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PCANAL DLOC



Panama and Suez Canals
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00006076/00001
 Material Information
Title: Panama and Suez Canals general comparative statistics
Portion of title: General comparative statistics Panama and Suez Canals
Physical Description: 24 p. : ill., maps ; 21 x 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Panama Canal Company -- Office of the Comptroller. -- Budget and Rates Division
Publisher: Panama Canal Company
Place of Publication: Canal Zone
Publication Date: 1971
Edition: Rev.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Panama Canal (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Suez Canal (Egypt)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Summary: This booklet presents general information and statistics comparing the Panama Canal with the Suez Canal. Although the Suez Canal has been closed since June 6, 1967, this waterway is frequently compared to the Panama Canal. The two canals differ significantly. The Suez is a sea-level canal in an arid region where blowing sand is an operational problem. Panama is a lock-type canal through a humid, mountainous rain forest. Suez was realized by private enterprise, while the Panama Canal was a United States accomplishment. All data in this report are based on the best sources of information available, and are considered reasonably accurate.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 24).
Statement of Responsibility: prepared by the Panama Canal Company, Office of the Comptroller, Budget and Rates Division.
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: "June 1, 1971 (Second Revision)"--P. 24.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 723158170
ocn723158170
sobekcm - AA00006076_00001
Classification: lcc - F1569.C2 P36 1971
System ID: AA00006076:00001

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Foreword
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Main
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text









D1 SUEZ [AIIALS


/


-S.


,. '- "',:,,,^ ... ....


















Gift ofthe Panama Canal Museuw












F ORE WQ RD


This booklet presents general information and statistics comparing the Panama Canal
with the Suez Canal. Although the Suez Canal has been closed since June 6, 1967, this
waterway is frequently compared to the Panama Canal. The closure has had a dramatic
impact on world shipping, particularly with the construction of huge supertankers of
200,000 tons and over. These tankers were developed to meet shipping needs and may have
an additional impact on the economic feasibility of a reopened Suez Canal, since petroleum
has been this canal's dominant commodity movement, as compared to general cargo transited
through the Panama Canal. The two canals differ significantly. Suez is a sea-level canal
in an arid region where blowing sand is an operational problem. Panama is a lock-type
canal through a humid, mountainous rain forest. Suez was realized by private enterprise,
while the Panama Canal was a United States Government accomplishment.

A basic difference is that the Panama Canal is open to vessels of all nations.
Conversely, the Suez Canal has excluded Israeli ships from transit from the time the canal
was nationalized by the United Arab Republic in 1956 until closure, despite free passage
guarantees. Panama Canal tolls have not been raised. Suez Canal Company policy was to
reduce tolls as often as possible. Tolls had been cut 27 times until nationalization.
There were periodic tolls increases after Egypt got control of the canal, with the most
recent increase effective July 1, 1966.

All data are based on the best sources of information available, and are considered
reasonably accurate.




















Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2011 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries with support from LYRASIS and the Sloan Foundation


