Proposed code of fair competition for the publishing-printing and printing subdivisions of the graphic arts industry as ...

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Material Information

Title:
Proposed code of fair competition for the publishing-printing and printing subdivisions of the graphic arts industry as submitted on September 6, 1933
Portion of title:
Publishing-printing and printing subdivisions of the graphic arts industry
Physical Description:
7 p. : ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Recovery Administration
Publisher:
United States Government Printing Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Graphic arts -- Publishing -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
At head of title: National Recovery Administration.
General Note:
"Registry No. 507-11."
General Note:
"637-B."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004952581
oclc - 63654735
System ID:
AA00007097:00001

Full Text







































The Code for the Pulblishing-PrintingI
and Printing Sulbdivisions of the Graphic Arts Industry
in its present form merely reflects the proposal of the above-mentioned
indulstry, and none of the provisions contained therein are
to be regarded as having received the approval of
the National Recovery Administration
as applying to this industry




UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHIINCTON: 1933

Per sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D.C. Price 5 cents


637-B


Registry No. 507--11


NATIONAL RECOVERY ADMINISTRATION



PROPO SE D C ODE OF FAIR C OMPET ITION



PUBLISHEING-IPRINTING

AND PRINTING SUBDIVISIONS OF

THE GRAPHIC ARTS INDUSTRY

AS SUBMITTED ON SEPTEMBER 6, 1933



































SUBMITTED BT

NATIONAL EDITORIAL ASSOCIATION












A CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION FOR THE PUBLISHING-
PRINTING AND PRINTING SUBDIVISIONS OF T]HE
GRAPHIC ARTS INDUSTRY
AS ADOPTED BY THE CONVENTION OF THE PUBLISHING, PRINTING,
AND ALLIED INDUSTRIES (THIE GRAIPHIIC ARTS INDUSTRY) HELD
IN CHICAGO, AUGUST 17-18, 1933

PREAMBLE

In sympathy with the spirit and purpose of the National Industrial
Recovery Act and the President's Reemployment Algreemlent the
avowed purpose of this code of fair competition is to aid in increasing
employment and purchasing power.
The national trade association, as :referred to herein, shall maean
the National Edit~orial Association and its cooperating state and/or
regional organizations; all members thereof; all newspapers; and all
printing plalnt~s; eit~her s;7ignig this code or being assigned to admin-
istration under it.
Nothing in the adoption or acceptance of this code shall be con-
strued as an abridgemlent of the freedom of the press as guaranteed
under the First Amendment to th~e Constitution of the United States.

AuRICLE I--DEFINITION
(a)r The Pubhlishingr-Prin tingr and Printing subdivisions of the
Graphic Arts Industry, as covered by this codte, shpall incd all
printing plants comuinga wTithin the UniedSaeDprmeto
Commerce definition as "iIndustry No. 510, Prfining and Publishing,
Newspapers and Periodicals wherein there is a newspaper pu blished
and/or printed; and "Industry No. 508, Printing and Publishing
Book and Job that are members of the Associatilon (as defined in
the Preamble hereof) and aU other printing plants signing this code
or being assigned to administration under it..
(b) It is to be understood that the act of signing this code by non-
members (of the AssocriRt~ion) pubhlishingr and/or printing plants
makes them subject to administration under this code.
(c) It is further understood that such publishing and/or printing
plants not signing this code, but which are assigned to administration
under it by the National Recovery- Administration, shall be subject
to administration under this code.
(d) The term newspaperr as used herein shll~ be considered as a
PUblication engaged in disseminating news matter or matter of reader
interest and advertising.

