Code of fair competition for the leather industry

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Material Information

Title:
Code of fair competition for the leather industry as revised on August 23, 1933 and as approved on September 7, 1933 by President Roosevelt
Portion of title:
Leather industry
Physical Description:
ix, 6 p. : ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Recovery Administration
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Leather industry and trade -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
At head of title: National Recovery Administration.
General Note:
Registry no. 930-1-01.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004940082
oclc - 31960900
System ID:
AA00006888:00001

Full Text




Registry No. 930--1--01


Somana by the Superltendent of Doeuments, Washington, D.C. Price_5 centa


NATIONAL RECOVERY AiDMINISTRATION




CODE OF FAIR COMPETITION



LE ATHER INDUSTRY


AS REVISED ON AUG UST 23, 1933
AND
AS APPROVED ON SEPTEMBER 7, 1933
BT
PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT


WE DO OUR PART


1. Executive Order of President Roosevelt
2. Report of Administrator
3. Report of Deputy Administrator
4. Text of Code


GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON :1933








































SUmbMITTED BY

TANN'ERS COUNCIL OF AMIERICA


















EXECUTIVE ORDER CODE OF FAIR COMIPETITION-
LEATHER INDUSTRY

SAn application having been duly made, pursuant to and in full
compliance with the prov~isions of Tirtle I of the National Industrial
Recovery Act, appl~roved June 16, 1933, for my appr~oval of a Code of
Fair Com pet ition for t he Leat her Indlust ry, and hea ri n gs having been
held thereon and thie Admrinistrator having rendered h~is report con-
taining an analysis of the saidl Code of Fair Competition together
with his recommleltndations andC finldings with respect ther~eto, and the
Administrator having found that the emid COde of Fair C:ompeti-
tion compliesi in all1 respects with thle pertinent provisions of Title I
ofi saidl Act and that the requirements of clauses (1) and (2) of sub-
section (a) of Section 3 of the said Alct have been met:
NOW\, THEREFORE, I, FRANK~LIN D. ROOSEVE~LT, TPrSident Of
the United States, pursuant to t~he authiority vested in me by Title I:
i~t of the NaTtional Inldustrial Recovery ALct, alpproved June 18, 1933, and
otherwise, do adopt andi approve thie report, recomllmendations, and
findings of the Adtminlistrato andc~ do order that the said Code of
Fair CompIetition be andl is hereby approvedd.

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELTC
Pres~ident.
Appr'oval Recommnenled :
HUGH S. JOHNSsON,
Adm11 jinstramtor.

THE T~HITE HOUSE,
~Septem12berl 7, 19JJ.:
10~22"-33 (III)













NATIONAL RECOV'ERY AZDMINISTRATION,
WFashingtonl D).C'., S'eptemler~ 7, 19.33.
The PRESIDENT
The Witel~f Howes, Wla~shingtion, D.C.
MrT~ D)EAR nlR. PRESIDrENT.: ThIs is a report of theP hearing on the
Code of Fair Comipetition for the Lenthier Indtustry in the United
States, condu~ctedl in Was~hingtonl on August 'L1, 10)33, in necor~dance
with the provisions of the National Indcustrial Recoveryr Act.
The following exhibits ar~e included and attached:
(1) Fiiinal Code submitted.
i(2) Notice of Hearing.
(3) Statistical Anlysis by Research anld Planning Division.
(4) Tralnscript of the r~ecord~s.
(5) List of W~itneesse.
PROVISIONS OF THIS CODE AS TO WAGES AND HOURS

ARTICLE I[V -WAES

1. Except as noted in Paragraph 4 of this Article, no employee
in the states of MS~ar~yland, West V irginia, Virginia, Kentuckly, Ten-
nessee, North Carolina, G7eorgia, Alab~ama, Alis~sissippi, Florida, Ar-
kansas, Louisia~na, Oklahomia, Texas, Newf 1lexico, or Arizona, shall
be paid less than 32%.C per hour. ElsewFhere in the United States
no female emp~loyee shanll be paid- less than 354 per hour, no muale
employee less than 40C per hlour. UTnikilledl labor receivinga in excess
of these m~inimumz rates shall not be reduced.
2. Thie foregoing mninimnum rates are niot a discrimination by rea-
son of sex but because of difference inl the worki of thle industry.
Where women. do the same kiind a7ndl amount of wor~k as mlen they
shall receive the same wages.
3. No employee earning less than 30 dollar's per week shall receive
lelss for 40 hours work than he w-as receivingb as of April 1, 1933, for
the estab~ilished work weeck at. that timne.
4. Exceptions to the above mninimnum rates~ are learners for a period
up to six weeks~ who shall receive not less than 80%; of the minimum;
anid employees dcisabledl by oldl age or other e~nues employed in the
plant; neither class to exceed in number 5r7 of thle pay roll.
5. This Article establishes a gruaraniteed minimnum rate of pay,
regardless of whether th~e employee is c~ompensanted on a time or
piecew-ork basis.
ARTICL, VTI-Ho:Rns