http://www.archive.org/details/panamasuezcanals00pana




TABLE OF CONTENTS


PAGE

COMPARATIVE DATA 4

SIGNIFICANT HISTORICAL DATES 6

MAPS AND PROFILES 8

ANNUAL TRANSITS CHART 10

ANNUAL TONNAGE CHART 11

ANNUAL CARGO TRAFFIC CHART 12

ANNUAL CARGO (LESS PETROLEUM) CHART 13

ANNUAL TOLLS RECEIPTS CHART 14

MONTHLY RAINFALL CHART 15

TRANSITS BY FLAG 16

CARGO DISTRIBUTION 17

COMPARATIVE OPERATIONAL STATISTICS 18

AVERAGE TOLLS PER TRANSIT 22

AVERAGE TOLLS PER MEASUREMENT TON 23

SOURCE REFERENCE 24









1. Constructed by


Financed by

Date opened to traffic

Type


5. Length from deep water i
water

6. Average transit time fr
water to deep water

7. Width of channel (from
to widest point


8. Minimum depth

9. Maximum permissible shij

10. Average transit time fr
ning lockage to ending

11. Average number of trans:
24 hour period

12. Original Construction C(

13. Annual transits

14. Annual tonnage

15. Annual tolls receipts


PANAMA CANAL SUEZ CANAL COMPARATIVE DATA

PANAMA CANAL

United States Government


United States Government

August 15, 1914

Lock type-raising ships in three steps
to fresh water lake normally 85 feet
above sea level. Lock chambers are
1,000 feet long.

to deep
51 miles

om deep
9.6 hours (In FY 1970)

narrowest Locks 110 feet
Gaillard Cut 500 feet
Gatun Lake 500 feet 1,000 feet

42 feet

ps draft 37 feet 40 feet


om begin-
lockage

its per


costs


7.6 hours (In FY 1970)


41 (June 1970)

387 million dollars

(See Chart on Page 10)

(See Chart on Page 11)

(See Chart on Page 14)


SUEZ CANAL

Suez Maritime Canal Universal Co.
(concession held by Count de Lesseps)

Public Subscription

November 17, 1869

Lockless or sea level





105 miles


15 hours

197 to 500 feet



46 feet

38 feet


56 (December 1966)

84 million dollars

(See Chart on Page 10)

(See Chart on Page 11)

(See Chart on Page 14)


(1)When Gatun Lake is at 85 feet 87 feet level, and subject to vessel characteristics.




PANAMA


16. Tolls rate-per ton
300 tons and over
Laden
Ballast
Under 300 tons
Laden
Ballast
Warships, Dredges, etc.


17. Number of Employees
Pilots
All Other


$.90
.72
Panama Canal net measurement ton
.90
.72
.50 Displacement ton


14,870 (June 30, 1970)


$1.0059
.4585
Suez net measurement ton*
Free

$1.0059 Measurement tork


240
13,000 (December 31, 1966)


*Excludes improvement dues.


TYPICAL TOLLS REVENUE PER SHIP: 1966 RATES


PANAMA TOLLS
Laden Ballast


18. Passenger
ARCADIA BRITISH
Suez tons
PC tons
Variation (Suez tons to PC tons)
Tanker
LIBERTY BELL LIBERIAN
Suez tons
PC tons
Variation (Suez tons to PC tons)
General Cargo
ASHLEY LYKES U.S.A.
Suez tons
PC tons
Variation (Suez tons to PC tons)
Ore Carrier
ORE MERIDIAN LIBERIAN
Suez tons
PC tons
Variation (Suez tons to PC tons)


Note: Variances are due to measurement systems.


23,503
18,657
+ 4,846


19,677
18,006
+ 1,671


7,623
7,328
+ 295


27,435
12,044
+ 15,391


$16,791 $13,433




$16,205 $12,964




$ 6,595 $ 5,276




$10,840 $ 8,672


SUEZ TOLLS
Laden Ballast



$23,642 $10,776




$19,793 $ 9,022




$ 7,668 $ 3,495




$27,597 $12,579


VARIATION
(SUEZ TO PANAMA)
Laden Ballast



$ 6,851 $(2,657)




$ 3,588 $(3,942)




$ 1,073 $(1,781)




$16,757 $ 3,907


SUEZ





SIGNIFICANT HISTORICAL DATES


PANAMA

1501 The Isthmus of Panama was discovered by Rodrigo de Bastidas.


1513 In September, Vasco Nunez de Balboa made a tortuous journey
across Darien and discovered the Pacific Ocean.


1530 Las Cruces trail was constructed across the Isthmus from Fort
San Lorenzo, at the mouth of the Chagres River, to Panama Viejo.


