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 Canal Zone Government
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PCANAL



Annual report - Panama Canal Company, Canal Zone Government
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00006068/00002
 Material Information
Title: Annual report - Panama Canal Company, Canal Zone Government
Portion of title: Annual report - Canal Zone Government
Physical Description: : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Panama Canal Company
Canal Zone
Publisher: Panama Canal Co. for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off.
Place of Publication: Washington
Creation Date: 1965
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Politics and government -- Canal Zone   ( lcsh )
Panama Canal (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama Canal (Panama)
 Notes
Summary: Continues: Panama Canal. Governor. Annual report. and Panama Canal Co. President's report to the board of directors.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1st- 1952-
Numbering Peculiarities: Report covers fiscal year.
Issuing Body: Also issued by Canal Zone Government.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01253695
lccn - 53060088
issn - 0475-6126
ocm01253695
sobekcm - AA00006068_00002
Classification: lcc - J184.5 .P324
ddc - 338.39|353.8
nlm - W2 DP3 P2a
System ID: AA00006068:00002
 Related Items
Preceded by: Annual report of the Governor of the Panama Canal
Preceded by: Annual report of the board of directors to the stockholder
Succeeded by: President's report to the Board of Directors

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
    Panama Canal Company
        Page viii
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    Canal Zone Government
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    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
t.t/:%5









PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT


ANNUAL REPORT

0


FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1965


























Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2009 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries














."


http://www.archive.org/detaiIs/annualreportpana1965pana











PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
Balboa Heights, C.Z.
OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT


December 29, 1965.

To THE STOCKHOLDER OF THE PANAMA CANAL COMPANY:
The story of the Panama Canal throughout the fiscal year
ending June 30, 1965, again demonstrates the importance of
this vital waterway to the industrial growth of the United
States and other nations of the world. A record volume of
78,899,012 long tons of cargo flowed through the Canal during
the year.
Since World War II extensive studies have been made of
the capacity of the Canal to meet the future requirements of
world commerce. On April 18, 1965, President Johnson
appointed a Commission, known as the "Atlantic-Pacific Inter-
oceanic Canal Study Commission," to make a full and com-
plete investigation to determine the feasibility of, and the
most suitable site for, the construction of a sea level canal
connecting the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The Commission
is to complete its studies by June 30, 1968.
During the year, the Board deferred action on a number
of major improvementt projects pending completion of the
Commission's studies. However, the Board is continuing a
careful evaluation of the need for improvement projects that
may be req fired to provide adequate service throughout the
remaining tife of the Canal. Such projects include completion

I


11351--1





of the widening of Gaillard Cut to a minimum width of
500 feet, provision of greater channel depth, assurance of
sufficient storage capacity for water required for operation
of the locks as traffic increases, and provision of increased
amounts of electric power required by the Panama Canal
Company and Canal Zone Government.
The Board of Directors has also initiated investigation of
the feasibility of securing certain supporting services from
private sources instead of making further investment of
Company funds in capital plant to provide such services.




ROBERT J. FLEMING, Jr.,
President.














CONTENTS


PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


INTRODUCTION
ORGANIZATION CHART F
THE CANAL-A BRIEF DESCRIPTION .
ORGANIZATION .
TOLLS RATES. .
BOARD OF DIRECTS AND GENERAL OFFICER .
COMPARATIVE TABULATION OF HIGHLIGHTS OF OPERATIONS
SUMMARY: PANAMA CANAL COMPANY OPERATIONS .
Canal Traffic and Cargo Movements .
Financial Review . .


CHAPTER I-REVIEW OF CANAL TRAFFIC
OCEANGOING TRAFFIC .
OTHER TRAFFIC .
PRINCIPAL TRADE ROUTES-COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC
NATIONALITY OF VESSELS .
CARGO STATISTICS-COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC
TRANSIT AVERAGES .
DATA IN STATISTICAL CHAPTER .

CHAPTER H-THE WATERWAY
TRANSIT OPERATIONS .
LocKs OPERATION .
CANAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM .
WATER SUPPLY .. .
MAINTENANCE OF CANAL CHANNEL
ORIENTATION AND EXCURSION SERVICE
CHAPTER IM-SUPPORTING OPERATIONS
EMPLOYEE SERVICES .
Supply and Community Service Bureau
Supply Division . .
Procurement Division .
Community Services Division
TRANSPORTATION AND UTILITY SERVICES .
Railroad Operations . .
Motor Transportation .


. 7
. 8
* 8
S 12
* 13
. 13
. 13


. 15
. 17
S 17
. 18
. 19
. 19


aces pag


Page
e 1
1
1
2
3
4
5
5
5






CONTENTS


Page
Water Transportation Operations 24
Electrical Power System 25
Seismology 25
Communications System 26
Water System .. 26
Vessel Repairs . 26
Harbor Terminals Operation 27
Printing Plant 28
PRINCIPAL ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS 28
Canal Widening at Las Cascadas-Bas Obispo Reaches 28
Proposed Trinidad Dam 28
New Locks Towing Locomotives and Cranes 29
Construction, Alterations and Additions to Gorgas Hospital 29
Locks Engineering .. 29
Expansion of Electrical Power System . 30
Additional Water Mains to Panama 30
Operations and Capital Construction by Contract 30
Other Projects 31
CHAPTER IV-ADMINISTRATION
PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION 33
MAJOR ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGES 34
MAJOR PERSONNEL CHANGES 34
FORCE EMPLOYED AND RATES OF PAY 35
FULL-TIME EMPLOYEES PAID AT U.S. WAGE BASE 36
Turnover in Full-Time U.S. Citizen Isthmian Force 36
Turnover in Full-Time Non-U.S. Citizen Isthmian Force 36
Recruitment .. 36
Pay Adjustments 37
Cash Relief for Disabled Employees 37
INCENTIVE AWARDS 38
SAFETY PROGRAM 38
CHAPTER V-FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA
Financial Statements and Related Supplementary Reports
NARRATIVE STATEMENT 41
Equity of the U.S. Government 41
Capital Expenditures 41
Automatic Data Processing 42
Financial Tables
TABLE 1.-Comparative Statement of Financial Condition . 42
Notes pertaining to financial statements 42
TABLE 2.-Comparative Statement of Revenue and Expenses . 45
TABLE 3.-Statement of Changes in Equity of the U.S. Government. 46





CONTENTS


Page
TABLE 4.-Statement of Source and Application of Funds 47
TABLE 5.-Statement of Revenue and Operating Expenses 47
TABLE 6.-Transit Operations-Statement of Revenue and Operating
Expenses 48
TABLE 7.-Supporting Services-Statement of Revenue and Oper-
ating Expenses 49
TABLE 8.-Administrative and Other General Expenses 50
TABLE 9.-Inventories 51
TABLE 10.-Comparative Statement of Fixed Assets 52

Shipping Statistics
TABLE 11.-Ocean Traffic Through Panama Canal, Fiscal Years
1955-1965 54
TABLE 12.-Traffic by Months, Fiscal Years 1965 and 1964 54
TABLE 13.-Canal Traffic by Nationality of Vessel . . 55
TABLE 14.-Classification of Canal Traffic by Type of Vessel 56,
TABLE 15.-Laden and Ballast Traffic by Nationality of Vessel 58
TABLE 16.-Frequency of Transits of Vessels Through Panama Canal 60
TABLE 17.-Segregation of Transits by Registered Gross Tonnage 62
TABLE 18.-Principal Commodities Shipped Through Canal 63
TABLE 19.-Origin and Destination of Cargo Through the Panama
Canal From Atlantic to Pacific Segregated by Coun-
tries in Principal Trade Areas 65
TABLE 20.-Origin and Destination of Cargo Through the Panama
Canal From Pacific to Atlantic Segregated by Coun-
tries in Principal Trade Areas . 68
TABLE 21.-Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Atlantic to Pacific 72
TABLE 22.-Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Pacific to Atlantic 75
TABLE 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade
Routes, Atlantic to Pacific . 79
TABLE 24.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade
Routes, Pacific to Atlantic . 93
TABLE 25.-Small Vessels Transiting Canal. 105

Other Statistics
TABLE 26.-Water Supply and Usage. 106
TABLE 27.-Dredging Operations 106
TABLE 28.-Electric Power Generated 107
TABLE 29.-Number of Full-time Employees Paid at U.S. Citizen
Rates 107
TABLE 30.-Number of Full-time Employees Paid at Non-U.S.
Citizen Rates 108






CONTENTS


CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT


LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL
ORGANIZATION CHART .
INTRODUCTION .
Canal Zone Government
Major Organizational Changes
Major Personnel Changes

CHAPTER I-PUBLIC HEALTH
Sanitation .
Preventive Medicine and Quarantine
Division of Mental Health .
Veterinary Activities
Quarantine .
Hospitals and Clinics .