1L. No employer shall employ any person except as thereafter mnen-
tioned over 40 h~our~s average in any~ 20 w~eeksi' period, not over 40
hours in any week except by paymlenlt of 1!5 rate for overtime, nor
over 8 hours in. any day except byr paymllen t of 1%,~ for overtime.
(IV~)









2. From the provisions of paragrraph one the following classes
shall be excepted:
(a) W'atchmen, supervisory staff, executives, and salesmen.
(b) Mlaintenance workers, engineers, firemlen,, beltmakers, emner-
gepncyrv r\ice wonrkers, patent. lea~t~herP luggrers and sorters of whole
leather, who may not wor~k over 40 hours in any one week, except
by payment of 11,$ rate for overtime, nor overr 8 hours in any one
day' except by payment of 11/ rate for overtime.
(c) Office workers whose maximum working hours shall be ani
average of 40r hours a2 weck over a 26-week period.
3. Further exceptions as to h~our~s shall apply to any emnergency1
situation whichl may arise whereby the product of the employers may
be spoiled or desrtr~oyedl while in a perish~able condition, and in such
cases the employer shall be empowered to put such, product. through
his regular processes into a nonperishable condition, and for such
emergency, over~tune shall be paid as provided for the groups of
wTorkers diesignated in Paraggraphs 1 and 2 (b) of this Article.
4. There shall be no evasion of this Code by reclassification
of the function of workers. AL worker shall not be included in one
of the above exceptions unless the identical functions which he
performs were identically classified on June 16, 19;33.
5i. F~or the purpose of this section, the first 26 weeks' period for
each employee in the employment of ~anytt ul member o the industry at
t~he effective date hereof shall begin wt uhdt.Tefrt2
weeks' period for any employee hereafter employed shall begin withr
the date of employment with such employer.
6. The provisions for maximum hours set out in this section
establish a mn ximuml number of hours of labor per week for each
employee so that under no circumstances shall any employee know-
ingly be employed or permitted to work for one or more employers
in the industry in the aggregate in excess of the prescribed number of
hours.
ECONOMIC EFFECT OF TH[E CODE

The maximum work weekr set at 40 hours, ~with p~ractically no
exemptions, is eminently satisfactory in view of the number of per-
sons whose reemployment it will affect.. Over 80%0 of the work~lers
at current levels of operation will have their hours of labor shortened
by thlis provision, and total employment in the Industryr will rise
again to the 1929 peak levels, 52 000 employees in leather tanning
alone, without any further increase in business. If business expands,
as we expect it to, t~he emnploym"ent will soon exceed even the 1929
peak for the Industry. If w~e should go any further in shortening
the hours of work in this Industry, there would be considlera~ble
danger of creating severe shortages of suitable ty~pes of trained labor
in many plants, particularly those located in~ isolated rural com-
munities.
The wage provisions in the Leather Code are perhaps not ideal,
but they certainly effect the best possible compromise in view of the
existing differentials in the Industry and the ability of the Industry
to bear its share of the N.R.A. program of expanding purchasing
power.









