indictment further charges that Arango offered two
bribes, totaling $2,200, to an undercover agent with USDA's office of the Inspector General. If
convicted, Arango could be fined and sentenced to a term of up to 15 years in prison. Contact:
Brian L. Haaser (202) 720-6701.

NEW DIETARY GUIDELINES ADVISORY COMMITTEE -- A new Dietary Guidelines Advisory
Committee, appointed by the Secretaries of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S.
Department of Health and Human Services, met for a two-day session September 22-23 in
Washington, D.C. The 11-member committee was appointed to comply with public law which
requires that secretaries of the two departments publish the dietary guidelines every five years.
If the committee decides revisions are warranted, based on current scientific evidence, their
recommendations will be incorporated into the 1995 edition of the guidelines. Contact: Johna
Pierce (202) 720-1691.

USDA RESTRICTS IMPORTATION OF PORTUGAL ANIMAL PRODUCTS -- On September
20, USDA announced restrictions on importation of ruminant meats and animal products and
byproducts from Portugal because bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, also known as mad
cow disease) has been detected in native cattle in that country. This action is being taken to
reduce the risk of introducing this disease into the U.S. Mad cow disease is a fatal neurologic
disease of cattle that was first diagnosed in Great Britain in 1986. Currently, USDA regulations
also restrict importation of ruminant products from France, Great Britain, Northern Ireland, the
Republic of Ireland, Oman and Switzerland because of this disease. USDA's Animal and Plant
Health Inspection Service enforces import restrictions and is conducting surveillance for mad cow
disease to ensure that this serious disease does not become established in the United States,
where it has never been detected. Contact: Kendra Pratt (301) 436-4898.

FAX -- You can obtain our radio and TV programming information and the Broadcasters Letter
through your facsimile machine by calling USDA's AgNewsFax. Use the telephone connected
to your FAX machine to call (202) 690-3944. At voice prompts press 1, press 4, then to receive
Broadcasters Letter, press 9200; radio newsline information, press 9250; TV contents billboard,
press 9260; TV scripts, press 9270. After all your selections, then press #, press 3, and press
the start button on your FAX machine.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1947 -- In this edition, Patrick O'Leary takes a look at a government
sponsored program that is helping small towns solve rural development problems. Grassroots
efforts are making a difference in solving problems and renewing spirit in this rural revitalization
effort. (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME # 1428 -- School lunch update; smokejumping patriots and pioneers; tick
disease research tool; cutting down on fat and sodium in the diet; bigger and better plants.
(Weekly cassette -- 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES #1938 -- China buys U.S. corn; budget and the farm bill; raising ticks
the new-fashioned way; back-up bees; 1995 rice program comments. (Weekly cassette -- news
features.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE. These are USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Thursday, September 29 -- grain stocks report; hogs and pigs report; Friday September 30 --
agricultural prices report; trout production report; Tuesday, October 4 -- weekly weather and
crop report; Wednesday, October 5 -- dairy products report.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE


FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill has several reports this week: The Beagle Brigade is located in
international airports in the U.S. as part of USDA's program to protect American agriculture from
costly pests and diseases; USDA researchers are working on an environmentally-friendly process
to make paper; USDA fungi collection that could hold some answers to forest management; tips
on how to use a slow cooker with food safety in mind.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen on the latest weather and crop
developments.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on a USDA Forest Service program to make
National Forests accessible to everyone.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., EDT.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

4 31262 08307981 3
OFF MIKE

FLYING BROADCASTER...who is in touch with the West is Evan Slack (Evan Slack Network,
Denver, CO). Evan says a big concern among his listeners is fed cattle market prices. He flies
his own plane in traveling to cattlemen's conventions, video cattle auctions and other events
while covering cattle, wheat and edible beans stories for 55 radio stations in nine states.
Evan's listeners range from Calgary, Canada, to Canadian, TX. He reports hearing long-time
farm broadcaster Bill McReynolds (WOAI, San Antonio, TX) on-the-air during a recent trip to
south Texas.

OLDEST COUNTY FAIR IN TEXAS...was a recent feature story reported by Jerry Lackey
(KLST-TV, San Angelo, TX). Jerry says the fair in Fredericksburg (Gillespie County) has been
held continuously for 106 years. He hosts a weekly, 30-minute Saturday morning TV program
about Texas agriculture, now in its fourth year. Prior to that, Jerry was a radio broadcaster for
20 years as well as a magazine writer and editor.

TV WATER STORY...is being featured at the Virginia State Fair this week. Our Patrick O'Leary
recently produced a video story on a new water system in the small rural community of Falls
Mills, VA, for use in our weekly TV package delivered via satellite. We understand this feature
is being shown at one of the fair's exhibits.

ON OUR DOORSTEP...this week I passed Judy Stratman (WNAX, Yankton, SD) as I was
rushing out of USDA to catch a commuter train. Judy was accompanying South Dakota
Farmers Union members on their annual "fly-in" to Washington to visit USDA and other
Washington offices, including the White House. Judy interviewed Deputy Secretary of
Agriculture Richard Rominger while at USDA and relayed the report back to her colleague,
Gene Williams.



LARRY QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


:ij I I I- IH I(
United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300







;A I 1W


United States Department of Agricl

Letter No. 2681


;atiori~ b a 3'Washington, DC 20250-1300
NOV 2 8 1994 September 30,1994


USDA REORGANIZATION -- On S io he U iiilSeobfFtBidesentatives passed
USDA's reorganization measure. Secretary ofAgriculture Mike Espy said, "Passage of USDA's
reorganization by the U.S. House of Representatives marks another major step toward reforming
a department created in the last century and giving it the ability to better serve Americans in the
next century." The U.S. Senate passed a similar measure on April 13, and Secretary Espy looks
forward to final passage in the near future. Espy said, "Under reorganization, we will streamline
and reinvigorate the department inside and outside of Washington. We will reduce the number
of agencies, cut red tape, make programs more user friendly and place a greater emphasis on
food safety, nutrition and rural development." Secretary Espy added, "Field offices across the
nation operated by various USDA agencies will be combined to reduce overhead and personnel
costs and to provide one-stop service for the department's customers. Programs for farmers,
long-bound by red tape, will be consolidated into one agency cutting out the bureaucracy."

SIGNING OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BANK ACT -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy
joined President Clinton September 23.at the signing of the Community Development Bank Act,
which will help bring additional investment capital to urban and rural communities across the
country. The legislation sets forth a program of federal support for a wide range of specialized
lenders known as community development financial institutions (CDFI) that target the
development needs of distressed rural and urban communities. This legislation will assist CDFI's
in creating jobs in distressed areas by making credit available and by providing necessary
technical assistance for start-up efforts, business expansions and employee-owned companies.
The program is funded with an authorization of $382 million over four years. The funding will be
managed by an administrator appointed by the President and advised by a 15-member board.
Contact: Mary Dixon (202) 720-4623.

USDA REQUESTS COMMENTS ON 1995 UPLAND COTTON PROGRAM -- USDA's
Commodity Credit Corporation issued a proposed regulation requesting comments on the 1995
upland cotton Acreage Reduction Program (ARP). Grant Buntrock, executive vice president of
the CCC, said "Comments are requested on whether the upland cotton ARP percentage for 1995
should be 5.0, 10.0 or 15.0 percent." These options were based on USDA projections of upland
cotton supply and demand estimates as of August, 1994. Other ARP levels could be considered
before the preliminary ARP announcement and/or final ARP decision if warranted by changes
in the supply-demand outlook. The preliminary ARP percentage for upland cotton must be
announced by November 1 and the final ARP percentage by January 1. Contact: Bruce Merkle
(202) 720-8206.

USDA/DISNEY PARTNERSHIP ON NUTRITION -- USDA and Walt Disney Company
announced September 29 that they will join forces in a nationwide media campaign to teach the
importance of good nutrition to children. The Disney agreement marks the beginning of USDA's
Children's Nutrition Campaign, which will work with other entertainment media to reach children
with the Department's eating-for-health message. Contact: Neal Flieger (703) 305-2039.


,1







USDA AWARDS GRANT TO HELP CREATE JOBS -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy
announced September 22 that USDA has awarded $657,500 to the Lummi Indian Nation to help
create jobs for the shellfish hatchery. The Rural Business Enterprise Grant, funded by USDA's
Rural Development Administration, will enable the Lummi Nation to renovate an existing shellfish
hatchery and provide technical assistance to some 30 area aquaculture farmers. The shellfish
agribusiness is a viable component of the American Indian's business, community and livelihood.
The Lummi Indian Business Council in Whatcom County, WA, was awarded the RDA grant to
help create an estimated 35 direct jobs and save approximately seven more jobs for the Lummi
Nation. Contact: Elwood Patawa (202) 720-2565.

COMPUTER MODEL "GROWS" SOYBEANS -- Soybean farmer Kenneth B. Hood "grows"
soybeans in the winter--on a computer. A crop sprouts every three minutes. Hood, owner of
Perthsire Farms in the Mississippi Delta, is one of five soybean farmers pioneering a computer
model to simulate.the life cycle of a soybean crop. He expects the model to become standard
farm equipment soon. The model knows how soybeans grow, having been fed data from years
of growing the plants in computer-wired growth chambers. It also has information on the soils
the crop is being grown in and on fertilizer use. The only additional information it needs is about
the weather. Hood and the other farmers have been reporting yield increases as high as 29
percent, along with labor and water savings, using the program developed by USDA scientists.
Contact: Don Comis (301) 344-2748.

BONE-IN HAM PRODUCTS RECALLED -- USDA announced September 22 that Wilson Foods
Corporation, an Oklahoma City food processing firm, is voluntarily recalling about 30,000 pounds
of its "Ham Steak," "Butt Portion," and "Shank Portion" bone-in ham products because the
products were undercooked and have the potential of causing serious illness if eaten. These
products were distributed to retail food and grocery stores in Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri,
Montana, North Dakota, Texas, and Washington. All packages of "Wilson Ham Steak," "Wilson
Butt Portion," and "Wilson Shank Portion" with the code "2324D3" or "2534D2" embossed on the
label are being recalled. No other Wilson food product is affected by the recall. The company
reported the problem to USDA after it discovered that some of the product already shipped to
stores may have been undercooked. Consumers with questions about the recall may phone the
toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-800-535-4555. Contact Jacque Knight (202) 720-
9113.

1994 NO-NET-COST ASSESSMENTS ANNOUNCED FOR TOBACCO -- USDA's Commodity
Credit Corporation announced September 22 that producers of 1994-crop Kentucky and
Tennessee dark air-cured (types 35-36) and fire-cured (types 22-23) tobacco must agree to pay
assessments on all marketing of these tobaccos to qualify for price support loans. Grant
Buntrock, CCC's executive vice president, said the no-net-cost assessment and the 1994
marketing assessment total 2 cents per pound and will be collected from producers on each
pound of dark air-cured and fire-cured tobacco marketed during the 1994 marketing season.
Contact: Robert Feist (202) 720-6789.

FAX -- You can obtain our radio and TV programming information and the Broadcasters Letter
through your facsimile machine by calling USDA's AgNewsFax. Use the telephone connected
to your FAX machine to call (202) 690-3944. At voice prompts press 1, press 4, then to receive
Broadcasters Letter, press 9200; radio newsline information, press 9250; TV contents billboard,
press 9260; TV scripts, press 9270. After all your selections, then press #, press 3, and press
the start button on your FAX machine.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1948 -- Jim Henry looks at some research on how what we eat may
affect our blood's ability to clot...and how that may affect our chances of stroke and heart attack.
(Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary.)

CONSUMER TIME # 1429 -- Better long range weather forecasts? Preparing for the next fire
season; new law could mean more jobs; walking makes better bones for older women; cultural
diversity program for young folks. (Weekly cassette -- 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features.)

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1939 -- Agriculture hurting in Haiti; U.S./Canadian grain trade memo
signed; U.S. farmers depend on more kinds of bees than just honeybees; computer soybean
simulation; farmers in the near future may get better seasonal long range weather forecasts.
(Weekly cassette -- news features.)

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE. These are USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Thursday, October 6, aquaculture outlook; Tuesday, October 11, crop/weather update;
Wednesday, October 12, U.S. crop production, world agricultural supply and demand (Newsline
will change twice on Oct. 12--10:30 a.m. and the usual 5:00 p.m.); Thursday, October 13, world
cotton update, hog outlook, world oilseed situation, world agriculture/grain production; Friday,
October 14, milk production.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES: Lynn Wyvill reports on small-scale agriculture: sheep farming; DeBoria Janifer
reports on purslane research; Patrick O'Leary takes a look at shoreline erosion control, and
DeBoria Janifer reports on diet and cholesterol.

ACTUALITIES: USDA meteorologist Norton Strommen on weather and crops.

UPCOMING FEATURES: DeBoria Janifer reports on natural access for groundwater research.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., EDT.


Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.







4 1
OFF MIKE608307

WELCOME VISITORS...to our radio and TV facilities here at USDA last week included Jim
Coyle (KWIX, Moberly, MO), Gary Wergin (KFEQ/KSJQ, St. Joseph, MO), Cyndi Young
(WTAX, Springfield, IL), and Cindy Cunningham (National Pork Producers Council, Des Moines,
IA). They were attending a legislative seminar here and took time out for a tour and visit with
us (Gary Crawford, Brenda Curtis-Heiken, and me).

NATIONAL 4-H WEEK...is October 2-8. Vicki Eilers (WTAD, Quincy, IL), a first-year farm
broadcaster who graduated last May from the University of Illinois, has been doing a series of
4-H interviews preparing for next week. She's an 11-year 4-H veteran herself. (I was an
Oklahoma 4-H member for 10 years myself.) Vicki tells us that the "10-Mile 4-H Club" in Marion
County, MO, just celebrated its 50th anniversary, an impressive history for a local club. About
200 people were there last week to recall their memories of membership.

CORN CROP...is one of the best in years for Kentucky, reports Allen Aldridge (Kentucky Ag-
Net, Louisville, KY). Corn harvesting is underway there, and soybean harvesting is just
beginning, but most tobacco is in the barn. Pastures are dry, and many producers are feeding
hay.

FEED GRAINS TOUR...to Vietnam, Malaysia and Indonesia was completed recently by Kathy
Patton (WIBW & Kansas Ag Network,-Topeka, KS) and Max Armstrong and Phil Reed (WGN,
Chicago, IL). They were part of a two-week, 16-member tour to develop new markets for U.S.
sales of corn, barley and grain sorghum in southeast Asia. Besides relaying stories back to
broadcasters here, Kathy said she produced a series of 10 two-minute reports and three 30-
minute radio features. Kathy witnessed a lot of intensive hand labor in Vietnam farm fields, but
she said their feed mills were impressive. Feed is transported in bags, not bulk. Donna Dunn
(U.S. Feed Grains council) coordinated the tour.


LARRY A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300









United States Departmentf griWtire ffi CommunidMiNbion 0NBbfbington, DC 20250-1300
Vrl Library
Letter No. 2682 iby October 7,1994

USDA REORGANIZATI D NGRESS -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy
announced October 5 that an to reorganiz I VSft s VEafnfidhe USDA has been
approved by Congress. The USDA reorganization will save $2.5 billion, close 1,100 field offices,
reduce staff by at least 7,500 and eliminate 14 of he 43 USDA agencies. Secretary Espy said,
"I pledged when I took this position that one of my first priorities would be a total restructuring
of USDA. I am pleased that Congress has passed the necessary legislation which will allow us
to move the Department into the 21st Century." Espy stressed that the $2.5 billion in savings
as a result of reorganization will come from office closings and streamlining of USDA in
Washington, not out of the programs run by USDA. 'The new reinvented USDA will work better,
cost less and improve service to our customers," Espy said. Contact: Jim Loftus (202) 720-
4623.