CHAPTER H-PUBLIC EDUCATION
General Description
Enrollment .
Special Education .
Library-Museum .


CHAPTER III-PUBLIC ORDER AND
Police Activities .
Court Activities .
Advisory Pardon and Parole Board
Fire Protection .
Civil Defense .


Page
S 111
. 112
S 113
. 113
. 113
. 113


S 115
. 116
S 116
S 117
S 117
. 117


PROTECTION


121
122
122
123


125
126
126
127
127


129
130
131


133
134
134
134


135
135
136


CHAPTER IV-POSTS, CUSTOMS, AND IMMIGRATION
Postal Service .
Customs, Immigration, and Shipping Commissioner Services .
Visas ... .

CHAPTER V-LICENSES, INSURANCE, AND ESTATES
Licenses . .. .
Insurance .
Administration of Estates .
Foreign Corporations .

CHAPTER VI-MUNICIPAL IMPROVEMENTS
Roads and Streets . .
Maintenance of Quarters, Hospitals, and Public Buildings .
Sewer System .





CONTENTS


CHAPTER VII-FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA
Financial Statements and Related Supplementary Reports
Page
NARRATIVE STATEMENT 137
Invested Capital . 138
Capital Expenditures 139
Financial Results 139
TABLE 1.-Comparative Statement of Financial Condition . 138
TABLE 2.-Statement of Changes in Equity of the U.S. Government 140
TABLE 3.-Statement of Operations 141
TABLE 4.-Comparative Statement of Fixed Assets 142
STATISTICAL DATA 143
Personnel Data 143
Area of the Canal Zone . 144


























































vm










INTRODUCTION


THE CANAL
The Panama Canal is a lock canal that connects the Atlantic and the Pacific
Oceans through the Isthmus of Panama, traversing a distance of approximately
51 miles from deep water to deep water. In the dredged channel, the Canal
has a minimum width of 300 feet and a normal depth of 42 feet. The greatest
part of the Canal channel is at the level of Gatun Lake, the surface of which
fluctuates from a high of 87 feet above sea level in the rainy season to a low
of 82 feet above sea level in the dry season. Variation in the level of Gatun
Lake necessitates adjustment of allowable ship draft from a maximum of
39 feet to a minimum of 34 feet. In transiting the Canal a ship is raised in
three steps from sea level to the level of Gatun Lake, and subsequently
lowered in three steps to sea level at the other side of the Isthmus. The six
steps or flights of locks are in duplicate, to enable simultaneous lockage of
two ships transiting in the same direction or of ships passing in opposite
directions.
The past fiscal year marked the completion of 51 years of successful operation
of the Canal. The Canal was opened on August 15, 1914, and has served
world commerce without major interruption since fiscal year 1916, when the
last Canal-closing slide occurred in Gaillard Cut at the Continental Divide.
A total of 359,811 vessels of all types have made the Canal transit, of which
283,921 were oceangoing commercial vessels plying the various routes of
world trade. In addition, the Canal has been of incalculable service to the
United States and her allies in time of war.
ORGANIZATION
The Panama Canal Company Act, which created the Panama Canal
Company and defined its basic purposes, organization, rights, powers, and
obligations, was enacted June 29, 1948 (62 Stat. 1076), as amended by the
act of September 26, 1950 (64 Stat. 1041). This act became effective on
July 1, 1951, pursuant to the provisions of Executive Order 10263 of June 29,
1951. The charter of the corporation was reenacted with only minor modifica-
tions as part of the act revising the Canal Zone Code, approved October 18,
1962 (76A Stat. 1). The charter now appears in two Canal Zone Code
sections, 61-75 and 121-123.
In its capacity as owner of the Company, the U.S. Government is represented
by the Secretary of the Army, referred to as "Stockholder," in his individual
capacity as the personal representative of the President of the United States
for such purpose. The Company operates under the management of a Board
of Directors appointed by the Stockholder. The Company is charged with
the maintenance and operation of the Panama Canal and the conduct of the
business-type operations incident to such maintenance and incident to the
civil government of the Canal Zone.
1


11351--2






INTRODUCTION


The Company and the Canal Zone Government, the independent agency
of the United States charged with the civil government of the Canal Zone,
are closely interrelated in mission, organization, and operations. The com-
bined function of these agencies is the administration of the Panama Canal
enterprise as a whole. The Governor of the Canal Zone, who is appointed by
the President of the United States and who is charged with the administration
of the Canal Zone Government, under the supervision of the Secretary of the
Army, is ex officio a director and President of the Company.
The Panama Canal Company is expected (a) to recover all costs of operation
and maintenance of its facilities, including depreciation; (b) to pay interest
to the Treasury on the net direct investment of the Government in the Company,
and (c) to reimburse the Treasury for (1) the annuity payments to the
Republic of Panama under the convention of 1903 as modified by the treaty of
1936 between the two governments, and (2) the net costs of operation of the
Canal Zone Government, including depreciation on fixed assets. The interest
rate for the fiscal year 1965 as set by the Secretary of the Treasury was 3.457
percent. The Board of Directors is required to appraise, at least annually,
the Company's working capital requirements, together with reasonable fore-
seeable requirements for authorized plant replacements and expansion, and
to pay into the Treasury as a repayment of capital the amount of any funds
in excess of such requirements. All funds other than working balances are
carried with the U.S. Treasury.
The activities of the Company are classified under two major headings;
namely: (a) Transit Operations and (b) Supporting Services. Category
(a) embraces those functions directly related to the waterway and the transiting
of ships and 'to services to shipping, including maintenance of the Canal
channel, maintenance and operation of the locks, and maintenance of a bridge
across the Canal at Balboa. The supporting services include vessel repairs,
harbor terminal operations, a railroad across the Isthmus, a supply ship
operating between New Orleans and the Canal Zone, motor transportation
facilities, storehouses, an electric power system, communication system, a water
system, and service activities that are essential to employees' needs including
the operation of quarters, retail stores, and restaurants.
TOLLS RATES
The rates of Canal tolls remained unchanged during the year. These rates
are as follows:
(a) On merchant vessels, Army and Navy transports, tankers, hospital ships,
supply ships, and yachts when carrying passengers or cargo: 90 cents per net
vessel-ton of 100 cubic feet of actual earning capacity; that is, the net tonnage
determined in accordance with the "Rules for the Measurement of Vessels
for the Panama Canal";
(b) On such vessels in ballast, without passengers or cargo: 72 cents per net
vessel-ton;
(c) On other floating craft: 50 cents per ton of displacement.
Tolls charges for the Canal are at the same level as were imposed on March 1,
1938. They are lower than those charged from the beginning of Canal
operations to 1938.






