<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Foreword
 Philosophy and objectives
 Guidance philosophy
 Administration and operation
 School calendar
 School districts
 Appointment requirements, assignment...
 Compensation, rates of pay
 Civil defense
 Leave
 Conduct of school officers and...
 Collection of payroll deductions...
 Hours of duty, overtime and...
 Extra duty school activity program...
 Equipment and supplies
 Furniture pool equipment
 Requests for materials direct from...
 Requests for services or materials...
 Facilities and equipment, use and...
 Fire prevention
 Procedure for handling reports...
 Flags, United States and republic...
 Student health
 Information and assistance, requests...
 Key control
 Mail
 Pupil admissions, promotions retentions...
 Pupil attendance
 Student conduct and discipline
 Curriculum
 Remedial help periods, elementary...
 Marking system
 Teachers' class record books
 Student health
 Field trips
 Athletic contests and eligibility...
 Student publications and news...
 Student files
 Transcripts
 Tuition rates
 Safety
 Standing operations procedures...
 Summer sessions
 Transportation of canal zone school...
 Back Cover


PCANAL DLOC



Manual of policies, regulations and procedures of the Division of Schools
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00006074/00001
 Material Information
Title: Manual of policies, regulations and procedures of the Division of Schools
Physical Description: 1 v. (loose-leaf) : ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Canal Zone -- Division of Schools
Publisher: Canal Zone Government, Division of Schools
Place of Publication: Balboa Heights, Panama?
Publication Date: 1952-
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: School management and organization -- Handbooks, manuals, etc -- Panama -- Canal Zone   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
handbook   ( marcgt )
comic strip   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1952?
General Note: Kept up to date by revisions.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 727353750
lccn - 2011229590
ocn727353750
Classification: lcc - LA469.5 .C36
System ID: AA00006074:00001

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents 1
        Table of Contents 2
    Foreword
        Page A1-1
        Page A1-2
        Page A2-1
        Page A2-2
    Philosophy and objectives
        Page A3-1
        Page A3-2
        Page A3-3
        Page A3-4
        Page A3-5
        Page A3-6
    Guidance philosophy
        Page A4-1
        Page A4-2
    Administration and operation
        Page B1-1
        Page B1-2
        Page B1-3
        Page B1-4
    School calendar
        Page B2-1
        Page B2-2
    School districts
        Page B3-1
        Page B3-2
    Appointment requirements, assignment to salary schedule, and promotion of school officers and teachers
        Page C1-1
        Page C1-2
        Page C1-3
        Page C1-4
        Page C1-5
        Page C1-6
        Page C1-7
        Page C1-8
        Page C1-9
        Page C1-10
        Page C1-11
        Page C1-12
        Page C1-13
        Page C1-14
        Page C1-14
        Page C1-14a
        Page C1-14b
        Page C1-14c
        Page C1-15
        Page C1-16
        Page C1-17
        Page C1-18
        Page C1-19
        Page C1-20
        Page C1-21
        Page C1-22
        Page C1-23
        Page C1-24
        Page C1-25
        Page C1-26
        Page C1-27
        Page C1-28
        Page C1-29
        Page C1-30
        Page C1-31
    Compensation, rates of pay
        Page C2-1
        Page C2-2
    Civil defense
        Page C3-1
        Page C3-2
        Page C3-3
        Page C3-4
    Leave
        Page C4-1
        Page C4-2
        Page C4-3
        Page C4-4
        Page C4-5
        Page C4-6
        Page C4-7
        Page C4-8
    Conduct of school officers and employee relations
        Page C5-1
        Page C5-2
        Page C5-3
        Page C5-4
        Page C5-5
        Page C5-6
        Page C5-7
        Page C5-8
        Page C5-9
        Page C5-10
    Collection of payroll deductions during school vacations
        Page C6-1
        Page C6-2
    Hours of duty, overtime and compensatory
        Page C7-1
        Page C7-2
        Page C7-3
        Page C7-4
    Extra duty school activity program and pay provisions
        Page C8-1
        Page C8-2
        Page C8-3
        Page C8-4
    Equipment and supplies
        Page E1-1
        Page E1-2
        Page E1-3
        Page E1-4
    Furniture pool equipment
        Page E2-1
        Page E2-2
    Requests for materials direct from publishers
        Page E3-1
        Page E3-2
    Requests for services or materials from Panama Canal printing plant
        Page E4-1
        Page E4-2
    Facilities and equipment, use and care of
        Page F1-1
        Page F1-2
        Page F1-3
        Page F1-4
        Page F1-4a
        Page F1-5
        Page F1-6
        Page F1-7
        Page F1-8
        Page F1-9
    Fire prevention
        Page F2-1
        Page F2-2
        Page F2-3
        Page F2-4
    Procedure for handling reports or secreted explosives
        Page F3-1
        Page F3-2
        Page F3-3
        Page F3-4
    Flags, United States and republic of Panama
        Page F4-1
        Page F4-2
        Page F4-3
        Page F4-4
    Student health
        Page H1-1
        Page H1-2
        Page H1-3
        Page H1-4
        Page H1-5
        Page H1-6
        Page H1-7
        Page H1-8
    Information and assistance, requests for
        Page I1-1
        Page I1-2
    Key control
        Page K1-1
        Page K1-2
    Mail
        Page M1-1
        Page M1-2
    Pupil admissions, promotions retentions and probations
        Page P1-1
        Page P1-2
        Page P1-3
        Page P1-4
        Page P1-5
        Page P1-6
        Page P1-7
        Page P1-8
        Page P1-9
        Page P1-10
        Page P1-11
        Page P1-12
    Pupil attendance
        Page P2-1
        Page P2-2
        Page P2-3
        Page P2-4
        Page P2-5
        Page P2-6
        Page P2-7
        Page P2-8
        Page P2-9
        Page P2-10
    Student conduct and discipline
        Page P3-1
        Page P3-2
        Page P3-3
        Page P3-4
        Page P3-5
        Page P3-6
        Page P3-6a
        Page P3-6b
        Page P3-6c
        Page P3-6d
        Page P3-6e
        Page P3-6f
        Page P3-7
        Page P3-8
        Page P3-9
        Page P3-10
        Page P3-11
        Page P3-12
    Curriculum
        Page P4-1
        Page P4-2
        Page P4-3
        Page P4-4
        Page P4-4a
        Page P4-5
        Page P4-6
        Page P4-7
        Page P4-8
        Page P4-9
        Page P4-10
        Page P4-11
        Page P4-12
        Page P4-13
        Page P4-14
        Page P4-15
        Page P4-16
        Page P4-17
        Page P4-18
        Page P4-19
        Page P4-20
        Page P4-21
        Page P4-22
    Remedial help periods, elementary schools
        Page P5-1
        Page P5-2
    Marking system
        Page P6-1
        Page P6-2
        Page P6-3
        Page P6-4
        Page P6-5
        Page P6-6
    Teachers' class record books
        Page P7-1
        Page P7-2
    Student health
        Page P8-1
        Page P8-2
    Field trips
        Page P9-1
        Page P9-2
    Athletic contests and eligibility for
        Page P10-1
        Page P10-2
        Page P11-1
        Page P11-2
    Student publications and news releases
        Page P12-1
        Page P12-2
    Student files
        Page P13-1
        Page P13-2
    Transcripts
        Page P14-1
        Page P14-2
    Tuition rates
        Page P15-1
        Page P15-2
    Safety
        Page S1-1
        Page S1-2
    Standing operations procedures in event of injury within school operated facilities
        Page S2-1
        Page S2-2
    Summer sessions
        Page S3-1
        Page S3-2
        Page S3-3
        Page S3-4
    Transportation of canal zone school children
        Page T1-1
        Page T1-2
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Page T1-4
Full Text

















CANAL ZOTIE GOVERIIMEIT






ift of the Panama Canal Museum




MANUAL

OF

POLICIES, REGULATIONS


AND PROCEDURES

OF THE

DIVISION OF SCHOOLS


Revised July 1, 1971









TABLE OF CONTENTS


Al Foreword

A2 Early Development of Canal Zone Schools

A3 Philosophy and Objectives

A4 Guidance Philosophy

B1 Adminiist-rion and Operation

B2 School Calendar

B3 School Districts

Cl Appointment Requirements, Assignment to Salary Schedule,
and Promotion of Vchool Officers and T-,,'.-h~rs

C2 Compensation, Rates of Pay

C3 Civil Defense

C4 Leave

C5 Conduct of School Officers and Employee Relations

C6 Collection of Payroll Deductions During School Vacations

C7 Hours of Duty, Overtime and Compensatory Time

C8 Extra Duty School Activity Program and Pay Provisions

El Equipment and Supplies

E2 Furniture Pool Equipment

E3 Requests for Materials Direct From Publishers

E4 Requests for Services or Mlterials from Panama Canal
Printing Plant

Fl Fecilities and Equlipment, Use and Care Of

F2 Fire Preven lion

F3 Procedure for frndlirng Reports of Secreted E:-plosives

F4 Flags, United States and r~pu.lic of P-narm


Rev. 79-1 (Jan/79)









































Digiized by the Internet Archi..e
in 2011 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries with support Irom LY RASIS and [he Sloan Fiondallon


http://www.archive.org/details/manualofpoliciesOOcana









CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT Al-I
DIVISION OF SCHOOLS




Balboa Heights, C. Z.





FOREWORD


The purpose of this manual is to make available to
all personnel of the Division of Schools the policies,
rules and regulations under which the Canal Zone Schools
are administered and operated. Although these policies
have been evolving over a period of more than 50 years,
it is recognized that they do not cover every phase of
school organization and control. Nevertheless, an attempt
has been made to include all of the statements of policy,
rules, :and regulations that principals, teachers, and
other employees need for reference and guidance.

The manual has been designed in loose-leaf form to
permit revision. Each employee is requested to keep his
copy of the manual up to date by making insertions and
deletions as revisions are issued. In order that the
manuals may be brought up to date during the summer
vacation period each teacher should return his copy of
the manual to his principal at the close of each school
year.












EARLY DEVELOPMENT OF CANAL ZONE SCHOOLS


The schools of the Canal Zone are operated by the Canal Zone
Government under authority contained in the Canal Zone Code,
Section 5, Title 2, appearing as the first sentence of the
United States Code, Section 1305, Title 48.

The United States of America secured control of the Panama
Canal Zone in 1904, but the first public school under the juris-
diction of the United States Government did not open until
January 2, 1906. William Howard Taft, then Secretary of War in
President Theodore Roosevelt's cabinet, authorized the first
allotment of funds for school purposes in the Canal Zone. His
authorization to the Isthmian Canal Commission, dated June 24,
1905, apportioned $30,000 of Canal Zone Government money for
the development of an educational program.

Originally established under the supervision of the Collector
of Revenues, the schools were turned over to the Bureau of Mitni-
cipalities in May 1906. Seven months later the educational
system had reached such proportions that it was made a separate
division and placed under the direction of the Department of Law
and Government. When the Canal was completed in 1914 and the
permanent organization of The Panama Canal established, the
Division of Schools was placed in the Executive Department, under
the jurisdiction of the Executive Secretary. The system of admin-
istration was reorganized on July 1, 1950, with the Division of
Schools being placed in the Civil Affairs Bureau.

The direct responsibility for administering the Canal Zone
Schools rests with the Superintendent of Schools, who reports to
the Civil Affairs Director who, in turn, is responsible to the
Governor of the Canal Zone. There is no body of school laws in
the Canal Zone, the school system being governed by administrative
regulations rather than statutory enactments.


A2-1











CHAPTER A3 PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES


1. General Statement of Philosophy.

a. A system of organized educational activities is to
be provided without charge for all youth to the extent that each
is able to participate in a curriculum suited to his particular
needs.

b. A graduate of our school system should possess the
basic understandings and be able to handle the basic skills that
are needed by a citizen of a democracy. He should have made def-
inite progress toward becoming a productive member of society.
And he should have been provided with many opportunities to
develop his interests, to learn new interests, and to develop
his abilities toward his self-realization and his concept of
the good life.

2. Aims and Objectives of the Schools.

a. The school should give depth and permanence to the
positive interests which the student possesses or that the school
is able to arouse in him, to broaden the intellectual horizon of
the student, and to inspire him to achieve in accordance with his
full capacity for achievement.

b. Three fundamental aims include development of

(1) the individual's character, worthy interests,
and personality;

(2) the individual as a worker and producer; and

(3) the individual as a well-informed, useful
citizen and cooperative member of society.

3. Specific Objectives.

a. Health. In order that each individual may develop
and maintain his maximum physical and mental efficiency, one of
the more important responsibilities of the schools is to provide
health instruction and guidance in the formation of desirable
health habits. To meet this responsibility the schools should
strive to develop in each student and understanding of the basic
facts concerning health and disease, a desire to protect his own
health and that of his family, and a deep concern for the health'
of his fellow men.

b. Moral and social values. Another major responsi-
bility of the schools is to help each student develop ethical


A3-1








A3-2 CHAPTER A3 PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES



principles and good habits of moral and social conduct. The stu-
dent should be taught to deal honestly and fairly with others and
helped to develop a sense of responsibility for the proper direc-
tion of his own life and for the welfare of others. Our schools
aim to develop in each student a high regard for friendly, sincere,
and cooperative human relationships and skill in the amenities of
social behavior. Development of initiative, self-reliance, and
leadership is an important part of the work of the schools.

c. Vocational guidance. The useful citizen is a worker
and a producer. Consequently, the schools constantly seek to ac-
quaint each pupil with the principal fields of vocational opportunity,
and to assist the pupil in choosing and preparing for a useful occu-
pation. The schools strive to develop in each pupil an intelligent
understanding of the.requirements and opportunities in the various
fields of work, and, to help insure successful accomplishment, a
realistic attitude toward the selection of a vocation. Pupils
should appreciate the social value of work and experience the satis-
faction of superior workmanship. Intelligent thrift and understand-
ing of economic values are important phases of this large area of
learning. Guides to wise expenditure and principles of sound in-
vestment are as much a part of the school curriculum as the three
"R' s."

d. Use of leisure time. To assist the student in making
worthy use of leisure time the schools seek to interest each indi-
vidual in a variety of desirable activities and to aid him in form-
ing the habit of utilizing his hours of leisure with profit and
interest. The schools attempt to develop in the students a wide
variety of socially acceptable avocational interests. Through
curricular and co-curricular activities pupils are led to appre-
ciate the best in literature, to look for beauty in nature and art
forms, and to seek recreation in worthy pastimes.

e. Fundamental skills. The educational program has
broadened since the days when the three "R's" constituted the en-
tire curriculum, yet the "fundamentals" still are the basic essen-
tials of the modern school program. It is the aim of the schools
to provide thorough instruction in those subjects which will enable
the individual to participate successfully in the social, economic,
and cultural life of his community, state, and nation. The aim is
to teach every individual to speak clearly, read efficiently, write
effectively, and to be skillful in solving mathematical problems.
The curriculum offers opportunities for pupils to learn the facts
and principles of the biological, physical, and social sciences
which are so necessary for an intelligent understanding of the
world and its peoples. In the schools of the Canal Zone the pupil
will be given an opportunity to become bilingual.







CHAPTER A3 PHILOSOPHY AID OBJECTIVES


f. Family life. We take the family to be the basic
group in human society. Worthy home membership is therefore one
of the major aims of education. The schools strive to cooperate
with parents in developing in each individual student an appre-
ciation of his responsibilities as a member of his family group,
and a desire to contribute to the happiness and success of his
family. Basic in this program is the development of an apprecia-
tion of the family as a social unit and a desire on the part of
each individual to maintain and strengthen family ideals and
harmonious family relationships. Work in the home is not for-
gotten in the schools as the curriculum offers ample opportunity
for the student to develop skill in performing the tasks neces-
sary for the proper maintenance of the home.

g. Citizenship.