ARTICLE TII-EMPLOYMENT

(a) Pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 7 of th Nlational1
Recovery Act and as long as this code shall be in effect, this code
shall be subject to the following conditions:
9014u IT \







1. That employees shall have the right to organize and bargain
collectively through representatives of their own choosing and shall
be free from interference, restraint, or coercion of employers of labor,
or their agents in the designation of such representatives or in self-
organizaltion, or in concerted activities for the purpose of collective
bargainilng or other mutual aid or protection.
2. That no employee and no one seeking employment shall be
required as a condition of employment to jomn an company union
or to reframn from jommig, orgamlzmg or assistmng ~a bor organization
of his own choosing.
3. That employers shall comply with the maximum hours of labor
minimum rates of pay, and other conditions of employment approved
or prescribed by the President.
(b) That no employee shall be required to join any organization to
secure or retain employment, or to secure the benefits of this code,
and the right of every mdividual to refrain from joining any organi-
zation, and the right of employee and employer to bargain together
free from interference from any third party is hereby recognized.
(c) No person under sixteen (16) years of age shall be em~ployed
except to sell and/or deliver newspapers, during now established
hours where it does not interfere with school hours, but those from
14 to 16 may be employed up to three hours between 7 A.M. and 7
P.M.
(d) Nothing in this code is to be construed as prevention of the
selection, retention, or advancement of an employee on the basis of
individual merit.
ARTICLE III- ORKING Houns

(a) Maximum hours of labor shaUl be uniform for the whole country
and shall not be more than forty hours in any one week, for all
mechanical or shop employees, including any propreos ebr
of their families, supervisors, and foremen, for~ S heime actall
engaged in mechanical work. However, when necessary, because of
an emergency, the character of the work or the inability to obtain
competent labor, overtime and extra shifts above and beyond such
limitations shall be permitted, provided that no employee as described
above will work more than 1,040 hours in any six months. These
limitations shall not apply to employees engaged in emergency matinte-
nance, or repair work, and an employer in any city, town, or village,
where there is a shortage of labor of any of the classes mentioned,
which shortage will create great and unavoidable hardship, may, in a
petition approved by the Association, obtain a stay of the require-
ments of these provisions pending investigation by the National
Recovery Admimstration, if he agrees to abide by the decision of
such investigation.
(b) Maximum working hours for all clerical help shall be uniform
for the whole country and shall not be more than 48 hours per week,
except: for those employed in a managerial or executive capacity
receiving $~35.00 per week or more, but newspaper reporters, editorial
writers, rewrite men, space writers, news-photographers, and all other
members of the editorial staffs of newspapers, being classed as profes-
sional persons, shall be exempt from the limitations of the working.
hours imposed by this article.







(c) Persons working solely on a commission basis shall not be
restricted as to their hours of labor nor guaranteed the minimlum
wages provided hereafter in this code.
ARTICLE TV-kilNIMUMrn -7AG ES

(a) There shall be a standard minimum wage for all mechanical
or shop labor employed in the industry of forty cents (.40) per hour
for male labor and thirty cents (.30) per hour for female labor wvith
the except.ion that janitors, a.pprent~ices and/or persons learning the
trade may be employed at, a lower wage ra.te, provided, however, that
the number of apprentices em~ployed8 shall not exrceed more! than one
apprentice for each five miechanical employees, or fraction thereof;
provided further, except with the permission of the Associa.tion, that
a person or persons employed in the trade as abbovre defined shall re-
ceive a compensation at a rate per hour at least equal to the rate per
hour paid said person or persons, or for said class of work, prevailing
on July 1, 1933.
(b) There shall be a standard minimum wage for all clerical help,
solicitorsi, salesmen, newspaper reporters, editoi-ial writers, rewrite
men, news-photographer~s, and all other members of the' editorial staffs
of newspapers, except~ space writers, of not less than $15.00 per wee~fk
mn any city of over five hundred thousand (500,000) population, or
in the immruediate trade area of such city; nor less than $14.50 per
weekly in any cityr between two hundred fifty thousand (250,000) and
five hundred thousand (50)0,000) population, or in the immediate
trade area of such city; nor less than $14.00 per weTek in, any city of
between t~wenty-five thousand (25,000) and two hundred fifty thou-
sand (250,000) population, or in the immediate trade area of such
city; nor less than $13.00 per week in any city' of between five thou-
sand (5,000) and twenty-five thousand (25,000) population, or in the
unmediate trade area of such city; anrd in towns of less than five
thousand (5,000) population to increase wages by not less than twenty
percent (20%/), provided that this shall not require wages in excess
of 8112.00 per week; provided, however, that persons learnmgth
business or profession, as above set forth, ma~ty beempl~oyed at a lower
wage rate than above designated. Population, for the purpose used
herein, shall be determined by t~he 1930 Federal census.
ARTICLE V
The foregoing requirements as to hours atnd wages shall be observed
except in the case of a contract arrived at by collective bargaining in
effect on or before July 1, 1933, and still remaining in full force and
effect and which cannot be revised except by mutual consent.
ARTICLE VI-TPRADE I"RACTICES