Under the Code, in only two sections of the Industry will wages
be below th~e 19L'0 levels, and in these cases the difference is a matter
of less thlan 109~c, whlile thle increase in the Code levels over May,
June, 1933, ranges fromt 9~ t~o 6~2%1. It is estimated that the average
increase over early 1933 will be 30 or 35%" in hourly earnings, and
that; compared with 1929 the wages under the Code will deviate less
than 59., Since this sharp increase in wages will be accomplished
at no retdulctiojn in the nmunber employed, the increase in purchasing
powrer will amount to between 30) and 35%~ from M~ay, June, 1933,
as a base.
Thle N~orth-Siouth differential, although it is not as large as that
created in the Steel, Lumb~er, and Shipbuilding Codes, is greater than
the differential proposed in the Cotton Texitile Code, and a few others.
The 7%e~c dit~erential in t~he Leather Code is, in our opinion, the
smallest differential which could be imposed without running a grave
r~itk of closing down a substantial portion of southern tanneries and
forcing all southern tanneries to discharge their present negro labor
and substitute for it more competent labor (white) which is available
in their communities. We feel that a higher minimtun in the South
would wor~k a garae injury to the negro and we should like to
avoid it.
The female differential might well be reduced; in fact, the pro-
ponents of the C'ode do not object strenuously to eliminating it
entirely. However, it is a fact that the demand for women in the
Industry is of such a character that any reduction in differential
below be would throw several thousand women out of work, turning
over their jobs to literally a few score men who would take their
places with seasoning "' machines. Since this would tend to defeat
the purposes of the Administration, we do not feel it wise to reduce
the female differential below 50~.
In considering the Lenther Code, it must be remembered that all
the provisionis in it have been worked out as a coordinated organic
whole, and~ that any changes in any provisions will make necessary
read~ju.-tmentst ~ in thle other provisions in order noct to work grave
inljulr to indlividuals and sections of the Industryp. For example, any
clause pr~obibiting the reduction of total weekly earnings below the
total amount learned in a given week in the past might impose impos-
sibly heavy burdlens upon a few leather companies that were working
as long as 60i hours even during the depression. Ai modifying clause
of this nature would force either widespread evasion of th~e spirit of
the Aict by thet hiring of new employees to displace old workers, who,
by virtue of this pirov.ision were being paid 500 above the minimum
rate for common labor, or it would force the comipaniies involved to
close their tanneries and open up elsewhere.

FINDING1s

The Adlministrator finds that:
(ar) The Code as recommllended complies in all respects with the
pertinent provisions of Title I of the Act., including, without limita-
tion, subsection (a) of Section 7I and subsection (b) of Section 10
thereof ; and that







VII


(b) The applicant group imposes no inequiitable restrictions on ad-
nussion to membe~rship tler~ein and is t.r~uly representative of the
Leather Industry; and~ that.
(c) The Cod~e as reconunend~ed is not designed to promote monop-
olies or to eliminate or op~press small enterprises and will not operate
to discrimiinate against themn, and will tend to effectuate the policy
of Title I of the National Indlustr~ial Recovery Act.
It is recommnenledl, therefore, that this Code be immediately
adopted.
Respect fully submnittedl.
Honc S. JOHNSO)N, iidff ~~l'll/W89-fOr

NATIONAL RECOVERY ADMLINISTRATION,
Wash~;intoni, D.C,., Au gust 8, 19;33.
To: General HEGCH S~. JOHNSOCN, A(idlival;).l'lOPI
From : General C. C. W\ILLIAMSi
Subject: Repor~t on thle C'ode of ]Fair Completition for- the ]Leather
Industry.
This is a report of the hearingr on the Code of Fair Competition
for thle Leather Indu~stry of thle United States, conducted in Wash-
ington on the 21st of August 1933 in accordance with the provisions
of the National Recovery ALct.
The following exhibits are included and attached:
A. Reports submiitted by-
(1) Industrial Advisory Board.
(2)' Consumlers;' Advisory Board.
(3) Labor AdvisoryF Board.
(4) Legal Division.
(5) Research and Planning Division.*
B. The Code* as finally proposed, revised, and accepted by the
Leather Industryl.

PROVrISONS OF THIS CODE AS TO AG-~ES AND HooRs

ART. IV. 1. "' Except as noted in Paragraph. 4 of this Article, no
employee in the States of Ralarylandl, West Virginia, Virginia, Ken-
tucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, Geor~gia, Alab~nmn, M~ississippi,
Florida, Ark~ansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas, New M~exic~o, or
Arizona shall be paid less t~han 321/2& per hour. Elsewhere in the
United States no female emlploy~ee shall be paid less thann 35$ per
hour, no male emnployee less than 40$ per hour. Unskilled labor
receivingr in excess of these mninimumn rates shall not be reduced.
2. The foregoing miiinimum rates are not a discrimination by
reason of sex, but because of difference in the work of the industry.
WVhere womenl do the same kind and amount of work as mnen they
shall receive the samie wages.
"L 3. No employee earning less thian 30 dollars per week shall ~ec~eiveu
less for 40 hours' work than he waS receiving as of April 1, 1933! for
the established w~ork-w~eek at that tim~e.
This is included in the group of papers for submission to the President and is not
duplicated herein.