SECRETARY ESPY RESIGNS -- On October 3, Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy announced
his resignation to President Clinton effective December 31. Espy had received word that day
that the bill authorizing the Secretary of Agriculture to reorganize USDA had passed the House
of Representatives. Espy said, "As we stand at this new beginning for USDA, I stand at a new
beginning for myself as well. I must personally overcome the challenge to my good name that
continues to distract from my work at USDA." Secretary Espy said, "I have many people to
thank and I will in the months ahead. I thank the President for the opportunity to serve, I thank
the people of American agriculture who have given me their support and encouragement as I
worked to bring change to USDA. I now owe it to myself and my family to turn my full attention
to defending myself. I look forward to dedicating myself to vigorously answering the charges
that have been made." Contact: Ali Webb (202) 720-4623.

MASSIVE REFORM OF CROP INSURANCE -- Both the House and Senate passed legislation
this week (October 3 & 4), overhauling the way the Department of Agriculture responds when
crop disasters strike America's farmers and ranchers. Both actions pave the way for President
Clinton's signature. As a result of the legislation, crop insurance will become an integral part of
most USDA farm programs. Most notably, farmers must buy crop insurance to be eligible for
other farm benefits, including commodity price support and certain Farmers Home Administration
loans. Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy said, "Farmers must be assured that adequate,
affordable and effective crop insurance is as guaranteed as the next disaster. That promise has
been kept." Contact: Paula Thomasson (202) 254-9344.

CROP INSURANCE DATE EXTENDED -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy announced the
extension of the sales closing date for crop insurance from September 30 to October 31. This
action gives producers an additional 30 days to purchase insurance policies for such crops as
winter wheat, oats, barley, potatoes, rye, sugarcane and nursery stock. Farmers should contact
their crop insurance agents to determine if they are affected by the action and to discuss their
options. Contact: Paula Thomasson (202) 254-9344.








USDA AWARDS $10 MILLION IN RURAL GRANTS -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy
announced September 29, $10 million in grants to 33 education and medical organizations in 28
states that help jump-start the development and deployment of advanced telecommunications
services throughout rural America. Espy said, 'This advanced telecommunications technology
will help bring rural America access to the Information Superhighway which is critical for their
ability to survive, compete, and prosper." The grants administered by USDA's Rural
Electrification Administration will be used to link education and health services from one rural
area to another and to more populated sites. The grants were made under REA's Distance
Learning and Medical Link Grant Program and varied from $63,711 to $490,000, including 20 of
$300,000 or more. Recipients ranged from a school district-cable company partnership to a
community college's educational-medical network. Contact: Jim Brownlee (202) 720-2091.

BEETLES CONTROL WEEDS THAT CHEMICALS CAN'T Tiny insects that love to eat leafy
spurge weeds are gradually bringing some relief to farmers and ranchers in the northern Great
Plains, according to a USDA researcher who releases the six-legged weed whackers. Chemical
weed killers are generally impractical and too expensive for leafy spurge weeds so scientists are
fighting back with several Aphthona species and other insects from overseas. Norman E. Rees,
USDA's Agricultural Research Service entomologist, says about 500 Aphthona nigriscutis flea
beetles were released at a site in central Montana in 1989 and have multiplied and practically
eliminated leafy spurge from an area now about 500 yards across. Rees said, "We expect flea
beetles to continue to free up more rangeland for wildlife and livestock every year. Contact:
Dennis Senft (510) 559-6068.

NATIONAL ORGANIC STANDARDS BOARD TO MEET -- USDA's National Organic Standards
Board (NOSB) will meet October 11-14 in Rohnert Park, CA. All sessions are open to the public
and will be held from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. each day at the Red Lion Hotel, 1 Red Lion Drive.
The main focus of the meeting is to discuss materials being considered for placement on the
national list of allowed synthetics and prohibited natural substances for use in the production and
processing of organic foods. A public input session is scheduled for Tuesday, October 11, from
1:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Contact: Connie Crunkleton (202) 720-8998.

USDA ANNOUNCES 1995 FEED GRAINS PROGRAM PROVISIONS -- Agriculture Secretary
Mike Espy announced September 30, the 1995 Acreage Reduction Program acreage reduction
percentages (ARPs) of 7.5 percent for corn, up from the zero-percent level in 1994, while
maintaining zero percent for grain sorghum, barley and oats. Corn stocks going into the
1995/1996 marketing year are expected to be about 777 million bushels higher than the previous
year's stocks. This year's ARP levels for grain sorghum, barley and oats are unchanged from
1994. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

1994 MEAT IMPORTS TO BE BELOW TRIGGER LEVEL -- USDA's fourth quarterly estimate
of meat imports under the Meat Import Act is 1,218.8 million pounds for 1994. This estimate of
imports is the same as previous quarterly estimates for 1994 because of voluntary restraint
agreements signed with Australia and New Zealand for this calendar year. The estimate of
imports is just below the trigger level of 1,218.9 million pounds at which import quotas would be
required under the Act's provisions. Australia and New Zealand have signed voluntary restraint
agreements allowing the U.S. to limit their imports of meat items subject to the law in 1994 to
664.9 and 406.6 million pounds, respectively. Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy said, "These
agreements should keep total 1994 imports of beef below the trigger level." Contact: Donald
Washington (202) 720-3101.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1949 -- In this edition, Brenda Curtis-Heiken describes how urban
sprawl is affecting one county's farm operations. (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute
documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1430 -- Putting trees and shrubs to bed; wildfire prevention; "Lion King"
characters to help USDA; high tech grants to rural America; talking to "TJ." (Weekly cassette -
- 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1940 -- Espy to resign; NAFTA study shows increase in U.S. farm
exports; USDA will reorganize; '95 feed grain provisions; mite protection for bees.
(Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE. These are USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Tuesday, October 18, weekly weather and crop outlook; Wednesday, October 19, wheat report;
Asian and Pacific Rim outlook; Thursday, October 20, catfish processing and agricultural outlook
report; Friday, October 21, cattle on feed report; dairy outlook report; livestock, dairy and poultry
outlook report.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.



FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Patrick O'Leary reports on six foot soybeans, an experimental forage crop being
developed by USDA researchers; Chris Larson reports on "Adopt A Watershed," a program
from USDA's Soil Conservation Service.

ACTUALITIES -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy resigns (excerpts from his October 3 news
conference).

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Patrick O'Leary reports on a prototype mechanical harvester for
blueberries developed by USDA researchers.


SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 am., EDT.


Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.





NIRST FLORIDA

31262 3
4
OFF MIKE

MEDFLIES THREATEN CROPS...in California. Walt Shaw (KHTK, Sacramento, CA) reports
that medflies have been found north of Los Angeles in Ventura County for the first time. An
infestation of those tiny insects could be devastating to such crops as lemons, strawberries,
oranges, avocados, grapefruit and peppers -- all grown in that county. California is selling a lot
of rice in export markets to customers like Japan this year. As a result, their rice production has
nearly doubled as result of this increased demand for American rice. Walt broadcasts
agricultural news an hour every morning and does two-minute farm updates six times a day.
He'll be hosting the 1997 Western/Southwestern Regional Meeting of the National Association
of Farm Broadcasters to be held in Monterey, CA.

AG BREAK...is the name of a five-times-per-week, 2 1/2-minute TV feature carried by KBIM-TV
(Roswell, NM) at 6:07 a.m. Jaccii Farris saw our TV listings in a recent issue and called to
inquire about our features. She said New Mexico State University also provides feature stories
for their use on a regular basis. (See page 3 if you would like to downlink satellite-delivered
stories on Mondays and Thursdays).

FAX DELIVERY...of this newsletter is available through AgNewsFAX and Mike Rogers (Michigan
Farm Bureau) regularly reads the letter this way. Mike reports that he finds our information
useful in preparing a regular agricultural radio show that he produces for WJR Radio in Detroit,
MI. You can receive the letter on the issue date (each Friday) by calling AgNewsFAX at (202)
690-3944.

HOW TO GET INFORMATION...from USDA is a listing of information contacts which has just
been updated and reprinted. A call from Bob Quinn (WHO, Des Moines, IA) requesting the
latest copy reminded e to offer a copy to anyone who will FAX or write us.



LARRY A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300









United St apartment of Art 4ture Office of Comrn ic6tifnM Washington, DC 20250-1300

Letter o B26q October 14, 1994
e 99 University of Florida
NAFTA REASES TRAD. D CREATES JOBS -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy says
that the .s reaping th efits of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).
These be w i wlLt 'ti with implementation of the Uruguay Round Agreement of the
General Agre Q~t s and Trade (GATT). U.S. agricultural exports to Mexico rose nine
percent ($211 million) for the first seven months of 1994 to $2.5 billion, according to a USDA
economic task force report. U.S. agricultural exports to Mexico are expected to reach a record
$4 billion by year's end. Secretary Espy said, "NAFTA is proof that trade agreements can
increase U.S. competitiveness in world markets and contribute to real growth in the national
economy." NAFTA gives the U.S. better access to the growing Mexican market and could boost
U.S. agricultural exports over the $10 billion mark by the year 2008. When the agreement is fully
implemented, NAFTA is expected to generate 56 thousand new agricultural trade-related jobs
for U.S. citizens. Contact: Maria Bynum (202) 720-5192.

PASSAGE OF CHILD NUTRITION LEGISLATION -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy welcomed
final Congressional approval of legislation reauthorizing and improving the USDA's Child Nutrition
and Women Infants and Children (WIC) Programs. The "Healthy Meals For Healthy Americans
Act" was passed by the House and Senate last week. Secretary Espy said, "This bill represents
a great stride forward for nutrition, for health, and for our nation's children. The legislation is a
testament to the principle that because children's health is a priority, our programs should meet
health objectives." In addition to school meals provisions, the legislation reauthorizes the
Summer Food Service Program and the Child and Adult Day Care Program, makes it easier for
pregnant women to receive WIC benefits, extends the WIC Farmer's Market Nutrition Program,
provides start-up and expansion grants for the School Breakfast Program, and provides for pilot
projects to test ways to improve WIC Program Administration. Also, the bill extends the
Homeless Children Nutrition program and establishes a demonstration program to provide health
and nutrition benefits to "boarder babies." Contact: Neal Flieger (703) 305-2039.

USDA PROPOSES TO AMEND MILK REQUIREMENTS -- USDA is proposing to amend its
recommended requirements for manufacturing grade milk. Lon Hatamiya, administrator of
USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service, says the proposed amendment would reduce the
maximum allowable bacterial estimate and somatic cell count in producer herd milk and would
reduce the maximum allowable bacterial estimate in commingled milk. Also, the proposal would
modify follow-up procedures when producer herd milk exceeds the maximum allowable bacterial
estimate. The USDA-recommended requirements are model regulations relating to sanitation
and quality requirements for the production and processing of milk for manufacturing purposes.
Contact: Connie Crunkleton (202) 720-8998.

MEXICO ELIGIBLE FOR MORE MILK POWDER --Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy announced
that Mexico is eligible for an additional 25,000 metric tons of milk powder under USDA's Dairy
Export Incentive Program. Sales of milk powder will be made to buyers within Mexico through
commercial channels at competitive world prices. Contact: Marlene Stinson (202) 720-2061.







NEW MEDFLY TRAP -- USDA scientists have developed a new, easy-to-use trap that catches
both male and female Mediterranean fruit flies. They are currently testing the new trap in
California and ten countries. Robert Heath, an Agricultural Research Service chemist, says the
trap uses a synthetic blend of chemical scents and colors to lure males and females inside a
plastic cylinder, where they feed on a lethal combination of sugar and insecticide. The new trap
was designed to overcome drawbacks of two current traps used today, the McPhail and
Jackson traps. Attracting females is one of the new trap's main advantages. The new trap's
blend of chemicals can be adjusted to attract females at different stages of their reproductive
cycle. It can be tuned to capture young females before they have mated. The research agency
is seeking to patent the trap on behalf of inventors Heath and entomologist Nancy D. Epsky,
both based at the agency's Insect Attractants Laboratory in Gainesville, FL. The trap is expected
to help state and federal regulatory officials detect medfly infestations in California, Florida,
Hawaii, Texas, and other parts of the world. Contact: Sean Adams (301) 344-2723.

STATES TO RECEIVE FOREST PAYMENTS -- Jack Ward Thomas, chief of USDA's Forest
Service announced October 4 that 41 states and Puerto Rico will share interim payments totaling
over $227 million as their portion of national forest receipts collected in fiscal year 1994. Thomas
said, "We estimate these states will eventually receive over $303 million as their total payments
from national forest receipts for the year. The interim payment represents 75 percent of the
estimated total amount each state will receive as its share of funds collected during the year from
the sale and use of a variety of national forest products and services. USDA pays any additional
funds it owes the states in December, after determining the actual receipts for the fiscal year
ending September 30. The Forest Service pays 25 percent of the revenue it collects -- from
timber sales, grazing, recreation, minerals and land use -- to states in which national forest lands
are located. Funds are used for schools and roads. Contact: Chris Holmes (202) 205-1006.

USDA AWARDS $435,000 FOR COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROJECTS -- Bob Nash, USDA's
under secretary for small community and rural development, announced October 5 that the
Department is awarding $435,000 to state agriculture offices and agricultural experiment stations
to help create economic opportunity for farmer-owned cooperatives. These are matching grants
under a new USDA Federal-State Research on Cooperatives program. The participating states
will invest an additional $535,000 of their own money in the research projects. Under Secretary
Nash said, "These grants underscore the commitment of USDA to helping ensure that America's
farmer-owned cooperatives will continue to represent a viable economic force in the years and
decades ahead." The intent of the program is to encourage research on cooperative marketing
at the state level to enhance the well-being of agricultural cooperatives and their members.
Contact: Dan Campbell (202) 720-6483.

USDA ANNOUNCES PUBLIC LAW 480 ALLOCATIONS -- USDA has announced the tentative
FY 95 allocations of $249.0 million to 24 countries to cover commodity financing extended under
Title I of the Food for Peace Program, and commodity donations under the Food for Progress
Program, funded by Title I appropriations. Christopher E. Goldthwait, general sales manager for
USDA's Foreign Agricultural Service says, these announced allocations reflect a P.L. 480
program level for fiscal year 1995 of $291.3 million for concessional credit financing and $29.0
million for ocean freight differential costs associated with cargo preference requirements. Title
I of the Food for Peace Program is a concessional sales program to promote exports of U.S.
agricultural commodities and to foster broad-based sustainable development in recipient
countries. Contact: Marlene Phillips (202) 720-2061.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1950 -- In this edition, Brenda Curtis talks with financial planning
specialist Mary Stephenson about big financial errors people make, and how to take
responsibility for financial planning. (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1431 -- A touch of the grape; witches as botanists and pharmacists; lead
paint poisoning; pass the apples, bananas and oranges, please; preserving the nation's
farmland. (Weekly cassette -- 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1941 -- New crop/price forecast; genetic research "bearing fruit;" the
medfly invades California; record cotton crop expected; wheat update. (Weekly cassette -- news
features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE. These are USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Monday, October 24, trade update; Tuesday, October 25, weekly weather and crops; Friday,
October 28, tobacco markets and trade; catfish production.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.



FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on six-foot soybeans. Chris Larson reports on a USDA Soil
Conservation program for kids called "Adopt-a-Watershed." Lynn Wyvill reports on small-scale
agriculture and sheep farming.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on food safety tips for handling a "take-out,"
ready-prepared Thanksgiving feast.


SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., EDT.


Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.