(a) Each establishment in the publishing and printing industry
shall maintain and kieep in proper order, an approved cost finding
system, or use an approved price list based on a cost-finding system,
and accounting methods that will furnish and make available, with
reasonable accuracy, all necessary information as to the costs of
production of newspapers and printing.







(b) Secret or Unfair Reba~tes and/or Agreements.--The making or
offering to make secret or unfair payments or allowances of rebates,
commissions, credits, unearned discounts; or the extending of special
favors, services, or privileges to purchasers of printing or advertise' ,
their agents, officers, or representatives in any form whatsoever, shall
not be permitted, and shall constitute a violation of this code.
(c) Deception and Fraud.--Deceiving or defrauding customers with
respect to newspaper circulation, or as to quantity, quality, grade or
substance of stock, or any other material element entering mnto the
completed printed product shall not be permitted and shall constitute
a violation of this code.
(d) Co~mpetitive Relationship.--The defamation or damaging of
competitors by false imlputations as to their conduct, ability, credit,
or service; or the attempt to breach or breaching of existing contracts
between competitors and their customers, or the obstructing of per-
formances of such contractual relationship by such means, shall not
be permitted, and shall constitute a violation of this code. The
wrogfu enticing away of employees of competitors, the use of
unfair subscription or circulation sales and solicitation or advertising
sales methods; or the pirating of ideas, designs, drawings, sketches,
copy, etc., known to be the property or product of any competitor
shal not be permitted and shall constitute a violation of this code.
(e) Special Com~petition.--No state or any political subdivision
thereof, church, educational, charitable, welfare, penal, or similar type
of institution which is publicly endowed or supported in whole or in
part by contributions, or which is exempt from payment of any local,
st~at~e, or F~ederal taxes what.soever, shall sell the product of any print-
ing platrr which it may own, or control by trust, or operate, in competi-
tion with commercial business enterprises manufacturing: printing.
(f ) Bidding.--This industry approves of the one-bid policy under
competit~ive bidding; any practice of fictitious bids for the purpose of
deceiving competitors or purchasers, or any attempt through conniv-
ance to have all bids rejected to the end that a more advantageous
position may be secured in the bidding shall constitute a violation of
this code.
(g) Ofjic~ial N~otice! by P~ublicat~ion.--In aUl states where a, rate is
established by law for giving offcial notice by publication, the price
charged for all notices required by state and/or Federal laws to be
published shall not be less than such statutory rate.

ARTICLE V~II-STABILIZATION OF PRICES

The stabilization of prices shall immediately be based upon cost
and no bid shall be submitted or price quoted, or printed matter or
service sold or rendered, by any person or concern in these subdivisions
of this industry for less than the cost of production as set forth in
Article VI, Section (a), hereof, plus the cost of all materials and out-
side purchases required to produce such printed matter or render such
service, plus a reasonable profit; provided, however, this provision
shall not apply to newspapers or other periodicals with a bona fide
paid circulation list, sold and/or delivered by the publisher.