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND GENERAL OFFICERS OF THE
PANAMA CANAL COMPANY AS OF JUNE 30, 1965

Board of Directors

Hon. STEPHEN AILES, Stockholder
Washington, D.C.
Secretary of the Army.

Hon. STANLEY R. RESOR, Chairman of the Board
Washington, D.C.
Under Secretary of the Army.

ROBERT J. FLEMING, Jr., President
Balboa Heights, C.Z.
Governor of the Canal Zone; Major General, U.S. Army.


CORNELIUS G. DUTCHER
Phoenix, Ariz.
Investor and Civic Leader.


Hon. J. KENNETH MANSFIELD
Washington, D.C.
Inspector General, Foreign Assist-
ance, Department of State.

C. ROBERT MITCHELL
Kansas City, Mo.
President, First Federal Savings &
Loan Association, Kansas City.

WALTER J. PEARSON
Portland, Oreg.
President, Pearson Insurance Co.,
Portland, Oreg.


Hon. JACK H. VAUGHN
Washington, D.C.
Assistant Secretary of State for Inter-
American Affairs.

JAMES A. WILLIAMS
Boston, Mass.
Vice President, Public Affairs, New
England Telephone & Telegraph Co.

Dr. CHARLES J. ZINN
Washington, D.C.
Law Revision Counsel, U.S. House of
Representatives.

HOWARD C. PETERSEN
Radnor, Pa.
President, Fidelity-Philadelphia
Trust Co.


General Officers

Hon. STANLEY R. RESOR, Chairman of the Board
Maj. Gen. ROBERT J. FLEMING, Jr., USA, President
Col. H. R. PARFrrr, USA, Vice President
PHILIP L. STEERS, Jr., Comptroller
W. M. WHITMAN, Secretary






I INTRODUCTION

COMPARATIVE TABULATION OF HIGHLIGHTS OF OPERATIONS


Number of oceangoing transits:
Commercial ------------
U.S. Government ---...
Free __- __ ___-------------------------
Total--------------------------------
Tolls earnings (including small vessels):
Commercial------------ _
U.S. Government --._.__
Total ------ ------
Total cargo transiting (long tons)----------------
Lockages:
Gatun -----... .---
Pedro Miguel------_______
Miraflores ------------------------------
Terminals operations (tons of cargo handled, transferred,
and stevedored at piers) -----------------------
Oil handling (number of barrels pumped) -----------
Maintenance of channel (cubic yards dredged)-
Number of full-time Company employees (as of June 30):
U.S. citizen---- -------------------------
Non-U.S. citizen --------------------------
Total Company employees --- --- --


Fiscal year
1965 1964
11,834 11,808
284 285
85 91
12,203 12,184


$65,502,769
1,651,890
$67,154,659
78,922,931

10,999
11,925
11,360
2,389,373
36,792,557
3,144,200

2,461
8,979
11,440


$61,146,998
1,399,393
$62,546,391
72,168,690

10,918
11,347
10,841
2,394,453
35,512,392
4,778,800

2,537
8,917
11,454












SUMMARY

PANAMA CANAL COMPANY OPERATIONS

Canal traffic and cargo movements.-During fiscal year 1965, Panama Canal
tonnage climbed to its highest figure in the history of the Canal, topping the
previous high record, 72,168,690, attained in 1964 by slightly over 6.5 million
long tons. The volume of cargo transiting the Canal in 1965 amounted to
78,922,931 long tons which is an increase of 6,754,241 tons, or 9.4 percent,
over last year's volume. Along with this increased cargo movement,
oceangoing transits and tolls also experienced a modest rise.
Oceangoing transits (including free transits) at 12,203 were only 19 above
last year, but tolls income amounting to $67,154,659 was $4,608,268 above
the income for fiscal year 1964. The volume of cargo per net ton on tolls-
paying vessels, or the load factor, was 1.02 tons for the year. During March,
Canal transits established a new high of 1,119 oceangoing transits for a daily
average of 36.1 ships.
Financial review.-Net revenues for 1965 totaled $1.5 million after charges
for interest costs totaling $11.4 million and the net cost of operations of the
Canal Zone Government totaling $18.4 million. The corresponding net
revenue for the previous year was $2.2 million.
Operations during the course of the fiscal year reflect the absorption of wage
increases and related costs in excess of $4 million.
Tolls revenue of $67.2 million and transits of 12,118 tolls-paying ships over
300 Panama Canal net tons set new all-time records. The corresponding tolls
revenue and vessel transits for fiscal year 1964 were $62.5 million and 12,093
ships, respectively.
Capital expenditures amounted to $10.6 million for the year. Improvements
to waterway facilities exceeded $4.2 million. The principal expenditure was
for the replacement of towing locomotives and cranes in the amount of $2.6
million. For supporting services operations the largest expenditure was for
a steam turbine-generator for the electric power system amounting to $2.4
million.
A major change in accounting technique was inaugurated on April 1, 1965,
with the installation of a computer. The first phase, now on the computer, is
that of inventory control. Systems studies and programming are in process
to expand the use of the computer for payroll and personnel procedures.
















Chapter I



REVIEW OF CANAL TRAFFIC

OCEANGOING TRAFFIC 1
During this past fiscal year the increasing growth in Panama Canal traffic
continued for the 13th year. Fiscal year 1965 established the highest year
of traffic since the Canal began operation. A grand total of 12,203 oceangoing
vessels transited the waterway, 284 of which were U.S. Government owned
or controlled vessels and 85 of which were free transits.
A total of 11,834 commercial ships transited, averaging 32.4 per day, and
for the fourth consecutive year exceeded the 11,000 mark. The Panama
Canal Company received $65,442,633 in tolls from commercial ships flying
the flags of 45 nations. Traffic of this type, amounting to 97 percent,
constitutes the bulk of the Company's workload.
Accompanying this rise in number of transits for the year in the oceangoing
commercial vessels was an 8.5-percent increase in cargo tonnage. The
76,573,071 long tons of commercial cargo that passed through the Canal during
fiscal year 1965 represent an average of 210,282 long tons per day. The total
tonnage was 6 million tons above last year's record and 9 million tons above
the previous record set in 1962. Of the 76.6 million tons of cargo, 5.8 million
moved in the U.S. intercoastal trade, 24.4 million tons were U.S. exports, and
19.4 million tons were imports of the United States for a total of 49.6 million
tons moving to or from the United States. This represents 64.8 percent of
the total cargo flow.
With the exception of U.S. intercoastal trade and that of Europe-west coast
United States/Canada, cargo movements to and from all the major geographical
areas of the world increased in 1965. The most significant change occurred
in the flow of cargo to and from the Far East. Other important increases are
shown in trade between the United States and South America. This year
cargo movements to and from the Far East increased 1,815,000 tons and
movements to and from South American ports rose by 4,555,000 tons.
1 Vessels of 300 net tons and over (Panama Canal measurement) for vessels rated on net tonnage,
or of 500 displacement tons and over for vessels rated on displacement tonnage (naval vessels,
dredges, etc.).






REVIEW OF CANAL TRAFFIC


A tabulation of the four principal features of oceangoing traffic for the past
3 years is shown below:
Fiscal year
1965 1964 1963
Number of oceangoing transits ------12,200 12,184 11,408
Net tonnage (Panama Canal measure-
ment) -------------------------77,207,090 71,793,761 66,744,515
Cargo (long tons of 2,240 lbs.) ------ 78,878,276 72,149,451 63,867,919
Total tolls and tolls credits ------------ $67,090,286 $62,493,860 $57,828,354

OTHER TRAFFIC
In addition to the oceangoing vessels, 687 tolls-paying small craft of less
than 300 net tons, Panama Canal measurement (or under 500 displacement
tons on vessels assessed on displacement tonnage), transited the Canal during
fiscal year 1965. Transits of small vessels have but slight effect on workloads
and tolls revenue volume, and are generally excluded from analysis of Canal
operations. Also excluded from the preceding table are statistics on 22 small
vessels, exempted from tolls, of the Government of the Republic of Panama,
war vessels of the Republic of Colombia, and 9 vessels transiting the Canal
solely for repairs at the Panama Canal shops. Further details on this traffic
will be found in table 25, chapter V, page 105.