OFF MIKE 4

NEARLY 50 YEARS...of outstanding service to agriculture and the communications industry is
coming to a close this year with retirement of Ray Wilkinson (WRAL-TV and Tobacco Radio
Network). In honor of his outstanding service, the Ray Wilkinson 4-H Scholarship Endowment
is being established. His colleague, Ken Tanner, tells us that Capitol Broadcasting Company
has provided a "Challenge Grant" of $60,000 (one-for-one match) with proceeds going to this
new 4-H scholarship. A series of four lunches with Ray are scheduled from October 25-
November 3 to raise matching funds. The scholarship will be presented each year to
outstanding North Carolina 4-H'ers who excel in communications. Any questions about this can
be directed to John Kruse at 919-515-2000.

COOPERATIVE MONTH...is being celebrated this month and Mike Austin (WGEE, Green Bay,
WI) has covered several events in his state. Mike reports a good alfalfa crop and says that silos
will be full for change. A Wisconsin program called Dairy 20\20 is bringing a focus to business
aspects of dairying there. Mike says Wisconsin is looking at their taxes on farming to try to
make the occupation more attractive to their next generation. We're glad to hear that Mike
checks our USDA radio newsline daily for stories he can use.

HOLIDAY SEASON...is nearing and food plays such a central role in holiday celebrations.
Especially now, FoodWatch of the Agriculture Council of America (ACA) is seeking airtime for
its "Amazing Grace" public service announcement. The 30-second TV PSA is a moving visual
tribute to the millions of people who produce America's safe and wholesome food supply.
Holiday meal scenes are featured with the hymn "Amazing Grace" as theme music. The only
spoken words are "America's bounty, brought to you by the 20 million people who put food on
your table." Brenda Marchesseault (ACA, Washington, D.C.) can supply more information if
you will call 1-800-676-3608 or write to 927 15th Street, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, D.C.
20005.



LARRY QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300









is Washington, DC 20250-1300


NO MORE WATERY GRA Secretary o&Ag l ~Wfld announced (October 13) as
of February 12, 1995, US ,I prohibit the cation of water to grain, except for milling,
malting or other processing o sis. aip s to all grain handlers, nbt just those receiving
official inspection and weighing times applied as a dust suppressant, water can
be too easily misused to increase the weight of grain. That water also has a significant potential
for degrading the quality of grain. Secretary Espy said, "Many foreign buyers already have
expressed deep concern about potential quality degradation caused by adding water and about
paying grain prices for that water. A major advantage of U.S. grain over our competitors' is the
relatively low moisture content of many U.S. grains, such as wheat. Adding water to these
grains may erode our market advantage." Contact: Dana Stewart (202) 720-5091.

CHANGES PROPOSED IN POULTRY STANDARDS -- USDA is proposing to update the
voluntary poultry grade standards to bring them in line with industry advancements and changing
consumer preferences. Lon Hatamiya, administrator of USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service
said, "Consumers have increased their use of convenience foods and have demanded more low-
fat, skinless products. Responding to this demand has required the poultry industry to implement
innovative technology and processes." The standards were last amended in 1986 when quality
standards were established for raw, boneless, skinless poultry products, and the tolerance for
exposed flesh and discoloration in ready-to-cook poultry carcasses was clarified. The proposed
revisions would amend existing regulations regarding discolorations and the definition of exposed
flesh, and would establish new grading criteria for large poultry parts. Contact: Connie
Crunkleton (202) 720-8998.

HORN NAMED TO SCIENCE AND EDUCATION POST -- Floyd Horn has been named as
deputy assistant secretary for science and education (October 18). Horn will assist in the
management of USDA's Agricultural Research Service, the Cooperative State Research Service,
the Extension Service, the National Agriculture Library, the Office of Agricultural Biotechnology
and the Office of Global Change Research. He will also help oversee national and international
research and educational activities in sustainable agriculture, pest management, livestock
diseases, food safety and biotechnology, nutrition and improved crop and livestock production.
Contact: Maria Bynum (202) 720-5192.

VIADERO SWORN IN AS INSPECTOR GENERAL -- Roger C. Viadero has been sworn in as
Inspector General of USDA. Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy said, "The Office of the Inspector
General plays a key role in our efforts to improve internal management controls and uncover
fraud where it exists. Mr. Viadero's 26 years of local and Federal law enforcement and
management experience will make him a vital asset to the USDA team." Viadero will provide
leadership in promoting economy, efficiency, and effectiveness in USDA programs, and in
preventing and detecting fraud and abuse in those programs. Contact: Dianne Drew (202)
720-6915.


United States Department of







USDA DEDICATES NEW PLANT SCIENCES BUILDING -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy
participated in the dedication of a state-of-the-art plant sciences building October 18 at the
USDA's Beltsville Agricultural Research Center (BARC) at Beltsville, Maryland. This is the
Center's first new laboratory building in 22 years. BARC is operated by the Agricultural Research
Service, USDA's chief research agency. K. Darwin Murrell, director of ARS's Beltsville Area said,
"This building will house our Fruit Laboratory, our Vegetable Laboratory and our Floral and
Nursery Plants Research Unit -- three research groups that are recognized internationally for
improving horticultural crop varieties and production." The three-story, $10 million plant sciences
building modernizes BARC laboratories, originally built in the early 1930s, and will accommodate
84 people. Contact: Doris Stanley (301) 344-2963.

END-USE CERTIFICATE REGULATIONS PROPOSED -- Gene Moos, under secretary for
international affairs and commodity programs at USDA, announced (October 18) proposed
regulations governing an end-use certificate program. The proposed system is designed to track
the importation of wheat and barley to their end use. Under Secretary Gene Moos, said "The
North American Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act requires that end-use certificates be
established for wheat and barley imported into the U.S. from any foreign country that requires
end-use certificates for imports from the U.S." Proposed regulations would allow the importation
of Canadian wheat and barley for purposes of resale by the importer. End-use of the imported
wheat and barley would be limited to milling for animal feed, milling for human consumption,
manufacturing, brewing, malting or distilling. Contact: John Carlin Ryan (202) 720-8207.

HEALTHY RECIPES FROM USDA -- Ellen Haas, assistant secretary of food and consumer
services, announced (October 14) that as part of USDA'4s effort to help schools serve healthy
meals, new low-fat, low-cost recipes will be distributed to 23,000 school districts throughout the
nation. The recipes were developed by chefs, working with local school food service directors
and registered dietitians as part of the American Culinary Federation "1994 School Lunch
Challenge" in partnership with USDA. The goal of the competition was to develop new,
nutritious, tasty recipes for school lunches that would be low cost and popular with students
while meeting the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The winning recipes were taste-tested by
a panel of school children. Contact: Johna Pierce (202) 720-1691.

USDA SCHOLARSHIPS -- The USDA/1890 National Scholarship Program for the '95-'96 school
year is underway. In continuing to strengthen the partnership between USDA and the 17
historically Black land-grant colleges and universities, USDA will provide students in the program
with full tuition, fees, books, use of a personal computer and software, and employment with
benefits for each of four years while pursuing a bachelor's degree. Free room and board will
be provided by the college or university. The scholarship is valued between $15,000 and
$22,000 per student per year. Contact: Linda Oliphant (202) 720-6662.

EXPORTERS HAVE MORE ACCESS TO INFORMATION -- Exporters now have access to a
USDA data base listing phytosanitary entry requirements of foreign countries for plant products.
Called "Excerpt," this computer program is used by USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection
Service (APHIS) and cooperating state and county plant health regulatory officials when certifying
unprocessed and unmanufactured plant products for export. B. Glen Lee, deputy administrator
of the plant protection and quarantine program of APHIS, says making the data base available
to private industry will facilitate exports by making critical requirements available 24 hours a day
to American shippers. The data base contains the import requirements for most countries where
U.S. agricultural commodities are exported. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-3256.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1951 -- Americorps: The new national service program. (Weekly
cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1430 -- A water crisis?; the pests who came to dinner; adventures in
science; time for bulb planting; review completed on animal welfare issues in stockyards.
(Weekly cassette -- 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1942 -- USDA implements reorganization; moving those record
harvests; earthworms: a farmer's good friend; new cooperative research projects; genetic
research "bearing fruit." (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE. These are USDA reports we know about in
advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.
Wednesday, October 26, feed outlook; Thursday, October 27, world tobacco situation; Friday,
October 28, catfish production; Monday, October 31, agricultural prices; Tuesday, November 1,
horticultural export situation; weekly weather and crop outlook. USDA has few scheduled
reports during the October 26 through November 8 period, but, as always, USDA radio will
have new stories every day on such things as research, special events, and breaking
news.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on Purslane Research; Patrick O'Leary takes a look at
Shoreline Erosion Control.

ACTUALITIES -- Eugene Moos, under secretary for USDA's international affairs and commodity
programs, on the proposed 1995 Farm Bill; USDA meteorologist Norton Strommen on Weather
and Crops.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on Natural Access for Groundwater
Research.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., EDT.


Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFF MIKE 3 1262 08307977

A READERSHIP SURVEY...is attached to this letter. We need your help in improving our
customer service to you. Your comments about our Broadcasters Letter are important. Please
take a few moments to complete the survey. Feel free to add any written comments and use
extra pages if necessary. We'll use this information to be more responsive to your needs and
to plan future issues. Just detach the survey and fax (202-720-5773) or mail it to us. If you fold
it just right, you can use the pre-printed return address. Lynn Wyvill, our customer service
coordinator, will appreciate your participation.

A NEW KIND OF HOME WORK...is being done by Wey Simpson (KAQQ, Spokane, WA). He
has a working radio studio in his home basement where he broadcasts daily. (A new way to
commute by air!) He's up at 4:15 a.m. and his broadcast work is usually done by 9:00 a.m.
He's on the air 25 minutes a day. Wey does go to the radio station twice a week.

BETTER THAN AVERAGE...crops of soybeans, corn, cotton and rice are being reported within
earshot of Dave Black (WMC, Memphis, TN). They've had such good crops that there is a
shortage of crop storage facilities. Dave does 2-3 minute early morning news segments on
weekdays and a 3-minute report of news, markets and agricultural weather at noon on his "all-
talk" station. Dave hosts an hour-long Sunday program from 6:00-7:00 a.m. where he often uses
our Agritape features or excerpts from Agriculture USA.

ISSUES OF CONCERN...in Oregon include Federal vs. state control of land, water, and property
rights as well as regulations related to minor uses of pesticides, reports Gary Claus (Northwest
Ag News Network, Newberg, OR). Gary says it's been a real good crop year for apples,
potatoes and vegetables. Winter wheat planting has been delayed due to dryness, and orchards
are being prepared for winter.



LARRY A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300









:e of C Wiirgiations Washington, DC 20250-1300


'95 CRP PAYM -- Cash payme i'f 1 Ib~Hipn are being made to qualified
producers in the C dity Credit j3 Q ratio S C Conservation Reserve Program (CRP).
The annual payment t ducers who enrolled cropland in the CRP during 1986-
1992. Under CRP, prorom production for 10 to 15 years highly erodible cropland
or land that is contributing to a serious water quality problem. In return, CCC makes annual
rental payments to producers and shares the cost of establishing an approved vegetative cover.
To date, 36.4 million acres have been enrolled in the CRP. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-
8206.

CROP INSURANCE PRICE ELECTION RAISED -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy raised the
1995 crop insurance market price election for wheat from $3.15 to $3.35. Espy raised the wheat
market price election so it more closely matched price projections for the 1995 wheat crop. This
20 cent increase means producers who elected the market price for wheat and suffer an insured
loss will be compensated based on $3.35 per bushel rather than $3.15. The $3.35 market price
will also provide the basis for the new catastrophic crop insurance policy for wheat available to
producers starting this winter. Contact: Paula Thomasson (202) 254-9344.

CHILD CARE AND FOOD SAFETY -- Make sure the food your child eats during the day is safe.
Every morning, nearly half of the children under five years old in this country are bundled up by
parents and taken to a child care center or a family child care home. As a parent, how do you
know the food that's served is safe? Dr. J. Glenn Morris, Jr., a physician and director of the
Health Affairs Staff at USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service, says parents can get a pretty
good idea of their child's risk of getting sick from food by seeing how well their child care
provider pays attention to the basic rules of cleanliness and safe food handling. Child care
experts agree. Dr. Susan Aronson directs a child care health and safety program with the
Pennsylvania Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Dr. Aronson advises parents to
check out their child care provider by observing: How often do care-givers and children wash
hands; Does your child care provider regularly clean areas where children play and eat; Are
diaper-changing areas separate from eating areas; and Does your child care provider handle
food safely? Contact: Dianne Durant (202) 720-4010.

RECORD EXPORTS PREDICTED -- Salon International del'Alimentation (SIAL '94) opened
(October 24) with more than 100 U.S. food firms displaying their products at the USDA-
sponsored USA pavilion. Eugene Moos, under secretary for farm and foreign agricultural
services, said, "From what I've seen at this show, I am confident that U.S. consumer-oriented
product exports will continue their double-digit growth and set another record this year." Last
year total U.S. overseas sales of consumer-oriented products amounted to nearly $15 billion--
almost one-third of agricultural exports. U.S. products featured range from almonds to frozen
yogurt. More than 100,000 trade visitors from all over the world are expected to visit the six halls
that make up the exhibition center. Contact: Maureen Quinn (202) 720-9444.








BOVINE BRUCELLOSIS ERADICATION -- USDA increased the amounts of federal indemnity
payments for owners who depopulate brucellosis-affected cattle and bison herds to expedite the
eradication of this bacterial disease from the U.S. To give owners more incentive to depopulate,
this interim rule increases indemnity amounts per animal from $150 to $250. The indemnity is
now available for all sexually intact female calves destroyed during depopulation. USDA will also
pay these new rates for brucellosis-exposed cattle or bison sold or traded from any herd later
found infected with this disease. Contact: Kendra Pratt (301) 436-4898.

PESTICIDE RESIDUE TESTING OFFERED -- USDA's Federal Grain Inspection Service will offer
official pesticide residue testing service for 29 pesticides in wheat beginning November 18, 1994.
Customers can contact any FGIS or FGIS-authorized inspection agency to obtain the service.
Contact: Dana Stewart (202) 720-5091.

VEGETABLE OIL EEP -- A multi-country package of initiatives under USDA's Export
Enhancement Program will be used to boost sales of 680,000 metric tons of U.S. vegetable oil.
Sales of vegetable oil will be made to buyers in all countries announced October 24 through
normal commercial channels at competitive prices. The subsidy will enable U.S. exporters to
compete at commercial prices in these markets. Contact: Lynn Goldsbrough (202) 720-3930.

95 SOAP/COAP ALLOCATIONS -- Allocations under the '95 Sunflowerseed and Cottonseed
Oil Assistance Programs (SOAP/COAP) will be made to encourage sales of 300,000 metric tons
of sunflowerseed oil and 175,000 metric tons of cottonseed oil. Seven countries are targeted
under USDA's fiscal year 1995 Sunflowerseed Oil Assistance Program and eight countries under
the Cottonseed Oil Assistance Program. The new allocations will remain in effect through fiscal
year 1995. Sales of oils will be made to buyers in these countries through normal commercial
channels at competitive world prices. The export sale will be facilitated with cash bonus
payments. The subsidy will enable U.S. exporters to compete at commercial prices in these
markets. Contact: Lynn Goldsbrough (202) 720-3930.