ARTICLE VIII -ADMINISTRATION
(a) This code for these subdivisions of the graphic-arts industry
shall be administered by the Na~tional Editorial Association.
(b) The Constitution and By-aws of the N~ational Editorial
Association shall be used as the basis and authority for the adminis-
tration of this code, with the further provision that state, regional,
and/or local administration under this code shall be carried on through
state, regional, and/or local organizations now cooperating and/or
affiliated, or to be affriliat~ed, wvith; the National Editorial Association;
provided that the governing body of the N~ational Editorial A9ssocia-
tion be augment.ed, for the purpose of administering this code only,
by at least four members o~f the N~ewspaper Association Maenagers,
Inc., one of whom shall be from the Pacific Slope, one from the M~iddle-
west, one from the Sout~h, and one frm the East. The selection of
the representatives from the Newvspaper Association Mlanagers, Inc.,
and the allocation of the section from which each shall be selected shall
be made by Newspaper Association M/anagers, Inc.; provided further,
that no member of New~spaper Association Mianagers, Inc., shall be
eligible to membership on this administering body wvho resides in a
state in which there r~esidles a regular member of the B]toard of D~irectors
of the Nat~ional Editorial Association.
(c) The righlt to establish and enforce state, regional, and/or local
rules of administration under this code shall remain with the :respective
state, regional, a~nd local cooperating and/or affiliated organizations,
subject to t~he approval of the National Editorial Assoilation.
(d) The right of appeal directly to the National Recovery Admin-
istrat~ion by individual members or others coming under the provisions
of this code is recognized.
(e) The National Editorial Association, -its committee, committees,
agent., or agents, shall have the right to required reports for statistical
purposes fromt individual publishers, corporations, and/or estab-
lisihments, grroups, nd/or orgasniz~t~ions comingr under the adm~in-
istrat~ion of this code.
(f) The National Edit~orial Association shall assess and collect
from all t.be individual publishers, corporations, and/or establish-
ments, coming under this code, thze proportionate f-unds necessary
to defray the actual costs of thze admlinistration of this code, as pro-
vided in the National Industrial Recovery Act.
(g) The penalty for the violation of anyg of thie provisions of this
code shall be as provided in. the National Industrial Rtecovery Act,
and in addition thereto t~he cost of investigation may be added.
ARTICLE IX-MENDMENTS

(a) This code is to be subject to amendments as experience wit~h its
operation develops the necessity therefore, subject to the approval.
of the President.
(b) The President may, fromr time to time, cancel anyodr
approval, rule, or regulation, issued under Title I of the Nati~odnal
Industrial Recovery Act.
(c) If any provision of this code is declared invalid or unenforceable,
the remaining provisions shall nevertheless continue in full force and
effect the same as if they had been separately- presented for approval
and approved by the President.












ARTICLE


This code is not designed to promote monopoly and shall not be

interpreted or administered so as to eliminate or oppress small
enterprises or to discriminate against them.


ARTICLE 11


This code shall be effective the second Mlonday after its approval

by t~he President.


Membership of the National Editorial Association and its cooperating State and
regional associations