(1) The U. S. schools are operated essentially
for citizens of the United States of America. It is only logi-
cal, then, that training in American citizenship becomes a major
task of these schools. From the primary grades through the
college, the schools strive to develop in eachopupil a thorough
knowledge of, and a patriotic loyalty to, American ideals and
institutions and a desire to perform with credit the duties of
a citizen of the United States.

(2) The Latin American schools are operated for
the children of citizens of the Republic of Panama who live in
the Canal Zone. Their major function is to give the pupils a
thorough knowledge of the language, the history, the geography,
and the economic and sociological traditions of the Republic of
Panama. For this reason the teaching language of the Latin
American schools is Spanish and the curriculum approximates
that of the Republic of Panama while providing for the group
differences of the children living in the Canal Zone.

(3) We want our youth to be loyal to their res-
pective countries and to have pride in their heritage. We want
our students to respect the law and the rights and property of
others. We want them to have an intelligent understanding of
current national and international problems and to develop a
sense of responsibility for the wise use of human and natural
resources. Because good citizenship means acceptance of respon-
sibility, there is provision in the program of the schools for
exercise and growth in both personal and group responsibility.

h. Problem solving and scientific method. The extent
of a person's education is only partly revealed by an encyclo-
pedic knowledge of the world and what it contains. It is more


_______


A3-3








CHAPTER A3 PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES


wholly revealed in a person's way of life and in the use to which
he puts his knowledge and skills. Consequently, the schools con-
sider it essential that each pupil be taught to apply his learning.
The schools seek to stimulate intellectual processes and to develop
skill in listening and observing. The schools provide practice
in solving problems by a scientific methodology defining the issues,
marshaling relative data, evaluating possible solutions, acting
upon the most likely solution, and noting the consequences of this
action. Finally, development in each individual of poise and
courage in facing problems is to some degree a responsibility of
the schools.

4. In summary the purposes of the educational programs of the
Canal Zone Schools are to contribute to the development in each
individual of:

a. Cognitive.

(1) An understanding of ethical principles.
(2) A thorough knowledge of American ideals and
institutions.
(3) An understanding of the family as a social unit.
(4) An intelligent understanding of current national
and international problems.
(5) An understanding of the basic facts concerning
health and disease.
(6) An understanding of the facts and principles of
the biological, physical, and social sciences.
(7) A knowledge of the best in literature and art.
(8) The principles basic to wise expenditure and to
sound investment.
(9) An intelligent understanding of the requirements
and opportunities in the various fields of work.
(10) A knowledge of the principal fields of vocational
opportunity.


b. Motor Skills


(1) The ability to speak clearly, read efficiently,
write effectively.
(2) Skill in solving mathematical problems.
(3) Skill in listening and observing.
(4) The ability to speak a second language.
(5) Skill in solving problems by a scientific method-
ology: defining the issues, marshaling relative data, evaluating


A3-4








CHAPTER A3 PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES


possible solutions, acting upon the most likely solution, and
noting the consequences of this action.
(6) Skill in performing the tasks necessary for
the proper maintenance of the home.
(7) The skills of a wide variety of socially
acceptable avocational interests.
(8) Skill in the amenities of social behavior.

c. Affective

(1) A sense of responsibility for the proper
direction of his own life and for the welfare of others.
(2) A high regard for friendly, sincere, cooper-
ative human relationships.
(3) A sense of responsibility for the wise use of
human and natural resources.
(4) Good habits of moral and social conduct.
(5) Poise and courage in facing problems.
(6) Desire to maintain and strengthen family ideals
and harmonious family relationships.
(7) A desire to protect his own health and that of
his family.
(8) A deep concern for the health of his fellow men.

(9) An inclination to look for beauty in nature
and art forms.
(10) A patriotic loyalty to American ideals and
institutions.
(11) A desire to perform with credit the duties
of a citizen of the United States.
(12) Respect for the laws and the rights and
property of others.
(13) Initiative, self-reliance, and leadership.
(14) A realistic attitude toward the selection of
a vocation.
(15) An appreciation of the social value of work
and of satisfaction in superior workmanship.


A3-5











CHAPTER A4 GUIDANCE PHILOSOPHY


1. The following is written as the result of the oral and
written comments of the Middle States evaluation report:

a. The guidance counselor, as implied in the title,
has the responsibility, the opportunity, and the honor of guiding
secondary students along proper paths toward adult citizenship.

b. This guidance includes not merely the vocational
and educational aspects of the student's problems and concerns,
but also the personal, the emotional, the ethical, the moral.
This guidance is in addition to and not in place of the guidance
provided by the home and the church. This guidance is in addi-
tion to and not in place of the guidance provided by the classroom
and the homeroom teacher.

c. The counseling function should attract students.
The counselor should be the confidant and the friend of all the
students who are his counselees. When a problem occurs the coun-
selor should be thought of as a person who can give assistance.

d. The counselor should not be a disciplinarian,
though by his precept and example he should inculcate self-disci-
pline in the students for whom he is responsible. His primary
concern shall be the strengthening of the positive which is
found in abundance in all young people, and not chastising the
negative which is also found (though in small degree) in all.

e. To be of maximum benefit to the students the
counselor must be aware of all the activities which occupy the
lives of our students. Such awareness is most effectively secured
by attendance at, and participation to a maximum extent in, the
activity program of the school.

f. To be of maximum value, the counselor must also be
well acquainted with the community, particularly with the parents
of the children in the school. The counselor should be the con-
fidant of the parents as well as their children.

g. This is a high calling in quality and a demanding
responsibility in terms of time and energy, and none should enter
the job without a deep interest in, and concern for, people.

2. The usual day of the classroom teacher does not end
when the last class is dismissed because there are additional
hours of preparation and correction and evaluation. Similarly,
the day of the counselor cannot end when the academic day is over,
because the time when students are most available for counseling
is after the close of the school day. The calendar and schedule


A4-1









A4-2 CHAPTER A4 GUIDANCE PHILOSOPHY



of the counselor should not close each day until the last student
has been seen who has a question or a problem. The counselor may
not have the papers to correct and mark of the other teachers,
but he has additional hours of counseling to perform after the
end of each school day. Indication was given by the Middle
States visitors that counselors in the United States now are
often arranging their weekly schedules so as to make themselves
available for evening appointments with parents one evening per
week.







CHAPTER Bl ADMINISTRATION AND OPERATION


1. Administrative Officers.

a. The Division of Schools is under the immediate
supervision of the Superintendent of Schools, who is responsible
for the operation, maintenance and administration of the public
school system in the Canal Zone, and for related functions.

b. The Deputy Superintendent of Schools will exercise
function over all areas and aspects of the school system under
the direction of the Superintendent of Schools.

c. The following personnel assist the Superintendent
in functions which encompass the entire school system:

(1) The Administrative Officer is responsible for
budgetary work, procurement of supplies, records management and
data processing, general supervision of the clerical staff, and
general supervision of the care and maintenance of all buildings
and structures.

(2) The Coordinator of Special Education is respon-
sible for the general operation of the programs for handicapped
and exceptional children.

(3) The Coordinator of Curriculum is responsible
for continuing and revising of the educational program and the
;materials necessary to carry out the program. Under him function
the Curruculum Library and the Audio-Visual Department.

Each of these officers may be furnished such pro-
fessional and clerical staff as necessary to carry out his function
effectively.

d. Assistant superintendents function under the Super-
intendent of Schools in each of the following areas: U.S. Elemen-
tary Schools, U.S. Secondary Schools, Latin American Schools.
Each Assistant Superintendent is responsible for the total opera-
tion of all schools in his area, and serves as the immediate
supervisor of each school principal.

2. Unit Administrators.

Principals and the college dean exercise general super-
vision over the schools to which they are assigned. They are
expected to see that the work in all departments of their re-
spective schools is conducted in accordance with existing rules,
regulations, and the instructions of their respective assistant
superintendents. They shall:


Bl-1








CHAPTER BI ADMINISTRATION AND OPERATION


a. Be responsible for the educational leadership of
the teachers under their supervision through such media as class-
room visits, professional meetings, developing programs of cur-
riculum revision, and striving constantly for the improvement of
classroom institction.

b. Be expected to cooperate fully with administrative
staff, special supervisors, supervisors of instruction. ROTC per-
sonnel, and medical staff in the development of the educational
program.

c. Be responsible for the grade placement of pupils
in the school.

d. Supervise the administration of the marking system.

(1) Promptly inform the parents of every pupil who
is in danger of failing his grade or who has been unmanageable or
who has been suspended, seeking to secure an interview with the
parent in each case.

(2) Systematically examine the reports of the
teachers and see that they are properly kept.

e. Be responsible for properly accounting for all
Government funds collected by his office.

f. Promote school activity programs which supplement
the educational program. Maintain a system of accounting for stu-
dent activity funds which is in keeping with approved accounting
procedures. Submit an annual report of such funds at the end of
each school year.

g. Be responsible for the order and neatness of build-
ings and grounds in cooperation with the Housing Branch; assume
responsibility for the conduct of pupils in and around the build-
ings and on buses and special trains; require of the teachers such
aid as is necessary to maintain good order.

h. Be responsible for the proper observance of safety
regulations in the schools.

i. Read, approve, publicize, and supervise publications,
musical programs, dramatic performances, and all other activities
bearing the name of the school, keeping in mind that publicity af-
fecting school policy must be referred to the appropriate assistant
superintendent, and that all outside contact with news media must
be through the Panama Canal Information Office.

j. Submit an annual report of the activities of the
school.


Bl-2








CHAPTER Bl ADMINISTRATION AND OPERATION


3. Supervisors.

Supervisors, under the direction of their respective
assistant superintendent, are charged with the supervision of the
work in their respective fields and levels, and will
a. Cooperate with teachers and principals, assist and
instruct all teachers and counselors under their supervision, in
groups and individually, by lecture and demonstration, striving
constantly for the improvement of classroom instruction.
b. Visit classrooms regularly so that they can eval-
uate fairly the work performed by classroom teachers.
c. Give such tests as they deem necessary.
d. Perform such other duties as may be assigned.
4. Teachers.
Teachers will
a. Set a good example for the students by conducting
themselves in a courteous and professional manner, presenting a
neat and clean appearance, dressing in a manner appropriate to
the teaching or extra-curricular duty on assignment, being
punctual and regular in attendance.
b. Work in accordance with the schedule issued for
their particular level and school, being on hand for the spec-
ified period before and after pupils arrive, and responsible to
attend meetings and participate in after-school activities and
programs in accordance with generally accepted educational
practice.
c. Exercise careful supervision over the pupils in
the rooms, halls, and playgrounds, maintain proper discipline,
and report to the principal pupils requiring special attention.
Under no conditions are teachers to administer physical punish-
ment.
d. Attend such conferences as may be arranged by the
principal or other administrative and supervisory officers.
Nonattendance shall be excused only for such reasons as would
justify nonattendance in the classroom.
e. Participate in testing programs and make proper
use of test results.
f. Keep accurate records on the official forms pro-
vided for each pupil's attendance and progress, and inform
parents fully.


Bl-3








CHAPTER B1 ADMINISTRATION AND OPERATION


g. Be responsible for placing books and supplies in
the hands of the pupils and seeing that they are carefully used
and duly returned. Shortages should be reported promptly to the
principal.

h. Exercise all possible precautions to preserve the
health and vitality of pupils, paying special attention to such
factors as proper seating, proper lighting, ventilation, and re-
ferring through the principal special cases to the school physi-
cian or nurse.

i. Teachers of physical education shall be responsible
for obtaining proper medical certificates required for pupil's
participation in athletics.

j.. All teachers, including ROTC personnel, shall co-
operate with principals, supervisors, medical staff, and other
administrative officers.

k. In addition to regularly assigned duty, teachers
shall perform other duties as may be required by the principal,
such as participating in curriculum revision, sponsoring student
activities, chaperoning events sponsored by the school, such as
special trains for school activities, picnics, parties, and
dances, and performing routine building assignments such as hall
duty, study hall supervision, cafeteria supervision, and lunch
room supervision.

5. Substitute Teachers .

Substitute teachers shall:

a. Report for duty at the call of and to the principal,
unless other personnel have been authorized to call.

b. Observe the same rules and regulations required of
regular teachers.

c. Make no entries in registers unless they relieve a
teacher for at least five days; however, a record of tardiness
and absences must be kept.

d. Leave a record of the work covered and the assign-
ments made for the following day.

e. After relieving a teacher for two successive days,
report for duty on a day-to-day basis until notified by the prin-
cipal that the regular teacher will return to duty.


B1-4








CHAPTER B2 SCHOOL CALENDAR


1. Schools will operate in accordance with a calendar
issued by the Superintendent of Schools, with U.S. (English-
language) Schools generally following the calendar prevailing
in the United States, and L.A. (Spanish-language) Schools the
calendar in Panama.

2. Schools will not be in session on the following days:
U.S. Independence Day (July 4), Labor Day (first Monday in
September) (L.A. Schools will not be in session all during
the week in which Labor Day falls), Panama Independence Day
(November 3), Veterans' Day (fourth Monday in October),
Thanksgiving Day and the Friday following, approximately ten
days during the Christmas season, Washington's Birthday (third
Monday in February), the week preceding Easter Sunday (U.S.
Schools), and Memorial Day (last Monday in May).

3. If a legal holiday falls on Sunday, the following
Monday will be observed as a holiday. If a legal holiday
falls on Saturday, the preceding Friday will be observed as a
holiday.

4. School will be in session five days per week, Monday
through Friday, at least six hours per day, according to
schedules issued by the Superintendent of Schools. Variations
in the school schedule must be approved by the appropriate
assistant superintendent.


B2-1











CHAPTER B3 SCHOOL DISTRICTS B3-1


School districts shall be established annually by the Super-
intendent of Schools in accordance with housing conditions,
transportation, school plant facilities, and other pertinent
factors.












CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGIRENT ci-1
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS

1. Eligibility Requirements. (For a more detailed explanation
of requirements to teach in the English language, U.S. schools, see
Cl-6, par. 6)
a. Age. No teacher will be appointed who is under 21
years of age.
b. Experience. No experience is required for appoint-
ment as a teacher in the elementary and secondary schools. How-
ever, preference will be given to applicants who have previous
teaching experience. Experience is required for counselors and
college teachers.
c. Training. Applicants for all teaching positions
should submit official transcripts of all undergraduate and grad-
uate work.
d. Kindergarten and elementary school teachers. Appli-
cants for appointment at levels from kindergarten through grade
six must hold a bachelor's degree with at least eighteen semester
hours in the field of education and supplemental training appro-
priate to the field for which application is made.
e. Secondary teachers. Applicants for appointment as
teachers in the secondary schools in grades seven and eight must
hold a bachelor's degree, and applicants for grades nine through
twelve must hold a master's degree. Applicants for grades seven
through twelve must have at least eighteen semester hours in the
field of education and at least eighteen semester hours in the
subject field in which application is made.
f. College instructors. Applicants for appointment as
instructors in the college must hold a master's degree with at
least eighteen semester hours in the field of education, including
a methods course, at least 30 semester hours in the field for
which applying, and three years successful teaching experience at
the secondary or college level. Requirements for the positions
of assistant, associate, and full professors in the college will
be furnished upon request. Applicants with doctor's degrees are
preferred.
g. Guidance counselors. Applicants for appointment as
counselors in the elementary, junior high schools, senior high
schools, and college must hold a master's degree. He must have
five years successful teaching experience at the level for which
applying.