1994 BURLEY TOBACCO SUPPORT RATES -- USDA's Commodity Credit Corporation
announced (October 24) grade loan rates for the 1994 crop of burley tobacco, based on the sale
price support level of $1.714 per pound. The national support level for burley tobacco is 3.1
cents per pound more than the price support level for the 1993 crop. The loan rates range from
$0.97 to $1.88 per pound for the 1994 crop.Both the Burley Tobacco Growers Cooperative
Associations and the Burley Stabilization Corporation, will deduct one cent per pound from the
grade loan rates for administrative overhead costs. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

CROP MALTING BARLEY ASSESSMENTS REDUCTION -- USDA's Commodity Credit
Corporation intends to reduce the assessments on 1994-'95 crop malting barley to zero percent.
The intention to reduce the assessment has been made since C.C.C. has determined that the
costs associated with levying the assessment exceed the revenue generated by the assessment.
The Agricultural Act of 1949 allows the Secretary of Agriculture to levy an assessment of up to
5 percent on malting barley producers participating in the barley production adjustment program
for each of the 1991-1995 crop years. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

MILK BOARD NOMINATIONS SOUGHT -- USDA is seeking nominations for the National Fluid
Milk Processor Promotion Board. Five members will represent geographic regions and two will
be members at-large for 3 year terms. Members representing geographic regions must be
active owners or employees of a fluid milk processor. Contact: Gil High (202) 720-8998.









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1952 -- On this edition, Brenda Curtis talks about a new approach to
healthier eating. (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1433 -- Reorganizing the U.S.D.A.; turkey myths; take-out turkeys; earned
income tax credit; preparing houseplants for winter. (Weekly cassette -- 2-1/2 to 3 minute
consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1943 -- Wheat prospects improving; '95 CRP payments; beetles battle
leafy spurge; wheat fungus disabled; is "El Niro" back so soon? (Weekly cassette -- news
features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wed. Nov. 2, coverage of Secretary Espy's
scheduled speech on Farm Bill issues; Tues. Nov. 8, crop/weather update; Wed. Nov. 9, Crop
production report, world supply and demand report. (Once again we will change the newsline
twice. The first time at 10:30 am. to carry most crop and supply reports and then at 5 p.m. to
carry citrus and cotton production reports.) Thurs. Nov. 10, cattle and sheep outlook, fruit and
tree nut outlook, world ag./grain production, world oilseed situation, world cotton situation;
Nov. 11 is Veterans Day holiday so newsline will change again Mon. Nov. 14, feed outlook.
These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries many stories
every day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- DeBoria Janifer reports on USDA research on the weed Purslane, which could
become a cash crop based on its high nutritional value. 1:45

ACTUALITIES -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy announces historic reorganization of USDA
and signs executive order to make it law at a ceremony at USDA headquarters in Washington,
D.C. (10/20/94). Various excerpts from his speech and ceremony. 10 minutes

SPECIAL -- "Images In Agriculture," a thirteen-minute video program about the issues of the
food, fiber and natural resources industries and the changing role of the U.S. Department of
Agriculture. (Airs in its entirety immediately following USDA-TV News). 13:07

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., EDT.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
OFF MIKE

STORING CORN IN THE FIELD...on the stalk by delaying harvest is bne answer to grain
storage problems in Iowa, reports Rich Balvanz (WMT, Cedar Rapids, IA). Record crops of
soybeans and corn have filled elevators and on-farm storage so farmers are either selling grain
now at lower prices or finding other creative answers. Elevators cannot store grain on the
ground unless they own it. Soybean harvesting is mostly complete, but about 50 percent of the
corn remains in the field. Corn yields are averaging 160-180 bushels per acre with some farms
topping 200. Soybean yields are running 50-55 bushels per acre with some above 60. Rich
says most farms are harvesting double the yields they did last year.

FARM TIMES OF THE AIR...is the name of a regular TV program hosted by Bill Whittom
(Rupert, ID). Bill has been using USDA's weekly TV features for several years. He often uses
audio from TV reports for his radio service on 33 stations in seven western states. Bill was
publisher of "Farm Times of Idaho" newspaper for seven years until he sold it last April 1.

RODEOS AND AUCTIONS...are among features that Cas Salley (KVOO, Tulsa, OK) includes
in his daily newscasts eight times a day from 5:05 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. A Tulsa native, Cas became
farm director about six months ago, moving over from a sales position. Formerly, he taught
agriculture courses at Murray State College in Tishomingo, OK. Cas covers 35-40 rodeos a year
plus cattle and horse auction sales, in addition to agriculture news and markets. He says
USDA's newsline and radio cassette services are useful in meeting his multiple, daily deadlines.

SURVEY RETURNS...are arriving to our readership questionnaire included last week. Please
respond if you wish to continue on our mailing list. Fax it to us at 202-720-5773 or use the
survey as a self-mailer. We'd like to hear from you!



RRY QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300









United States Department (


ammunicatioS e-ncBWashington, DC 20250-1300
Lbrar ,nmk,. A ,100A


ESPY SIGNS JOINT S iNT WTH S AFF -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy
signed (October 31) an ag ent with the o African gov rryni lWablishing a permanent
channel for promoting joi eets. ThdT* ennt indicates hbw USDA will
cooperate with the new South nment. Areas include school nutrition, small farmer
development and rural water development. Espy said, "This agreement will help to forge a new
and vigorous partnership between our two democracies." Under the terms of the agreement,
USDA staff will work with their counterparts in South Africa to develop and implement projects.
An eight-person task force was formed to advise Espy on how USDA could assist the new South
African government. Contact: Mary Dixon (202) 720-4623.

NEW MEAT SAFETY POLICY -- USDA is changing its policy to help the red meat industry move
faster to install new technologies that reduce pathogens on raw products that can cause
foodborne illness. Acting Under Secretary for Food Safety and Administrator for Food Safety
and Inspection Service Michael Taylor said, "By deciding to forego prior approval on certain
accepted antimicrobial treatments, we are eliminating some procedural obstacles and enabling
the industry to implement safety measures as soon as possible." Taylor said plants and
inspection personnel are being notified that antimicrobial rinses and hot water rinses will be
allowed without prior FSIS approval. The agency will allow the new procedures after carcasses
have passed inspection and prior to going into a cooler. In addition, the agency's long-term
strategy and rule making will include a comprehensive review of its entire system of approving
changes in facilities and equipment to see how it can be streamlined or, in some cases,
eliminated. Contact: Susan Conley (202) 720-7943.

BARLEY AND MALTING EEP -- Deputy Secretary of Agriculture Richard Rominger announced
(October 31) a multi-country package of initiatives under the USDA's Export Enhancement
Program to boost sales of 2,600,000 metric tons of U.S. barley and malting barley. Sales of
barley and malting barley will be made to buyers through normal commercial channels at
competitive world prices. The export sales will be facilitated with cash bonus payments. The
subsidy will enable U.S. exporters to compete at commercial prices in these markets. Contact:
Marlene Phillips (202) 720-2061.

'95 UPLAND COTTON PROGRAM PROVISIONS -- USDA announced (October 31) a
preliminary 7.5 percent Acreage Reduction Program (ARP) requirement for the 1995 upland
cotton program. The Agricultural Act of 1949, as amended, requires the upland cotton ARP to
be announced by November 1. It also requires that the program lead to a supply/use situation
in which projected ending stocks approximate, as closely as possible, 29.5 percent of the
projected total of domestic mill use and exports for the 1995 marketing year. Based on USDA's
October supply and use estimates, USDA determined that a 7.5 percent ARP level will most likely
achieve stocks meeting this ratio. The '95-crop upland cotton program provisions include: a
target price of 72.9 cents per pound, a 51.92 cent-per-pound price support loan level for base
quality and no paid land diversion. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.








ALLOWING PROHIBITED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES -- USDA proposed (October 25) to
allow some previously prohibited fruits and vegetables from 11 countries to be imported into the
U.S. B. Glen Lee, deputy administrator for plant protection and quarantine for the Animal and
Plant Health Inspection Service, said, "This would provide the U.S. with additional kinds and
sources of fruits and vegetables while continuing to provide protection against the introduction
of injurious plant pests." As a condition of entry, all fruits and vegetables would be subject to
inspection, disinfection, or both at the port of first arrival as required by a USDA inspector. Also,
some commodities would be required to undergo prescribed treatments for fruit flies or other
injurious insects. The proposed fruits and vegetables include, currant and gooseberry from
Argentina and Australia; asparagus from Austria; sage from Belize; cilantro from El Salvador,
Honduras and Nicaragua; dill from El Salvador; onion and shallot from Indonesia; corn salad and
lambs quarters from Peru; eggplant, kiwi and lettuce from South Korea; and jicama from Tonga.
Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-3256.

FOOD FOR PEACE PROGRAM -- USDA announced (November 1) which agricultural
commodities the U.S. will make available in fiscal 1995 for distribution under the USDA's Public
Law 480, Food for Peace Program. The commodities eligible are: wheat and wheat products,
rice and rice products, feed grains and feed grain products, dry edible beans, peas, lentils and
soybean meal. Other commodities include: edible vegetable oils, soyfood products, soybeans,
peanuts, potatoes and potato products, pork, Atlantic mackerel, Coastal herring, edible and
inedible tallow and lard, cotton and solid wood products. Under the program, U.S. agricultural
commodities are donated or sold on long-term, low-interest credit terms to foreign governments
to meet humanitarian needs, assist in economic development and promote the development of
foreign agricultural markets. Contact: Priscilla B. Glynn (202) 720-3329.

GRASSHOPPER MANAGEMENT PROGRAM -- USDA intends to prepare a programmatic
environmental impact statement for its Rangeland Grasshopper Cooperative Management
Program. This program protects rangeland from grasshopper and Mormon cricket infestations.
These infestations have the potential for sudden and explosive population increases, which can
be so extreme that all vegetation is consumed. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-3256.

EARTHWORMS: NATURE'S SOIL DOCTORS -- Night crawlers have helped rainfall soak into
the ground four times faster than plots without wormholes, according to USDA's study on soils
and the ecosystem. In turn, that benefits soil health and reduces water runoff. Edwin C. Berry
of USDA's Agricultural Research Service says, burrows left by the worms are nature's own
system for collecting rain water in the soil where plant roots can suck it up. The wormhole
system also means less water runoff that strips away valuable topsoil and deposits channels in
waterways. Night crawlers and other earthworms give farmers and gardeners a free natural
drainage and aeration system. Contact: Hank Becker (301) 344-2769.

A NEW APRICOT -- A new apricot named Helena could offer tomorrow's consumers a more
colorful, plumper, tastier summer snack. Craig A. Ledbetter with USDA's Agricultural Research
Service says Helena apricots are big and juicy, with deeper orange skin than most apricots. The
flesh is firm and sweet, not mealy, so Helena is ideal for eating fresh or adding to summer
salads. Helena apricots could appear in supermarkets in a few years. The new variety can self-
pollinate. Ledbetter says that's a bonus because Helena can bear fruit without needing another
variety of apricot tree nearby to furnish pollen. Contact: Marcia Wood (510) 559-6070.







FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1953 -- Aging Farmers: Farmers are waiting longer to retire, and fewer
young people are getting into the farming business. John Snyder takes a closer look at this
trend in this edition of Agriculture USA. (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1434 -- New meat safety policy; talking turkey; in search of Thanksgiving;
three turkeys cook a turkey; turkey bargains? (Weekly cassette -- 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer
features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1944 -- Farm policy update; extended forecasts; cotton: how much
land to plant; cooperating with South Africa; getting ready for new crop insurance; Eastern
Europe trade forecast. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Wednesday, November 9, U.S. crop production;
world supply and demand. (Our newsline will change twice on the 9th, at 10:30 a.m. for the
grains section of the crop report and supply/demand. At 5:00 p.m., the newsline will carry
additional cotton and citrus reports.) Thursday, November 10, cattle and sheep outlook; fruit
and tree nut outlook; world agricultural grain production; world oilseed situation; world cotton
situation. November 11 is Veteran's Day so our newsline will not change until Monday,
November 14. November 14, feed update. Tuesday, November 15, farm labor; and crop and
weather update. Wednesday, November 16, milk production; vegetable outlook; and, world
hunger and food aid needs. Friday, November 18, cattle on feed; and, agricultural outlook
report. These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries many
stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

ACTUALITIES -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy signs agreement with South African
government establishing permanent channel for promoting joint agricultural efforts and excerpts
from Secretary Espy's speech to the Commodity Club in Washington, D.C. (November 2).

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on food safety tips for handling a "take-out"
ready-prepared Thanksgiving feast. For those cooking their own feast, Lynn Wyvill reports on
turkey food safety basics and how to safely grill a turkey. Airs on November 10 and 14.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., EDT.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


OFF MIKE

HEARD AROUND THE WORLD...was a USDA radio report on Haiti done by our Gary
Crawford. Gary recently interviewed USDA Caribbean expert, Richard Brown, about the food
and farm situation in Haiti. Two weeks later Gary did a followup call and learned that a colleague
of Brown's working in Kenya for the Peace Corps had written about hearing the story.

BREAKFAST TABLE BROADCASTS...by Tom Beavers and Tom Brand (KMA, Shenandoah,
IA) were originated live from seven home kitchens featuring winner families as part of their
October Pork Month Promotion. A local grocery chain and pork producers cooperated to serve
breakfasts to lucky families. Each of seven stores had five weekly winners of $5 pork certificates
with one being chosen as a breakfast winner. Winning homes had between 10 and 20 guests,
and many were introduced to the variety of pork dishes available. I suspect Tom and Tom's
"fork-by-fork coverage" of these breakfasts included a few tastes for themselves.

CONSERVATION FORUM...in Salina, KS, this week with Paul Johnson, Chief, Soil Conservation
Service, included broadcaster Kelly Lenz (WIBW, Topeka, KS) as a moderator of the morning
listening session. Kelly says that fall harvest of corn, grain sorghum and soybeans is nearing
completion and most wheat seeding is done. He says there is a lot of concern about current
low subsoil moisture conditions.

SHARE YOUR NEWS...with us about new broadcasting techniques, interesting experiences in
telling the story of food and agriculture, or unique ways that you are using our services.
Write us a note or send information to the FAX number in next item.

THANKS...to those who have responded to our readership survey in the October 21 issue.
Please verify that you wish to continue receiving Broadcasters Letter by using the form as a
self-mailer or by faxing it to us at 202-720-5773.



LARRY A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300







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CROP DISAS R\RELIEF -- Abou billion in emergency disaster aid will be available to
farmers with da d crbps due erse weataiaaBit &libfof19 i 1994. Abnormal weather
patterns, causing give rain r, brought, have led to substantial crop losses in isolated but
widespread areas o i mers suffering losses can apply for emergency assistance
at their local Farm Servi Si cy office beginning on December 1. Contact: Bruce Merkle
(202) 720-8206.

1994-CROP FEED GRAINS -- Producers will be allowed to enter 1994-crop corn, grain
sorghum, barley and oats into USDA's Farmer Owned Reserve (FOR). FOR entry is allowed
because the average market price for corn for the 90 days preceding this announcement was
less than 120 percent of the price support rate, a statutory price trigger. Producers must file
their intentions to place feed grains in the FOR with their local Farm Services Agency office by
April 30. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

BE A TURKEY GENIE-US! -- The USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline can turn you into a turkey
"genie-us." If you're like most people, the three things you'd wish a genie could do, turkey-wise,
are defrost it, cook it and put the leftovers away. If you buy a fresh turkey, you can save one
wish. The easiest way to defrost a turkey is to put the frozen turkey in the refrigerator and allow
one day for every 5 pounds. If you haven't allowed enough time, there are two faster, safe ways
to defrost a frozen turkey. Use the cold water method or the microwave. For more information
about food safety, call a "turkey genie-us" at the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline toll free at 1-
800-535-4555. Contact: Susan Conley (202) 720-7943.