VIII


4. Exceptions to the above minimum rates are learners for a
period up~ to six weeks, who shall receive not less than SOS~o of t~he
mninimum;n anld emplloy'ees disabled b~y o~ld age or other causes em-
p~loyed in the plant.; neither class to exceed in number 570 of the
pay roll.
5. This Article establishes a guanranteed minimum rate of pay,
regardless of whether the employee is compensated on a time or
pieceworki basis.'"
ARr. VI."1L No emp~loyer shanll employ any per o~n except as here-
after mentioned over 40i hours n\verage in any L96 weeks period, not
over 40 hours in any week except by payments n of 113 rate for ov-er-
timne, nlor overI 8 hours in any day except by payment of 10~ rate for
overtime.
"L2. From the provisions of paragraph,~ one the following classes
shall be excepted:
"' (a) W~~atchmnen, srupervisory~ staff, executives, and salesmen.
"L (b) Ma~intenanlce w-orker~s, engineers, firemen, beltmlakers, emer-
gency service workers, potent-leather luggTers, and sorters of whole
leather, who may not work over 410 hours in any one week, except
by payment of 11/3 rate for overtime. nor over 8 hours in any one
day except by payment of 11/3 rate for overtime.
"" (c) Office workers whose mlaximuml working hours shall be an
average of 40 hours a w~eek over a 26-week period.
"3. Further exceptions as to hours shiall apply to any emergency
situation which may arise whlereby the product of the employer may
be spoiled or destroyed while in a perishable condition, and in such
cases the emlployer shall be empowered to put such product through
his regular pjrocesses into a no~nper~ishable condition, and for such
emergency overtime shall be panid as provided for the groups of
workers designated in Paragraphs 1 and 2 (b) of this Article.
"C 4. There shall be no evasion of this Code by reclassification of
the function of workers. A, workler shall not be includled in one of
the above exceptions unless thle identical function which he per-
formes were identically classified on June 16, 1933.
5. For thle purpose of this section, thr first. P6 weeks period
for each employee in the emlploymlent of anly member of the industry
at the! effectiv-e date hereovf shall begin w~ith~ such date. The first 26
weeks period for any employee hereafter emiployred shall begn with
the dlate of e~mplolymlent with such employer.
"" 6i. The provisions for maximumn hours set out in this section estab-
lish. a maximum number of hours of labor per week for each em-
ployee so that under no circumstances shall anly employee knowingly
be employed or permitted to work for one or more employers in the
industry in the aggregate in excess of the prescribed number of
'hou rs."
FINDINGS

The Deputy Administrator finds that:
(a) The Code as recommended complies in all respects with the
pertinent provris ions of T'itle I of the Act, including. without limita-
ton, subsection. (a) of Section 7 and subsection (b) of Section 10
thereof ; and that







II

(b) he aplicnt roupn imnpoes no inequitable restrictions on
ad mission to membllershipl theremn and is truly retprese~ntative of the
Leather Indulstry!; andl that
(c) The Cod~e as reconllunended is not designed to promote monop-
olies or to eliminated or opp~r~ess small enterprises anld will not oper-
ate t.o dlisicriminate against. them, and will tend~ to eff'ectuate the
policy of Title I of the National Indlustr~ial Recovery Act.
From evidence addl~uedl tur~ing this hearing and fr ~nn recommend-
ations and reports of the varioicus Adr~visory 1Boards it is believed that;
this Code as niowr prloposed and revised r~epresienlt an eff~ective, prac-
tical, equitable solution for thiis ind-ustry3 and its approval as here-
with submittedl is r~ec~ollmmended.c
Respect fully sulbmli tted-.
C. C. WVILLIAMs. 87elfy ~nillmbl8/TG/Of















































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CODE OF FAR COMLPETITTION FOR THE LEATHER
IN DU STRY

~AnTICLE I--FURPOSE]

For the purpose of effec~tuat~ingg the policy of Title I of the
National Indust~rial Recovery Act, the following provisions are estab-
lished as a code of fair competition for thte leather industry.