Cl-2 CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS





h. Special education. Applicants for appointment as
teachers of special education must hold a bachelor's degree and a
special credential for teaching one or more areas of exceptionality.

i. Administrators and supervisors. Applicants for admin-
instrative and supervisory positions must meet all the above general
requirements and in addition will be expected to have specific
professional preparation in administration and supervision. Special
consideration will be given to the personal characteristics of the
candidates. Consideration will also be given to the amount,
quality, and character of the applicant's professional preparation
and experience. Other things being equal, preference will be given
to candidates who have had training and successful experience in
the field of the vacancy.

j. Other requirements. The qualifying degree, or one of
the qualifying degrees, must have been granted by an accredited
college or university in the United States.

k. Official transcripts covering all college work must
be submitted by all applicants.

1. Additional information regarding application is pro-
vided in a brochure "Teach in the Canal Zone Schools? issued
periodically by the Superintendent of Schools.

2. Types of Appointments.

a. Permanent appointment. New absolute appointment
after having completed a probationary appointment which entitles
incumbent to be promoted, transferred, reassigned, or reinstated
to permanent appointment without a new probationary appointment.
In reinstatements under this appointment a teacher, if fully
qualified, shall receive placement credit and salary step to a
maximum of nine years in accordance with years of prior qualified
service with the Division of Schools or other accredited schools.

b. Probationary appointment. New appointment with
period of two years probation to determine fitness of employee.

(1) Qualified teachers granted such appointments
shall be assigned to numerical service step in pertinent salary
group in accordance with prior qualified full-time teaching expe-
rience in accredited schools, not to exceed step 10.









CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGIfMENT Cl-3
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS


(2) Such teachers may be terminated at any time
upon the written recommendation of the Superintendent of Schools
and concurrence of the Personnel Director.

(3) The first year of service of any employee in
initial appointment OTHER THAN TEMPORARY in the Division of Schools
shall be probationary regardless of any change in title or class
during probationary period.

c. Temporary appointment. Appointment authorized
whenever such action is necessary and justified in writing by
the Superintendent of Schools and confirmed by administrative
authority for periods of one school year or less. Teachers
granted temporary appointments may or may not meet degree and
course requirements of salary class to which assigned. If a
teacher is not qualified (either degree, minimum course require-
ments, and/or experience), he shall be assigned to step one of
the appropriate salary group and may not receive either prior
service credit or annual increment. If teacher is fully quali-
fied, he shall be assigned to the pertinent salary group at the
step appropriate to his prior qualified service not to exceed
nine years. If the temporary appointee is later given a proba-
tionary appointment, he will be given credit on the salary
schedule for each full year of temporary service. All appoint-
ments after the beginning of the school year are normally
temporary appointments, regardless of the nature of the position
or the qualifications of the individual.

d. Assignments. While assignments of teachers are
normally made to the grades and subjects in which they have had
special training and experience, the teacher may be assigned by
the appropriate assistant superintendent wherever needed.

3. Teacher Salary Class.

Class 15 College Instructor
Senior High School Teacher
Junior High School Teacher
Elementary School Teacher

Class 13 College Assistant Professor

Class 11 College Associate Professor


Class 8 College Professor









Cl-4 CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS


4. Salary Groups.

Group A Bachelor's degree

Group Al Bachelor's degree plus 15 graduate
semester hours

Group B Master's degree

Group C Master's degree plus 30 graduate
semester hours

Group D Master's degree plus 60 graduate
semester hours for Class 15; earned
doctorate for all other classes

5. Method of Salary Advancement.

a. Permanent employee. Each permanent employee except
those in frozen rates shall receive an annual service increment on
July first of each year provided the employee's service has been
satisfactory, until he reaches the highest step provided on the
schedule for his Class and Group. If a teacher has been in a leave-
without-pay status in excess of 4C working days during the previous
school year, his effective date of receipt of annual service incre-
ment would be postponed until July first following the normal ef-
fective date. Permanent employees who have been granted leave to
enter the Armed Forces of the United States or its allies shall
receive annual periodic increments to which they would have been
entitled had they remained continuously in the service of the
Division of Schools.

b. Probationary appointment employee. Each probation-
ary employee shall receive his first numerical service step 6n July
first following successful completion of his probationary year and
shall advance one numerical service step each year thereafter on
July first provided the employee's service has been satisfactory
until he reaches the highest step provided on the schedule for his
Class and Group, EXCEPT leave without pay in excess of 40 working
days would postpone effective date until July first following
normal effective date.

c. Temporary appointment employee. Temporary appoint-
ment employees,wexcept those fully qualified for the position, will
not receive any additional annual service increments. If given
probationary appointments they will then receive placement to
include the temporary service, if such service was for full years









CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNTMENT Cl-5
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION[ OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS


With not more than forty working days of leave without pay, and
they were in a position for which they were fully qualified.

d. Promotion to a higher group.

(1) Employees qualifying for promotion to a higher
group shall receive the pay increase resulting from such promotion
on the first day of the pay period immediately following the date
on which written documentary evidence is received in the office
of the Superintendent of Schools. The responsibility for apply-
ing for reclassification to the higher group and for submitting
necessary documentary evidence rests with the employee,; Such
letters must be confirmed as soon as possible by an official tran-
script which will be placed in the employee's official personnel
file.

(2) To be eligible for Group Al a person must have
fifteen graduate semester credits beyond the bachelor's degree.
These credits must be related to the person's teaching field and
are subject to administration approval. In some instances gradu-
ate credits may have been earned prior to receipt of the bache-
lor's degree. In such instances, for salary credit to be granted
the credits must be in excess of 120 credits, and it must be
indicated by the institution that enrollment by the student in
the course or courses was for graduate credit.

(3) In order to qualify for promotion to Group C
an employee must have not less than thirty graduate semester
hours from an accredited institution in academic, vocational, or
professional courses beyond the master's degree, representing a
definite educational program normally related to the person's
teaching field, subject to the approval of the designated admin-
istrative authority. Graduate semester hours beyond thirty
which were earned prior to obtaining a master's degree and were
not counted toward hours of master's degree may be applied in
computing such thirty credit hours.

(4) For promotion to Group D an employee in Class
15-must have not less than 60 graduate semester hours from an
accredited institution in academic, vocational, or professional
courses beyond the master's degree, representing a definite ed-
ucational program normally related to the person's teaching field,
subject to the approval of the designated administrative authority.
Employees in all classes above 15 must have an earned doctorate
to qualify for Group D.









Cl-6 CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS


(5) Any employee who is promoted to a higher group
of the same salary class shall be assigned to the same numerical
service step on the schedule for his new group as he would have
occupied on the schedule of the group from which he is promoted.

(6) Any employee promoted to a higher pay class
shall be assigned to the first pay step of the class to which
promoted or if his previous pay was more than the first step, h1
shall be assigned to the step which will avoid any loss of pay.
He will then progress by annual increment.

e. Promotion from Group X (frozen rate).

(1) An employee assigned to Group X who later qual-
ifies for the position to which assigned and is promoted to Group
A or Group B shall be assigned to the same numerical service step
on Group A or Group B which he held in Group X at time of such
reassignment.

(2) An employee assigned to Group X, at a rate
below the entrance rate, who later qualifies for the position to
which assigned and is promoted to Group A or B, shall be assigned
to the entrance rate of the group for'which he qualifies.

(3) An employee assigned to Group X, whose salary
is within the salary range of a group, who later qualifies for the
position to which assigned shall be assigned to the step nearest
but not below his "X" salary.

6. U.S. Schools Teacher Qualification Standards and Rating
Schedule.

a. Minimum Requirements

In order to qualify to be placed on the 'register an
applicant must have a minimum of 70 points. To have 70 points,
that is, to meet the minimum requirements and to be placed on the
register, he must satisfy all of the following:

(1) Degree

The applicant must have a degree appropriate to
the grade level, subject, and/or area of specialization for which
he is applying. The qualifying degree, or one of the qualifying
degrees if more than one degree is required, must be from a









CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT Cl-7
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, ANID PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS

college or university in the United States. All qualifying degrees
must be from fully accredited colleges or universities.

The minimum qualifying degrees are:

(a) Grades K-8

Bachelor's degree, except for counseling
positions.

(b) Grades 9-College

Master's degree, except for industrial arts
positions.

(c) Special Education

The degree must be appropriate to the grade
level as shown in (a) and (b) above.

(d) Counselor

The master's degree is required for all
counseling positions regardless of grade level.

(e) Industrial Arts

The bachelor's degree for industrial arts
positions from grades seven through twelve.

(2) Subject Area, Specialization, and/or Grade Level
Requirements

(a) Grades K-6

The applicant must have a degree showing
that he majored in elementary education with practice teaching
and/or specialization in the grade levels for which he is applying.
In lieu of this, he must have a minimum of 18 semester hours in
elementary specialization (in addition to the education require-
ments in Par. (3) below).

(b) Grades 7-12


The applicant must have at least 18 semester









C1-8 CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS

hours in the subject area for which he is applying. (See "U.S.
Secondary Schools Subject Matter Requirements" attached.)

(c) College

The applicant must have at least 30 semes-
ter hours in the subject area for which he is applying. (See
"Canal Zone College Subject Matter Requirements" attached.)

(d) Counselor

The applicant for a counseling position
must have a degree showing he majored in guidance. If he does
not have a degree in guidance, he must have at least 18 semester
hours in the area (in addition to the education requirements in
Par. (3) below).

(e) Special Education

The applicant must hold a valid certifi-
cate from a state department of education in the United States
showing that he is qualified to teach in the area of exception-
ality for which he is applying. In lieu of this, an applicant
must have a minimum of 18 semester hours in special education
which include certain required courses in the area of special-
ization (see Special Education Subject Matter Requirements,
attached).

(3) Education Requirements

The applicant must have a minimum of 18 se-
mester hours in the field of professional education.

(4) Citizenship Requirements

The applicant must be a United States citizen,
except for the teaching of the Spanish language, in which case
he must be either a Panamanian or U.S. citizen.

(5) Reference Requirements

The candidate must have a minimum of three
references either on Form 1021 or on placement office forms.
These ratings must be from persons who have observed the appli-
cant's teaching in a supervisory capacity, one of which must









CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT Cl-9
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS

be from the school where he most recently taught. One Form 1021
documenting a personal interview conducted by a Canal Zone Schools'
official can be the equivalent to two references.

(6) Physical Requirements

The applicant must meet the Panama Canal
Company/Canal Zone Government height-weight-age standards.

(7) Experience

Experience is required for all counseling posi-
tions regardless of grade level and all college positions, as
shown below. All experience, whether required for minimum quali-
fication or for points above the minimum 70 (par. below), must
have been satisfactory experience earned as a full-time staff mem-
ber of an accredited school for a full academic year (not more
than 40 days without pay during the school year). Qualifying
experience must have been subsequent to receipt of the bachelor's
degree.

(a) Counselors

The applicant must have five years satis-
factory teaching and/or counseling experience at the grade level
for which he is applying. Two years of practical experience in
business, industrial, governmental or military counseling may be
used to meet the five year requirement.

(b) College

The applicant for a teaching position at
the college level must have three years satisfactory secondary
and/or college teaching experience.

(8) The candidate must not have had his teaching
certificate revoked in any state in the past five years.

b. Additional Points for Training and Experience Above
Minimum Requirements.


as follows:


From 70 to 100, that is, 30 points, may be earned









Cl-10






























area (Max.


minimum qu


CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS

(1) Training 0-15 Points

(a) Quantity of Training 0- 5 Points

(i) Positions requiring B.A. degree

B.A. plus 15 1
Master's 2
Master's plus 30 3
Master's plus 60 4
Doctor's degree 5

Maximum 5

(ii) Positions requiring Master's degree

Master's plus 30 3
Master's plus 60 4
Doctor's degree 5

Maximum 5

(b) Quality of Training 0-10 Points

Quality of training includes:

(i) Recency of training in subject or related
5)
Within 2 years 1 point per course (0-5)
Within 4 years 1 point per course (0-3)

(ii) Depth: 18 graduate semester hours above
alification hours in subject or related area (5)


(2) Experience 0-15 Points

(a) Quantity of Experience 0-10 Points

(i) 1 point for each year of full-time
teaching experience acquired within the past five years up to a
maximum of five years or 5 points.

(ii) 1 point for each year at the grade level
or teaching the subject for which applying up to a maximum of 5 years








CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT CI-11
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS

or 5 points, if acquired within the past 5 years.

(b) Quality of experience 0-5 Points

Quality of experience includes:

(i) General ability as a teacher when
evaluated as "excellent" by supervisors. Two points for each
evaluation. (0-4 points)

(ii) Experience as an educational super-
visor or administrator (1).

c. Unsatisfactory Evaluations

Each rating of less than satisfactory in any one
area by an evaluator (see a. (5) above) will result in the de-
duction of 5 points. Unsatisfactory evaluations shall not lower
the applicant's earned rating below 70 points.

d. Veterans Points 0-10 Points

In addition, those entitled to veteran's preference
will receive 5 or 10 points which will be added to their total
earned rating which may give them a final rating in excess of
100 points.

e. Suitability

Applicants must meet the minimum standards speci-
fied in the Canal Zone Merit System Suitability Guide prior to
employment. Questionable suitability for employment will delay
an applicant's final rating until resolved.

f. Substitute Teachers

(1) Elementary

(a) Bachelor's degree (See a (1) is the
minimum requirements for all levels.

(b) Must have no less than 21 semester hours
in education which must include one course in teaching of
reading and one course in modern math or the teaching of modern
math.







C1-12 CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS

(2) Secondary

(a) 18 semester hours in education.

(b) 18 semester hours in a general subject area
such as social studies, science, business education, etc.

g. U.S. Secondary Subject Matter Requirements

(1) Art (Junior-Senior High)

At least 18 semester hours in art.

(2) Business Education

(a) Bookkeeping (Senior High)

(i) Two courses in bookkeeping or accounting

(ii) Sufficient related business education
courses to complete the minimum requirement of 18 semester hours in
the subject area.

(b) General Business (Senior High)

(i) One course in bookkeeping or accounting

(ii) Sufficient related business education
courses to complete the minimum requirement of 18 semester hours in
the subject area.

(c) Secretarial (Senior High)

(i) One course in advanced typing

(ii) One course in advanced shorthand

(iii) Sufficient related business education
courses to complete the minimum requirement of 18 semester hours in
the subject area.

(3) English (Junior-Senior High)

(a) Four courses in grammar, composition,
linguistics or rhetoric.








CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGIUHENT C1-13
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS

(b) Sufficient related English courses to com-
plete the minimum requirement of 18 semester hours in the subject
area.

(4) Foreign Language (Junior-Senior High)

At least 18 semester hours of a foreign language
(Spanish, French or Latin). At least two courses must have been
at the senior level.

(5) Home Economics (Junior-Senior High)

(a) One course in food preparation

(b) One course in clothing construction

(c) One course in personal adjustment or family
living

(d) Sufficient related home economics courses
to complete the minimum requirement of 18 semester hours in the
subject area.

(6) Industrial Arts (Junior-Senior High) (at least
3 of the following)

(a) One course in woodworking

(b) One course in metals

(c) One course in electricity

(d) One course in mechanical drawing

(e) Sufficient related Industrial Arts courses
to complete the minimum requirement of 18 semester hours in the
subject area.

(7) Journalism (Senior High)

At least 18 semester hours in journalism

(8) Mathematics (Junior-Senior High)

(a) At least 18 semester hours of mathematics.








Cl-14 CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT '
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS

(b) At least one course in calculus

(9) Music

At least 18 semester hours in music.

(10) Physical Education (Junior-Senior High)

At least 18 semester hours in physical education.

(11) Science

(a) Biology (Senior High)

(i) Two courses in general biology or one
course in general botany and one course in general zoology.