PRINCIPAL TRADE ROUTES-COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC
The following table shows the eight major Panama Canal trade routes ranked
according to the net vessel tonnage (Panama Canal measurement) moving
over them. The cargo tonnage moving over these routes is also shown with
comparable 1964 statistics and the percentage change.
The net tonnage is the calculated cargo capacity of the various ships whereas
the cargo tonnage is the actual weight of the cargo transported in long tons.
Total net vessel tonnage moving through the Canal increased 7.3 percent
over the previous year. Vessel tonnages moving over the eight main trade
routes increased by 4 percent and the tonnage transported over all the other
routes increased by 17.1 percent.
All eight main routes maintained their status in the lineup of principal trade
routes served by the Panama Canal. Seven of the routes shown reveal
increases in net ship tonnage. Only two of the eight experienced decreases
in cargo tonnage shipped, neither of which is significant.
The most significant change in volume occurred in the top-ranking east
coast United States-Asia route with a vessel tonnage increase of 895,000
measurement tons, or a 5.5-percent gain. The largest percentage increase
took place in the seventh ranking route, the east coast South America to west
coast United States movement. The route increased 30.6 percent, an increase
of 609,000 net tons moving between the two countries. Retaining its eighth
position in importance among the routes, the east coast United States to west
coast Central America/Mexico trade reflects the second highest percentage
gain in net tonnage.







PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Fiscal year
(in thousands of tons) Percent in-
crease or
1965 1964 (decrease)
Panama Panama Panama
Canal Long Canal Long Canal Long
net tons net tons net tons
Trade route tons cargo tons cargo tons cargo
East coast United States-Asia................ ............... 17,234 22,540 16,339 21,354 5.5 5.6
East coast United States-west coast South America .............. 9,541 7,S24 9,960 7,031 (4.2) 11.3
Europe-west coast South America---------------------.......-...---. 7,751 7,153 7,500 7,073 3.3 1.1
Europe-west coast United States/Canada--------------------........... 6,779 6,882 6,620 7,044 2.4 (2.3)
U.S. intercoastal (including Alaska and Hawaii) ..---.-----------...... 4,920 5,823 4,566 6,088 7.8 (4.4)
Europe-Oceania---------------------------------- ---...... 3,233 2,378 3,148 2,158 2.7 10.2
East coast South America-west coast United States------------....... 2,598 2,838 1,989 2,355 30.6 20.5
East coast United States-west coast Central America/Mexico --.... 1,998 945 1,848 825 8.1 14.5
Subtotal-------------------------------------. 54,054 56,383 51,970 53,928 4.0 4.6
Allotherroutes---------------------------------------- 20,681 20,190 17,663 16,622 17.1 21.2
Total -------------------------------------.......... 74,735 76,573 69,633 70,550 7.3 8.5
The only decline occurring in net vessel tonnage is shown in the east coast
United States to west coast South America route which experienced a drop of
419,000 measurement tons, representing a decline of 4.2 percent. The east
coast South America to west coast United States, retaining its seventh position
in importance among the routes, shows the highest percentage gain in net
tonnage. Two other substantial gains in net tonnage are shown in the fifth
and eighth ranking routes, but the fifth route, U.S. intercoastal trade, took
a drop of 4.4 percent in cargo tonnage.
The total volume of cargo moving through the Canal increased by 8.5
percent, or 6,023,000 long tons. The highest single route increase in volume
of cargo tonnage, 20.5 percent, occurred in the east coast South America to
west coast United States. The gain falls just short of that experienced by the
"all other routes."
A brief description of shipping engaged in these trade routes is given in the
following paragraphs:
East coast United States-Asia.-Although retaining the position of first place
in importance among the various routes served by the Canal the route this year
dropped back to more normal gains in both Panama Canal net tonnage and
volume of cargo moved. From the phenomenal increase of 27 percent last
year the gain in long tons of cargo transiting eased off to 5.6 percent, or 1.2
million tons as compared with a gain of 4.5 million in 1964.
The flow of cargo to and from the Great Lakes area increased substantially
with a gain of 251,000 long tons, contributed almost entirely by the Asian to
United States movement.
Total exports from the east coast United States to Asia rose to 17,611,837
long tons, 190,000 tons under 1964 exports, while Far East exports to the
United States increased to 4,928,259 tons for a gain of 1,186,491 tons, or 5.6
percent over the tonnage moving in fiscal year 1964.
The three most important increasing commodities moving in this trade from
the United States to Asia were coal and coke, phosphates, and soybeans. Other
commodities contributing substantial volumes were sorghum with 208,000 tons,
and rice with an increase of 112,000 tons over the 1964 totals. Exports of
scrap metal declined some 850,000 tons during 1965. In the eastbound move-
ment, shipments of iron and steel products to the United States accounted


11351--3






REVIEW OF CANAL TRAFFIC


for 74.8 percent of the increased tonnage while sugar shipments rose by
some 126,000 long tons. Textiles and lumber shipments rose moderately.
East coast United States to west coast South America.-Although suffering
a modest decline in volume of shipping, this route retained its second place
position in importance. However, the volume of cargo increased by slightly
more than 11 percent.
Cargo tonnage moving over this route consists principally of the flow of
raw materials from South America to the United States. This year ores and
metals moving from South America over the route amounted to 4,196,000
long tons for a gain of 869,000 tons over fiscal year 1964. Iron ore alone
contributed 781,000 tons of this gain, or 89.5 percent of the total increase
over 1964. Sugar exports to the United States increased some 101,000
long tons.
The westbound volume of cargo increased only slightly in comparison with
the eastbound movement, contributing a total of 1,655,000 long tons moving
in this direction.
Europe to west coast South America.-Retaining its position as third-ranking
route of the year, the area experienced a very slight rise in net tonnage and
cargo movements. Trade this year contributed a total of 7,751,000 net vessel
tons of shipping to Panama Canal traffic in comparison with 7,500,000 net
tons in fiscal year 1964, a 3.3-percent rise in volume.
Raw materials, as in previous years, Atlantic-bound for European ports
contributed the principal cargo moving in this direction. During this fiscal
year 84.4 percent of the cargo moved from Pacific to Atlantic.
The flow of cargo from the west coast of South America to Europe increased
by 89,000 long tons, whereas the commodity flow from Europe declined by
9,000 tons.
Movements of bananas, fishmeal, and fish oil registered the most significant
advances, increasing some 434,000 tons in total, with fishmeal alone contribut-
ing 289,000 tons of the increase. These increases were offset to a considerable
extent by decreases in the movement of iron ore, coffee, and sugar in the
commodity flow from South America to Europe.
Europe to west coast United States/Canada.-Recording a modest increase
in the volume of shipping employed this fiscal year, this fourth-ranking route
in importance to the Canal experienced a decline of 2.3 percent in the volume
of cargo transported.
The significant rises in exports of oilseeds, lumber, sulfur, and petroleum
products of some 661,000 long tons to European ports was more than
offset by declining volumes amounting to 874,000 tons in wheat, barley, coke,
and metals.
The principal decrease recorded moving from Europe to the west coast area
was a decline" of 22.5 percent in iron and steel manufactures in comparison
with the fiscal year 1964 figure of 262,000 long tons. Nominal increased
shipments from Europe to the area occurred in automobiles and paper and
paper products.
U.S. intercoastal (including Alaska and Hawaii).-In terms of percentage,
the third highest increase in net vessel tonnage over a single route through