ArntcLE II--DIEFINIIONS

The term "L leather industry "' shall be held to comprise all persons
engaged in tann~inga or finishing leather, for fur~th~er fabrication or
for sale, for their owFCn account or for the account of others, or per-
formingr any operation subsidiary thereto, or having leather tanned
or finishled in Amner~ienn factories, or engaged in the sale of Aimeri-
can tanned or finishled leather for their own account or for the
account of others, and~ persons, approved by the N-ational Recov-ery
Adm~inisitration, engaged in the cut~ting or further partial fabrication
of leather.
The term "L employer as used herein shall mean any member of
the indust ry.
The terlm employee as used herein shall mean any person
emnployed in any phase of the industry.
The term effective date as used herein is defined to be the
second M~onday after t~he appr~oval by thne President., this period
b~einga necessary to protect perishable products in process.
Trhe ter~m "' persons shall ilc~ludle natural persons, partnerships,
associations, trusts, and corporations.

ARBTICLE 111---APPLICA9TIOlV

All members of the industryr shall comzply withl the provisions of
this codle and are eligible for membership inl the Tanne~rs' Council of
America, and/or any divPisional trade association now existing or
which may be organized wliith the approval of the. National Recovery
Administration for any branch of the leather industry for the p~ur-
p~ose of admlinistering this code. Such organization or organizations
have not and2 shall not set up inequitable restrictions as to maember-
ship and shall be truly representative.
ARTICLE 17- AGES

1. Except as noed in Paragraph 4 of this Airticle, no employee
in thle States of Maryland, WTest Virginia, Virginia, Kentucky, Ten-
nlessee, North Carolina, GeorgSin, A~labama, M~lississippi, Florida,
Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahloma, Texas, New Miexico, or Arizona









shall be paid less than 321,6 per hour. Elsewhere in the United
States no female employee shall be paid less than 354 per hour, no
maale emnployvee less than 40e per hour. Unskilled: labor receiving
in excess of these minimum rates shall not be reduced.
2. The foregoing miinimum rates are not a discrimination by
reason of sex but because of difference in the work of the industry.
illere women do the same kind and amount of workt as men they
shall receive the same wages.
3. N~o employee earning less than 30 dollars per week shall re-
ceive less for 40 hours work than he wras receiving as of April 1,
1933, for thle established work week at that tim~e.
4. Exceptions to the above minimzum~ rates are learners for a
period up t.o six weeks who shall receive not less than 80%~1 of
the minimum; and employees disabled by oldl Age or other causes
emiployedl in the plant; neither class to exceed in number 5% of
the pay roll.
5. This Article establishes a gulnranteed miinimum rate of pay
regardless of whether the employee is compensated on a time or
pieceworki basis.
ARTICLE V--CHEI~LD LABOR

On and after thre effective date emnployers in the Leather Industry
sh~all not employ or retain any mmnor under the age of sixteen years,
provided however, that where a StaRte law provides a higher mlini-
mum age, no person below the a~ge Lspecified byv such State law shall
be employed by the Tr~ade or Industry within that State.
ARTICLE VI-Hars
1. Nio employer shall employ any person except. as thereafter men-
tioned over 40 hours average inr any 26 weeks' period, not over 40
hours in any week; except by payment of 1! rate for overtime, nor
over 8 hours in any day except by paym~ent of' 113 rate for overtime.
2. Firomn the provisions of para~graph one thle following classes shall
be excepted:
((a)1 Watchmien, supernisory staff, executives. and salesmen.
(b) Maintenance workers, engineers, .firemnen, beltmakers, emer-
grency serniee workers, patent leather luggrer~s and sor~ters of whole
leather, who may not work overr 40 hours mn any one werek, except, by
payment of 11/3 rate for overtime, nor over 8i hours mn any. one day
except by payment of 11/3 rate for overtime.
(c) Office wvorkrers whose maxsimumn working hours shall be an aver-
age of 40 hours a w-eek; over a 16-week; period.
3. Further exceptions as to hours shall ap~ply to any emergency
sit uation which may arise whereby thte product of the employer may
be spo~iledl or destroyed hei a perishbecniin n nsc
cases the emlployer shall be emnpowered to put such product through
h~is regular priocess inito a nonperishable condition, and for such
emergency overtime shall be paid as provided for the grroups of
workers dlesignated in Paragraphs 1 and 2 (b) of this Article.
4. Ther~e shall be no evasion of this Code by reclassification of the
functions of work~ers. A worker shall not be' included in one of the