1534 Charles V of Spain directed that a survey be made for a ship
canal between the Chagres River and the Pacific Ocean.


1850 Construction of the Panama Railroad was begun in May.


1855 The first transcontinental train ran from Colon to Panama in
5 hours on January 28.


1876 A concession to construct a Panama Canal was granted by
Colombia to Anthony de Gorgorza, an American citizen.


1878 A revised concession was granted by Colombia to Lt. Lucien N.
B. Wise, representative of a French company, for the construction
of a Panama Canal.


1880 Construction of the canal was started January 10 by Count de
Lesseps in the Gaillard Cut area, in advance of the organization of
the French company, Compagnie Universelle de Canal Interoceanigue.


1889 The French company suspended work, following the excavation of
some 67 million cubic yards of earth and rock. The collapse of the
project was fundamentally due to insistence on a sea level design.
A successor, Compagnie Nouvelle, attempted to complete the canal
from 1889 until 1904. This firm engaged in preservation and exca-
vated some additional 11 million cubic yards. About 30 million
cubic yards were usable for construction of the present canal.


1899 President McKinley approved an Act to appoint a commission to
study construction of a Panama Canal.


SUEZ

1800-1200 B.C. Pharaohs dig a canal linking Mediter-
ranean to Red Sea via the Nile River. Canal reopened by
Darius circa 500 B.C. Later reconditioned by Ptolemies
and improved by the Romans who name it River of Trajan.



641 A.D. Canal redug by Caliph Omar, used until 776 when
the Turks finally close it as a blockading measure
against the revolted cities of Mecca and Medina.


1498 Vasco da Gama discovers route around Cape of Good
Hope.


1798 Napoleon Bonaparte has Isthmus surveyed by his
engineers during Egyptian campaign.


1805 Birth of Ferdinand de Lesseps November 19.



1832-1837 de Lesseps, French Consul in Egypt, studies
means of constructing a canal.


1854-1869 Negotiations between de Lesseps and Viceroy
Mohammed Said lead to signing of First Act of Concession
for the building and operation of direct waterway.
Second Act signed 1856. Suez Canal Company formed 1858.
Work begun on Suez Canal 1859, terminated 1869. Canal
inaugurated November 17, 1869.


1875 Purchase by Disraeli of Egypt's 44% holding of the
Company's stock, turning Great Britain into largest but
not controlling stockholder.



1888 Constantinople Convention confirms international
status of the Canal.




PANAMA

1902 The Spooner Act authorized the President to purchase all pro-
perty of the Compagnie Nouvelle and to acquire, by treaty with
Colombia, perpetual control of a strip of land across Panama for
the purpose of constructing, operating and maintaining a canal
connecting the Caribbean Sea and the Pacific Ocean. If either or
both of these acquisitions proved impossible within a reasonable
time, the President was authorized to acquire by treaty with Costa
Rica and Nicaragua perpetual control of all territories within
those countries necessary to construct and operate a canal through
the "Nicaragua route." The Isthmian Canal Commission, also created
by the Act, was charged with responsibility for the actual construc-
tion of the canal through whichever route was adopted.

1903 The Hay-Herran Treaty was signed in Washington between the
United States and Colombia concerning the construction of a
Panama Canal.

The State of Panama revolted from Colombia on November 3 and
was recognized by the United States on November 6.

A treaty between Panama and the United States (the Hay, Bunau-
Varilla Treaty) was signed on November 18, granting the United
States in perpetuity, the use, occupation and control of a zone of
land and land under water for the construction, maintenance, opera-
tion, sanitation and protection of a ship canal across the Isthmus
of Panama.

1904-1914 Construction period following transfer of property to the
U. S. on May 4, 1904, at a cost of $40 million.

1914 The Panama Railroad, twin-screw steamer, ANCON, made the first
passage on August 15.

1956 A significant milestone in the history of the waterway
occurred on December 12, when the one billionth ton of cargo
transited on the steamship EDWARD LUCKENBACH.

1962 The high level Thatcher Ferry Bridge was built by the United
States at a cost of some $20 million dollars. The bridge spans the
Pacific end of the canal and unites the Americas.