ADDITIONAL LOANS ON '94-CROP CORN -- USDA will offer recourse loans to producers who
have corn that has been cracked, rolled or crimped. The 9-month farm-stored recourse loans
are available to eligible producers of 1994-crop at 70 percent of the country price support rate.
The entire measured quantity will be eligible. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

SUGAR MARKETING ALLOTMENTS -- USDA announced (November 2) the final marketing
allotments and allocations for sugar and crystalline fructose for fiscal year 1995. The preliminary
marketing allotments and allocations were revised based on new data submitted by processors
and updated USDA estimates of beet and cane sugar production. USDA also announced a
reassignment of 138,948 short tons of Hawaii's and Puerto Rico's marketing allotments to
Florida, Louisiana, and Texas. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

NEW PRICING FOR MILK -- USDA is recommending multiple component pricing for milk priced
under the Chicago Regional, Nebraska-Western Iowa, Upper Midwest, Eastern South Dakota
and Iowa federal milk orders. The multiple component pricing plan for all five orders would price
milk based on its protein and other nonfat solids components, as well as butterfat. The
proposed plan includes adjustments per hundredweight of all producer milk based on the
somatic cell count of the milk. Contact: Connie Crunkleton (202) 720-8998.


;4


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U.S. PORK EXPORTS -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy announced (November 2) an
opportunity for sales of an additional 20,000 metric tons of U.S. pork to 7 independent states of
the former Soviet Union under the USDA's Export Enhancement Program (EEP). Sales of pork
will be made to buyers in Armenia, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Moldova, Russia and Ukraine
through commercial channels at competitive prices. Contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.

FGIS PROPOSES FEE INCREASE -- USDA's Federal Grain Inspection Service proposed
(November 3) increasing fees for services provided by its Commodity Testing Laboratory in
Beltsville, MD. David Shipman, acting FGIS administrator, said, "FGIS has contained costs at the
laboratory through program efficiencies and streamlining actions." While these actions reduced
certain costs, the overall operating cost of the laboratory increased by eight percent between
fiscal years 1992 and 1993. Concurrently, there was a 17 percent decrease in revenue due to
fewer service requests. Contact: Dana Stewart (202) 720-5091.

HIGHER EGG ASSESSMENT -- The nation's egg producers voted in a Sept. 29-Oct. 14
referendum to increase the mandatory assessment to the American Egg Board to 10 cents per
30-dozen case of eggs. A total of 66.4 percent of egg producers voting in the referendum
approved an amendment to the order raising the assessment. For the referendum to pass, at
least two-thirds of the voting producers, or a majority of producers representing at least two-
thirds of the volume of eggs produced by all voters, had to favor the amendment. Contact:
Connie Crunkleton (202) 720-8998.

SAFE CANOLA -- USDA will no longer regulate certain genetically engineered laurate-producing
canola plants. John Payne, acting director of biotechnology, biologics and environmental
protection for USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, says these canola lines do
not present a plant pest risk. They contain gene sequences derived from the California bay
laurel tree with other regulatory sequences from other organisms. The result of the genetic
change is that these canola lines accumulate laurate in the seeds. Laurate is a major
component in laundry detergent and shampoo. Edible uses of laurate include nondairy coffee
whiteners and whipped toppings. Current sources of laurate are coconut- and palm-kernel oils.
Contact: Cynthia A. Eck (301) 436-5931.

FOREST HEALTH INITIATIVE -- James R. Lyons, under secretary for natural resources and
environment, announced (November 4) 36 proposed forest health projects to be undertaken by
the USDA's Forest Service over the next 24 months. The projects, some of which focus on
areas heavily damaged by this summer's forest fires, are part of a Western Forest Health
Initiative. The projects cover a range of management actions needed to address those and
other problems and include: reforestation of burned forest lands, restoration of watersheds,
reductions of excessive levels of understory vegetation which can fuel wildfires, and salvage of
timber burned in this summer's fires. Contact: John Denne (202) 205-1134.

AFRICAN HORSE SICKNESS -- USDA has proposed to declare Spain free of African horse
sickness, which would reduce the quarantine requirements for horses being imported into the
U.S. from Spain. This proposed rule would remove Spain from USDA's list of countries where
African horse sickness (AHS) is known to exist. USDA importation requirements for horses from
countries on the list are stringent to prevent this exotic disease from being introduced into the
U.S. horse population. AHS is a highly infectious viral disease that spreads among equine by
biting insects. It occurs in Africa and the Middle East but has never been reported in the
Americas or Australia. Contact: Kendra Pratt (301) 436-4898.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1954 -- In this edition, Brenda Curtis reviews issues related to the 1995
Farm Bill. (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1435 -- The greying American farm; the invisible itch caper; making those
credit cards; how much mulch can a wood chip mulch?; seafood safety. (Weekly cassette --
2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1944 -- Farm bill buzzwords; feed grain into Farmer Owned Reserve;
recourse loans for '94 crop corn; bees deliver biocontrol agent; a farming game for Russia.
(Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Monday-Friday, November 14-18, special reports
filed by Brenda Curtis from the midwest during a tour of the area's wetlands. Friday, November
18, cattle on feed report; ag outlook report; Monday, November 21, catfish processing report;
wheat outlook; Tuesday, November 22, cotton and wool outlook; livestock, dairy and poultry
outlook; U.S. farm trade update; weekly weather and crop update; Wednesday, November 23,
poultry outlook. Thursday, November 24, HOLIDAY. These are USDA reports we know about
in advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this
lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.



FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE


FEATURES: Lynn Wyvill reports on food safety tips for handling a "take-out" ready-prepared
Thanksgiving feast. For those cooking their own feast, Lynn Wyvill reports on turkey food safety
basics and how to safely grill a turkey.


SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., EDT.


Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

OFF MIKE 3 12608307 962 3

FOUR-STATE WETLANDS TOUR...will include Brenda Curtis of our Radio Team, November 14-
18. She will be accompanying USDA Natural Resources and Conservation Service (formerly Soil
Conservation Service) officials, as well as representatives of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, EPA,
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, farm organizations and state natural resource officials on a tour
of wetlands of the midwest. Sites include Ft. Dodge, IA; Worthington, MN; and Fargo, ND.
Brenda will be reporting daily for our Radio Newsline on issues relating to wetlands restoration
and the future of the Conservation Reserve Program. Watch for upcoming feature programming
as a result of this tour.

THANKSGIVING FOOD SAFETY...should be on our minds by now. Lynn Wyvill of our TV Team
produced a package of food safety features with tips from USDA's Meat and Poultry Hotline for
the holiday. Features cover how to safely handle a ready-prepared Thanksgiving dinner, how
to cook a turkey at home and how to use a grill to safely prepare a turkey. If you missed the
features on the USDA TV News Satellite feed this week, you can call Wanda Sullivan at USDA's
Meat & Poultry Hotline for a broadcast copy. Wanda's number is 202-720-5604.

INTERESTING USE...of our Broadcasters Letter reported by Judy Oskam formerly at
Oklahoma State University, now an undergraduate college professor at Texas Tech University.
Judy writes that she plans to use our letter in her public relations and telecommunications
classes.

MANY THANKS...to all who have responded to our readership survey for the Broadcasters
Letter. Your comments are important to us. If you haven't responded yet, it's not too late.
Please mail or fax us your completed survey, including your name and address. If you need a
copy of the survey, call Lynn Wyvill 202-720-9951.




LARRY A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300









United States Department otAgneurture utice ot cu


NO ADDITIONAL D JRg ~ili1Td UN USDA' 0 mmodiity Ce-it oration announced
(November 18) that the estimate of surplus dairy p rlcts to be remove d om the commercial
market during calendar year 1995 is 6.4 billion pou a total i ids basis. Since the
surplus is less than 7.0 billion pounds, no additional re k ces paid to farmers will
be necessary. The Agricultural Act of 1949, as amende 3CCC to estimate the dairy
surplus for the coming calendar year and notify Congress of the estimate by November 20.
Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

'94 TREE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM Sign-up is underway for the Department of Agriculture's
1994 Tree Assistance Program (TAP). Sign-up for the disaster assistance program will be held
from November 21 through March 31, 1995. USDA will reimburse eligible small and medium
scale commercial tree and nursery inventory growers for up to 65 percent of the average
reestablishment costs. Any losses that exceed 35 percent after adjustment for normal mortality
will be covered. To be eligible, each grower of orchard trees must own 500 acres or less, and
each grower of forest trees must own 1,000 acres or less. The Farm Service Agency, which
administers the TAP, will disburse the payments after applications have been approved by the
local FSA offices. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

AUSTRALIAN BEEF HELD -- Shipments of beef from sections of Australia won't be allowed
into the United States until they are determined to be free of chemical residues. The Food Safety
and Inspection Service is testing the meat for residues left over from crop by-products fed to
cattle in drought stricken areas. Scientists are looking for chlorfluazuron, which is not registered
for use in the U.S. The Australian government notified USDA officials that small traces of the
chemical were found during routine monitoring of beef samples. Beef from 63 Australian plants
is being held until test results are confirmed. Contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.

JOINT JOBS PROGRAM HELPS HABITAT -- USDA and the Department of Commerce (DOC)
announced (November 21) an interagency agreement to implement a $6 million jobs program
focusing on Pacific Northwest habitat restoration. This is one part of DOC's $12 million
Northwest Emergency Assistance Plan for dislocated salmon fishermen in the Pacific Northwest.
Under Secretary of Agriculture for Natural Resources and Environment James Lyons says, "This
program demonstrates how Federal agencies are quickly responding to community economic
and natural resource needs in the Pacific Northwest." The program will work with state agencies,
conservation districts, tribal governments, and other nonprofit organizations to restore key
watersheds on private lands. Contact: Christine Williams (202) 720-7570.

NATIONAL RURAL CONFERENCE -- Because of the GATT vote and other scheduling conflicts,
the National Rural Conference scheduled for December, 1994 has been postponed until the first
part of 1995. Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy said, "The administration is committed to working
together with rural Americans and looks forward to this opportunity for open dialogue." The
conference will be moderated by President Clinton. Contact: Jim Brownlee (202) 720-2091.


I .







2
AG LIBRARY IN EGYPT USDA's National Agriculture Library is assisting the government of
Egypt in establishing an Egyptian National Library (ENAL) in Cairo. Since 1987, NAL has been
providing Egypt with technical assistance and staff training as the Egyptian government moves
ahead in developing ENAL. NAL Acting Director Pamela Andre said, "Over the years we've
hosted a number of Egyptian librarians and agricultural specialists from the ENAL staff." Other
training included instruction in developing statistics, scheduling library staff, and using NAL's
AGRICOLA bibliographic database. The Egyptian government is planning to open its National
Agricultural Library in 1995. Contact: Brian Norris (301) 504-6778.

ORIENTAL FRUIT FLY -- USDA announced (November 22) that it is has quarantined 59 square
miles of the Florence area of Los Angeles County due to an Oriental fruit fly infestation. Deputy
Administrator for Plant Protection and Quarantine in USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection
Service B. Glen Lee said, "Fruits and vegetables that can harbor this pest are restricted from
leaving the quarantined area to prevent the Oriental fruit fly from spreading into non-infested
areas in the U.S." The Oriental fruit fly is a destructive pest of citrus and other types of fruit, nuts
and vegetables. Heavy infestations can cause complete loss of crops. Contact: Ed Curlett
(301) 436-7799.

EGYPT ELIGIBLE FOR MORE WHEAT Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy announced
(November 18) that Egypt is eligible for an additional 1,300,000 metric tons of wheat under
USDA's Export Enhancement Program. The subsidy will enable U.S. exporters to compete at
commercial prices in these markets. Sales of wheat will be made to buyers in Egypt through
normal commercial channels at competitive world prices. The export sale will be facilitated with
cash bonus payments. Contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.

ANIMAL SCIENTIST WINS AWARD -- Animal physiologist Lawrence A. Johnson of Beltsville,
Md., who developed technology to preselect gender of animals, has been named "Distinguished
Scientist of 1994" by the Agricultural Research Service. The award is the agency's highest
scientific honor. Johnson is research leader for the Germplasm and Gamete Physiology
Laboratory at the ARS Beltsville Agriculture Research Center. He is being honored for his
adaptation of flow cytometry and laser technology to differentiate between Y-chromosome sperm
that produce males versus X-chromosome sperm that produce females. The award also
recognizes Johnson's role as co-developer of a method to preserve swine sperm by freezing.
Contact: Sandy Miller Hays (301) 344-2764.

USDA NAMES DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF CIVIL RIGHTS Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy has
appointed Jetie Wilds as Deputy Director of the Office of Civil Rights Enforcement for USDA.
Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy said, 'The Office of Civil Rights Enforcement plays a key role
in providing leadership, direction, and coordination for USDA's civil rights program, including
program compliance, equal employment opportunity, and special emphasis programs. Wild's
28 years of civil rights and management experience will make him a vital asset to the USDA
Team." Contact: Hector Mimiaga (202) 720-4200.

TRADE SURPLUS FALLS The U.S. agricultural trade surplus fell $102 million dollars in
September, down to $1.2 billion. That puts the Fiscal Year 1994 agricultural trade surplus at $17
billion, down $600 million from last year. While agricultural exports nearly broke a record,
imports did break records, accounting for the drop in the trade surplus. Contact: Tom
Capehart (202) 219-1262.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1956 -- Playing the farming game is the topic for this week's edition of
Agriculture USA. Gary Crawford talks with the inventor of 'The Farming Game" along with a
USDA official in charge of helping emerging democracies like Russia. (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2
minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1437 Ham for the holidays; going nuts for the holidays; debt
consolidation loans; bankruptcy: the only way out of debt?; food gifts from afar. (Weekly
cassette -- 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1946 -- The decline of the sheep; turkey producers: a pretty good
year; Tree Assistance Program; farming game for Russia; dairy surplus. (Weekly cassette --
news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- As we go to press with this issue, Congress is
still scheduled to debate and vote on the GATT World Trade Agreement November 30 and
December 1. We will cover the debate and offer stories on the newsline. Other upcoming
stories are: Wednesday, November 30, ag prices report; Thursday, December 1, GATT
coverage, horticultural export update; Tuesday, December 6, crop/weather update; Friday,
December 9, U.S. crop production, supply/demand report (**Note: USDA will have only one
release time for crop production and supply/demand for December crop reports. It will be at
3:00 p.m. EST, so our newsline will change only at the usual 5:00 p.m. time. There will be no
10:30 a.m. change for December). These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our
newsline carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Pat O'Leary reports on guayule rubber research and DeBoria Janifer reports on
a "hi-tech" rice that could boost the value of U.S. rice exports.

ACTUALITIES -- Excerpts from phone conference with Vice President Gore, Secretary of
Agriculture Mike Espy, U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor and U.S. farmers on GATT
(November 21) and USDA Chief Meteorologist Norton Strommen on the latest weather and crop
conditions.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on holiday food safety and research on blending
wood fiber and plastic to help conserve natural resources.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., EDT.






3 1262 083079672

OFF MIKE

ON THE AIR AGAIN... Sonny King says they're bringing back the farm program at WKRT in
Cortland, N.Y. They haven't decided if they'll go with a half hour or a full hour. Along with using
the variety of USDA radio programs, he's looking for any additional programming sources he
could use on their show.

DOES ANYONE SPEAK RUSSIAN, MANDARIN....asks producer Steven Towell of shortwave
station KNLS out of Anchor Point, Alaska. Broadcasting to Russia, China and other Pacific Rim
countries, he says they program two hours of English broadcasting a day. The rest is in
Mandarin and Russian. Towell says he's able to use some of USDA programming for the
English part of the broadcast. We're sorry but we can't help him with the Russian and Mandarin
portions!

JAPANESE BOMB STORY EXPLODES IN LOUISVILLE...says Fred Wiche, Farm and Garden
Director for clear channel radio station WHAS in Louisville, KY. A Gary Crawford piece on
Japanese balloon bombs falling on the continental United States during World War II sparked
heated debate during Wiche's farm show, and later popped up during a local talk show. The
story also caught the attention of broadcast veteran Paul Harvey, who talked about it during a
"Rest of the Story" broadcast.