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


the Canal this year was registered in this fifth-ranking route. The trade con-
tributed 4,920,000 net vessel tons of shipping to Panama Canal traffic this
year in comparison with 4,566,000 net tons recorded in 1964, a 7.8-percent
rise in volume. On the other hand, after a significant rise of 24 percent
registered in cargo volume transiting in 1964 over the 1963 tonnage, the
cargo tonnage declined 4.4 percent, or a total of 265,000 long tons, under 1964.
. Although recording a net gain of some 931,000 long tons in cargo flow in
the westbound movement, 702,000 of which was increased tonnage of petro-
leum products, a total decline of 1,178,000 tons occurred in the eastbound
volume. This is a decrease of 30.8 percent under the volume of 3,820,000
long tons transiting in this direction in 1964.
Sugar, the leading export from Hawaii to the east coast of the United States,
decreased only slightly, 19,000 tons, under the 1964 figure. Canned food
products, also a leading commodity, declined some 52,000 long tons in
comparison with fiscal year 1964 when 260,000 tons were shipped.
The principal decrease suffered in the west coast to east coast movement
was due to decrease shipments of petroleum products which were down
1,158,000 long tons from the 1964 volume, a decline of 59.7 percent.
Europe to Oceania.-Ranking sixth in importance in trade via the Panama
Canal since 1955, the route showed a modest increase of 2.7 percent in net
vessel tonnage employed during 1965, and recorded a substantial increase
of 10.2 percent in cargo transported between the areas.
In this trade the bulk of the commodities flow principally between New
Zealand and Great Britain. This year, of the 2,378,000 long tons of cargo
moving over the route, 1,268,000 tons, or 53.3 percent, was trade between
the two countries.
Principal commodities contributing to the slight gain in the westbound
movement were iron and steel products and machinery with shipments of
iron and steel increasing 25.4 percent. In the eastbound flow substantial gains
were recorded in dairy and meat products, up 113,000 long tons. Fuel oil and
sugar exports also increased by 39.9 and 23.3 percent, respectively.
East coast South America to west coast United States.-This route retained
its position in seventh place and experienced the highest increases in Panama
Canal net vessel tonnage and cargo tonnage of any of the major routes. Net
vessel tonnage was up 30.6 percent and cargo tons rose 20.5 percent. In com-
parison with fiscal year 1964, a gain of some 609,000 net vessel tons and
483,000 long tons in cargo was contributed by the route.
The movement of cargo over this route consists almost entirely of a flow
of petroleum and products from Venezuela to the west coast of the United
States. Of the combined 2,838,000 long tons of cargo passing over the route
this year, 2,610,000 tons were petroleum and products bound for the west
coast of the United States. This is a percentage gain of 26.8 over lasi year's
commodity or some 551,000 long tons in the trade. United States to South
America shipments declined slightly from the preceding year.
East coast United States-west coast Central America/Mexico.-This route
retained its eighth-place position among the major routes served by the Canal,
and recorded the second highest percentage increases in volume of net






REVIEW OF CANAL TRAFFIC


tonnage and cargo tonnage for fiscal year 1965. Net vessel tonnage volume
rose by 8.1 percent while cargo tonnage increased 14.5 percent over last
year's volume.
The bulk of the cargo moving in this trade is bananas, chiefly from Costa
Rica and Panama to the eastern ports of the United States. Banana shipments
this fiscal year rose some 70,000 long tons, while shipments of sugar rose
sharply and contributed an additional 77,000 tons over the volume shipped
in 1964. These two commodities accounted for 77.2 percent of the total cargo
moving in this direction. Moderately increased shipments of phosphate and
paper and paper products occurred in the Atlantic to Pacific movement.

NATIONALITY OF VESSELS
Forty-five nationalities were represented in the oceangoing commercial
traffic passing through the Canal during fiscal year 1965, the same number
as in the previous year.
Transits of U.S. registry, numbering 1,678 with an aggregate net vessel
tonnage, Panama Canal measurement, of 12,197,141 tons, ranked first among
the nations using the Canal. For the fifth consecutive year ships flying the
Norwegian flag attained second place in importance among the various nations
using the waterway. British ships, for the sixth year, ranked in third place.
Germany remained in fourth place. Following these 4 top nations in order of
importance based on number of transits were Liberian, Japanese, Nether-
land, Greek, Panamanian, and Swedish vessels to round out the 10 nations
who accounted for 81.7 percent of the commercial transits.
The 3,303 different commercial vessels made 11,834 transits for an average
of 3.58 transits per vessel, varying from 1 to 165 transits per ship. This year
the Honduran tanker Gulfoba transited the Canal 165 times, 41 transits more
than were made last year, and an all-time high record for a single vessel in a
fiscal year. The Seatown, of Panamanian registry, also a tanker, again placed
second in transiting honors with 114 transits to its credit. Both tankers are on
a shuttle run between Panama's new oil refinery at Las Minas Bay and Balboa.
Of the 11,834 oceangoing commercial transits made during fiscal year
1965, 9,555 were classified as general cargo vessels. This is a decrease of 151
vessels of this type under the number transiting in fiscal year 1964. All other
types of transits declined with the exception of ore vessels which rose to 1,642
transits, an increase of 308 vessels from the previous year.
U.S.-flag vessels decreased by 10 transits with a decline in long tons of cargo.
However, an increase of 141,120 Panama Canal net vessel tonnage is shown
over last year as well as a slight increase in tolls revenue.
An increase of 109 transits occurred in the foreign registry class with
Panama Canal net vessel tonnage increasing 5,014,865 net tons over last year's
volume. An additional 6,684, 429 long tons of cargo transited the Canal in
these ships for an 11.2-percent rise in such tonnage over the volume recorded
in fiscal year 1964.
This year ships of U.S. registry paid 16.4 percent of the total tolls collected
on large commercial carriers. Last year such vessels paid 17.5 percent of the
total tolls.






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


CARGO STATISTICS-COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC
Cargo flowing through the Canal during fiscal year 1965 established the
highest level attained since the Canal opened 51 years ago. The volume of
cargo transiting this year was 76,573,071 long tons. This is a gain of 6,017,000
tons, or 8.5 percent, over last year's volume, and surpasses the previous record
established in 1962 by 9,048,519 tons.
The Atlantic to Pacific movement of cargo recorded a high of 42,948,996
long tons, for an increase of 4,047,597 tons. Cargo moving in the Pacific to
Atlantic direction contributed a gain of 1,975,384 tons over the volume attained
in fiscal year 1964. Of the 11 commodity groups which have consistently
accounted for approximately 75 percent of the volume of cargo passing through
the Canal, only wheat and canned and refrigerated products declined in ton-
nage with the remaining 9 groups all increasing. Heaviest contributors among
those commodities which increased were iron and steel manufactures, petro-
leum and products, phosphate, and lumber. Iron and steel increased by
49.3 percent for a gain of 1,269,000 long tons; petroleum and products showed
a gain of 7.5 percent for a gain of 1,066,000 long tons. Percentagewise, phos-
phates were second with an increase of 36.9 percent, but contributed
only an additional 875,000 long tons over movements last year. Lumber ship-
ments rose by 12 percent, and sugar gained some 13 percent over fiscal year
1964 tonnages.