Number
Number members
Total mmes a baso National
State~~o ne a n-Eddo tal At ni

paesal assocla- LinState and
tions regional
associations


Allabama....._._ ......~.____..__......................... 156 13j 17 142
Arizons~_~..~.. ... .... ~~........ .~ ~~~~.~............ ........ 65 .-~.......... 9 9
Arkansas.~.~~__....._........... .................. 220 715 24 85
California...................................~~~~_ 535 301 136 355
Colorado.~~-......._................._.~..................... 215 15B 39 174
Connecticut. _............... ........ ..... ..... ...... 100 58 25 1 B
D e aw re .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .211............ 31 3
Florida...~._......~.~...._.~..................... 206 118 30 130
Georgia~... ~.~.. .._..~..~._...................... 244 210 1 31 222
Id b .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 10 23 31 35
Illinois..... ..._..~.~...~._..~._.................. 780 717 151 1777
In i na .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 405 175 66 201
Iowa~~._._.._. ...................._~........................ 496 280 163 345
Kansas................................ ....................~. 456 150 80 186
Kentuc~ky..................................~~~_~~. 180 120 30 132
Louisiana~___..............................~.~_~~. 121 75 21 83
MaTine..,.__~.....,_..................~..................... 65 56 17 63
M aryland_ __.~._.~.._._._._~_~.................... 6 41 13 46e
Massachusetts__~. _~......~._..._.................. 188 63 70 95
M~ichigan_,- ___...~.._~~_~........................ 367 197 112 242
Minnesota~._~. ... _......... ........................... 481 375 198 45&
Mississippi......... ..._.._........... ........................ 145 ............~ 42 4S
Missouri......._.~....................................... 502 289 73 318
Mlontana...__,~............... ........................... 153 150 34 164
Nebraska.~___~.~. ~_.~.~..~....................... 405 235 85 260
Nevada~..~ __.._.._~_... .....................__... 26 20 14 26
New Hampshire.,.~..~~.~...~.~._................... 68 55 11 50
New Jersey,-_.~........................... ........~__... 2688 10B 44 126a~
New Mexico___.~..~._~_._.~........................ 71 30 11 8 4
N e Y r .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 600 130 173 100
North Carolina_........~.............. ........ _. ..... 204 104 20 112
Noth D koa ... ..... ...... .._.. ... ... .. 192 125 41 141
O hio_-...........................~...........~.... 450 160 800 184
Oklaboma.__-.. ~.....~.~....._.................... 3441 150 66 176
Oregon..__,, _,........ ~_.~._..................... 167 90 41 107
Pennsylvania.._._.~._.........................~ ~ 420 220 130 272
Rhode Island.................. ......_ ......-.~.-..... 30 17 71 20
Both Carolina..-..-........~........................ 11 ....... 3 8
South Dakota._~_~._... ~~.~._.. ~~.~................ .. 270 226 81 257
Tennessee~- _.~. ... ...~..~...~..~. .... .....~..... ......... 151 Ill 17 119
TexIas.-... ____~.~. ~~._.~........................ 797 405 60 6lB
Utab___._._._. .............................._......._.. 59 55 15 61
Vermont.-~._..~~-._......~.~................... .. 69 55 9 59
Virginla~.~.-_..............~.~...~.~.. ............._._..... 147 OB 261 10B
Washington.~~~.. ..._.......... ....................-..... 236 107 36 122
West Virginia.....-. ._.............................. ]34 106 411 122
Wisconsin~~._~~__.-.. .................__~~~.-~............ 870 100 116 206
Wyoming..... ..._. .............. ....... .._....... .. 66 43 261 5
District of Columbia. .-..~~~~~-~.. ~~............. .. ........ 14 I----- 1


I


11, 027


6, 665


4 569 I


7,720


Total..................................,.......










NUMrBER OF LOCALITIES IN Waren N\EWSPAPERS daR PUBLISHED)

Number of cities and towns in which newspapers are published:
New England States................---........................, 413
New York State _------ ........-,- .................. ..... 490
M iddle Atlantle States_-_-_------.. ....... ...... ....... ... 665
Southern States..... ... ..... ..... ..... ..... ... .. 11
Middle W western States........ ..... .. ........ ........ ..... 1 95011
Western States.....---,-_- --,--------------............... __ 3113
Pacific Coast States...................................... .,,, 942

Total---------------------------------- -,,--,--,----_- ___-- 9, 696
Number of metropolitan areas shown by United States Department of
Commerce under Industryv 510, Newspapers and Periodicals __ ___ 29
Number of cities and towns outside mejtropolitan areas in wirhich the
12,000 publisher-printer establishments covered by this code are located. 9, 667
Because the vasst majority of publisher-printers have local competition in
the form of the smaller job printer, and as similar information to the
above concerning these job printers is that they are located in at least
(smaller cities and towns)......,,, ,,,....,,,, ,... .............. 8, 000
Source: N. W. Ayer Directory and Unitedi States Department of Commerece.















































Digitized by the Inierniel Archive
1n 2011 Wilh iunidinig rom
University ofI Florida. George A. Smnathers Librac~les w~ilh support from LYRASIS and the Sloan Foundallon


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UIiVERSITY OF FLORIDA
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