above exceptions unless the identical functions which he performs
were identically classified on Junie 16, 1933.
5. For the purpose of this section, thle first 26 weeks' period for
each employee in thle employment of any member of the industry at
thle effective date her~eof shlall begin wCithl such date. The first 26i
weeks' period for any employee h~lerefter emiployed shall begin with
thle dlate of emplloymlent with such employer.
6. The provisiionls for' max3imumlll hoturs set oult in this section estab-
lish a maxrimum numbe~rtr of hourls of labor per week for each emn-
ployee so that under no circumstances shall any employee knowfingly
be employed or perm~ittedl to ior~k for one or mor~e emlployers in the
industry in the aggr~egat~e in excess of the pr~escr~ibed number of
hou rs.

AlRTICLE VII STATISTICS
The leather indurstry~ through the Tanners' Co~uncil of Amnerica,
N'o. 41 Par~k Row, New Yor~k, N.Y. shall collect and compile all
reports r~equir~edl by thle National srIndstia Recovery Act. Everyv
member of the indlustry shall furnish such reports as are required
pursuant to the provisions thereof.
AIRrICLE VCIIII-STBTrTonY PKovIsions

All employers in t~he industry shall comply with the following
provisions of thle National Indlustrial Recovery A-ct:
1. That employees shall have the righlt to organize and bargain
collectively through representatives of their own choosing, and shall
be free from thle interference, restraint, or coercioni of employers of
labor, or their agents, in the designation of such representatives, or in
self-orgaaniz~t~ion, or in others concerted activities for the purpose of
collective bargaining or other mutual aid or protection;
2. That no employee and no one seeking employment shall be re-
quired as a condition of employment to join any company union, or
to refrain from joining, organizing, or ass~isting a labor organization
of his own choosing; and
3. That employers shall comply with the masximium hours of labor;
minimum rates of pay, and other conditions of employment approvred
or prescribed by the President.
ARTICLE IXY-PRICE ACSDJUISTHE1 08

WThere the costs of executing contracts entered into by the Leather
Industry are increased by the application of the provisions of the
code it is equitable and promotive of the pSt~urpoeit of t uhe Naonal
Industrial Recovery Act that appropriate ajsmnso uhcn
tracts to reflect such increased costs be arrived at by mutual agree-
ment, arbitral proceedings, or otherwise.
ARTICLE XY-PLANNING COMM~ITTEES

For the purpose of carry~ing into effect the policies set forth in
the National Industr~ial Recovery Act, the Board of Directors of









the T"anners' Council of America from time to time, subject to the
approval of the National Recovery Administration, shall classify
all members of the industry into divisions, each of which shall be
trulyr representative of it~s branch of the leather industry. One rep-
resentative from each division shall be elected, according to its own
rules, to a General Planning Comimittee, which shall constitute the
coordiinating agrency for the divisions of the Industry.
The Greneral Planning Commit~tee so organized is hereby con-
stituted the agency for cooperating with the Admiinistration or the
Administrator as an adminis~crt~ratve p-lanning, and fair-practice
agency for the Leather Industry. Such agency may from time to
timne present. to the Administrator recommendations based on con-
ditions in the indlusitry as they may develop, which will tend to ef-
fecluate the operations of the provisions of this code and the policy
of the National Industrial Recoveryr Act.. The President may
appoirnnt. three membersP for the Ge~neral Plainning Commnittee, who
shall not be: entitled to vote. The Chairman of the Board of
Directors of the Tanners' Council of A~merica shall preside over this
Committee without vote.
NIo decisions of the General Planning Comimittee shall be binding
unless concurred in by two thirds of the members thereof entitled to
vote, and~ by renpesentative9 of divisions employing two thirds of
the total emnployees of thle industry as recorded by~ the Tanners'
Council of America for the last six months for which figures are
available.
Each division of the leather industry shall elect its own separate
and dis-tinct Divisional Planning Commn~ittee, and ea ch such
Divisional Planning Commnittee shall present in writing recommen-
dation or rec~ommlendantions to eeiry member of the Greneral Plan-
ning Comimittee twenty days before such recommendation or recom-
mnendlations become effective. If the G~eneral Planningr Committee
fail to dicapp~rove of such recommendation or recommendations, they
shall be deemedl approved. If th~e General Planning Comm~ittee dis-
a~pprove th~ere~of, then andl in that event the Divisional Planning Com-
mittee shanll be entitledl to present its recommendation or reconunen-
dutions to the Admclninistrator~ for his approval. Such division may
of its own election enrry out the recommendation or recommiendations
of its planning commiiittee, all to thie end that each division shall be
indlepenlennt andc setlf-,rovetrningr in all problems relating exclusively
to sulch divisionl. Rcommnendatinsin puit inlto effect under this para-
graph~l andl th~e opieration thereof shall be subject to the approval of
the Adm1li nistrIa t or.