1970 The widening of Gaillard Cut, a vital 8.5 mile channel,
from 300 to 500 feet was completed in August.


SUEZ


1956 The Canal was nationalized by the Egyptian
Government on July 26.


1959 The World Bank granted a loan of $56.5 million to
deepen, widen, and generally improve the Canal and Port
Said Harbor. The 6% interest loan has a 15 year life.


1967 The Canal was closed on June 6 when Israeli troops
occupied the east bank of the Canal during the six-day
war. The Canal was blocked by Egypt and made unusable.


















NORTH ENTRANCE
SOUTH ENTRANCE


PANAMA
LATITUDE LONGITUDE
9* 23'N 790 55'W


8" 53' N


79 31' W


SUEZ
LATITUDE LONGITUDE
310 16'N 320 19'E
29 55'N 32 32'E


MAPS AND PROFILES




GEOGRAPHICAL DATA


I Baoh Bypass


THE PANAMA CANAL


P T


Fresh
Water
Canal


Great
Bitter
Lake


Lake


TAUFIQ


RED SEA
SUEZ CANAL


_ - .. ,,.

o" 7- -1.,
-~ i,,-- $ ~ 5 C-I, r

-- -aoa








ELEV. 540' HI GHEST POINT
ON GOLD HILL
II
II
II


(FEET)
600'



500'



400'



300'



200'



100'



0"



-100,


CUBIC YARDS OF

EARTH & ROCK

EXCAVATED
(PRIOR TO OPENING)

PANAMA 248 millions


ATLANTIC v u P U PACIFIC
OCEAN / \ OCEAN
PANAMA CANAL \
0 5 10 i5 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 (MILES)


EL 4U18R
62.
EL FERDANE j
31'


CHALET DU
VICE ROI
A 67',


SERAPEUM
RIDGE 33 EL SHALLUFA 29'


BITTER LAKE


CLEAR BOTTOM TO ELEV.-46'

SUEZ CANAL


RED SEA


0I I 3 4 I I 9 1 I
0 t0 20 30 40 50 60 70 sO 90 100 (MILES)


ELEVATION 390' HIGHEST POINT
ON CONTRACTORS HILL


SUEZ


(FEET)


97 millions


-100'







PANAMA CANAL SUEZ CANAL


SHIPS
IN
THOUSANDS
22


20


i1-
1C-

Is-


14-


12-


10


8-


6 -



4


2


0 1
1870


ANNUAL TRANSIT
SINCE OPENING DATES


1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950


1880


1960


1970










TRANSIT
TONS
IN MILLIONS
280


260


240


220


200

180


160


140


120


I 00 -


80


60


40-


20


0 .