(ii) One course in vertebrate anatomy

(iii) One course in genetics

(iv) One course in general chemistry

(v) Sufficient related biology courses to
complete the minimum requirement of 18 semester hours in the subject
area.

(b) Chemistry (Senior High)

(i) Two courses in general chemistry

(ii) One course in qualitative analysis

(iii) One course in quantitative analysis

(iv) One course in organic chemistry

(v) Sufficient related chemistry courses
to complete the minimum requirement of 18 semester hours in the
subject area.

(c) Earth Science (Junior High)

(i) One course in geology
(ii) One course in astronomy
(iii) One course in meteorology








Cl-14 CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS


specific professional preparation in administration and supervision.
Special consideration will be given to the personal characteristics
of the candidates. Consideration will also be given to the amount,
quality, and character of the applicant's professional preparation
and experience. Other things being equal, preference will be given
to candidates who have had training and successful experience in the
field of the vacancy.

7. Substitute Teachers, U.S. Schools.

a. The minimum requirements for all substitute teachers
are:

(1) Age No person under 21 years of age will be
appointed.

(2) Citizenship United States except for substitute
teachers of the Spanish language who may be Panamanian citizens.

(3) Academic Qualifying academic training must be
from a fully accredited college or university in the United States
or the Canal Zone.

b. Additional minimum requirements for Substitute Teacher
(Level I):

(1) Bachelor's degree.

(2) Elementary specialization

(a) 21 semester credits in professional education
or methods courses including one course in the teaching of reading
and one course in mathematics or the teaching of mathematics.

(3) Secondary specialization

(a) 15 semester credits in professional education
or methods courses.

(b) 18 semester credits in a general subject area
applicable to the Canal Zone Schools.

(4) Panamanian citizens must have 18 semester credits
in Spanish for elementary and secondary levels.


Rev. 75-2 (10/1/74)






CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT Cl-14a
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS


c. Additional minimum requirements for Provisional
Substitute Teacher (Level I):

(1) Bachelor's degree, but does not meet the special-
ization requirements for Substitute Teacher.

(2) Completion of Canal Zone College Course ED150,
Substitute Teaching in the Canal Zone, which includes a 30-hour
practicum.

(3) For secondary schools, 18 semester credits in
a general subject area applicable to the Canal Zone Schools.

(4) For elementary and secondary schools, the
Panamanian teacher must have 18 semester credits in Spanish.

(5) Prior to or Within one calendar year of employ-
ment as Provisional Substitute Teacher, completion of the follow-
ing courses or their equivalents is required:

(a) Audiovisual Materials in Education

(b) For elementary specialization, U.S. citizens
must complete two courses, Teaching Reading in the Elementary
Schools, and Teaching Math in the Elementary Schools.

d. Additional minimum requirements for Substitute
Teaching Assistant (Level II):

(1) Associate of Arts degree'or a minimum of 60
semester hours of college credits.

(2) Completion of Canal Zone College Course ED150,
Substitute Teaching in the Canal Zone, which includes a 30-hour
practicum.

(3) Prior to or within one calendar year of employ-
ment, completion of the following courses or their equivalents:

(a) Audiovisual Materials in Education

(b) For elementary specialization, U.S. citizens
must complete two courses, Teaching Reading in the Elementary
Schools and Teaching Math in the Elementary Schools.

(c) For secondary specialization, U.S. citizens
must complete one course from any three of the four major subject
areas, English, social studies, science, or mathematics.


Rev. 75-2 (10/1/74)






Cl-14b CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS


(d) For elementary and secondary, Panamanian
citizens must complete at least one college level course in Spanish.

e. Additional minimum requirements for Substitute
Teaching Aide (Level III):

(1) Diploma from an accredited high school in the
United States or the Canal Zone.

(2) Eligibility to enroll in the Canal Zone College.

(3) Recommendation of the appropriate assistant
superintendent.

(4) Completion of Canal Zone College Course ED150,
Substitute Teaching in the Canal Zone.


f. Waiver Clause If an applicant for Substitute Teacher,
Level I, has some special qualifications in terms of training or
experience, but does not meet the specialization requirements for
Substitute Teacher (Level I), the Superintendent of Schools, with
administrative approval, may waive any of the qualification
standards listed under "Additional Minimum Requirements" and
accept the special training and/or experience in lieu of the re-
quired courses if he feels it to be in the best interests of the
Schools Division.

g. If substitute teachers in Provisional Substitute
(Level I) or Substitute Teaching Assistant (Level II) do not fulfill
the requirements as set forth in c.(5) and d.(3) of this section,
the Superintendent of Schools will do one of the following:

(1) Grant additional time to fulfill the requirements
and rehire at the same level.

(2) Rehire at the next lower level.

(3) Not rehire.

8. Promotion to Supervisory and Administrative Positions.
a. Promotions to supervisory and administrative positions
within the Division of Schools shall be made in accordance with the
Civil Affairs Bureau Promotion Plan, as revised May 1, 1964.
b. The purpose of this plan is to provide systematic and
clearly stated methods, guided by the merit principle, of making pro-
motions in the Civil Affairs Bureau. This plan conforms with and sup-
plements the principles and requirements set forth in the Company-
Government Promotion Policy published in Chapter 335 of the Company/
Government Personnel Manual.
Rev. 75-2 (10/1/74)




















































H:








CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT Cl-15
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS

(iv) One course in chemistry

(v) Sufficient related earth science
courses to complete the minimum requirement of 18 semester hours
in the subject area.

(d) Life Science (Junior High)

(i) Two courses in general biology or
one course in general botany and one course in general zoology.

(ii) One course in anatomy (vertebrate)

(iii) One course in general chemistry.

(iv) Sufficient related biology courses
to complete the minimum requirements of 18 semester hours in the
subject area.

(e) Physical Science (Junior-Senior High)

(i) Two courses in general chemistry

(ii) Two courses in physical science
or general physics

(iii) Sufficient related physical science
courses to complete the minimum requirement of 18 semester hours
in the subject area.

(f) Physics (Senior High)

(i) Two courses in general physics

(ii) Sufficient related physics courses
to complete the minimum requirement of 18 semester hours in the
subject area.

(g) Physiology (Senior High)

(i) One course in human anatomy

(ii) One course in human physiology









C1-16 CHAPTER C1 APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS

(iii) One course in general chemistry

(iv) Sufficient related biology courses to
complete the minimum requirement of 18 semester hours in the subject
area.

(12) Social Studies

(a) American Institutions (Economics, American
Government)
(i) At least two courses in American govern-
ment
(ii) At least two courses in Economics

(iii) Sufficient courses in related social
studies to complete the minimum requirement of 18 semester hours.

(b) Geography

(i) At least four courses in Geography

(ii) Sufficient courses in related social
studies to complete the minimum requirements of 18 semester hours.

(c) United States History

(i) At least three courses in United States
History or
(ii) Two courses in United States History
and one course in American Government.

(iii) Sufficient courses in related social
studies to complete the minimum requirement of 18 semester hours.

(d) World History

(i) At least one course from four of the
five areas: United States History, Latin American History, European
History, African History and Asian History.

(ii) Sufficient courses in related social
studies to complete the minimum requirements of 18 semester hours.








CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT Cl-17
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS

(13) Speech and Drama (Senior High)

At least 18 semester hours in speech and drama
(combined).

h. Special Education Subject Matter Requirements

(1) Categories of Exceptionality

(a) At the present time, the Special Education
Department provides services to the following categories of excep-
tional children.

(i) Mentally Retarded (both Trainable
and Educable)
(ii) Deaf and Hard of Hearing

(iii) Blind and Partially Seeing

(iv) Physically Handicapped

(v) Speech Defective

(vi) Retarded Readers

(vii) Learning Disorders

(b) Ancillary services are offered by psycho-
logists, educational prescriptionist, a physical therapist, and
an occupational therapist.

(2) Certification Requirements

(a) Mentally Handicapped (Trainable and
Educable)
(i) Bachelor's degree for elementary
positions and Master's degree for secondary level positions.

(ii) Minimum of 18 semester hours in
education.
(iii) 15 semester hours in special edu-
cation, which include courses equivalent to those below. The
other courses listed are suggested for teaching in the area.









Cl-18 CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS

*A. Methods and materials for teaching
mentally retarded children.
*B. Introduction to education of the
exceptional child.
*C. Building a curriculum for mentally
retarded children.
D. Psychology of the handicapped.

E. Diagnosis and remediation of
reading disorders.
F. Child growth and development.

G. Speech correction.

H. Orientation to psychological tests.

I. Arts and crafts for the mentally
retarded.
(b) Physically Handicapped

(i) Bachelor's degree

(ii) Minimum of 18 semester hours in edu-
cation
(iii) An applicant must have 15 semester
hours in special education which include courses equivalent to
those below. The other courses listed are suggested for teaching
in the area.
*A. Methods of teaching the learning
disordered child.
*B. Introduction to the education of
the exceptional child.
*C. Medical and health problems of
the physically handicapped.
D. Diagnosis and remediation of
reading disorders.
E. Methods and materials for
teaching brain-injured children.

F. Child growth and development.

G. Orientation to psychological
tests.
H. Counseling and vocational
guidance for the handicapped.









CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT Cl-19
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS

I. Anatomy and physiology.

J. Rehabilitation through
physical education, physical therapy and occupational therapy.

K. Speech correction.

(c) Visually Handicapped

(i) Bachelor's degree

(ii) Minimum of 18 semester hours in
education
(iii) An applicant must have 15 semester
hours in special education, which include courses or equivalents
to those below. The other courses listed are suggested for
teaching in the area.
*A. Methods of teaching blind or
partially sighted children.
*B. Introduction to education of
the handicapped.
*C. Braille and methods of teaching
braille.
D. Psychology of the handicapped.

E. Child growth and development.

F. Orientation in psychological
tests.
G. Visual impairments and their
educational and social implications.

H. Counseling and vocational
guidance for the handicapped.
I. Reading disabilities.

J. Methods of teaching typewriting.

(d) Auditorilly Handicapped

(i) Bachelor's degree

(ii) Minimum of 18 semester hours in
education.
(iii) An applicant must have 15 semester









Cl-20 CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS

hours in special education, which include courses or equivalents to
those below. The other courses listed are suggested for teaching
in the area.


*A.
hard of hearing.
*B.
handicapped.
*C.
to the deaf or hard of hearing.

D.

E.

F.

G.

H.

I.


Methods of teaching the deaf or

Introduction to education of the

Teaching speech and speech reading


Psychology of the handicapped.

Child growth and development.

Reading disabilities.

Speech correction.

Orientation in psychological tests.

Teaching language to the deaf or


hard of hearing.
J. Anatomy and physiology of the ear
and speech mechanisms.
K. Audiometry, hearing aids, and
auditory training.
L. Counseling and vocational guidance
for the handicapped.

(e) Speech Correction.

(i) Bachelor's degree.

(ii) Minimum of 18 semester hours in edu-
cation.
(iii) An applicant must.have 15 semester
hours in special education, which include courses or equivalents to
those below. The other courses listed are suggested for teaching
in the area.
*A. Speech correction

*B. Introduction to education of the
handicapped.
*C. Introduction to audiology.


e









CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT Cl-21
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS

*D. Clinical practice in speech
therapy (150 clock hours supervised practicing experience).

E. Psychology of the handicapped.

F. Child growth and development.

G. Reading disabilities.

H. Orientation in psychological
tests.
I. Anatomy and physiology of the
ear and speech mechanisms.
J. Phonetics.

K. Speech pathology

(f) Remedial Reading

(i) Bachelor's degree.

(ii) Applicant must have 18 semester
hours in education, which include courses or equivalents to
those below. The other courses listed are suggested for
teaching in the area.
*A. Reading methods.

*B. Analysis and correction of
reading disability.
C. Diagnostic and remedial
instruction.
D. Orientation to psychological
tests.
E. Diagnosis and remediation of
learning disorders.

(g) School Psychologist

(i) Master's degree in special edu-
cation, psychology, or educational psychology from an accred-
ited college or university.

(ii) Minimum of 18 semester hours in
education.
(iii) Course work completed should be
distributed in the following areas:









C1-22 CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS

A. Remedial instruction.

B. Individual and group mental tests.

C. Psychology and education of excep-
tional children.
D. Child development, Mental hygiene,
and Counseling and guidance, including interviewing.

(h) Clinical Psychologist

(i) Master's degree in special education
and/or psychology.
(ii) Fifteen graduate credits in psychology
and/or special education to include courses equivalent to those
listed below
A. Psychometric procedures

B. Educational diagnostic techniques

C. Projective techniques

D. Educational or psychological
statistics
E. Introduction to the exceptional
child
F. Remedial education

(iii) One year of closely supervised expe-
rience in the individual clinical examination of children.

(iv) Five years of clinical experience or
four years of clinical experience and at least one year of public
school teaching experience.

(i) Physical Therapist

(i) Bachelor's degree

(ii) Minimum of 18 semester hours in edu-
cation
(iii) Certification as a physical therapist
from an accredited school approved by the American Physical Therapy
Association.








CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGEIIENT Cl-23
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS

(j) Educational Prescriptionist

(i) Master's degree in special education,
or elementary education, reading, learning disorders, psychology.

(ii) Minimum of 18 semester hours in edu-
cation.
(iii) Applicant must have demonstrated
successful teaching experience in special education, remedial
reading, and/or elementary education.

(iv) Applicant must have demonstrated
ability to plan, design, and conduct remediation programs based
upon an educational assessment. This includes the selection and
utilization of appropriate educational activities, technological
equipment, materials, and techniques.

(k) Learning Disabilities

(i) Master's degree

(ii) Minimum of 18 semester hours in
education
(iii) Applicant must have 15 semester
hours in special education which include courses equivalent to
those below. The other courses listed are suggested for
teaching in the area:

*A. Introduction to the education
of exceptional children.
*B. Identification of learning
disabilities.
*C. Remediation of learning disa-
bilities.
D. Arithmetic disorders

E. Corrective reading

F. Remedial reading and writing

G. Theory and problems of spoken
language
H. Practicum in learning disa-
bilities








C1-24 CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS

i. Canal Zone College Course Requirements.

(One course is equivalent to three semester hours)

(1) Business Education

(a) Accounting and Law

(i) 6 courses in Accounting

(ii) 2 courses in Law

(iii) Sufficient related business courses
to complete the minimum requirement of 30 semester hours.

(b) Business Administration

(i) 2 courses in Economics

(ii) 2 courses in Management

(iii) 1 course in Business Math

(iv) 1 course in Marketing

(v) Sufficient related business courses
to complete the minimum requirement of 30 semester hours.

(c) Secretarial Administration

(i) 2 courses in Advanced Typing**

(ii) 2 courses in Advanced Shorthand**

(iii) 2 courses in Business Machines

(iv) Sufficient related business courses
to complete the minimum requirement of 30 semester hours.

** U.S. Employment Service Certificate or Equivalent








CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT Cl-25
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS

(2) Education

(a) At least one course in Educational Psychol-
ogy.
(b) At least one course in Modern Philosophies
of Education

(c) At least one course in Educational Tests
and Measurement

(d) At least one course in Audio-visual tech-
niques and materials production

(e) Sufficient courses in related education
areas to meet the minimum requirement of 30 semester hours.

(3) English

(a) 1 course in American literature

(b) 1 course in English literature

(c) 1 course in world literature

(d) 4 courses in Composition

(e) 1 course in Speech

(f) Sufficient related English courses to
complete the minimum requirement of 30 semester hours.

(4) Foreign Languages

A minimum of 30 semester hours in the language.

(5) Library Science

A minimum of 30 semester hours in Library
Science.