Average Tonnage, Tolls, and Tons of Cargo Per Transiting Vessel
The average measurement of tonnage, tolls, and tons of cargo per oceangoing
commercial vessel during fiscal years 1965 and 1964 is shown in the following
table:
Fiscal year
Average per vessel 1965 1964
Panama Canal net measured tonnage--------------------- 6,315 5,910
Tolls ---------------------------------------------- $5,530 $5,175
Tolls per Panama Canal net ton ---------------------------$0.876 $0.877
Tons of cargo per laden transit -----------------------------_ 6,467 7,180
Tolls per ton of cargo (laden vessels only)-------------------- $0.753 $0.772

DATA IN STATISTICAL CHAPTER
Further particulars of traffic through the Canal are presented in chapter V
of this report.
















Chapter II


THE WATERWAY

The efficient and dependable operation of the Panama Canal is of vital
concern not only to maritime interests throughout the world but also to a host
of others whose livelihood and general welfare are dependent to some degree
upon an even flow of world commerce. The process of getting the ships
through the Canal and the performance of certain auxiliary or supporting
functions are grouped under the classification of Transit Operations, for pur-
poses of this report, and are the primary missions of the Marine Bureau and
the Engineering and Construction Bureau. These two bureaus must provide
for the transiting of ships, operation of the locks, vessels repairs, maintenance
of the Canal channel, meteorology and hydrographic work, operation of utility
systems, and the maintenance of all Canal supporting facilities.

TRANSIT OPERATIONS
Traffic control
During fiscal year 1965 there were 12,203 oceangoing vessels transiting
the Canal, 19 more than in fiscal year 1964. These vessels spent an average
of 14.3 hours in Canal Zone waters from time of arrival to departure. There
was an average of 33.4 ships per day with the highest peak in traffic being
reached in March 1965, when 1,119 oceangoing transits were made during
the month. A total of 1,008 vessels were recorded as holdovers during the
year, 318 of which were delayed because they required transit during daylight
hours. The remaining 690 vessels were delayed due principally to reduction
of capacity during periods of locks overhaul.
Tug operations
Certain vessels such as tankers, ore carriers, and those carrying hazardous
cargoes are selectively dispatched so that they will not meet or pass any other
vessel in the narrow sections of Gaillard Cut and are not permitted to proceed
unless they can clear the Cut and the locks during daylight hours. Such ships
are called "daylight clear-Cuts," and during fiscal year 1965 a total of 1,345
of this type transit moved through the waterway in comparison with 1,114
handled during 1964. In addition, there were 985 vessels which did not
require "daylight only" transit, but did require clear-Cut transit compared
with 960 such transits in fiscal year 1964. The total of 2,330 clear-Cut transits






THE WATERWAY


is significant because it means that almost 1 out of every 5 transiting vessels
required special treatment in Gaillard Cut. This fast growing category of
vessels increased 10.5 percent in fiscal year 1965 over the previous year volume.
There was a significant increase in the number of large vessels transiting
during the year. Although vessels continued to be built longer and wider,
their handling has become less difficult due to the completion of approximately
5 miles of widening in the Gaillard Cut channel, thus permitting the classifica-
tion of 1,696 vessels into the partial-clear-Cut category. From 646 in 1964,
a total of 848 vessels transited in 1965 with beams of 80 feet or over, while
vessels of over 575 feet in length increased from 1,036 to 1,325 in 1965.
Seven tugs of the Navigation Division were in service throughout the year-
three at the Atlantic terminal and four at the Pacific terminal. The tugs
operated a total of 19,348 revenue-hours in the servicing and assisting of ships,
in comparison with 18,535 revenue-hours in fiscal year 1964. Dredging Divi-
sion tugboats performed a total of 3,890 hours of service in assistance to
commercial shipping as well as to vessels of the U.S. Army and Navy.
Accidents to shipping
During fiscal year 1965, the Board of Local Inspectors were called upon to
investigate 35 marine accidents which occurred in Canal Zone waters, and to
fix the blame and responsibility for them. Of this total, 13 accidents occurred
at the locks, 5 occurred at other points in transit, and 17 occurred in the terminal
ports. This compares with 29 investigations in fiscal year 1964.
The Panama Canal Company was found wholly responsible for damages
incurred in 17 accidents. Seventeen of the accidents were determined to
have been caused by fault of the vessel or other causes for which the Company
assumed no responsibility, and one case was a divided responsibility between
the ship and Panama Canal Company. There were 407 transits per accident
during 1965, as compared to 487 in 1964.
Admeasurement and boarding party operations
During 1965, 684 new oceangoing vessels were measured and in addition
379 ships with structural changes were remeasured. This compares with
645 new ships and 455 with structural changes in the previous year.
The functions of the boarding party consist of all phases of routine boarding
which includes admeasurement of vessels for tolls assessment, inspection to
insure compliance with customs, immigration, quarantine, and navigation
regulations, and the performance of Deputy Shipping Commissioner duties
for seamen aboard the U.S.-flag vessels. There were 13,108 ships boarded
and inspected during the year as compared with 13,246 in fiscal year 1964.
Aids to navigation
As of June 30, 1965, there were 2,106 navigational aids in service located
in the Canal proper, its approaches and terminal harbors, and the adjacent
coastal areas, all maintained by the Navigational Aids Unit of the Dredging
Division. Included in this total are the electrically operated fluorescent
luminaries which comprise the Gaillard Cut lighting system and the Gatun
and Miraflores approach lighting. Classified according to the type of illumi-
nants used are the following: gas operated, 82; electrically operated, 1,509;






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


battery operated, 101; and unlighted aids, 414. Outlying navigational aids
were visited for the purpose of inspection and servicing, and all aids were
maintained in good operating condition throughout the year.

LOCKS OPERATION
Gatun Locks near the Atlantic entrance to the Canal forms two continuous
parallel flights of three steps each which raise the ships 85 feet above sea level
and then lower them. The three flights at the Pacific entrance are divided
between Pedro Miguel Locks with one flight and Miraflores Locks with two
flights. Each of the twin chambers in each flight of locks has a length of
1,000 feet, a width of 110 feet, and a depth of 70 feet. Since the flights are
in duplicate, ships may pass in opposite directions simultaneously.
The duration of a lockage depends on many factors, including the size of
the ship, its handling characteristics, and whether the vessel is locked separately
or in tandem. This latter procedure is used to save overall time and water.
The normal lockage intervals are 40, 60, and 80 minutes at Pedro Miguel,
Miraflores, and Gatun Locks, respectively.
The number of large vessels passing through the locks in fiscal year 1965
was greater than ever before. Ten-locomotive lockages increased 12.5 percent
over the previous year, and 10-locomotive tandem lockages decreased 17.6
percent. There were 208 12-locomotive lockages in fiscal year 1965 as
compared with 138 the previous year. Total lockages for 1965 showed an
increase of 1,178, or 3.6 percent.
Lockages-Vessels handled
The number of lockages and vessels handled (including Panama Canal
equipment) is shown in the following table for the fiscal years 1965 and 1964:
Fiscal year
1965 1964
Gatun Locks:
Number of lockages --------------------------- 10,999 10,918
Number of vessels ------------------- 13,506 13,725
Pedro Miguel Locks:
Number of lockages ------------------------------11,925 11,347
Number of vessels ----- ------------------- 15,103 15,008
Miraflores Locks:
Number of lockages ---------------11,360 10,841
Number of vessels ------- ------------------- 14,574 14,514

CANAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM
Canal widening program
The Canal widening program is one of several aimed at increasing the
capacity of the Canal by expediting the movement of ships in transit. It is
concerned with increasing the width of the usable channel in Gaillard Cut
from 300 to 500 feet.
The work of removing the nonrocky overburden from that part of the Canal
in Las Cascadas-Bas Obispo Reaches which was to be widened was completed
early in fiscal year 1965. A total of 5,585,337 cubic yards were removed at
a cost of $0.448 per cubic yard.