ARTICLES~ 11-1MPORTATIONS

In accordal~n-ce withl Sec~tion 3 of t~he Nat~ional Industrial Recovery
A4ct, the Lentherl Inlust ry through the General Planning Comimittee,
in dune cour~ise and~ from-I1 timne to time as ocension may arise, may sub-
mit com1pla~ints to ther President of thec United Stat~es with reference
to impllortaltions of leather in competition with the domestic product,
for such steps undecr the National Industrial Recovery A4ct to be
taken by the Admninistration,, and in order that such importations
may not defeat the purposes of the National Industrial Recovery









Act and the provisions of thlis code in the furtherance thereof. The
General Planning Comnmittee, w~hen any Divisional Planningn Com-
mittee may have ask~ed for action under Section 3 of the Act referred
to, shall followv the rules agreed to in this code.
~AnrcLE EI~--11NOPOLIES

No provision in this Code shasll be interpreted or applied in such
a manner as to: (1) Promote monopolies; (2) Permit or encourage
unfair completition;l (3) Eliminate, olppress, or discrimma~te against
smazll e~nter1pr~ises

ARTICLE XIII- -TESIGN8

No miembl:er of the indlustry shall imitate or simulate within one
yvear fr~omu date of r~egistr~ationl, any new emblossed or decorativec de-
sign or panttern1 or~iginatedt by any other member of the ind~ustry and
regristerred with the Tannlers' Council of America, or its designated
ag5ency.
ARTICLE SI`V--7CRADE TERMSB

All invoices covrcing~r domestic sales in the Leather Ind~ustry shall
be due and~ payauble in 30 day~s. At seller's option payment m~ay be
made on thle 15th day of any calendar month f-or all invoice~s of the
precedling calendar month. No datings shall be allowed. Discount
shall be for ensh payment only and shall not exceed BR~. All bills
are net. afterl 30! day~s andZ interest shall be added at the rate of 6
percent per annumu after due dlate.
Forwanrd ordlers shall b~e booked only after purchaser has signed
a uniformn sales contract app~roved by the Gxeneral Plannling Com-
mittee subject to approval of the Aidministrator..

AlRTICLE S \--AMIENDMIENTS? '1\0DIFICATIONS, TEH IIRMINTIO.N S, AND
Vortlno

This Code and all the provisions thereof are expr~essly made sub-
ject to the right of the Presidlent, in accordaln ce with the provisions
of the National Industrial Rec-overy ~ALctto cancel or modt-'ify any
order, approval, license, r~ule, or regu~lations~ issuedi pursuant to the
pr~ov-iions of said act, andr specifically to the right of the President
to modify his approval of this cod~e or any conditions imposed by
himi upon his approval thereo~f.
Such of the provisions of this code as are not rIequir~ed to be
includled therein by the N'ationni Incdustrial Recovery; Act may with
the approval of the President, if the appr~ovul of the Presid~nt, is
required, be mnodified or elimlinatedl as changes in cir~cumstatnces or
experience mayr indicate by a three-fourths vote of the mermbers of
theo Leather Indusltry at a? meeting to be called upon ten. days'j notice
by the Tanners' Council of Amlerica. Voting shall be~ on the basis
t:of the average number of employees during the previous six months
as shown byv the records of the Tanners' Council of Amerzlica. Vot-
Sing may be by proxy.




UNrIVERSITY OjF F LORIDA

3 1262 08851 7676


It is contemplated that fromt time to time supplementary provi
sions to this c~ode or additional codes will be submitted for the ap-
proval of the President to prevent unfair competition in prices and
other unfair and destructive competitive practices andi to effectuate
the other~ purposes and policies of Title I of the National Industrial
Recovery Act consistent with the provisions hereof.
This Code shall continue in effect for the period provided in
thie National Industrial Recovery Act, unless sooner terminated in
accordance with the law in such case made and provided.

O r