WETLANDS TOUR...Brenda Curtis reports that her travels to some of the nations wetlands
went off without a hitch. *Brenda covered the debate over the nation's wetlands and a variety
of other stories. Brenda visited USDA'S Human Nutrition Lab in Grand Forks, North Dakota and
the Agricultural Research Lab in Fargo, and interviewed Extension personnel at North Dakota
State University. Jerry Rostad, Extension Communications at NDSU, helped with scheduling.
Be on the look-out for lots of programming.


LARRY A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference. and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300







-A -If


United States Department bf'AWlYsI'ture
JAN 3 1 1995
Letter No. 2690


of Cor


)ns Washington, DC 20250-1300


December 2, 1994


NEW FSA OFFIdI NStD 0 0 f the new F Service Agency were announced
(November 30) by Deputy Secretary o future 3g ominger. Rashid Nuri will serve as
the Actind Deputy Administrator for he Acting Deputy Administrator for
Commodity Operations will be Alan King. e Aldaya will fill in as the Acting Deputy
Administrator for Program Delivery, and Acting Controller will be Harvey Wiley. Permanent
appointments to these positions will be made at a later date. Contact: Tom Amontree (202)
720-4623.

JOINT COMMISSION ON GRAINS -- The Canadian and U.S. Joint Commission on Grains
concluded discussions (November 23) on the commission's mandate and action plan. The
Commissioners agreed on an initial list of issues to address and how the commission will
operate. The Joint Commission will seek to improve the general understanding of the Canadian
and U.S. policies and systems for cereal grains and products in order to achieve lasting
solutions for the mutual benefit of farmers and the agri-food industry in North America.
Comments on the new commission are welcome. Contact: Wayne Baggett (202) 720-2032.

AGRICULTURAL EXPORTS NEAR RECORD -- Deputy Secretary of Agriculture Richard
Rominger announced (November 23) that U.S. agricultural exports reached $43.5 billion in fiscal
year 1994, up $1 billion from fiscal 1993 and the second highest dollar value on record.
Combined U.S. exports of agricultural, fish, and forestry products climbed to a new high of $53.5
billion, up $600 million from the previous record set in fiscal 1993. The U.S. agricultural trade
surplus was more than $17 billion. Contact: Eric Van Chantfort (202) 720-9443.

AUSTRALIAN BEEF STILL ON HOLD -- USDA will continue to hold shipments of beef from the
Australian territories of Queensland and New South Wales. Until testing is completed for
residues of chlorfluazuron, a chemical compound that may be present in some meat exported
to the U.S., that beef will not be allowed into the country. Acting Under Secretary for Food
Safety Michael Taylor said, "Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is working to gather all
available information on the chemical chlorfluazuron." FSIS officials said available data do not
suggest the need for a recall of Australian beef that has passed through port of entry inspection.
Contact: Jacque Knight (202) 720-9113.

PEST-FREE TRADE -- A working group of USDA officials and their Russian counterparts has
met to ensure that Asian gypsy moths do not hitch a ride on cargo ships into the U.S. Acting
Administrator of USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Lonnie King said, "By
monitoring Asian gypsy moth populations around ports with direct ship traffic from Russia to the
U.S., we can determine which ships might harbor hitchhiking moths. Then USDA can inspect
those ships en route to prevent moths from flying ashore." The Asian gypsy moth is similar to
the European gypsy moth that is found in the Northeastern U.S. Perhaps the most dangerous
aspect of the Asian gypsy moth is the ability of the female to fly, unlike the European-strain
female. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-3256.


.I-L








FEDERAL MILK ORDERS -- USDA is recommending the merger of five federal milk orders in
the Southern U.S. Administrator of USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service Lon Hatamiya said,
'The proposed merger is based on a hearing held last November in Atlanta. USDA's
recommended decision would merge the Georgia, Alabama-West Florida, Greater Louisiana,
New Orleans-Mississippi and Central Arkansas marketing areas into a hew "Southeast area."
The new area would also include the territory of the former Memphis and Nashville, TN, milk
marketing areas. Contact: Gil High (202) 720-8998.

HONG KONG AND NEAR EAST ELIGIBLE FOR MORE EGGS -- Secretary of Agriculture Mike
Espy announced (November 29) that Hong Kong and six countries in the Near East region are
eligible for an additional 30 million and 25 million dozen eggs, respectively, under the USDA's
Export Enhancement Program. The Near East region includes Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar,
Yemen and the United Arab Emirates. Egg sales will be made through commercial channels at
competitive world prices. Contact: Maureen Quinn (202) 720-9444.

ANDRE' NAMED NAL DIRECTOR -- Pamela Q.J. Andre' has been named Director of USDA's
National Agricultural Library (NAL), replacing Joseph H. Howard who retired February 3, 1994.
Andre' has served in various library management positions with the federal government over a
28-year career. She had been Acting NAL Director since Howard's retirement. NAL is the
largest agricultural library in the world, with more than 2.1 million volumes and receiving 22,000
periodicals annually. Contact: Brian Norris (301) 504-6779.

TOBACCO PRICE SUPPORT RATES -- USDA's Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) issued
(November 25) price support grade loan rates for the 1994-crop Kentucky and Tennessee dark
air-cured tobacco, types 35 and 36 and fire-cured tobacco, types 22 and 23. These grade loan
rates reflect the average support level of $1.273 per pound for dark air-cured tobacco and
$1.483 for fire-cured tobacco. Adjustments made in certain grades reflect the overall grade
distribution change. The rates were determined by CCC in consultation with the producer
associations that are used to provide price support for the respective types of tobacco. The
grade loan rates for Virginia fire-cured tobacco are based on the average support level of $1.407
per pound, compared with a price support level of $1.395 per pound for the 1993 crop. The
rates were determined in consultation with the Dark Tobacco Sales Cooperative, the producer
association that provides price support for these types of tobacco. Contact: Bruce Merkle
(202) 720-8206.

NOMINATIONS SOUGHT FOR DAIRY BOARD -- The Department of Agriculture is looking for
nominations for people to serve on the National Dairy Promotion and Research Board. Nine
regions have openings. Terms are for 3 years, beginning in May and ending in April, and
nominations must be submitted by December 23. Contact: Gil High (202)720-8998.

FOR THE PERSON WHO HAS EVERYTHING -- Why not give them a present that promotes
food safety? A meat thermometer, a food timer, cutting boards, slow cookers or other food
preparation items make unique gifts, and they're practical too! Even an insulated lunch box for
those who like to take their meals from home to work or school is a good idea. For more food
safety gift ideas, or for any food safety questions, you can call the USDA Meat and Poultry
Hotline, 1-800-535-4555.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1957 -- Brenda Curtis talks with nutrition experts about the best way
to escape the holidays without gaining unwanted pounds. (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute
documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1438 -- Be "berry" careful about holiday berries; out on a limb with a
Christmas tree forecast; toys and safety; a "fresh" Christmas tree; a living Christmas tree.
(Weekly cassette -- 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1948 -- GATT update; a blue Christmas for some hog producers; new
export forecast; ASC elections rescheduled; new weather satellite in orbit. (Weekly cassette --
news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Note: In December there won't be any 8:30
reports; therefore, we will not update the radio newsline at 10:30 a.m. on crop report days. The
crop reports will be issued at 3:00 p.m. EST with the newsline carrying those stories at 5:00 p.m.
Upcoming reports include: Friday, December 9, U.S. crop production; world supply/demand.
Monday, December 12, world cotton situation; world oilseed update; dairy outlook; world ag and
grain production. Tuesday, December 13, crop and weather update; ag income and finance
outlook. Wednesday, December 14, industrial uses of ag materials. Thursday, December 15,
milk production; sugar outlook. Friday, December 16, cattle on feed; tobacco outlook. These
are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries many stories every
day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURES -- Patrick O'Leary reports on an experimental blueberry harvester developed by
USDA researchers; DeBoria Janifer reports on USDA research on a mechanical "sniffer" for grain
inspectors.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA chief meteorologist Norton Strommen with his weekly weather and crop
update.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Patrick O'Leary reports on the USDA "field office of the future."

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., EDT.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A. Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.




UNIVERSITY OF FLOAIDA

4 3 1262 037
OFF MIKE

SPOKESPERSON FOR AGRICULTURE...competition will be held during the National Young
Farmer Educational Institute in Springfield, MO, December 11-14. Joann Locke (KTTS,
Springfield, MO) will be one of the judges. The state winner selected will travel around to
schools and visit local media telling the story of agriculture. Joann is a Southwest Missouri State
graduate in agricultural communications who has been on the job for 2-1/2 years. Her daily
broadcasts include a lot of market information especially since one of the leading feeder cattle
auctions is in her listening area. Joann will be next year's editor of CHATS, the newsletter
published by the National Association of Farm Broadcasters.

THUMB AG DAY...will be celebrated December 7 in Cass City, MI, which happens to be in the
"thumb" region of the state. Rod Zamarron (Michigan Farm Radio Network, Lansing, MI) says
that farmers are wrapping up corn harvest, wheat is in, and soybeans and sugar beets are out
of the ground. Rod says their network converted to digital equipment this past year. He records
and edits all his material on a computer hard drive. He feels he not only gets a better sound
quality, but he can do more in the same amount of time.

FORMER SECRETARY...John Block was a recent guest on WINU's "Across the Fence" radio
program. (When I came to USDA several years ago, we had a half-hour TV show by that name.)
Kevin Jay (WINU, Highland, IL) hosts the 7:30 a.m. show each Saturday morning. Kevin said
the topic was recent trends in hog markets and grocery price ratios.

NOT IN MY BACKYARD...is the cry heard from some in the Minnesota hometown of Farm
Director Kim Spiczka (WYRQ, Little Falls, MN). An ethanol plant is scheduled to arrive
sometime in 1995 bringing much needed jobs and money to the area, but some area residents
are protesting location of the plant, saying the smell will drive down home values. Kim's sister,
Lori S "czka Hol is a member of our radio team.


RRY QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300









United States Department of fi~oulture Office oCp uC i iotns Washington, DC 20250-1300


Letter No. 2691 December 9, 1994
S.niersity of Florida
1274 USDA FIELD OFFICE (' CLOSf&-- -ecretary of Agriculture Mike Espy announced
(December 6) plans to conso t s JQJ'74 field offices to save money and streamline
operations. Offices throughoL'u tiill close their doors and trarisfer their functions to
USDA field service centers to offer "one stop shopping" for customers. USDA's new Farm
Service Agency combines the efforts of the Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service,
the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation, the Soil Conservation Service, the Farmers Home
Administration and the Rural Development Administration. Espy says the closings will save
taxpayers $3.6 billion. The doors to 152 offices have already closed, with another 20% to close
immediately. In the next four or five months, 30% of the field offices will close. The remaining
offices are scheduled to close some time in the next two or three years. Espy says USDA will
lose 11,000 jobs in the move, but almost all of the downsizing would take place through attrition,
retirement and buyouts. Espy estimates farmers will save 2.5 million hours annually in reduced
paperwork requirements. Contact: Jim Loftus (202) 720-4623.

ESPY ON GATT -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy said, "The passage of the General
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) implementing legislation are votes of confidence in the
future. The GATT will strengthen the world economy, increase demand for farm products, and
give American farmers, ranchers, processors, and exporters a level playing field to compete for
trade opportunities in the growing global marketplace." Contact: Tom Amontree (202) 720-
4623.

LABEL CHANGES -- USDA announced (December 2) a proposal to change food labels to
inform consumers that some poultry products are made using a mechanical separation process.
Mechanically separated poultry is produced with high pressure machinery that separates skeletal
tissue from bone by crushing the bone, and then forcing the bone and tissue through a
screening device such as a sieve. USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service said it will issue
a proposed rule that would require mechanically separated poultry to be identified in the
ingredients statement on hot dogs, bologna and other processed products as "mechanically
separated chicken or turkey" instead of simply "chicken" or "turkey." USDA's Acting Under
Secretary for Food Safety Michael Taylor said, "This proposal will help ensure that the labeling
for processed poultry products is truthful and not misleading." The proposed labeling change
is consistent with rules governing red meat processed in a similar fashion. Contact: Jacque
Knight (202) 720-9113.

'95 ELS COTTON LOAN RATE -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy announced (December 1)
the 1995 price support loan rate for extra long staple (ELS) cotton will be 79.65 cents per pound
and the Acreage Reduction Program (ARP) percentage will be 10 percent. The Agricultural Act
of 1949, as amended, authorizes the establishment of a limitation on the acreage planted to ELS
cotton if it is determined that the total supply will be excessive. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202)
720-8206.


~ ~ ~~ ~~ ~~-~ ----









ARP REQUIREMENT FOR RICE --Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy announced (December 1)
a preliminary acreage reduction requirement of 5 percent for the 1995 crop of rice. The
Agricultural Act of 1949, as amended, requires that the preliminary ARP level for the 1995 crop
of rice be announced no later that December 1 and the final ARP level be announced no later
than January 31. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-8206.

STILL HOLDING -- As of December 2, USDA is continuing to hold sonie 36 million pounds of
frozen beef from Australia in warehouses until it conducts tests to confirm Australian results
showing the absence of a pesticide not in use in the U.S. The Australian embassy in
Washington notified USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) that laboratory tests have
proven negative for the pesticide chlorfluazuron. FSIS began this week to confirm Australian
laboratory results. FSIS officials said available data from Australia has not suggested the need
for a recall of beef that had passed through port of entry inspection in two states Contact:
Jacque Knight (202) 720-9113.

USDA PROTECTS NEW PLANTS -- The Department of Agriculture issued (December 7)
certificates of protection for 31 new plant varieties. The seed-reproduced plants include corn,
soybeans, wheat, tobacco, barley, beans, celery, corn, oats, onions, peanuts and peppers.
Developers of the new varieties will have the exclusive right to reproduce, sell, import or export
their products for 18 years. These certificates of protection are granted after a review of the
breeders' records and claims that each new variety is novel, uniform and stable. USDA's
Agricultural Marketing Service administers the plant variety protection program which provides
marketing protection to developers of new and distinctive seed-reproduced plants ranging from
farm crops to flowers. Contact: Alicia L. Ford (202) 720-8998.

FARM PROGRAM IMPROVEMENTS -- USDA has initiated a series of actions over the past
year in the administration of farm programs. The purpose has been to slash the paperwork
burden on farmers and improve efficiency in the USDA agency carrying out the mission. The
actions stem from a task force study USDA undertook in February 1993 as part of a "Reinventing
Government" Initiative. The study was titled a "Policy and Regulatory Review." Of the nearly 275
recommendations in the report, more than 200 have been approved, and 30 have been
implemented to date. The thrust of the undertaking is to use a common sense approach to
making farm program participation less complicated and burdensome for farmers. Contact:
Martha Cashion (202) 720-3310.

CHICKENS CAN CURE THEMSELVES -- Agriculture Department scientists are working on a
way to protect young chickens from salmonella by using bacteria taken from the guts of a
mature chicken. A mixture called CF-3 boosts the resistance of a 3-day old chick to that of a
21-day old chick, which is strong enough to resist salmonella infection. USDA scientist Billy
Hargiss said using natural methods of battling micro bacteria in poultry could reduce the need
for antibiotics in chicken feed. Contact: Donald Corrier (409) 260-9372.

FAX -- You can obtain our radio and TV programming information and the Broadcasters Letter
through your facsimile machine by calling USDA's AgNewsFax. Use the telephone connected
to your FAX machine to call (202) 690-3944. At voice prompts press 1, press 4, then to receive
Broadcasters Letter, press 9200; radio newsline information, press 9250; TV contents billboard,
press 9260; TV scripts, press 9270. After all your selections, then press #, press 3, and press
the start button on your FAX machine.









FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1958 -- In this edition of Agriculture USA, Brenda Curtis talks to
Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy about the recent passage of the GATT and what it means for
farmers. (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1439 -- Batteries and the holidays; holiday home safety; a season of
moderation; Christmas tree history; a living holiday gift. (Weekly cassette -- 2-1/2 to 3 minute
consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1949 -- USDA closes field offices; Christmas tree "growing" is really
"farming"; a farmer holiday gift idea; reorganization could make things easier for farmers; CRP
and the 1995 farm bill. (Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Friday, December 16, cattle on feed report;
Monday, December 19, agricultural outlook; Tuesday, December 20, weekly weather and crops;
catfish processing; Wednesday, December 21, livestock, dairy and poultry outlook; coffee
products; Thursday, December 22, livestock slaughter, agricultural trade update. These are
USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries many stories every day
which are not listed in this lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.



FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE


FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on mail order food safety for the holidays. Patrick O'Leary
reports on the USDA field office of the future.

ACTUALITIES -- Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy announces USDA field office closings.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Will Pemble reports on USDA research on irrigation.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., EDT.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call LarryA. Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.







4110
OFF MIKE

SUB-ZERO WIND CHILLS...from 10 degree temperatures along with the first 5-inch snowfall
in recent days indicate that winter has arrived in the northern Great Plains, reports Matt
Westergaard (KMIT, Mitchell, SD). Farmers in southeast South Dakota enjoyed record yields
of corn and soybean crops this year, but they are concerned about low grain prices and the hog
market. Matt is on the air about an hour a day with his primary reports airing from 5-7:00 a.m.

25 YEARS...in agricultural broadcasting is the milestone Chuck Early (WNIX, Greenville, MS)
reaches this year with his "Mississippi Farm Focus" program. Chuck says this was a record year
for rice production and acreage in the Magnolia state. Late rain lowered the grade of cotton,
but rice and soybean grades were not adversely affected. Winter pasture conditions are
excellent. He plans remote coverage of 22nd Annual Delta Ag Expo, January 24-25, in
Cleveland, MI.

NORTHEAST NEBRASKA FARM SHOW...planning is underway by Susan Risinger (WJAG,
Norfolk, NE). Scheduled for January 18-19, there are 90 exhibitors and sessions planned on
livestock, grain marketing and property taxes. In past years, daily attendance has topped 3,000.

AN EARLY CHRISTMAS...gift of record crops has yielded a lot of happy farmers in Iowa. Many
farmers reported corn yields of more than 200 bushels per acre. Kevin Morse (WOC,
Davenport, IA) says farmers experienced nearly perfect crop conditions from planting through
harvest, a total turnaround from last year's flood conditions.

ADVOCATES FOR AGRICULTURE...campaign in the northeast is wrapping up this month,
reports Jeff Stewart (Ag Radio Network, Utica, NY). To date, nominees from seven northeast
states have been received. Two $1,000 awards will be presented for outstanding work in
improving the image of agriculture.


LARRY A QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300









Washington, DC 20250-1300


"" o clas University of Florida
TOP USDA POSTS ANNO ey officials for USDA were announced (December
8) by Agriculture Secretary Mike hose named are Floyd Horn, Acting Under Secretary
for Research, Education and Economics; Karl Stauber, Acting Deputy Under Secretary for
Research, Education and Economics; and Grant Buntrock, Acting Administrator of the
Consolidated Farm Services Agency. Espy said, "These individuals bring talent and valuable
experience to these key posts. They have proven to be 'Team USDA' players and I am sure they
will add much to reinventing USDA as an agency more responsive to its customers." Contact:
Tom Amontree (202) 720-4623.

SAVINGS THROUGH REORGANIZATION -- A proposal to reinvent both USDA's Forest Service
(FS) and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) was announced (December 6) by
James R. Lyons, Under Secretary for Natural Resources and Environment which should save
$75 million. The proposal calls for the NRCS to cut headquarters full-time staff by 51 percent
and to co-locate field offices with USDA's new Farm Service Agency. FS anticipates reducing
headquarters staff by 10 to 20 percent, and downsizing its regional structure from nine to seven
offices. Lyons said, "One of the primary goals of reinvention and reorganization of the Natural
Resources and Environment agencies is to continue to provide quality customer service and
save taxpayers money." Contact: Jim Loftus (202) 720-4623.

GENETICALLY ENGINEERED POTATO -- USDA is asking the public for comments on a
petition for a determination of non-regulated status for potatoes that are genetically engineered
for resistance to the Colorado potato beetle. The Monsanto Company has asked to produce
its genetically engineered potato without securing further USDA permits or acknowledged
notifications. USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) regulates the potato
because it contains gene sequences derived from plant pathogenic sources. The potato was
field tested at 34 locations under nine USDA permits issued between 1991 and 1993. APHIS
reviewers determined that the vectors and other elements used did not present a plant pest risk.
Contact: Cynthia A. Eck (301) 436-5931.

MILK PRICING CHANGES -- USDA will change how the Class II milk price is calculated each
month under all federal milk marketing orders. The new method will use the Minnesota-
Wisconsin (M-W) price for the second preceding month and add a fixed differential of 30 cents.
This price will be announced at the same time as the Class I milk price. Pat Jensen, the Acting
Assistant Secretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs, says, "Adoption of this pricing
formula will coordinate the value of producer milk used in the manufacture of Class II dairy
products with higher Class I milk prices." About 10 percent of the nation's milk production is
used to manufacture Class II dairy products. USDA is also recommending multiple component
pricing for milk under the Southern Michigan federal milk order. The rule would allow for pricing
milk based on three components: protein, butterfat and a "fluid carrier" residual. Shipping
percentages would be amended and the allowable assessments would be increased.
Comments will be accepted until January 13. Contact: Gil High (202) 720-8998.







DISTRICT COURT UPHOLDS USDA A U.S. District Court has upheld USDA's methods of
enforcing international trade provisions protecting endangered plant species from being illegally
collected from the wild for importation into the United States. The judgment also upheld the legal
authority of USDA to seize shipments of plants determined to have been collected in the wild or
that lack accurate information on accompanying export permits from signatory countries of the
Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora. Contact
Kendra Pratt (301) 436-4898.

AND THE AWARD GOES TO "HEROES OF REINVENTION" -- A representative sample of
local "heroes" at USDA who have enacted President Bill Clinton's goal of making a government
that works better and costs less have been given the Hammer Award. The Hammer Award
recognizes reinvention efforts that cut red tape, streamline programs, empower front line
employees, cut wasteful spending and improve customer service. The award was handed out
at an interagency event sponsored by the Washington area Working Group for Reinvention and
National Performance Review. Lonnie King, the Acting Administrator for USDA's Animal and
Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) said, "Employees in APHIS's Simplifying Rulemaking
Reinvention Lab have shown great initiative in meeting goals of the National Performance Review
by reinventing the review and clearance procedures that apply to the development of APHIS
rules." Contact: Margaret Webb (301) 436-7799.

IT CAN KEEP GROWING AND GROWING -- The Department of Agriculture will no longer
regulate a genetically engineered yellow crookneck squash. Known as ZW-20, the squash was
developed to resist infection from zucchini yellow mosaic virus and watermelon mosaic virus two,
which frequently damage squashes. These plants don't present a plant risk and are as safe as
other squash varieties, according to John Payne, the Acting Director of Biotechnology, Biologics
and Environmental Protection for USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. He says
in the past five years of evaluation in a laboratory, greenhouses and field experiments, it was
confirmed that the ZW-20 squash exhibits agronomic characteristics similar to those of other
squash. Contact: Cynthia A. Eck (301) 436-5931.

SEEDS OF CHANGE -- The Department of Agriculture has amended the Federal Seed Act
regulations to eliminate potential conflict between state and federal regulations that could inhibit
the movement of seed. The amendments include adding methods to test coated seeds,
changing names of some seeds to names more widely accepted, adding several agricultural and
vegetable seeds to those subject to the Federal Seed Act, and updating the standards for
certifying seeds. The Federal Seed Act is a truth-in-labeling law to protect farmers and
consumers. Contact: Gil High (202) 720-8998.

ECONOMIC FORUM -- USDA will hold an Economic Outlook Forum in Washington, D.C. on
February 22 and 23, 1995 to assess farm prospects for the remainder of the decade. Long term
commodity projections and debate on trends and future farm prospects will be featured. Call
(202) 720-3050.

FAX -- You can obtain our radio and TV programming information and the Broadcasters Letter
through your facsimile machine by calling USDA's AgNewsFax. Use the telephone connected
to your FAX machine to call (202) 690-3944. At voice prompts press 1, press 4, then to receive
Broadcasters Letter, press 9200; radio newsline information, press 9250; TV contents billboard,
press 9260; TV scripts, press 9270. After all your selections, then press #, press 3, and press
the start button on your FAX machine.








FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTURE USA # 1959 -- In this edition of Agriculture USA, a report on a week long tour
of wetlands in the mid-west. Brenda Curtis looks at this controversial issue. (Weekly cassette -
- 13-1/2 minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1440 -- Christmas tree history; holiday gift plant; milder winter; car seats
and child safety; gauging tobacco's economic importance. (Weekly cassette -- 2-1/2 to 3 minute
consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1950 -- Farm income; the outlook isn't good for dairy farmers;
brighter export price picture; the wetlands issue; farm bill buzzwords. (Weekly cassette -- news
features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Monday, December 26, HOLIDAY; Tuesday,
December 27, weekly weather and crops; Thursday, December 29, hogs and pigs; Friday,
December 30, agricultural prices; Monday, January 2, HOLIDAY; Tuesday, January 3, weekly
weather and crops. These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline
carries many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.


USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.



FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE


FEATURES Lynn Wyvill reports on food safety tips for holiday parties and on USDA Forest
Service research on turning wood and plastic into a useful material.

ACTUALITIES -- USDA meteorologist Norton Strommen on the latest weather and crop
conditions.

UPCOMING FEATURES -- Lynn Wyvill reports on Forest Service accessibility projects.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 am., EDT.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Larry A Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 2 08307 993 8
4
OFF MIKE

CORPORATE FARMING...is an issue on the minds of farmers, and it's been on the ballot in
many Kansas communities, reports new farm director Carolyn Kelly (KXXX, KQLS, & KFNS,
Oberlin and Colby, KS). Odor and pollution control are the primary concerns with corporate hog
and dairy operations. Carolyn assumed her position a month ago when Joe Munsell moved
over to become sales manager. She is a farmer's daughter and was raised on her family's
wheat farm. Her stations serve a tri-state listening area of northwest Kansas, southwest
Nebraska and eastern Colorado.

AG DAY...executive producer Larry Lyle died December 6 following an illness, reports Don
Greene. Larry will be missed in the world of farm broadcasting and leaves a legacy in the
continuing success of Ag Day, a daily national TV program. Brian Conrady has been named
new executive producer.

RURAL CONCERNS RALLY...is scheduled for December 20, 11:00 3:00 p.m. in Sioux City,
IA. Emery Kleven (KMNS, Sioux City, IA) says the rally sponsored by the Town and Country
Alliance is expected to draw 4-5,000 farmers to discuss hog markets and related topics to help
producers. Emery says producers will be invited to donate one hog each that can be offered
to area food banks. He estimates that may generate 250,000 pounds of pork for charitable use,
if enough participate.

LOOKING AHEAD...to 1995, Kim Dlouhy (WOW, Omaha, NE) reports that the Husker Feed
Grains and Soybean Conference is scheduled for January 11-13 in Lincoln, NE. Kim has been
active recently covering farm organization and cattlemen's meetings. She does three farm
newscasts and several market updates daily, totaling about 15 reports that air from 5:50 a.m.
to 5:15 p.m. Kim says her station moved into new facilities last March, and they have enjoyed
the transition into digit I audio.


LARRY A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


MR 'I, I 1
United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300









Communications Washington, DC 20250-1300


EARLY WARNING DI ~ER SYSTEM iAgricuTW S ary Mike Espy announced
(December 19) the expa h f the h .early ir'di ater network in rural America.
This Clinton Administration' ti e A| ed the site for the first new transmitter, which was
made operational in Piedmon l't ffa. That'sUnl'rrsi le0obliedwhere a tornado killed 20
worshippers in a church on Palm Sunday this year. Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy said,
"Advance notice--even a few moments--is central to taking the right safety actions. Expansion
of the network is a vital step which will save lives." The initiative is a collaborative effort among
several Alabama and federal agencies, including USDA's Rural Utilities Service (RUS), and the
National Weather Service, which operates the All Hazard Weather Radio Network. Contact:
Eileen McMahon (202) 720-1255.

NEW AGENCY, NEW ADMINISTRATOR -- James Robert Baker has been named the first
administrator of the USDA's Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA).
GIPSA is a new agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. This agency is a combination of
the Federal Grain Inspection Service and the Packers and Stockyards Administration. Before
joining GIPSA, Baker was the manager of Lewis Livestock Company in Conway, Arkansas. Also,
he has been chairman of the Arkansas Livestock and Poultry Commission since 1989. Baker
has spent the past 27 years in production agriculture. Contact: Dana Stewart (202) 720-5091.

BEEF FROM AUSTRALIA NO LONGER ON HOLD -- USDA will not detain further some 36
million pounds of frozen beef from Australia which was held in warehouses since November 19.
USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service had impounded the beef pending results of testing
for the possible presence of chlorfluazuron, a pesticide not registered used on cotton crops later
fed to Australian cattle, and not registered for use in the U.S. Michael R. Taylor, Acting Under
Secretary for Food Safety, said, "All test results for the pesticide chlorfluazuron in the beef
entering the U.S. were negative, and EPA has advised us that even if present at low levels, this
pesticide does not pose a risk concern. No public health purpose would be served by further
detaining this product." Contact: Jacque Knight (202) 720-9113.

WATERMELON REFUNDS ELIMINATED -- Watermelon producers, handlers and importers
voted in a November referendum to amend the Watermelon Research and Promotion Plan,
according the Department of Agriculture (December 7). The amendments will eliminate the
refund of assessments provision, assess watermelon imports and add importer members to the
National Watermelon Promotion Board. Lon Hatamiya, Administrator of USDA's Agricultural
Marketing Service said, "Of those voting, 61 percent favored eliminating refund of assessments
and 81 percent favored assessing watermelon imports and the addition of watermelon importers
to the board." The plan is authorized by the Watermelon Research and Promotion Act, and the
referendum was conducted by USDA. The Act requires a simple majority of votes to approve
such changes. Contact: Clarence Steinberg (202) 720-8998.









ASSESSMENT UP FOR EGG PRODUCERS USDA will increase the assessment rate paid
by egg producers to the American Egg Board by amending the Egg Research and Promotion
Order. The new assessment will be 10 cents per 30-dozen case of commercial eggs, double
the current assessment of 5 cents per case. The new rate will go into effect Feb. 1, 1995. The
increase was approved by egg producers who voted in a national referendum during the fall of
1994. The increase follows a 1993 amendment to the Egg Research and Consumer Information
Act, which authorized an increase. The Act authorizes the Egg Research and Promotion Order.
Contact: Gil High (202) 720-8998.

DIPPING ERADICATES CHRYSANTHEMUM DISEASE -- USDA scientists report that dipping
chrysanthemum plants in a fungicide protects them from a disease posing a devastating threat
to commercial nurseries in the U.S. The fungicide, myclobutanil, is now being used to prevent
the introduction of chrysanthemum white rust disease into the U.S. Morris Bonde of the USDA's
Agricultural Research Service (ARS), said, "A .01 percent solution of myclobutanil in water
eradicates chrysanthemum white rust disease." USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection
Service (APHIS) has now incorporated the fungicide dip in a program to eradicate white rust
disease. The project was a cooperative effort among ARS, APHIS, the California Department of
Food and Agriculture, and the flower industry. Members of the flower industry provided the
chrysanthemum plants to the Frederick, MD lab for their use throughout the study. Contact:
Sean Adams (301) 344-2723.