PANAMA CANAL- SUEZ CANAL

ANNUAL NET TONNAGE
SINCE OPENING DATES


1870 1880 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960


1970









PANAMA CANAL- SUEZ CANAL

ANNUAL CARGO TRAFFIC
CARGO
TONS
IN MILLIONS
250



225



200
SUEZ
------PANAMA
175



1 5 0 .... ..
NOTE: CERTAIN WAR YEARS AND EARLIER
PANAMA CANAL FIGURES ARE
UNAVAILABLE
125



100 -



75



50


25 ---- -----WA--R YEARS-
5 0----2S .------------------ j -----


1935 1940 1945 1950


1920 1925 1930


1965 1970


1955


1960












CARGO
TONS
INMILLIONS
100-



90 -



o -



70-



60-


50-



40-



30 -



20 -
--o


10




1920


PANAMA CANAL- SUEZ CANAL

ANNUAL CARGO TRAFFIC
LESS PETROLEUM PRODUCTS


1935 1940 1945 1950 1955


1960 1965


1970


1925 1930










RECEIPTS
IN
MILLIONS
$280

260 -

240

220


200-

180 -

160-


140

120

I00-

80 -

60 -

40-

20-


1870
1870


PANAMA CANAL" SUEZ CANAL

ANNUAL TOLLS RECEIPTS
SINCE OPENING DATES


1900 1910 1920 1930


1880 1890


1940 1950 1960 1970





PANAMA CANAL- SUEZ CANAL

AVERAGE MONTHLY RAINFALL


MAY


RAII
IN
INCHE
25






20






15






10






5






0


JUN


JUL


AUG


SEP


NOV


DEC


THE SUEZ CANAL IS LOCATED ON A DESERT PLAIN AND HAS MINIMAL MONTHLY RAINFALL,
CONTRASTED TO THE TROPICAL LOCATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL.
AVERAGE ANNUAL RAILFALL IS:


SUEZ CANAL
PANAMiA CANAL ATLANTIC SIDE
PANAMA CANAL PACIFIC SIDE


9.8 INCHES
130 INCHES
70 INCHES


S


ATLANTIC SIDE- PANAMA CANAL










PACIFIC SIDE- PANAMA CAN AL


JAN


FEB


MAR


APR




TRANSIT BY FLAG


(RELATED TO TRANSITING NET TONNAGE)


SUEZ 1966
Flag


PANAMA 1970
Flag %


LIBERIAN

BRITISH

NORWEGIAN

U. S.A.

JAPANESE

GERMAN

GREEK

PANAMANIAN

SWEDISH

DUTCH

DANISH

ITALIAN

FRENCH

OTHER


17. 1

12.4

12.2

11.0

9.3

5.9

4.8

3.9

3.4

2.9

2.4

1.8

1.2

11.7

100.0


LIBERIAN

BRITISH

NORWEGIAN

FRENCH

ITALIAN

GREEK

RUSSIAN

DUTCH

SWEDISH

GERMAN

PANAMANIAN

DANISH


U.S.A.

OTHER


20.6

16.6

16.0

6.0

5.6

4.6

3.7


3.3

3.0

2.9

2.8

2.5

2.4

10.0

100.0





CARGO DISTRIBUTION


PANAMA 1970


Cargo


SUEZ 1966


Tons
(In Thousands)


Cargo


Tons
(In Thousands)


COAL AND COKE --------------

PETROLEUM AND PRODUCTS-----

IRON AND STEEL PRODUCTS ----

CORN -----------------------

LUMBER AND PRODUCTS --------

IRON ORE -------------------

SUGAR ----------------------

SCRAP METAL ----------------

PHOSPHATES -----------------

SOYBEANS -------------------

OTHER ----------------------


21,331

17,635

8,112

5,032

4,736

4,214

4,207

3,945

3,740

3,292

42,665

118,909


17.9

14.8

6.8

4.2

4.0

3.6

3.6

3.3

3.1

2.8

35.9

100.0


PETROLEUM AND PRODUCTS ----

IRON AND STEEL PRODUCTS ---

CEREALS -------------------

FERTILIZER ----------------

FABRICATED METALS ---------

CEMENT --------------------

LUMBER AND PRODUCTS -------

COAL AND COKE -------------

SALT ----------------------

RAILWAY STOCK -------------

OTHER ---------------------


175,671

11,505

9,738

6,748

5,015

1,407

675

605

412

104

30,013

241,893


72.6

4.8

4.0

2.8

2.1





1.3





12.4

100.0




COMPARATIVE OPERATIONAL STATISTICS


PANAMA CANAL
FISCAL YEARS
Number


Ships
Transit-
ing


Net
Tonnage


Gross Revenue
From Tolls


1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888
1889
1890
1891
1892
1893
1894
1895
1896
1897
1898
1899
1900
1901
1902
1903


SUEZ CANAL
CALENDAR YEARS
Number


of
Ships
Transit-
ing


486
765
1,082
1,173
1,264
1,494
1,457
1,663
1,593
1,477
2,026
2,727
3,198
3,307
3,284
3,624
3,100
3,137
3,440
3,425
3,389
4,207
3,559
3,341
3,352
3,434
3,409
2,986
3,503
3,607
3,441
3,699
3,708
3,761