(6) Mathematics

(a) 1 course in Linear Algebra

(b) 1 course in Differential Equations









Cl-26 CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS

(c) Sufficient related Mathematics courses to
complete the minimum requirement of 30 semester hours.

(7) Science

(a) Biology

(i) 1 course in Invertebrate Zoology

(ii) 1 course in Plant Morphology

(iii) 1 course in Comparative Anatomy

(iv) 2 courses in General Chemistry

(v) 2 courses in Organic Chemistry

(vi) Sufficient related Biology courses to
complete the minimum requirement of 30 semester hours.

(b) Chemistry

(i) 2 courses in General Chemistry

(ii) 1 course in Qualitative Analysis

(iii) 1 course in Quantitative Analysis

(iv) 2 courses in Organic Chemistry

(v) Sufficient related Chemistry courses
to complete the minimum requirement of 30 semester hours.

(c) Physics

(i) 2 courses in General Physics

(ii) 1 course in Engineering Physics

(iii) 1 course in Statics and Dynamics

(iv) Math through differential equations

(v) Sufficient related Physics courses to
complete the minimum requirement of 30 semester hours.








CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGIIMENT Cl-27
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS

(8) Social Science

(a) Behavioral Science

(i) At least two courses in Psychology
(other than Educational Psychology)

(ii) At least one course in Anthropology

(iii) At least one course in Sociology

(iv) Sufficient courses in related
Behavioral science to meet the minimum requirement of 30 semester
hours.

(b) United States History

(i) At least two courses in United
States History
(ii) At least one course in United States
Government
(iii) At least one course from two of the
three areas: Geography, Economics, Latin American History

(iv) Sufficient courses in related
history areas to meet the minimum requirement of 30 semester
hours.

(c) World Civilizations

(i) At least one course in Ancient
Civilizations
(ii) At least one course in World
History c. 500 A.D. to c. 1650 A.D.

(iii) At least one course in World
Civilizations c. 1650 A.D. to Present

(iv) At least one course from two of
the three areas: Geography, Economics, Latin American History

(v) Sufficient courses in related
history areas to meet the minimum requirement of 30 semester
hours.








CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGIMENIT Cl-28
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS


7. Promotion to Supervisory and Administrative Positions.

a. Promotions to supervisory and administrative positions
within the Division of Schools shall be made in accordance with the
Civil Affairs Bureau Promotion Plan, as revised May 1, 1964.

b. The purpose of this plan is to provide systematic and
clearly stated methods, guided by the merit principle, of making pro-
motions in the Civil Affairs Bureau. This plan conforms with and
supplements the principles and requirements set forth in the Company/
Government Promotion Policy published in Chapter 335 of the Company/
Government Personnel Manual.

c. This plan applies to all positions in the Division of
Schools below the level of Assistant Superintendent.

d. The first area of consideration will be the Schools
Division. After consideration has been given to all qualified can-
didates within the Schools Division and no selection made, the area
of consideration may be broadened in accordance with Chapter 335,
Company/Government Personnel Manual.

Candidates for promotion will be located by advertising
vacancies within the Schools Division. This may be accomplished by
posting vacancy announcements on bulletin boards or by memoranda.
Within five days from the date of the announcement, interested
employees must submit to the official advertising the vacancy a
brief memorandum request for consideration. If after at least five
work days from the date of the advertisement no selection can be
made, then the vacancy may be referred to the Personnel Bureau for
advertisement in the Company/Government Transfer-Vacancy Bulletin.
When no selection is made from among applicants answering advertise-
ments in the first area of consideration, selecting officials will
consider these applicants in competition with applicants at the next
and each successive area of consideration utilized.

e. Only qualified employees will be considered for pro-
motion. If knowledge or skill in a specific operation is essential,
consideration of candidates will be limited to those who possess
that qualification. It will be the responsibility of the employee
to make known his interest in the position vacancy by making written
application for consideration. However, management may consider
any qualified employee whether or not an application is received.


_ _~~ _____ ___ _









Cl-29 CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS

f. The qualification requirements as set forth under the
Canal Zone Merit System will be used as minimum qualification stand-
ards in filling vacant positions. Additional special qualifications
for some positions may be required for the most satisfactory selec-
tion of employees. These special qualifications will be realistic
in terms of kind and quality of work to be performed. Additional
qualification requirements for promotion may include one or more
of the following:

(1) Potential for future advancement.

(2) Personality factors such as ability to get along
with others, initiative, drive, etc.

(3) Special skills such as analytical ability.

(4) Substitutions in higher rated positions.

The nature and variety of qualification considerations for a partic-
ular position will be determined on the basis of the type of positic
involved; that is, certain qualifications required for promotion to
supervisory-level positions would not be applied to non-supervisory
ones, etc. Before announcing a vacancy, a decision will be made as
to any additional or special qualification requirements considered
necessary. These will be included in the announcement advertising
the vacancy.

g. The Superintendent of Schools or someone designated by
him will e'.'aluate the candidates. The evaluation process normally
may include any or all of the following techniques:

(1) Personal interview. A personal interview with
each applicant will provide the recommending official with personal
impressions of the employee and the opportunity to fill in gaps in
information which are not always readily apparent in an employee's
personnel file. The interview may be limited to those who are ap-
parently qualified and those who might qualify if certain questions
could be cleared up. The recommending official will use his best
judgment in this matter as to the importance of the position to be
filled, the number of applicants, the length of time involved in
interviewing the qualified persons, the urgency for filling the po-
sition, but he must give equal opportunity for an interview to each
apparently qualified applicant, if this method is used for any of
the applicants.
(2) Appraisal of experience. The criterion of experie
will be adjudged in the light of the requirements of the position to
filled and its relationship to higher positions of the same or simil
series. Consideration will be given to whether the experience has be









CHAPTER Cl APPOIINTMEIII REQUIRElMENTS, ASSIGNMENTI Cl-30
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, ArD PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS

of a nature related to the position to be filled, whether it
represents a rotation of more than one type of duties and a
progression of increasingly more responsible assignments. Mere
length of experience by itself will not be the controlling
factors in recommending employees for promotion. The length of
service will control the recommendation only when all other
factors considered are rated equal.

(3) Completion of training program. Training of a
broad related nature or specifically pointed at the duties of the
position to be filled will be considered by the recommending official
Training may be that given on the job by the Bureau or Company/
Government in a regular course, on the job through relief assign-
ments in the position to be filled or in similar positions where
the knowledge gained is pertinent, special training through
formalized courses in AMA, Civil Service Commission or Univer-
sities sponsored by the Company/Government, or after-hours training
at the employee's own expense and on his own time.

(4) Appraisals by former and present supervisors.
The recommending official may obtain information from former and
present supervisors of the applicants) to the extent that he
considers reasonable and feasible in the circumstances. This may
be done either by telephone, personal interview or in writing. The
information obtained by personal means (telephone or interview)
shall be noted in the recommending official's file on the subject
as a matter of record.

(5) Tests. To the extent that tests are required,
the relative standing of the applicants in such examinations will
be given due consideration.

(6) Group appraisals. To the extent considered
feasible and reasonable in the circumstances, the recommending
official may convene an advisory board of three employees of higher
grade than the employees) seeking promotion, to review the
applicantss' qualifications and to make a 1-2-3 recommendation
to the recommending official of its opinion as to the relative
merits of the several applicants for the position to be filled.
The recommending official will not be relieved of the responsibility
for the selection which he recommends.

h. The Superintendent of Schools or the division official
designated by him to be responsible for evaluating the candidates
shall select one applicant from among those employees determined
to be the best qualified. He shall recommend this applicant for










Cl-31 CHAPTER Cl APPOINTMENT REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENT
TO SALARY SCHEDULE, AND PROMOTION OF SCHOOL
OFFICERS AND TEACHERS


promotion. If ten or fewer qualified applicants are available, the
entire eligible group will be considered as the best qualified. If
there are more than ten qualified applicants, they will be ranked as
"best-qualified" or "qualified". If there are three or more in the
"best-qualified" group, selection will be made from this'group. If
fewer than three, selection will be made from the combined "best-
qualified" and "qualified" groups.

i. The selection recommended by the Superintendent or
designated division official will be forwarded to the Civil Affairs
Director, who shall review and approve all selections for promotion.
The approved selection will then be forwarded to the Personnel
Director to be handled in accordance with paragraph 1.5 of the
Company/Government Promotion Policy.

j. As soon as a promotion action has been made each
unsuccessful candidate within the bureau will be notified in
writing that his application was given careful consideration. He
will also be given the name of the successful candidate as determined
by the selection process. If there are specific ways that an
employee can become better qualified for future promotional oppor-
tunities, his supervisor will be prepared to offer this information
to the employee.

k. Employees may appeal promotion actions only on the
basis of procedural non-compliance. Such appeals will be handled
under the grievance procedure set forth in Chapter 335 of the Panama
Canal Personnel Manual.









CHAPTER C2 COMPENSATION, RATES OF PAY


PUBLISHED IN THE

OFFICIAL PERSONNEL MANUAL

OF THE

PANAMA CANAL COMPANY

AND

CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT


C2-1




















1







CHAPTER C3 CIVIL DEFENSE


1. External Threat.

a. Calculated initiation of general war by any present
nuclear power is considered unlikely. Nevertheless, as long as
the world's nuclear war-making capability exists and spreads,
there is a possibility that general war could occur through
accident, miscalculation, an irrational act, or the unplanned
escalation of limited war. The most likely contingency leading
to a nuclear attack would involve a substantial period of rising
international tension and crisis prior to a nuclear conflict.
Under nuclear attack, all areas are subject to the likelihood of
fallout radiation; and many areas would be subject to the hazards
of blast, fire, and initial radiation.

b. Since 1961, the primary emphasis of the office of
Civil Defense has been directed toward the creation of a protec-
tive base for the population; e.g., fallout shelters. Such a
system is being developed in the Canal Zone. When plans are
completed, each individual will be advised where to go and what
to do in an emergency. Each school will have a civil defense
plan which suits its particular situation and each teacher will
have an assignment.

c. Each school must have warning signals which resemble
the two public warning signals, as follows:

(1) Attention or Alert Signal: A steady tone on
sirens, horns, or other devices, of three (3) to five (5) minutes
duration. This signal means "listen for emergency information."
Tune your radio to SCN (790 kc Pacific Side and 1420 kc Atlantic
Side).

(2) Attack Warning Signal: A wavering tone on
sirens or series of short blasts on horns or other devices for
three (3) to five (5) minutes duration. This signal means that
an actual attack has been detected and that everyone should take
protective action immediately.

(3) There are no "all clear" signals.

d. At least three civil defense instructional periods
or drills (one must be held during the first semester) will be
held during each school year. A report of these instructional
periods or drills will be forwarded to the Office of the Super-
intendent of Schools by the start of the last grading period.
The Chief, Civil Defense, will furnish instructional material
and possibly films upon your request. (Telephone Balboa 3209)


Rev. 75-1 (7-1-74)


C3-1








CHAPTER C3 CIVIL DEFENSE


e. Before the start of each school year, it is the re-
sponsibility of the principal or Dean to review his existing civil defense
plan and issue instructions to the teachers and students within the first
few days of school. If changes in the plan are necessary, send a copy of
the revised plan to the Office of the Superintendent of Schools at the
beginning of the school year.

f. DEFCON 3: Upon notification by higher authority, the Super-
intendent of Schools or his Civil Defense representative will call the
principals or dean of each school. Principals will be informed that we
are entering DEFCON 3 and that they should review their civil defense
activities under DEFCON 1 and 2. All telephone calls should be limited
to short official messages. Schools will function normally.

g. DEFCON 2: Principals will be notified to have their
teachers inform all students that they should not return to school after
being dismissed. Pupils should be instructed to listen to SCN at home
for announcements regarding the reopening of school. All teachers will
move their attendance and scholarship record cards to their school office.
The principal of each unit will designate secretarial, custodial, and if
necessary, teacher help, to secure records, accountable forms, and money.

h. DEFCON 1: All school personnel except those designated to
secure these items are relieved of duty at this time to return to their
homes. After the records and buildings are secured, all remaining school
personnel will be relieved of duty to return to their homes. The cumu-
lative record folders, accountable forms, money, and current registration
cards will be secured in school offices/vaults.

2. Internal Disturbance.

a. These procedures will be implemented to provide guidance and
to control the movement of U.S. personnel and their dependents when a
local situation dictates.

Condition
Designator Description of Restriction

PML ALPHA (Normal) Exercise caution and avoid potentially hostile
crowds, i.e., meetings, demonstrations, etc.

PML BRAVO Do not wear uniforms or drive private vehicle in Panama
unless residing there or on official business; stay out of
Panama between 1800 and 0600 hours, unless residing there or
on essential business. U.S. personnel in Panama monitor SCN
(See b. below).


Rev. 75-1 (7-1-74)


C3-2








CHAPTER C3 CIVIL DEFENSE


Condition
Designator

PML CHARLIE




ML DELTA






PML ECHO


Description of Restriction


Enter Panama only on essential official business or if
residing there. Civilian clothing will be worn unless
official duties require otherwise. All private civilian
and Aero Club aircraft flying restricted to the Canal Zone.

Personnel residing in Panama remain inside their homes at
all times and prepare to evacuate to Canal Zone. Other
personnel enter Panama only if specifically authorized on
an indivual case basis. All private civilian and Aero
Club aircraft grounded. Transisthmian travel by rail,
water, or air only.

Dependents residing in Panama evacuate to the Canal Zone
or safe havens as directed by military authorities.


b. To "monitor SCN" means that military and civilian personnel
and their dependents should closely monitor SCN Radio and TV any time
Personnel Movement Limitations (PML) has been been imposed. SCN Radio
and SCN-TV will be used to provide general guidance regarding the PML in
effect, and specific instructions to be followed in the event evacuation
to a safe haven is directed.


Rev. 75-1 (7-1-74)


C3-3




























j







CHAPTER C4 LEAVE


1. Sick or Emergency Leave for Full-Time Teachers.

a. Full-time teachers shall be credited with 10 days leave at
the beginning of each school year. Such leave which is unused at the
end of the school year shall be accumulated for use in succeeding school
years without limit.

b. This leave shall be usable in accordance with this regula-
tion, for illness or injury, presence of contagious disease in the home,
occurrence of death in the family, or other pressing personal emergency.

c. Three (3) days of sick leave may be used for personal
reasons in a school year, provided not more than 5% or three persons per
school, whichever is greater, use it at the same time (other than to
attend a religious service or to observe a religious holiday), at least
a day's notice is given, and the permission of the principal is obtained.

d. Teachers employed after the beginning of the school year,
terminated prior to the end of the school year, or absent without pay
during the school year, shall forfeit leave credits on a pro rata basis,
the minimum forfeiture being one (1) day for a period of 30 consecutive
calendar days in a non-pay status or non-employee status.

e. Leave shall be chargeable only for absence upon days during
which the employee would otherwise work and receive pay and shall be
exclusive of holidays.

f. The resignation of a teacher to accept temporary summer
employment shall not prevent the accumulation of such leave provided
the teacher is reemployed as such by the opening day of the following
school year.

2. Request for Emergency Leave. A request for leave of absence
with pay to cover "pressing personal emergency" over which the employee
has no control (as set forth above in paragraph 1.b.) must be accompanied
by convincing evidence that the emergency is a "pressing" one. However,
in case of real emergency a teacher may request such leave by telephone
to the principal. As a general policy, a leave of absence with pay to
cover a "pressing personal emergency" requiring a trip to the United
States will be limited to five (5) school days and must be approved by
the appropriate assistant superintendent. When such leave falls imme-
diately before or after a school holiday period such as the Christmas
vacation, documentary evidence of the emergncy, such as a signed state-
ment by a licensed physician, must be submitted to the appropriate
assistant superintendent when the employee returns to duty.