COMMENTS ON HASS AVOCADO IMPORTS USDA is extending its comment period
regarding the possible importation of Hass Avocados from Mexico until January 3. B. Glen Lee,
Deputy Administrator of USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service's (APHIS) said, "We
are extending the comment period to ensure that we consider all relevant issues associated with
the possible importation of Hass avocados from Mexico." APHIS establishes growing, packing,
shipping and other conditions whereby fruits and vegetables can be imported into the U.S.
without posing a significant pest risk to American agriculture. Contact: Ed Curlett (301) 436-
3256.

'95 PEANUT POUNDAGE QUOTA USDA announced (December 15) a national peanut quota
for the 1995 marketing year of 1,350,000 short tons, which is unchanged from the 1994 level.
Grant Buntrock, the Acting Administrator of the Consolidated Farm Service Agency, said, "This
quota level is the minimum permitted under law." The Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938
requires the national poundage quota for the 1995 crop of peanuts to be the greater of
1,350,000 short tons or a formula quantity equal to the estimated quantity of peanuts needed
for domestic edible, seed and related uses in the 1995 marketing year. Contact: Bruce Merkle
(202) 720-8206.

SOYBEAN PROMOTION BOARD Agriculture Mike Espy has named 18 members and three
alternates to the United Soybean Board. All appointees will serve 3-year terms beginning in
December. The 60-member board is authorized by the 1990 Soybean Promotion, Research, and
Consumer Information Act. There are also three temporary members whose terms expire in
December. The order provides for an alternate member for each state or region with only one
member on the board. Alternates will serve terms that coincide with the terms of members from
the state or region which they will represent. The Secretary selected the appointees from
soybean producers who were nominated by Qualified State Soybean Boards. Contact: Alicia
L. Ford (202) 720-8998.






FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE
AGRICULTURE USA # 1960 Is North Dakota an urban state? In this edition of Agriculture
USA, Brenda Curtis talks with a population expert about North Dakota's declining population and
the impact on life in the Northern Great Plains. (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1441 -- Nature's heat pumps; tobacco use stabilizing; population
concerns in North Dakota; toddlers and food safety in the home; a Jekyll and Hyde virus.
(Weekly cassette -- 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features).

AGRITAPE FEATURES # 1951 -- CRP contracts extended; a brighter tobacco outlook; long
range forecasts; deficiency payments to wheat, oats and barley producers; new I.P.M. initiative.
(Weekly cassette -- news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIO NEWSLINE -- Tuesday, December 27, weekly weather and
crops; Thursday, December 29, hog and pig inventory; world tobacco situation. Friday,
December 20, agricultural prices. Monday, January 2, HOLIDAY. Tuesday, January 3, weekly
weather and crops; horticultural exports. These are all of the scheduled USDA reports for
December 29-January 9. As always, our radio line will provide other unscheduled news
stories every weekday.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.

FROM OUR TELEVISION SERVICE

FEATURE Will Pemble reports on a new vaccine for cattle shipping fever, developed by
scientists with USDA's Agricultural Research Service in Ames, Iowa. (1:33)

FEATURE Repeat of above without narration. (1:33)

FEATURE Will Pemble reports on a painless test for colon cancer, developed by scientists
with USDA's Agricultural Research Service in Beltsville, Maryland. (1:37)

FEATURE -- Repeat of above without narration. (1:37)

ACTUALITIES -- President Bill Clinton, Vice President Al Gore, Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy
and HUD Secretary Henry Cisneros announce winners in the "EZ/EC" program (via satellite from
the White House on Wednesday, December 21). The Empowerment Zone/Enterprise
Community program supplies funds and incentives to communities for revitalization efforts.
Hundreds of communities submitted applications; winning communities are announced.

SATELLITE COORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., EDT.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Call Lany A Quinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.




IVERSITY OF FLORIDA


OFF MIKE

AG REPORTER OF THE YEAR...as named by the California Farm Bureau Federation for 1994
is Roy Isom (KMJ, Fresno, CA). Roy received this award at the Federation's 76th Annual
Meeting in Anaheim. He was selected as the outstanding agricultural reporter who is the best
at telling California agriculture's story to the public. Nominations were submitted by county Farm
Bureaus. Roy is described as the "voice of agriculture in the Central Valley: He understands
the issues, talks with farmers and is deeply committed to agriculture." Roy began reporting farm
news in May 1981 and has been KMJ's news director for the past eight years.

ICE STORM...left many families without electricity for three or more days last week in southeast
Iowa, northern Missouri and eastern Illinois, reports Mike Buchanan (KBIZ, Ottumwa, IA). Aside
from inconvenience, there was not much permanent damage. An informational swine meeting
is scheduled in Ottumwa on January 21. Hog prices will be a key topic.

RADIO SERVICES SURVEY...should be in your mailbox or your inbox if you are using the
weekly radio news features on cassette. Please take time out to complete the survey so that
we can plan our services for the future. If you regularly use our programs and did not receive
a survey, call Lynn Wyvill, 202-720-9951, and she'll fax you a copy. This is not to be confused
with an earlier survey about the Broadcasters Letter. We thank you for your many replies to
that. We're tabulating that information and will report to you soon.

AN EARLY RESPONDENT...to our radio services survey was Gary Kinnett (WIAI/WACF/WPAF,
Danville, IL) who picked up the phone and told us how he uses USDA radio services. Gary says
his listeners call and request our material and adds that Gary Crawford's features are
particularly popular at holiday time. He uses our weekly documentary AgUSA and likes our
longer features. We will use Gary's and all of your comments to provide better service in 1995.

H PP HOLD S!

LARRY QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use $300




I 1 -1 I


* Washington, DC 20250-1300


Sof Florida
GLIC A OASNEXTS OF AGRICULTURE-- President BillClinton
nominated Dan Glick Qbe the secretary of Agriculture. Glickman, a Democrat from
Kansas, served nine tr of the House of Representatives. During his tenure,
he served on two House Agriiii subcommittees and has been a key player in the formulation
of the past four farm bills. In making the announcement, President Clinton praised outgoing
Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy's work on trade, reorganization and the Empowerment
Zone/Enterprise Communities. Contact: 720-4623.

EARLYRELEASE BECOMES PERMANENT The U.S. Department of Agriculture willmake
permanent the 8:30 a.m. ET release time for market-sensitive grains and oilseeds reports.
During a trial period that ran from May through November of 1994, USDA released Crop
Production Reports, World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimate reports and several other
market sensitive reports at 8:30 a.m. rather than 3:00 p.m. Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy said,
"The test period demonstrated that the early release time provides timely information to both
cash grain and futures markets, and allows U.S. markets to trade on our forecasts before
commodity markets." The new policy takes effect immediately. Contact: Mary Dixon (202)
720-4623.

PUMPING IRON HELPS OLDER WOMEN -- A new study reveals that older women who
strengthen their thigh and torso muscles can reduce their risks of osteoporosis and related
fractures. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, in conjunction with the National Institutes of health
supported the year-long study and the results were reported in the December 28 Journal of
American Medical Association. Researchers concluded that high-intensity training "isan effective
and feasible means" to preserve bone density and prevent other factors that increase fractures,
such as muscle weakness, poor balance and inactivity in women past menopause. Study leader
Miriam Nelson says, "The study shows for the first time that a single treatment can improve
several risk factors for spine and hip fractures in older women. Bone density is only one element
in these fractures." She says improving muscle strength and balance prevents falls, the greatest
risk factor for fractures in the elderly. Contact: Judy McBride (301) 344-2861.

NEW BRAND REQUIREMENTS FOR MEXICANCATTLE- The Department of Agriculture has
new requirements for identifying Mexican steer and spayed heifers imported into the United
States. Patricia Jensen, USDA's acting assistant secretary for marketing and regulatory
programs says there was a need to balance public concern about the treatment of cattle with
the need to maintain identification methods to ensure the effectiveness of the eradication of
bovine tuberculosis. The new regulations willrequire Mexican cattle to be permanently marked
with the letter "M"high on the hip near the tailhead before entering the United States. Heifers
willbe marked with an "Mx"in the same location. Previously, imported cattle were to be hot-iron
branded on the right jaw. Additionally, freeze branding will be allowed as a method to
permanently identify imported Mexican cattle, as long as the mark has at least 18 days to
become visible. Contact: Kendra Pratt (301) 436-4898.







2
USDA PLEASED WITH COURT DECISION TO UPHOLD FOREST PLAN Officials at the
Department of Agriculture applauded a recent federal court decision upholding President
Clinton's Northwest Forest Plan. Designed to protect the natural habitat for the spotted owl,
salmon, and other species dependent on old-growth forecast, the plan allows the government
to sell about 1 billion board feet of timber per year from its land in the .Northwest. Jack Ward
Thomas, the chief of the Forest Service, and a scientist instrumental in writing the plan, says this
decision marks a milestone for people who have invested years of hard work to serve the public
interest in resolving this issue. He says the Forest Service and other federal agencies willmove
quickly and deliberately to implement the plan. Contact: Alan Polk (202) 205-1134.

POWERING UP COMMUNITIES AROUND THE U.S. President Clinton, Vice President Al
Gore and Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy announced the designation of three Rural
Empowerment Zones and 30 Rural Enterprise Communities (EZ/EC) around the United States.
The EZ/EC designations were made to communities plagued by poverty, in both rural and urban
areas. The designations were based on strategic plans developed by the communities showing
how federal, state and local funds would be used to implement their plan. Each Empowerment
Zone willreceive $40 million in federal funds while each Enterprise Community receives $2.95
million. The designation also means special consideration for various federal programs, grants,
and tax breaks. Contact: Jim Brownlee (202) 720-2091.

FINAL COTTON ARP SET Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy announced the final Acreage
Reduction Percentage (ARP) for upland cotton of zero percent. This is a reduction from the
preliminary level of 7.5% announced on October 31. The new level reflects tightened 1993-crop
ending supplies resulting from a significant increase in U.S. upland cotton sales, and should help
maintain the desirable 1995-96 end-of-year stock level. Contact: Bruce Merkle (202) 720-
8206.

NEW MEMBERS NAMED TO COTTON BOARD The Cotton Board has six new members,
and six new alternate members to serve. Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy named the new
members (December 23) to serve on the board, which administers a national cotton research
and promotion program. Appointees willserve 3-year terms, ending in 1997. Authorized by the
1966 Cotton Research and Promotion Act, the Cotton Board advances the position of cotton in
the marketplace. It is funded by assessments on all domestically produced cotton and imports
of cotton or cotton-containing products. Contact: Clarence Steinberg (202) 720-8998.

MUSHROOM COUNCIL SET Three mushroom producers have been named to the
Mushroom Council to administer the National Mushroom Promotion and Research Program.
Reappointed is Wilhelm Meya of Connecticut, and newly appointed members are James
Angelucci of Pennsylvania and Shah Kazemi of California. Allthree willserve three year terms.
Authorized by the Mushroom Promotion, Research and Consumer Information Act of 1990, the
council administers a national promotion, research, and consumer information program to
maintain and expand markets for fresh mushrooms. Contact: Clarence Steinberg (202) 720-
8998.

USDA GOES INTERNET To access this document via Internet, point your gopher to
esusda.gov and a menu selection will appear or send an e-mail message to
almanac@esusda.gov. The single line message should read: send(space)USDA-
releases(space)help. Retrieval instructions and a list of documents currently available will
appear. Need more help? Contact: Maria Bynum (202) 720-5192.







3
FROM OUR RADIO SERVICE

AGRICULTUREUSA # 1961 On this edition of Agriculture USA, Brenda Curtis talks with the
head of USDA's Foreign Agriculture Service Gus Shumacher about the changing world of farm
exports. (Weekly cassette -- 13-1/2 minute documentary).

CONSUMER TIME # 1442 Post holiday dieting; giving power to the people; winter bird
feeding; the winds of change are blowing; controversial new squash given the O.K. (Weekly
cassette -- 2-1/2 to 3 minute consumer features).

AGRITAPEFEATURES # 1952 President Clinton nominates new Agriculture Secretary; farm
export outlook; a new way of looking at an old favorite; wheat crops out in the cold; cotton ARP
set. (Weekly cassette news features).

UPCOMING ON USDA RADIONEWSLINE- Tuesday, January 10, weekly weather and crops;
Wednesday, January 11, world agricultural supply and demand outlook for cotton; Thursday,
January 12, 8:30 world agricultural supply and demand outlook (newsline willchange at 10:30
a.m.); cotton and wool outlook; Friday, January 13, feed outlook; oil crops outlook; rice outlook;
wheat outlook. These are USDA reports we know about in advance. Our newsline carries
many stories every day which are not listed in this lineup.

USDA RADIO NEWSLINES (202) 488-8358 or 8359.
COMREX ENCODED (202) 720-2545
Material changed at 5 p.m., EDT, each working day.


FROM OUR TELEVISIONSERVICE

FEATURE- WillPemble reports on a new automatic irrigation system for fruittrees, developed
by scientists with USDA's Agricultural Research Service in Kearneysville, West Virginia. 1 minute
46 seconds.

FEATURE- Repeat of above without narration. 1 minute 46 seconds.

FEATURE- Patrick O'Leary reports on new cotton products, being developed by Agriculture.
Department researchers in New Orleans, Louisiana. 1 minute 54 seconds.

FEATURE- Repeat of above without narration. 1 minute 54 seconds.

ACTUALITIES- President Clinton nominates Dan Glickman as new Agriculture Secretary.

SATELLITECOORDINATES FOR TV NEWSFEEDS:

Galaxy 7, Transponder 9, Channel 9, Audio 6.2 or 6.8, Downlink frequency 3880 Mhz.
Available on Thursdays 3:45 4:00 p.m., EDT; Mondays 11:00 11:15 a.m., EDT.

Comments and suggestions are welcome regarding USDA broadcast services.
Cal Larry A. Ouinn, (202) 720-6072; write 1618-S, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250-1300.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 08307 988 8 1
4
OFF MIKE

AG POLICY PERSPECTIVES...is the name of a new radio program that will feature information
related to the 1995 Farm Bill debate, reports Ron Hays (Oklahoma Agrinet, Oklahoma City, OK).
This four-minute daily series will take a look at the farm bill from the history of the 70's, 80's and
90's and will be distributed via satellite and audiotape. For more information, call Ron at (405)
841-0297.

TOY SAFETY STORY...in our Consumer Time series done by Lori Spiczka Holm persuaded
a Minnesota woman to avoid buying a toy that was not "age appropriate." She considered
buying a toy sewing machine for a three-year-old niece despite the label indicating it was for
children ages 7 and up. Hearing Lori's report helped her realize the safety risk and make
another choice.

GREAT YEAR...for cotton, rice and soybeans crops in Arkansas! Stuart Doan (ARN Agriculture
Network, Little Rock, AR) says yields were the highest in 45 years. He adds that most of the row
crop farmers have smiles on their faces as they begin the new year. Exports of cotton are up
so planted acres may increase by 10 percent in 1995.

RETIRING...after more than 36 years on the air as a farm broadcaster with the same station is
Earl Hunter (WKTY, La Crosse, WI).

NOW ON INTERNET...you can read our weekly Broadcasters Letter. Many of you stay in
touch with the world through this information super highway. Some of you suggested that we
offer the letter by Internet when replying to our recent readership survey. We hope this will help
you more readily obtain timely listings of our news stories and radio and TV programming. See
instructions for access at the bottom of page 2.



LARRY A. QUINN, Director
Video, Teleconference and Radio Center


United States Department of Agriculture
Office of Communications
Room 1618-S
Washington, DC 20250-1300
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Pivae Use $300