Net
Tonna ge


436,609
761,467
1,160,743
1,367,767
1,631,650
2,009,984
2,096,771
2,355,447
2,269,678
2,263,332
3,057,421
4,136,779
5,074,808
5,775,861
5,871,500
6,335,752
5,767,655
5,903,024
6,640,834
6,783,187
6,890,094
8,698,777
7,712,029
7,659,060
8,039,175
8,448,383
8,560,284
7,899,374
9,238,603
9,895,630
9,738,152
10,823,840
11,248,413
11,907,288


Year


Gross Revenue
From Tolls

$ 1,000,909
1,735,790
3,117,442
4,350,390
4,723,282
5,488,397
5,695,250
6,227,125
5,908,664
5,640,351
7,729,054
9,742,126
11,503,718
12,511,084
11,851,842
11,857,413
10,740,204
10,993,850
12,318,132
12,571,840
12,627,455
15,737,381
14,014,369
13,290,551
13,918,574
14,655,331
14,762,129
13,687,253
15,952,882
17,118,821
16,844,746
18,727,744
19,497,855
19,481,887


Construction Period of the
Panama Canal by the French company
(Compagnie Universelle)












Limited Panama Canal Work
Performed by successor French firm
(Compagnie Nouvelle)






PANAMA CANAL
FISCAL YEARS
Number
of


Ships
Transit-
iny


Year


Net
Tonnage


Gross Revenue
From Tolls


Construction Period of the
Panama Canal by U. S. Government


1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934


$ 4,367,602
2,407,047
5,628,068
6,439,066
6,173,028
8,514,207
11,276,483
11,198,000
17,508,701
24,291,596
21,400,994
22,931,764
24,230,027
26,945,862
27,128,893
27,077,267
24,646,109
20,707,856
19,621,181
24,065,707


SUEZ CANAL
CALENDAR YEARS
Number


of
Ships
Transit-
ing


4,237
4,116
3,975
4,267
3,795
4,239
4,533
4,969
5,373
5,085
4,802
3,708
3,110
2,353
2,522
3,986
4,009
3,975
4,345
4,621
5,122
5,337
4,980
5,545
6,084
6,274
5,761
5,366
5,032
5,423
5,663


Net
Tonnage


13,401,835
13,134,105
13,445,504
14,728,434
13,633,283
15,407,527
16,581,898
18,324,794
20,275,120
20,033,884
19,409,495
15,266,155
12,325,347
8,368,918
9,251,601
16,013,802
17,574,657
18,118,999
20,743,245
22,730,162
25,109,882
26,761,935
26,060,377
28,962,048
31,905,902
33,466,014
31,668,759
30,027,966
28,340,290
30,676,672
31,750,802


Gross Revenue
From Tolls

$ 21,843,150
21,350,604
20,013,676
21,771,038
20,341,467
22,726,693
24,550,236
25,289,800
25,655,362
23,736,948
22,640,176
17,424,318
14,691,131
11,787,748
15,312,532
26,435,194
27,906,632
27,887,110
31,384,730
31,927,862
34,270,431
38,282,901
35,768,497
40,175,849
42,710,459
43,492,183
40,434,990
36,294,152
31,017,504
33,197,163
33,372,214


Culebra from October 1915 May 1916.