11351--4






THE WATERWAY


The remaining work required to complete the widening of Gaillard Cut
consists of the removal of 3,870,000 cubic yards, more or less, in Zone I
(material above elevation 90), and 7 million cubic yards in Zone II (below
elevation 90 subaqueous material). If the extra 5-foot depth design is used,
there will be an additional 650,000 cubic yards of this Zone II material.
Locks towing locomotives
New locomotives have been placed in service at all locks, resulting in fewer
personnel being required for lockage crews.
Experience with new locomotives has enabled larger ships to be locked with
fewer locomotives than originally anticipated. The present operation is now
handling larger ships and more lockages with 215 fewer personnel.
Continued improvements have been made in maintenance procedures on
new locomotives, resulting in savings in parts, material, and labor costs. Four
test locomotives are to be returned to Japan to be standardized and returned
to service, windlass and traction units removed for return and standardization.
These units and other usable parts will become spare parts for the 57
locomotives remaining in service.
Four maintenance shelters for servicing the new locomotives were built
under contract during the fiscal year. Two are at the north end each side
of Miraflores Locks, and two are located at the north end each side of Pedro
Miguel Locks.
24-hour locks outage concept
As a part of the 24-hour outage concept, overhaul of two gates was begun
in January 1965. A trial installation of the east wall hollow quoin cofferdam
was attempted, unsuccessfully. The cofferdam was redesigned and will be
altered by the Industrial Division. It is expected that the experimental
overhaul will be resumed in October 1965, at Miraflores Locks.

WATER SUPPLY
The supply of water necessary for the operation of the Panama Canal in
transiting of ships, the generation of electric power, and for municipal use,
is derived from several tributary streams that flow into Madden and Gatun
Lakes which serve as storage and flood control reservoirs of a drainage basin
comprising 1,289 square miles. All inflow from Madden Lake, whether
drawn for hydroelectric power or spilled for lake control, flows into Gatun
Lake and together with the runoff from the area below Madden Dam is used
for lockages, power generation, municipal purposes, or may be spilled to
control the operating level of Gatun Lake.
An average rainfall of 84.57 inches in the Canal Zone during fiscal year
1965 was approximately 11.04 inches below normal. Runoff during the
5-month "dry season," December through April, amounted to 241,069 acre-feet,
which was 70 percent below the 51-year average. This year the dry season
began on December 2, and ended on May 8, 1965, continuing 13 days longer
than the average dry season, and recording the 10th longest season in 51 years.
The total runoff from Gatun and Madden Dam Lake Basin for fiscal year
1965 was 12 percent below normal and amounted to 4,196,763 acre-feet.






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Of this amount, 39 percent, or 1,624,541 acre-feet, was derived from the basin
above Madden Dam. A net drawdown on Madden Lake of 32.63 feet and
4.35 feet on Gatun Lake during the December-April period represents a draft
on storage from both lakes of 794,582 acre-feet. After deducting the evapora-
tion losses for both lakes of 527,571 acre-feet, the remaining yield or runoff
amounted to 4,056,589 acre-feet. This remaining yield was expended as
follows: 1,892,172 acre-feet furnished for lockages (average 31.4 per day);
1,535,009 acre-feet used to generate 96,688,200 kilowatt-hours at Gatun
hydroelectric plant; municipal requirements totaling 49,977 acre-feet; leakage
and miscellaneous losses amounting to 19,651 acre-feet; and the spilling of
559,780 acre-feet at Gatun Spillway to control the lake elevation.
Thermal power generation for water conservation began in December 1964
and continued through April 1965. A total of 201,855,700 kilowatt-hours was
produced. Of this amount, 22,939,400 kilowatt-hours were furnished from
December 10, 1964, to April 30, 1965, by Fuerza y Luz through interchange.
Sources and usages of water together with comparable data for the preceding
year are itemized in table 26, chapter V, page 106.

MAINTENANCE OF CANAL CHANNEL
The maintenance of the Canal Channel, its terminal harbors, the adjacent
navigable waterways of the Panama Canal, and special improvement projects
were accomplished during the year with two 15-cubic-yard dipper dredges and
two suction dredges of 28- and 10-inch capacity. Maintenance dredging totaling
3,144,200 cubic yards of material was performed in the Canal prism and
harbors. A total of 20,700 cubic yards of mined material was removed from
Mandinga Flare during the year. The material was used in the construction
of collision dikes at Piers 6 and 7 of the Thatcher Ferry Bridge.
In addition to these activities, it became necessary to remove slide material
moving into the Canal from the Cartagenita slide on the west side of Gaillard
Cut at the south end of Cerro Paraiso. The dredge Mindi removed 19,200
cubic yards of material, and another 35,000 cubic yards were removed by
dry excavation.
In January 1965, removal of the precipitous material above this slide was
begun. A dike is being constructed, with this spoil, across the Rio Grande
River which will provide a large settling basin for the silt to be dredged from
Gaillard Cut and Miraflores Lake.
A summary of dredging operations for the fiscal year 1965 is shown in
table 27, chapter V, page 106.

ORIENTATION AND EXCURSION SERVICE
During the year the Company provided two vessels, the launches Las Cruces
and the Reina Manuelita I, for orientation and excursion service through the
Canal. The launch Las Cruces, a 200-passenger vessel, made 414 trips,
carrying a total of 41,082 passengers and the Reina Manuelita I carried
1,803 passengers on 103 trips in partially transiting the Canal. The launch
Anayansi was used on 37 trips in connection with inspections, aids to navigation,
and Interoceanic Canal Studies.






20 THE WATERWAY

The Reina Manuelita I activity increased by 24 trips over fiscal year 1964,
with an increase of 514 passengers carried; the Las Cruces made 4 less trips
and carried 731 fewer passengers.
For the dry season months, January to March, two launches were used for
a total of 72 recreational trips.













Chapter III


SUPPORTING OPERATIONS

In support of the maintenance and operation of the waterway and incident
to the civil government of the Canal Zone, the Company conducts many
auxiliary operations that are essential to the accomplishment of its basic mission.
These include rail, ocean, and highway transportation; public-utility-type
services, the operation of retail stores and housing for employees; and a wide
variety of engineering, supply, and service functions. These services are also
made available to the other Federal agencies in the Canal Zone and, to a limited
extent, to the Republic of Panama.
EMPLOYEE SERVICES
Supply and Community Service Bureau
The principal objectives and responsibilities of the Supply and Community
Service Bureau consist of procurement of supplies and materials, and their
storage; distribution and sales; operation of theaters, restaurants, and bowling
alleys; operation of living quarters for employees; care of public buildings;
care of grounds, collection and disposal of trash and garbage; the operation
and maintenance of the Canal Zone cemeteries, and the operation of Summit
Gardens, Nursery, and Zoo.
SUPPLY DIVISION
Retail Stores, Warehousing, Manufacturing and Allied Operations
The retail stores, warehouses, and related operations make available food
supplies, clothing, general household items, and other essentials to U.S. citizen
employees and their families, to non-U.S. citizen employees residing in the
Canal Zone, and to members and U.S. citizen employees of the Armed Forces.
The retail stores in the Canal Zone include the operation of gasoline service
stations. Manufacturing and processing plants include a bakery, a dairy and
ice cream plant, and a laundry. Improved merchandising methods and
reduction of operation expenses were pursued throughout the year with a view
to eliminating or combining functions to reduce manpower and labor costs
with a minimum loss of service to customers.
The Milk Products Unit used a total of 598,976 gallons of raw milk in the
process of bottling fresh milk and 8,787 gallons in manufacturing other milk