Rev. 75-1 (7/1/74)


04-1








CHAPTER C4 LEAVE


a. Emergency leave concerned with serious illness or death
will be restricted to "immediate family." Immediate family is defined
as parents, spouse, brothers and sisters, and children, including step-
parents, half brothers and sisters, step-brothers and sisters, adoptive
and foster children. In case of death of parents, employed spouses may
also be granted emergency leave upon request; i.e., persons will be
granted emergency leave connected with death of parents-in-law but not
for other persons in an "in-law" relationship.

b. Emergency leave with pay may be continued beyond five
days (up to the limit of accumulated sick leave) by authorization of
the Superintendent of Schools when the emergency is of a nature requir-
ing continued presence of the employee. When the presence of an
employee is later necessary for settlement of an estate a second period
of emergency leave may be granted. Leave without pay may be granted
for emergency reasons beyond the amount of sick leave available, or in
lieu of sick leave upon request of the employee.

3. Responsibility for Certifying Absence. Although no certificate
from a physician is needed in the case of absence for less than three
days due to illness, the principal must be able to certify that the
absence is actually caused by illness.

4. Notification Concerning Absence. Absences will be charged in
multiples of one-half day and amounts of leave charged will be shown on
deduction slips for the period in which the absence occurred. Teachers
should report their absences from duty as follows:

a. All Elementary and Secondary Schools.

(1) First day of absence. Notify the principal the evening
before or between 6:30 and 6:45 a.m. the day of the absence. A sub-
stitute teacher will be engaged for one day only. No further calls are
necessary if the absence is of a single day's duration.

(2) Second day of absence. Notify the principal as above.
The substitute will continue to report thereafter until notified otherwise.

(3) Last day of absence (if more than one day). Notify
the principal of anticipated return to duty so that the substitute may be
informed.

b. Emergency absence. Teachers who have reported for duty and
who find themselves unable to continue because of illness should notify
the principal, and a substitute will be engaged. If this absence extends
into the second day, procedure should be followed as indicated under
"second day of absence" above.


Rev. 75-1 (7-1-74)


C4-2







CHAPTER C4 LEAVE


c. The rules and regulations provide that if a teacher, after
having been absent for more than one day, fails to make notification of
her intended return and in consequence a substitute is engaged, such
teacher shall forfeit pay for one-half day and the substitute shall be
paid for reporting for duty.

5. Sabbatical Leave Leave of Absence for Educational
Improvement.

a. In addition and without regard to any leave authorized
by other regulations, leave of absence for educational improvement
granted by the Civil Affairs Director upon recommendation of the Super-
intendent of Schools, will be considered according to the following
limitations and requirements:

(1) Leave of absence without pay will be granted to
teachers and school officers who have had at least four years con-
tinuous service in the Canal Zone Schools.

(a) Such leave will not be granted for periods of
less than or more than one school year.

(b) Leave cannot be granted unless the position can
be filled by temporary appointment or promotion.

(c) A detailed written plan of the educational work
and travel itineraryto be undertaken must be submitted in advance and
approved by the Superintendent of Schools. Any change to the plan must
also be approved in advance if credit earned during the leave is to be
accepted upon return.

(d) The person on leave must spend two semesters (or
three quarters) in resident study at an accredited institution of higher
education or may spend one semester (or two quarters) in study and the.
remainder of the time in travel.

(e) A transcript of credits earned and a report of any
travel undertaken must be submitted upon return to duty.

(2) Educational leave with part pay ("sabbatical leave")
will also be granted with the following requirements (in accordance with
procedures in Washington, D.C.) in addition to those in effect for leave
without pay:

(a) The individual must be in service in the Canal
Zone Schools for six continuous years (including current year) before
leave may be granted.


Rev. 75-1 (7-1-74)


04-3








CHAPTER C4 LEAVE


(b) To be eligible for educational leave with part
pay, persons must already be fully qualified for the position held.

(c) Any person granted leave with part pay must agree
to serve in the Canal Zone Schools for a period of two years upon return
from leave.

(d) Not more than two per cent of the total number
of employees may be on leave with part pay at the same time. If more
than two per cent apply, preference will be given to those with the
most service.

(e) Partial pay will consist of half the current pay
of the person on leave, less normal deductions for retirement, income
tax, health insurance, etc., not to exceed one half the salary of Class 15,
Group D.

b. Regulations require that application for educational leave,
together with tentative plans, be submitted at least five months prior
to the close of the school year. Form 267, Request for Leave, will be
completed, and attached thereto will be the tentative plans for study and
travel.

c. The general regulations issued by the Personnel Director
governing educational leave with part pay or without pay stipulate that
"... The request shall include a written plan of the educational work or
educational work and travel itinerary to be undertaken, which shall.be
approved by the Superintendent of Schools under supplementary require-
ments established by the Superintendent of Schools..."

d. The general regulations also provide in relation to selec-
tion that:

"17.27(b)(5) Selection for Sabbatical Leaves. In
evaluating applications for educational leave, the following factors may
be considered in making selections:

"(a) Relation of the program to the teaching or adminis-
trative assignment of the applicant and to special needs of the schools.

"(b) Effectiveness of teaching and professional dedication
of the applicant, as evaluated by supervisors.

"(c) Availability of a qualified replacement for the
applicant during the period of leave."


Rev. 75-1 (7-1-74)


C4-4








CHAPTER C4 LEAVE


e. In relation to the above the following guidelines are
provided for persons interested in applying for leave:

(1) The primary purpose of the sabbatical leave program is
improvement of the educational program of the school system. Therefore,
applications must be evaluated in terms of value of their proposed
program of study and travel to the present assignment of the applicant
or to some indicated possible future assignment.

(2) Applications showing a graduate degree program will
be evaluated more highly than those which show no degree goal.

(3) It will be necessary for the applicant to show
evidence of acceptance by a specific institution for the program to be
studied. When an applicant has already been attending a graduate
institution, new evidence of acceptance will not be required unless
there is a significant change in program or degree goal.

(4) There must be demonstrated aptitude to pursue success-
fully the indicated program. This aptitude may be indicated by such
evidence as prior academic record, responsibilities undertaken previ-
ously in his career, acceptance by the graduate institution, and any
aptitude tests such as the Graduate Record Examination.

(5) Evaluation by supervisory personnel must indicate
that the applicant is a person with above-average present performance
and above-average future promise. Performance by an applicant which is
"satisfactory" does not in itself guarantee approval of an application
for sabbatical leave.

(6) The applicant must list the exact courses to be
studied. Changes in the program will obviously be necessary in many
instances, but the initial list of courses will provide evidence that
the program has been planned adequately. Later changes in the program
must be submitted to the Superintendent of Schools for approval.

f. Leave applications which involve travel must include an
itinerary for the travel with places to be visited and periods of time
involved, though exact dates are not required. Minor variation in the
program as approved need not be submitted but significant changes in
place or time should be reported to the Superintendent of Schools for
approval. Itineraries should indicate any professional meetings to be
attended, schools to be visited, and other activities which will be
related to the applicant's present assignment or future professional goal.


Rev. 75-1 (7-1-74)


C4-5








CHAPTER C4 LEAVE


g. Periods of leave with half pay preclude the acceptance during
the leave period of full-time teaching assignments. An individual may
teach not to exceed six hours a week with pay or may teach on part-time
basis while on educational leave without pay provided the approved academic
and related program is carried out. A teaching assignment with pay (ex-
cept when compensated on a fee basis) can only be in a non-government
facility, i.e., it cannot be in the legislative, executive, or judicial
branch of the Government of the United States (including non-appropriated
fund instrumentalities under the jurisdiction of the armed forces) or in
the municipal government of the District of Columbia.

h. Persons on a leave-without-pay basis for educational improve-
ment may obtain approval to accept full-time teaching with pay in the
United States, if the proposed teaching will contribute to the profes-
sional development of the applicant, and provided that the approved
academic study program of the applicant includes the equivalent of at
least one semester of graduate study. Such leave without pay may also
be approved for persons who are to accept a foreign one-way exchange
teaching position with pay related to their teaching field since such
teaching assignments will be considered to include educational improvement
per se.

6. Request for Leave Without Pay. A request for leave of absence
without pay, local or U.S., may be granted for any pressing personal
activity within the control of the individual which cannot reasonably be
handled outside school hours or during vacation periods. The request must
be made to the principal and approved by the appropriate assistant super-
intendent.

7. Detached Duty Status. A teacher, principal, or supervisor may
be placed in a detached duty status with the approval of the appropriate
assistant superintendent.

8. Retirement and Insurance Benefits for School Personnel on
Sabbatical Leave.

a. Because salary is paid during the sabbatical leave the entire
period of such leave is treated as creditable service. Retirement deduc-
tions are withheld at the proper percent of the salary rate in effect while
on sabbatical leave, which is regarded as the basic salary rate not only for
deduction purposes but for annuity computation purposes if it is material
at retirement in computing the highest three year average salary.

b. Consistent with the above, the salary rate in effect while o
on sabbatical leave is also considered base salary for Federal Employee's
Group Life Insurance purposes. Life insurance withholding and contribu-
tions while on sabbatical leave will, therefore, be in amounts which
correspond to the reduced amounts of insurance.
Rev. 75-1 (7/1/74)








CHAPTER C4 LEAVE


c. Health benefits enrollment and withholding and contri-
butions (at the full prevailing rates for the plan in which the par-
ticular employee is enrolled) will continue during the period of
sabbatical leave.

d. Leave of absence without pay will be credited toward
retirement not to exceed six months in any calendar year.


Rev. 75-1 (7-1-74)


C4-7











CHAPTER C5 CONDUCT OF SCHOOL OFFICERS C5-1
AND EMPLOYEE RELATIONS


1. Employee Conduct and Supervision. Supervisors at all
levels are responsible for providing the leadership and example
that ordinarily will result in obtaining from employees willing
and full compliance with instructions, with established policies,
procedures, rules and regulations, and with accepted standards of
personal conduct. If an employee's performance of duty or his
personal conduct is unsatisfactory because of neglect of duty or
failure or unwillingness to comply with instructions or regulations,
appropriate disciplinary action will be taken. Employees will be
informed fully of the reason for any adverse personnel action
affecting them. An employee who believes that he has been treated
unfairly has recourse to the employee grievance procedure. Both
employees and supervisors should be familiar with:

a. Panama Canal Employee Responsibilities and Conduct,
Title 35, Chapter 1

b. Discipline and Employee Grievance Appeals,
Executive Regulation No. 5

c. Employee-Management Cooperation, Executive
Regulation No. 69

d. Procedure Governing Adverse Personnel Action,
Executive Regulation No. 70

2. Specific Items for Disciplinary Action.

a. Loans from subordinates. An employee who borrows
money from another employee or student over whom he exercises
supervision, control, or authority will be subject to dismissal
from the service.

b. Courtesy. Every person who transacts business or
comes in contact with any officer or employee of the Panama Canal
Company or the Canal Zone Government, regardless of the circum-
stances, is entitled to receive courteous and considerate treat-
ment. No person's prestige, dignity, contentment or other self-
interest is served by display of temper, annoyance or discourtesy
at any time and the business of the Company-Government organization
is affected adversely in every such incident. It is the duty of
every employee to exercise consideration, self-control, tact,
and courtesy in all circumstances in his dealings with the public
and with his fellow employees.








C5-2 CHAPTER C5 CONDUCT OF SCHOOL OFFICERS
AND EMPLOYEE RELATIONS


c. Profane and abusive language. The use of profane or
abusive language by those in authority in addressing subordinates
is forbidden and any violation may be regarded sufficient cause
for dismissal from the service.

d. Gifts.

(1) Acceptance of gifts. Officers and employees of
the Canal Zone Government and of the Panama Canal Company are cau-
tioned that neither they nor members of their immediate families
should accept any gift, except as provided in the paragraphs
below, which is tendered by reason of their official or employment
status. The legal and policy considerations which make the
acceptance of such gifts incompatible with the high standard of
conduct required of all officers and employees are believed to be
evident. Any officer or employee who accepts a gift which he
knows or has reasonable grounds for believing was tendered by
reason of his official or employment status shall be subject to
such disciplinary action, including dismissal from the service, as
may be deemed appropriate under the circumstances.

(2) Acceptance of gifts, decorations, or awards
from foreign governments. As a matter of law, officers and em-
ployees of the United States Government accepting any present,
decoration, award, or other article conferred or presented by any
foreign government must be approved by the U.S. Department of
State. Officers or employees of the Panama Canal Company or
Canal Zone Government who receive information that they are to
be tendered gifts, decorations, or awards by a foreign government
must report the facts to the office of the Governor to receive
instructions as to applicable laws and procedures.

(3) Christmas gifts.

(a) It is school policy to discourage chil-
dren from giving Christmas presents to principals, teachers, or
janitors. This policy was designed to eliminate the competitive
and semicompulsive feeling that sometimes develops among children
in matters of this kind. Principals should announce tactfully
to pupils that teachers are not permitted to receive gifts at the
school.

(b) Teachers are permitted to receive gifts
from pupils if they are mailed or delivered at home. However,
even this practice is undesirable, for reasons indicated above,
and it is suggested that all concerned discourage it whenever
they can.








CHAPTER C5 CONDUCT OF SCHOOL OFFICERS C5-3
AND EMPLOYEE RELATIONS


(c) If the students in any classroom wish, there
is no objection to their bringing Christmas cards or small gifts,
which cost not more than fifty cents, for exchange among the mem-
bers of their class, the arrangement for exchange to be worked
out by the students and approved by the teacher.

(d) School children should not contribute toward
Christmas presents for janitors. Principals and teachers who de-
sire to give the janitors money or other gifts at Christmas may do
so.

e. Correspondence.

(1) Correspondence with business concerns. Teachers
are prohibited from corresponding with commercial firms or
publishing companies concerning purchases to be made or already
made by the Division of Schools, the Canal Zone Government, or the
Panama Canal Company. Those who wish to secure information from
such companies on such matters should transmit their requests to
the school principal. This does not preclude teachers writing for
free materials available from commercial sources, so long as there
is clearly no commitment by the Division of Schools or the Panama
Canal Company.

(2) Correspondence with high officials. High
officials of the Canal Zone Government, Panama Canal Company, the
Army, Navy, Air Force, the Republic of Panama, the United States
Embassy, or the diplomatic corps will not be sent individual invi-
tations to attend school programs or similar functions without
clearance by the appropriate assistant superintendent. This plan
will insure compliance with protocol and policy considerations.

f. Private employment and other business interests. No
employee shall engage actively in any private business, or accept
employment on the Isthmus with any corporation, firm, or individ-
ual, without permission from the office of the Governor-President.
Any employee who engages in such activity without permission or
who fails to observe other provisions of these regulations
related to outside employment is subject to disciplinary action
which may include dismissal.

(1) An employee's request for permission to engage
in outside employment or other business activities must be for-
warded to the Executive Secretary through the Superintendent of
Schools for the latter's recommendation or comment.








C5-4 CHAPTER C5 CONDUCT OF SCHOOL OFFICERS
AND EMPLOYEE RELATIONS


(2) The application must be made on the proper form
provided for this purpose. The authority must be renewed annually.
The total number of hours of such outside employment should not
exceed six per week if the duties involve teaching classes which
require outside preparation or eight per week if the duties involve
teaching which require little outside preparation.

(3) During the school year no teacher will tutor for
compensation any pupil who is regularly taught,by said teacher.

g. Lectures and instruction by nonemployees of the
Division of Schools. No persons, except those officially con-
nected with the Division of Schools, shall be permitted to give
instruction or deliver lectures in the classroom without the ap-
proval of the principal. No persons, except those officially con-
nected with the Division of Schools, shall be permitted to give
instruction or deliver lectures or talks before a school assembly
without the approval of the appropriate assistant superintendent.

h. Talks or speeches at public or private functions.
Talks or speeches at public or private functions concerning Com-
pany-Government policy by employees of the Division of Schools
must be cleared in advance with the Superintendent of Schools.