3,916,212
2,544,170
6,178,406
6,754,636
6,236,983
8,903,885
11,830,228
11,695,575
19,008,997
21,336,080
23,186,930
25,162,516
26,753,017
29,999,146
30,456,488
30,104,637
27,902,711
23,722,187
22,901,874
28,754,565


1,108
807*
1,937
2,210
2,230
2,777
3,371
3,050
4,449
5,787
5,174
5,923
6,259
7,116
7,197
6,875
6,217
5,075
5,040
6,211


--


*Closed by slides at




COMPARATIVE OPERATIONAL STATISTICS (CONTINUED)


PANAMA CANAL
FISCAL YEARS
Number
of


Ships
Transit-
injg


Net
Tonnage


Year

1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964


6,369
6,453
6,695
6,930
7,479
6,945
6,623
4,643
4,372
5,130
8,866
9,586
6,375
6,999
7,361
7,694
7,751
9,169
10,210
10,218
9,811
9,744
10,169
10,608
11,192
12,147
12,019
12,106
12,005
12,945


SUEZ CANAL
CALENDAR YEARS
Number


of
Ships
Transit-
ing


28,028,840
28,131,251
27,563,921
26,193,647
27,798,801
24,982,065
21,581,716
12,839,359
9,699,302
11,394,533
19,737,129
30,207,854
21,915,288
24,622,887
26,047,635
30,362,243
30,354,600
34,486,229
42,970,714
42,446,404
39,895,725
42,619,271
44,844,725
49,073,532
53,405,526
59,636,807
63,377,380
66,947,660
66,412,553
71,500,810


Net
Tonnage


Gross Revenue
From Tolls

$ 23,339,239
23,510,629
23,147,640
23,215,208
23,699,430
21,177,759
18,190,380
9,772,113
7,368,739
5,473,846
7,266,211
14,796,406
17,634,361
20,017,439
20,617,635
24,511,713
23,958,879
30,409,500
37,530,327
37,191,107
35,136,529
37,450,759
39,653,712
42,834,005
46,546,620
51,803,032
55,172,719
58,347,290
57,855,931
62,546,390


5,992
5,877
6,635
6,171
5,277
2,589
1,804
1,646
2,262
3,320
4,206
5,057
5,972
8,686
10,420
11,751
11,694
12,168
12,731
13,215
14,666
13,291
10,958
17,842
17,731
18,734
18,148
18,518
19,146
19,943


32,810,968
32,378,883
36,491,332
34,418,187
29,573,394
13,535,712
8,262,841
7,027,763
11,273,802
18,124,952
25,064,966
32,731,631
36,576,581
55,080,866
68,811,016
81,795,523
80,356,338
86,137,037
92,905,439
102,493,851
115,756,000
107,006,000
89,911,000
154,479,000
163,386,000
185,322,000
187,059,000
197,837,000
210,498,000
227,991,000


Gross Revenue
From Tolls

$ 34,589,184
56,446,660
53,856,969
47,455,050
35,367,640
13,095,318
9,982,460
9,143,220
14,447,000
24,908,836
38,639,121
49,258,112
52,923,664
49,635,603
74,033,424
80,445,364
78,898,198
80,547,047
87,149,570
91,485,060
101,420,338
84,660,480
70,380,000
132,657,802
127,887,923
144,747,979
146,704,370
154,943,440
204,724,742
223,111,318




PANAMA CANAL
FISCAL YEARS
Number


SUEZ CANAL
CALENDAR YEARS
Number


Year

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970


Totals*

TOTALS


Ships
Transit-
ing

12,918
13,304
14,070
15,511
15,327
15.523


434,080


Net
Tonnage


76,987,407
83,063,183
95,065,742
107,465,942
110,479,600
115,567,581

1,606,478,240

2.035.057.105


Gross Revenue
From Tolls

$ 67,148,451
72,594,110
82,296,638
93,153,649
95,913,576
100,875,390

$1,376, 477,567

$1,748,716.820
**


Ships
Transit-
ing

20,289
21,250





44.1.205

583.714


Net
Tonnage


246,817,000
274,250,000


Gross Revenue
From Tolls

$ 246,356,567
273,334,839


Closed in June 1967


3,511,286,615

3,888,121,865


$3.507.010.898


*Totals (1915-1966) Both canals open.
**Excludes U. S. Government Tolls Credits for period 1915 1951.




AVERAGE TOLLS PER TRANSIT
(ANNUAL TOLLS DIVIDED BY NUMBER OF SHIPS TRANSITING)


Panama
(Rounded Average)


Year


1870
1875
1880

1885
1890


3,942
3,066
4,136
3,939
3,665
3,049
820**
3,186
3,581
4,265
5,198
6,501

* Closed in June 1967.
** High proportion of World War II
*-*.*Excludes U. S. Government Tolls


Suez
(Rounded Average)


1895
1900
1905
1910
1915
1920
1925
1930
1935
1940
1945
1950
1955
1960
1965
1970


toll-free transits
Credits for period 1915 1951.


$ 2,059
3,674
3,815

3,272
3,726

4,268
4,895
5,187
5,416
4,699
6,961
7,173
7,019
5,773
5,058
9,187
6,847
6,915
7,726
12,142
I




AVERAGE TOLLS PER MEASUREMENT TON
(ANNUAL TOLLS DIVIDED BY TONNAGE OF TRANSITING SHIPS)
(COST PER NET TON TO SHIPPING)


Panama*
(Rounded Average)
$ -


Year

1870
1875
1880
1885
1890
1895
1900
1905

1910
1915
1920
1925
1930
1935
1940
1945
1950
1955
1960
1965
1970


Suez
(Rounded Average)
$ 2.29
2.73
2.53
1.87
1.83
1.73
1.73
1.63


1.12

.91
.91
.88
.81
.84
.17**
.80
.87
.87
.87
.87


1.48
1.14
1.59
1.43
1.28
1.05
.97
1.54
.98
.88
.78
1.00


* Excludes displacement tonnage and tolls.
** High proportion of World War II toll-free transits.
*** Closed in June 1967.
Note: The Dual Measurement System for the Panama Canal was terminated in 1938.


- *d**r




SOURCE REFERENCE


1. Report by Dr. Emory R. Johnson, University of Pennsylvania, December 2, 1911. Tolls converted
from Francs at 19. P. C. C. File 92-B-18 (2).
2. N. Y. World Almanac 1924. C. Z. Library.
3. Le Canal de Suez, June 12, 1920, Extract P. C. C. File 92-A-23/R.
4. Various reports from U. S. Consul, Port Said, Egypt. Files 9-A-23/R.
5. N. Y. World Almanac, 1956. C. Z. Library.
6. Suez Canal Report "Assemble General des Actionnaires", June 1955. Franc receipts converted at
free exchange rates, from N. Y. Times.
7. Panama Canal Company, Annual Report to Stockholder, 1957-1970.
8. Panama Canal Company, Personnel Bureau, Administration and Statistics, FY 1970.
9. Director of Admeasurement, Memo to Marine Director, June 5, 1957. P. C. C. File 9-A-23(S).
10. Marine Bureau, Panama Canal Company.
11. Les Courants Economiques Compares de Canal de Suez et du Canal de Panama. C. Z. Library.
12. The Land Divided, 1944, Mack. C. Z. Library.
13. Encyclopedia Brittanica. C. Z. Library.
14. Meteorological and Hydrographic Branch, Panama Canal Company.
15. The Panama Canal Funnel for World Commerce. C. Z. Library.
16. Maritime Canal of Suez, J. E. Nourse. C. Z. Library.
17. Suez Canal Report, 1959-1966, Suez Canal Administration.
18. The Suez Canal, Suez Canal Administration.
19. The Suez Canal, American Society of Civil Engineers.
20. Statesman's Yearbook, 1959, 1969-1970.
21. Selected Commodity Movements, Panama Canal, March 1, 19 70.
22. Foreign Exchange Department, Chase Manhattan Bank, Balboa, C. Z.
23. Suez Story, Longgood, C. Z. Library.
24. Encyclopedia Americana, C. Z. Library.








Prepared by the Panama Canal Company
Office of the Comptroller
Budget and Rates Division
June 1, 1971 (Second Revision)
































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