3. Termination of Service.

a. Rating of teachers. When termination of service
papers and other forms require the rating of teachers, when the
good of the service demands it, or when other school officials
request it, teachers will be reported from the Division of Schools
as "Outstanding," "Satisfactory," or "Unsatisfactory." In rating
teachers the following points will be among those considered.
Special application is made to the act of teaching.

(1) Quality of performance, including such fac-
tors as thoroughness, dependability, orderliness, technical skill,
originality of suggestions pertaining to work improvement, and
effectiveness.

(2) Productiveness, including such factors as
amount of work done, industry, planning, promptness in complet-
ing assignments, and effectiveness in securing adequate output
from a unit.

(3) Qualifications shown on the job, including
such factors as knowledge of duties and related work, ability
to profit from observation and experience, training and education,








CHAPTER C5 CONDUCT OF SCHOOL OFFICERS C5-5
AND EMPLOYEE RELATIONS


judgment, initiative, cooperativeness, and effectiveness in
developing and training pupils.

b. Teachers not dismissed for cause or reduction of
force are retained. Teachers may be dismissed from the service
of the Division of Schools for cause such as: immoral, indis-
creet, or unprofessional conduct; incompetence; unfitness for
teaching; persistent violation of or refusal to obey the rules
of the Division of Schools and the instructions of the Super-
intendent of Schools or of his administrative school officials;
and failure to pay just debts.

c. Any teacher who wishes to resign will consider the
following:

(1) A resignation shall be submitted to the
Superintendent of Schools as soon as possible, and in any event
at least thirty days before such resignation is to be effective.

(2) The Division of Schools will not normally
recommend favorably a teacher who resigns during a school year,
except for emergency.

4. Performance Ratings.

a. Authority. The Panama Canal Performance Rating
Plan has been approved by the Civil Service Commission as meeting
the requirements of the Performance Rating Act of 1950.

b. Purpose. The purpose of the plan is to evaluate
the work performance of officers and employees in order to
recognize their merits and contributions to efficiency and
economy. It shall provide such officers and employees with
the following:

(1) Information as to what are the performance
requirements of their jobs;

(2) An appraisal, or rating, of their perform-
ance in relation to such requirements; and

(3) A medium through which supervisors will
assist employees to improve the effectiveness of their perform-
ance, and through which supervisor-employee relationships may
be strengthened.









C5-6 CHAPTER C5 CONDUCT OF SCHOOL OFFICERS
AND EMPLOYEE RELATIONS


In addition, the plan will assist in determining proper personnel
actions, such as within-grade salary increases, promotions, demo-
tions, reassignments, transfers, separations, and reductions in
force. It also will contribute to the discovery, development,
and maximum utilization of employee's skills and qualifications
for the benefit of both management and employees.

c. Scope. All employees are covered by this plan.

d. Responsibility for administration. The Personnel
Director shall supervise generally the function of performance
rating. Bureau directors and division heads are responsible for
the thorough and proper administration of the function within
their particular units. Each supervisor is responsible for
rating each employee under his supervision by strict adherence to
the instructions and provisions of the plan.

e. Review and approval of ratings. "Satisfactory" and
"Unsatisfactory" ratings will be approved by the reviewing offi-
cial. The Incentive Awards Committee, which passes on awards for
superior accomplishments, shall operate for and exercise the
authority of the Governor-President in reviewing and approving
"Outstanding" ratings, as required by law to insure it is a fac-
tual report and that all aspects of performance not only exceed
normal requirements but are outstanding and deserving of special
commendation. The Personnel Director and the Chairman, Incentive
Awards Committee, shall issue such supplementary instructions as
may be necessary or desirable in the performance of their respec-
tive functions, with a view to publicizing, supplementing, and
securing compliance with regulations and procedures of the Civil
Service Commission.

f. Official performance ratings. Official performance
ratings shall be "Outstanding," "Satisfactory," and "Unsatisfac-
tory" and shall be given as either entrance or regular ratings.
An entrance rating of "Satisfactory" shall be given to an employee
when first assigned to any position. A regular rating is one re-
quired to be made six months after the appointment or change in
position of an employee only when a significant change in duties
and responsibilities has occurred, and annually thereafter on
March 31st. A regular rating must be based on at least 90
calendar days of service. Ratings will be deferred until the
end of the 90-day period or in the case of an "Unsatisfactory"
rating, until the end of the warning period. For any official
action wherein an employee performance rating is pertinent, the
appropriate current rating is the latest official rating assigned
to the employee.








CHAPTER C5 CONDUCT OF SCHOOL OFFICERS C5-7
AND EMPLOYEE RELATIONS


g. Responsibility of ratings.

(1) Rating official. Each employee shall be rated
initially by a rating official. The rating official, normally
referred to as the rater, is the immediate supervisor of the
employee and directs and controls the work of the employee.

(2) Reviewing official. The reviewing official,
normally referred to as the reviewer, is the supervisor highest
in line of authority above the rating official who has personal
knowledge of the employee's general performance in relation to
the employee's work requirements.

h. Basis of performance ratings. Ratings shall be
based on performance requirements of the duties performed by and
made known to the employee; and performance requirements used in
the appraisal process shall be those in effect at the time the
performance was rendered. Performance requirements will be de-
veloped by the supervisor in consultation with employees and will
be reviewed semiannually in order that employees may be kept
currently informed of the requirements of their position. Rating
and reviewing officers must not be influenced by friendship, pre-
judices, personal likes or dislikes, or other extraneous factors.

i. Performance rating procedure. In arriving at a
performance rating, raters and reviewers will insure that proper
performance requirements are made known to employees; that their
performance is fairly appraised in relation to such requirements;
that they are kept currently advised of their performance; and
that performance ratings do not conform to any predetermined
distribution or any other arbitrary controls that prevent the
fair appraisal of performance. An employee will not be marked
as deficient with regard to any work requirement that was not
known by the employee or which the employee had not been given a
fair opportunity to meet.- An "Unsatisfactory" performance rating
will not be made without a 90-day prior written warning and a
reasonable opportunity after the warning to demonstrate satis-
factory performance.

j. Performance evaluations. The following criteria
shall be used to evaluate the performance of all employees,
except that the last point in each group will be used only when
rating supervisors:

(1) Quality performance.

(a) Thoroughness, acceptability and adequacy
of results.








C5-8 CHAPTER C5 CONDUCT OF SCHOOL OFFICERS
AND EMPLOYEE RELATIONS


(b) Dependability, accuracy of work.

(c) Orderliness and neatness of work.

(d). Technical skill with which important
procedures, instruments, or machines
are employed in performing required
duties.

(e) Original suggestions or contributions
to improvement in work methods.

(f) Effectiveness in getting good work
done in a unit.

(2) Productiveness.

(a) Amount of work done.

(b) Industry, application of time, interest,
and energy to duties.

(c) Planning work to utilize best time and
resources.

(d) Speed, promptness in completing assignments.

(e) Effectiveness in securing adequate out-
put from a unit.

(3) Qualifications shown on job.

(a) Knowledge of duties and related work.

(b) Ability to learn and profit by observa-
tion and experience.

(c) Special education and training for position.

(d) Judgment, sense of proportion, common
sense.

(e) Initiative and resourcefulness, ability
to improve.

(f) Cooperativeness, ability to work with and
for others.








CHAPTER C5 CONDUCT OF SCHOOL OFFICERS C5-9
AND EMPLOYEE RELATIONS


(g) Effectiveness in developing and
training employees.

k. Uses of performance ratings.

(1) In improving the effectiveness of employee
performance and strengthening supervisor-employee relations. The
ratings shall serve as a basis for discussion between the rating
official and employee of the following: work requirements of the
employee's position and his performance in relation to those re-
quirements -- the aspects in which the employee satisfies, exceeds,
or fails to meet the requirements; and suggestions as to ways for
effective improvement.

(2) In formal personnel actions. A grade-to-grade
promotion or within-grade salary increase shall be granted only if
performance ratings are satisfactory br better; appropriate awards
may be granted for "Outstanding" ratings under the Incentive Awards
Program; reassignment, demotion, or removal shall be effected as
the result of an unsatisfactory rating.

1. Furnishing performance rating information. Rating
officials shall keep employees under their supervision currently
informed of their performance and shall promptly notify them of
their performance ratings. Such information may be oral except
in the case of an "Unsatisfactory" or Outstanding" rating, in
which case copies of the justification will be given the employee.

m. Written justification for "Outstanding" and
"Unsatisfactory" ratings. An "Outstanding" rating must be sup-
ported by a written statement from the rating official setting
forth in detail the performance in every aspect, based on the
performance standards, and the reasons for considering each
aspect of performance outstanding and worthy of .special commend-
ation. An "Unsatisfactory" rating may not be assigned unless
written warning is given at least 90 days in advance, and a full
opportunity provided the employee to render satisfactory service.
The warning should advise the employee in writing wherein his
performance failed to meet the requirements of his job, what
steps he can take to improve his performance, that failure to
do so will result in an "Unsatisfactory" rating, and that help
will be afforded him to improve. An "Unsatisfactory" rating
must be supported by a written statement from the rating offi-
cial, indicating wherein the performance, based on the performance
standards, is unsatisfactory and how efforts were made after the
written warning to help the employee bring his performance up to
a satisfactory level. An employee who receives an "Unsatisfactory"








C5-10 CHAPTER C5 CONDUCT OF SCHOOL OFFICERS
AIID EMPLOYEE RELATIONS


rating shall be reassigned, if possible, to a different position
for which he is qualified and in which satisfactory performance
can reasonably be expected, or shall be separated from the service.

n. Recording ratings. Immediately following the end
of the rating period, each rating official will furnish the review-
ing official with certification that he has discussed the perform-
ance rating requirements with each employee as required by this
plan and that he has notified each employee of.his rating. The
reviewing official will confirm or revise the rating official's
certification in view of his personal knowledge of the rated em-
ployee's general performance in relation to the employee's work
requirements. The reviewing official's certification will then
be forwarded to the Personnel Bureau through the approving author-
ity(s). The Personnel Bureau will record the rating on the em-
ployee's record where it will be available for inspection by the
employee. All material on "Outstanding" and "Unsatisfactory"
ratings will be filed in the personnel folder of the employee.

o. Performance rating appeals.

(1) "Satisfactory" ratings. An employee with a
"Satisfactory" performance rating may request an impartial review
of his rating within the agency or appeal directly to the Statu-
tory Board of Review, but not both.

(2) "Unsatisfactory" ratings. An employee with an
"Unsatisfactory" performance rating may request an impartial re-
view of his rating within the agency or appeal his rating directly
to the Statutory Board of Review, or both.

(3) Time limits and procedures. Except in unusual
circumstances, a request for an impartial review of a rating or
an appeal to the Statutory Board of Review will be accepted only
if it is filed:

(a) within 30 days after the date the employee
received notice of his rating; or

(b) within 30 days after the date the employee
received notice of the decision on
impartial review; or

(c) within 10 days after the employee has
withdrawn his request for an impartial
review if more than 30 days have elapsed
since he received notice of his rating.








CHAPTER C6 COLLECTION OF PAYROLL DEDUCTIONS C6-1
DURING SCHOOL VACATIONS


1. Exact procedures with dates will be announced by the
Chief Accountant each year, but the following general informa-
tion is provided for planning purposes.

2. The procedures for the collection of payroll deductions
during the school vacation from 9-month and 10-month employees
of the Division of Schools will be as follows:

a. Charges, including installment purchases, due the
Panama Canal Company and the Canal Zone Government, accruing dur-
ing the school vacation for collection by payroll deduction, will
be held in open receivables for collection from affected employees
in the second, third, and fourth full pay periods in the next
school year.

b. Collection of insurance premiums (Worldwide Assur-
ance for Employees of Public Agencies, life insurance for Lincoln
Life Insurance Company, Bankers Life Insurance Company, and Gi-
braltar Life Insurance Company, hospitalization other than Federal
Employees Health Benefit Association, and M.B.A.) accruing during
the school vacation, will be collected by payroll deduction in
advance from pay in the last full pay period.

c. Payroll deductions for savings bonds will be sus-
pended during the school vacation and automatically reinstated
at the beginning of the next school year. Partial collections
on savings bonds will be refunded in the last full pay period if
the full amount for the bonds cannot be completed by the end of
the school year.

d. Payroll deductions for hospital bill installments
will be suspended during school vacation and automatically rein-
stated at the beginning of the next school year.

e. There will be no collections made by payroll deduc-
tion generally, or for FEGLI insurance, in those cases that
teachers work on a part-time or a fee basis during the school va-
cation, unless specifically authorized by the teacher concerned.

3. Service performed in the final partial pay period will
be payrolled in the normal manner and the payroll deductions
normally occurring in this pay period will be collected in the
usual manner to the extent possible.

4. Employees who are leaving the Isthmus prior to receiving
their final pay checks) should notify the Treasurer in writing or
on leave requests (through the Division of Schools) of the address








C6-2 CHAPTER C6 COLLECTION OF PAYROLL DEDUCTIONS
DURING SCHOOL VACATIONS


to send their checks, and the checks) will be forwarded by air
mail. Employees who do not leave the Isthmus will receive their
pay checks in the usual procedure.

5. In emergency cases when an employee is leaving the
Isthmus prior to receipt of the last pay checks) and when it
will be impractical for the individual to furnish a forwarding
address for his pay checks) (such as, if he leaves immediately
after the end of school for a vacation in Europe, and he will be
continually traveling) the Payroll and Machine Accounting Branch
will issue time vouchers to the Agents Accounts Branch author-
izing prior payment. In such cases written requests from the
individuals for time vouchers should be forwarded through the
Division of Schools to the Payroll and Machine Accounting Branch,
not later than the end of the last full pay period.

6. The above applies strictly to payroll deduction opera-
tions for active employees. Final pay to.terminating employees
will not be released until outstanding charges have been accumu-
lated and collected.

7. These procedures will also apply to both U.S. and non-
U.S. citizen teachers who are working either in the U S. or in
the L.A. schools.









CHAPTER C7 HOURS OF DUTY, C7-1
OVERTIME AND COMPENSATORY TIME


1. The performance of overtime work by employees of the
Division of Schools is to be held to a minimum and is to be
authorized only when the needs of the service require it. In
all cases, except emergencies, overtime will be authorized in
advance. The following school officers have been delegated the
authority to authorize required overtime for employees of their
units.

Dean, Canal Zone College
Assistant Dean, Canal Zone College (in absence of Dean)
Principals
Assistant Principals (in absence of Principal)

The following school officers have been delegated the authority
to authorize overtime, as indicated after the position title, for
Division of Schools employees.

Administrative Officer (All)
Assistant Superintendent, U.S. Secondary Schools
(U.S. Secondary Schools)
Assistant Superintendent, U.S. Elementary Schools
(U.S. Elementary Schools)
Assistant Superintendent, L.A. Schools (L.A. Schools)

2. When authorized or emergency overtime is worked, the
employee performing the overtime work will submit a report to
the school officer in charge of the unit. The report must show
the beginning and ending hours of such overtime. The employee
must indicate on the report his request for overtime pay or com-
pensatory time off. The school officer must approve the report
before it is submitted to the timekeeper for entry on the time
card. A statement as to the necessity for the overtime will be
placed on the time card. Employees in the Division of Schools
office will submit the report through their immediate supervisor
who will initial it and forward it to the Administrative Officer
for approval and submission to the timekeeper.

3. With respect to compensatory time off the following
regulations quoted from the Personnel Manual will be adhered to
by all employees.








C7-2 CHAPTER C7 HOURS OF DUTY,
OVERTIME AND COMPENSATORY TIME


Personnel Manual, Chapter H2, Section 7.05

"(a) The practice of granting compensatory time off
shall be utilized only upon request of the officer or employee
concerned. Such request will be made during the pay period in
which the overtime work is performed.

"(b) When the needs of the service permit, the requested
compensatory time off may be granted on the basis of an allowance
equivalent to the period of overtime duty performed. If practi-
cable, the compensatory time should be granted in the same pay pe-
riod in which the overtime work occurs; it must be granted within
the three subsequent pay periods. If time off is authorized, but
the officer or employee fails to take it within the time limit
aforesaid, he loses his rights both to the compensatory time and
to overtime pay unless the failure is due to an exigency of the
service beyond his control. If the workload or other circumstances
preclude the allowance of compensatory time prior to the end of
the third pay period after the overtime work is performed, compen-i
station for the extra duty shall then be paid.

"(c) Compensatory time off shall not be granted in any
instance in which overtime compensation would not be payable for
the extra duty in question due to the maximum limitation on aggre-
gate compensation set out in Part 10 of these regulations. (See
26 Comp. Gen. 750; 37 id. 362.)

"(d) The overtime work for which compensatory time off
is requested and granted shall be recorded on the official time
cards in the manner prescribed by the Comptroller or his designee.
In addition, an official record shall be maintained in the time-
keeping units showing the overtime work for which compensatory
time off may be requested, the request for such time off, and the
disposition of such request."

4. Employees will not be permitted to work during lunch
hour for the purpose of taking time off in lieu of or for the
purpose of overtime pay. Exceptions to this policy may be made
by the school officers listed in paragraph 1 when the needs of
the service require it.

5. Employees are required to adhere to the hours of duty
for which they are scheduled. School officers have the respon-
sibility for requiring employees in their units to comply with
scheduled hours of duty.









CHAPTER C7 HOURS OF DUTY,
OVERTIME AND COMPENSATORY TIME


C7-3


6. During the months when they are on duty the Dean of the
Canal Zone College (or in his absence the Assistant Dean) and the
principals of the schools (or in their absence the assistant prin-
cipals) will certify to and sign all time cards.

7. The following employees in the offices of the Division
of Schools will be responsible for submitting time cards to time-
keepers for the personnel as indicated. In the absence of the
employee responsible for submitting time cards the employee indi-
cated by asterisk will be responsible for timing.


Superintendent


I





Asst. Superintendent,
US Secondary Schools


* Deputy Superintendent
SSupv. of Music, US Schools
Supv., Phys. Ed., US Schools
All Assistant Superintendents
Coordinator of Curriculum
Coordinator, Special Education
Secretary to Supt. & Dep.Supt.
Administrative Officer

* Supv. of Instruction, US Secondary
Secretary to Asst. Supt., US Sec.


Asst. Superintendent, Supv. of Instruction, US Elementary
US Elementary Schools Secretary to Asst. Supt., US Elem.

Asst. Superintendent, Supv. of Instruction, LA Schools
LA Schools Supv., Phys. Ed., LA Schools
Supv. of Music, LA Schools
Secretary to Asst. Supt., LA Schools

Administrative Officer 'Administrative Assistant
Time Personnel Clerks
Mail Clerk
Supervisor, EDP
Procurement Personnel
Secretary to Admin. Officer
Truck Driver
Bookbinder
Maintenanceman

Coordinator, Special Clinical Psychologist
Education School Psychologists
Secretaries








CHAPTER C7 HOURS OF DUTY,
OVERTIME AND COMPENSATORY TIME


Coordinator of
Curriculum'


Supervisor, Phys. Ed.,
US Schools

Supervisor EDP


* Audio-Visual Specialist
Subject Specialists
Secretaries and Clerks

* Supv., US Pools & Safety
Secretary, Phys. Ed. Office

* Computer Programmer
Data Processing Personnel


8. Any employee who wishes to engage in outside employment
should familiarize himself with the regulations set forth in
Section 255.735-32 of the booklet "Employee Responsibilities and
Conduct" of the Canal Zone Regulations. Such outside employment
will be limited to six hours per week if it involves preparation
(such as teaching) or eight hours per week if no preparation is
required. Authority should be requested on Form 222, "Employee's
Application for Permission to Engage in Outside Business or
Employment."


C7-4







CHAPTER C8 EXTRA-DUTY SCHOOL ACTIVITY PROGRAM C8-1
AND PAY PROVISIONS


REFERENCE: PCC/CZG Personnel Manual: C3-19.8 through 19.11 and
C3-20.8 through 20.12

1. The Personnel Director, in establishing the school activity
extra-duty pay and setting forth guidelines as given in the references,
has indicated that the Superintendent of Schools will determine the
exact activities to be implemented and will make appointments of teacher
personnel to carry out such activities.

2. The activities approved for a school year and the personnel to
handle these activities will be listed in a memorandum issued by the
Superintendent of Schools.

3. In order for an activity supervisor to receive full pay, the
activity must include the minimum number of students (10) and minimum
amount of time indicated for each activity.

4. It will be the responsibility of each principal to maintain
adequate records to justify the extra-duty pay. These records will in-
clude a weekly statement from the employee certifying the time worked
and the number of students participating. These records will be properly
filed for a period of two years for possible audit review.

5. Pay reports will be submitted by the principals at regular
intervals as established by the appropriate assistant superintendent.
These reports will include those who have concluded their assignment.
Personnel with a year long assignment will be reported at the end of
each semester. Pay reports must show the employee&' names listed in
alphabetical order and include the I.P. number, name of activity, activ-
ity level, total assigned hours, and hours completed. These reports will
be routed from the principal to Chief, Payroll Branch, through Assistant
Superintendent, and Personnel Records and Administrative Branch.

6. Recommendations for changes in the approved activity program
may be forwarded to the appropriate assistant superintendent. Any
changes approved will be effective at the beginning of the next school
year.

7. The following information is provided regarding the manner in
which the extra-duty program assignments are made:

a. All persons awarded extra-duty pay must be Class 15.

b. All persons with extra-duty pay assignments must have a
minimum of 25 class periods per week in a 30-period week or a minimum of
30 class periods per &wek in a 35-period week. College personnel must
have 15 weighted hours per semester.


Rev. 75-2 (10/1/74)







C8-2 CHAPTER 08 EXTRA-DUTY SCHOOL ACTIVITY PROGRAM
AND PAY PROVISIONS


c. Audio-visual personnel may be assigned according to the
following formula:
1- 9 teachers One Level III
10-19 teachers One Level II
20-34 teachers One Level I
35-49 teachers One Level I plus one First Assistant
50-69 teachers One Level I plus one First Assistant and one Second Assistant
70 and over One Level I plus one First Assistant and two Second Assistants

d. Enrichment and remedial assistance within departments at the
secondary and college levels will be determined according to the following
formula:

9.1 or more teacher units in department Level I
5.1-9.0 teacher units in department Level II
2.5-5.0 teacher units in department Level III

except in the science, physical education, art and industrial arts depart-
ments which will be determined by the following formula:

5.1 or more teacher units in department Level I
2.2-5.0 teacher units in department Level II

In the U.S. secondary schools a teacher unit is equal to 25 class periods
per week in which the subject is taught; in the L.A. secondary schools it
is equal to 30; and in the college it is equal to 15 weighted hours per week.

8. The number of hours for each activity is the minimum number of
hours and does not prevent any activity sponsor from handling the activ-
ity for more than the number of hours indicated. In MOST cases an activ-
ity may require many more hours than the minimum.

9. The availability of extra-duty pay does not change the authority
of the Superintendent of Schools to assign duty to the individual he con-
siders best qualified to carry out the duty. The Superintendent of
Schools, will, however, attempt to make appointments from among persons
who indicate an interest in such assignments. Empty positions may be
filled by such appointments from among teachers of other school who have
indicated an interest, or from among remaining teachers of the original
school faculty. The procedures for filling extra-duty pay positions will
be:

a. The appropriate assistant superintendent will make a deter-
mination of the assignments needed in each school (approximately eight
weeks before school ends).


Rev. 75-2 (10/1/74)







CHAPTER C8 EXTRA-DUTY SCHOOL ACTIVITY PROGRAM C8-3
AND PAY PROVISIONS


b. Upon receipt from the appropriate assistant superintendent
of the positions assigned to the school, the principal (dean) will make
his faculty members aware of these and determine their interest in such
positions. Where no teacher indicates interest, the principal will
consider others whom he considers qualified for recommendation to the
Superintendent. The fact that a person has held an assignment one year
does not automatically give that person the preference the following
year. (Recommendations are to be sent to the appropriate assistant
superintendent approximately five weeks before the end of school.)

c. Assistant superintendents will submit the recommendations
to the Superintendent for his approval (approximately three weeks before
end of school).

d. Approved assignments will be returned to the schools and
principals will notify faculty members concerned (approximately one week
before end of school). Efforts will be made to have all positions
filled by this time; when this is not possible the letters TBF should
be listed indicating this position is to be filled.

e. Within the first month of the school year, the assistant
superintendents will furnish each school with a final list of assign-
ments which will reflect changes in assignments that were necessitated
by personnel changes during the vacation period. This final list
should also indicate the assignments to the TBF positions.

f. Once the final assignments have been announced changes will
only be permitted in cases of extreme emergency. Principals can recom-
mend changes for the second semester provided they are submitted no
later than two weeks prior to the start of the second semester.

10. The Superintendent of Schools may authorize partial payment
for a non-completed activity when the activity is not completed due to
circumstances beyond the control of the sponsor. Payment will be pro-
rated based on the ratio of activity hours completed to total minimum
activity hours.









Rev. 75-2 (10/1/74)..







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CHAPTER El EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES


1. Principals, teachers, and other employees of the Divi-
sion of Schools are prohibited from making commitments with
commercial firms, publishing companies, and the like concerning
the purchase of equipment and supplies by the Division of
Schools, the Canal Zone Government, or the Panama Canal Company.
Principals may write directly to companies to secure catalogs,
free materials, and price quotations only.

2. There are three classes of school equipment:

a. Capital Equipment
b. Operating Equipment
c. Rental Equipment

3. Principals are directed to maintain records on all equip-
ment as follows:

4. Capital Equipment.

a. Acquisition. Each year a list of capital items is
prepared for the Superintendent of Schools by each assistant
superintendent upon recommendation of principals. Such lists, as
revised, are then included in the capital budget program which is
then submitted through channels to the Governor for his approval
and submission to the Bureau of the Budget and Congress. Capital
items cannot be purchased until funds are appropriated by Congress
for this purpose. Supervisors and principals should notify the
appropriate assistant superintendent of needs.

b. Disposal.

(1) Serviceable excess capital equipment will be
reported to the Administrative Officer, Division of Schools.

(2) Unserviceable, worn-out, or obsolete mis-
cellaneous items of capital equipment will be reported to the
Administrative Officer who will advise as to the method of dis-
posal and procedure to be followed.

5. Operating Equipment.

a. Acquisition.

(1) Operating equipment, books, and supplies,
which require procurement are requested by the principal or
staff officer on the Division of Schools "Request for Purchase,"
which is then sent to the appropriate assistant superintendent


El-1









CHAPTER El EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES


for approval. Purchases under $250 at one time from one source
are made by Division Purchase Order, and may arrive in one to
eight weeks. Purchases over $250 are processed through the
Panama Canal Procurement Section and generally take about three
months for delivery.

(2) Items available within the Panama Canal Supply
Division are obtained directly by the principal, using the proper
form. Athletic equipment orders will be forwarded to the appro-
priate Supervisor of Physical Education and Athletics for signa-
ture.

(3) In submitting requests for purchase, proper
information must be given as to source of supplies, complete no-
menclature, and estimated cost. In the case of spare parts for
equipment, the name, serial number, model, etc., of the machine
for which the parts are ordered are needed.

(4) Principals will prepare annual requisitions
for textbooks, reference books, and library books for their
schools.

b. Book inventory.

(1) The department chairman will be responsible for
the inventory of all books (basic texts, supplemental texts, and
reference books) used in his department.

(2) The inventory record should be kept by the
department chairman and made readily available to the principal
or other school officials for use in ordering, etc. In subject
areas where there is no department chairman, the principal will
designate the person responsible for maintaining the inventory
records.

(3) The school librarian will be responsible for
maintaining an inventory of all library books.

c. Disposal.

(1) Excess usable items will be reported to the
appropriate assistant superintendent who will arrange for redis-
tribution.

(2) Damaged or worn-out items may be disposed of
in accordance with instructions from the appropriate assistant
superintendent.


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CHAPTER El EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES


(3) Principals and teachers are not authorized to
give away books. Books that are obsolete or in such poor condi-
tion that they have no further use will be disposed of as
follows:

(a) Books suitable for possible resale should
be shipped directly to Section I, Store-
house Branch, Balboa, C. Z., with a cov-
ering memorandum giving the total number
of books.

(b) Books torn, worn-out, or unfit for any
further use should be destroyed.

6. Rental Equipment.

a. Equipment furnished by the Storehouse Branch Furni-
ture Pool bears a PCC metal tag. Inasmuch as the Division of
Schools is charged rental for this type of equipment, care should
be exercised to make certain that only the items actually needed
are rented.

b. Acquisitions, exchanges, or returns. Principals
should submit their requests to the appropriate assistant super-
intendent of schools. The Deputy Superintendent of Schools will
coordinate all Furniture Pool requests. Requests should not be
submitted directly to the Furniture Pool.

c. Repairs. Principals should call the Furniture Pool
for repair service. Any problem with repair should be reported
to the appropriate assistant superintendent.


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CHAPTER E2 FURNITURE POOL EQUIPMENT


1. Additional Equipment. Requests for additional Furniture
Pool equipment will be submitted by principals in memorandum form
as follows:

To: Superintendent, Storehouse Branch
Through Assistant Superintendent of Schools

2. Transfers Between Schools. When a pool item is trans-
ferred from one unit to another the releasing unit will report
the transfer by memorandum directly to the Furniture Pool, with
information copies to the receiving unit and the Deputy Superin-
tendent of Schools.

3. Exchange or Return of Equipment. Requests for exchange
or return of equipment should be made by memorandum directly to
the Furniture Pool, with merely an information copy to the Deputy
Superintendent.

4. Loss or Theft of Equipment. In case of theft, the
principal should immediately, by telephone, notify the police and
the appropriate Assistant Superintendent. As soon as feasible
after discovering a theft or other loss the principal should
make a written report, giving all pertinent details, to the
Furniture Pool, addressed as in paragraph 1 above.

5. Storage. During school vacation periods all equipment
should be stored in areas which will result in minimum deteriora-
tion and maximum safety. Electronic and mechanical items should
be stored in air conditioned areas or dry closets. Small items
(such as typewriters) should preferably be stored in locked closets
inside locked rooms on upper floors. Proper key security should
be maintained and there should be a perfunctory daily check of
doors and windows.

6. Repair. Emergency repairs of pool items, particularly
of instructional items such as typewriters, should be initiated
by telephone at the time of breakdown. This telephonic request
should be followed by a confirming memorandum. As indicated in
other instructions a simple log should be kept on each item of
equipment showing dates of breakdown, type of trouble, date of
repair request, and date item returned to service. This should
facilitate timely retirement of items which reach such condition
that they can no longer be repaired effectively or economically.
The best person to keep such a log is the person who has primary
responsibility for an item -- usually a teacher, secretary, or
janitor. Items which need periodic or preventive maintenance
or reconditioning should be scheduled for this during the summer


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