SUPPORTING OPERATIONS


products. The 1,295-gallon daily average milk production this year is 1.7
percent higher than that of fiscal year 1964. The policy of purchasing surplus
fresh milk from approved Panamanian dairies continued throughout the year
at the rate of 3,000 quarts per day, 5 days per week. Milk purchased from
Panama suppliers this year totaled 195,750 gallons, an average of 2,041
quarts daily for the year.
Fifteen calves from the Mindi Dairy Farm were presented to Panama's
Ministry of Agriculture for distribution to various 4-S clubs in November 1964.
In April 1965, two calves were donated as prizes at the Chorrera Agricultural
Fair, and, in June, five were donated to the Divisa School of Agriculture.
Service center operations
The service centers and Tivoli Guest House provide certain essential sales
and recreational facilities for the employees of the Company/Government
organization, their dependents and guests, as well as others authorized to
receive Canal Zone privileges. These functions include cafeterias, soda
fountains, guest accommodations; recreational activities such as theaters,
bowling lanes and related activities; and merchandise sections. In addition,
rental space is conveniently furnished for the use of various licensee shops,
which include barber, beauty, tailor, cobbler, and dressmaking establishments,
and also union organizations.
During the fiscal year continued efforts were made toward maximum
utilization of automatic food and beverage vending machines. At year's end
50 Company-owned machines were in operation and 19 were on hand pending
installation. In addition, 23 machines were being operated in service center
facilities by contractual agreement.
Extensive renovation and improvement work was performed at the Tivoli
Guest House. An additional 29 rooms were air conditioned. Dining rooms
and other spaces were refurnished and redecorated to reflect as much as
possible the historical background associated with the Canal construction
period.
Storehouse branch
The organizational units of this branch include administrative, stock manage-
ment, warehousing, scrap, and salvage operations; excess disposal; and office
furniture and equipment pools. During the fiscal year, a continued program
of improvements and operating economies, realinements and consolidations
was pursued throughout the functional units of the branch. Rewarehousing
of the consolidated Motor Transportation and Storehouse auto parts inventory
in Motor Transportation Division areas was completed in August 1964. New
procedures have eliminated much of the paperwork in this operation.
This year sales of nonferrous metals approximating 494,000 pounds resulted
in a gross margin of approximately $131,000. Bids were opened on June 25,
covering approximately 7,000 tons of ferrous scrap; 5,480 tons were awarded
to two bidders for approximately $113,200. Thirty-eight locks towing
locomotives were converted to scrap during the year.
The new elementary school located at Fort Davis was supplied with equip-
ment and furniture during the first quarter of the fiscal year. Office furniture






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


for the new Gorgas Hospital in the amount of $46,000 was received in April
and installed by the contractor. The remaining $14,000 of this special
allotment will be obligated in fiscal year 1966. The first shipment of GSA
furniture, specially packed for export, was received in excellent condition.

PROCUREMENT DIVISION
Efforts continued throughout the year to develop new resources in the South
and Southwest to promote savings on inland freight and to permit maximum
use of the Company's supply ship.
The New Orleans Procurement Office placed into effect the direct purchasing
system. Under this system, resale and non-bid merchandise for resale that
was heretofore purchased by the New Orleans office is now purchased directly
from the Isthmus by the Procurement Section of the Supply Division.

COMMUNITY SERVICES DIVISION
Employee housing
An experimental program to determine the feasibility of preventive main-
tenance of employee quarters continued through the year. A 5-year program
to incorporate all employee quarters buildings into the program was budgeted
to commence in fiscal year 1966. At year's end the transfer of responsibility
for custodial service in all Canal Zone Schools from the Schools Division to
the Housing Branch had been accomplished, to be effective July 1, 1965.
As of June 30, 1965, there were 2,507 family units in operation in U.S.
citizen communities, and 1,726 family units in Latin American communities.
Nine additional quarters buildings, representing 32 apartments, were con-
structed in the Pedro Miguel townsite. There was no other new quarters
construction during the year. Quarters presented for retirement consisted
of 14 buildings containing 94 apartments, all in the Latin American towvnsites.

TRANSPORTATION AND UTILITY SERVICES
Railroad operations
The Panama Railroad, connecting the terminal cities of Panama and Colon,
provides transportation across the Isthmus for both passengers and freight. In
addition, it furnishes industrial switching services to the major Company/
Government and Armed Forces warehouses and installations.
The 47-mile mainline is supported by 74 miles of sidings, yard, and industrial
track. Freight and passenger stations, locomotive and car repair shops are
maintained by the Railroad. It serves all Federal Government agencies on
the Isthmus and is a common carrier serving commercial interests in the Canal
Zone and the Republic of Panama. The Railroad also operates the Panama
Local Agency which is responsible for the receipt, delivery, and forwarding
of all railroad freight at the Panama City terminus.
Substantial economies were achieved on the railroad this year due to the
abolishment of positions, consolidations, and overtime reduction. In fiscal
year 1965 the Railroad Division maintained the same high level freight
workload as in the previous year. Canal Zone freight continued at a high level;






SUPPORTING OPERATIONS


however, the Republic of Panama freight over the line declined instead of
increasing as anticipated. The drop in high-revenue freight is attributed to
the slow economic recovery of business conditions in Panama following the
civil disturbances in early 1964, and a longshoremen's strike of 2 months in
the east and gulf ports of the United States.
Passenger business declined from 695,000 in 1964 to 648,000 in fiscal year
1965, a drop of 7 percent which was anticipated as transportation conditions
resumed a more normal trend following the disturbances in 1964.
Freight hauled decreased very slightly, some 2,000 tons under the previous
year. Freight services income improved 5.8 percent, or $65,000, over the
fiscal year 1964 figure due to improved composition and ocean freight rate
increases on through billed cargo effective the last 3 months of the fiscal year.
Comparative workload and income statistics are shown in the following table:
Fiscal year
1965 1964
Passengers carried -------------------------------- 648,000 695,000
Revenue freight tons carried --------------- 196,000 198,000
Passenger service income -------------------------- $451,000 $505,183
Freight service income --------------------------- $1,143,000 $1,080,064
Switching and locomotive service income --------$87,000 $116,578
Net operating deficit -------------- -------------- $89,000 $19,779
Motor transportation
This division operates consolidated motor vehicle repair shops and maintains
a motor vehicle fleet for use of the Company/Government. Supervision is
also exercised over a public bus transportation system operating in the Pacific
area under franchise.
Special operating economies resulted in a reduction of some $49,000 in
labor costs over the year. Transportation workload increased slightly, with
a 3-percent gain in total fleet mileage. Trans-Isthmian pilot runs that had
been curtailed due to the civil disturbances were resumed, dirt hauling and
a fleet increase contributed to the increase in mileage. A daily average of
2,638 schoolchildren of all grades were transported as compared with an
average of 2,554 during 1964.
To meet requirements for furnishing the wide variety of transportation
services, the motor vehicle fleet was maintained at the 624 unit level. During
the year a total of 37 new replacement vehicles were received.
Significant workload indices for the fiscal year in comparison with the
previous year are given below:
Fiscal year
1965 1964
Vehicles in service ----------------------------- 624 595
Vehicle mileage ------------------------------- 7,179,00 6,852,000
Trans-Isthmian freight hauled ------------------------- 13,049 12,925
Schoolchildren transported (average per day) -------- 2,638 2,554
Repair shop services furnished others ----------- $814,393 $771,425
Operating margin (or deficit) -------------------------- ($6,700) $9,710
Water transportation operations
This division operates one combination cargo-passenger steamship of 10,000
tons between the ports of New Orleans, La., and Cristobal, C.Z. This vessel
is restricted to the carriage of U.S. Government cargo and passengers.






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Cargo workload increased by 14 percent over fiscal year 1964, while
passenger workload dropped by 2 percent under the previous year.
Shown below is a statistical comparison of the fiscal years 1965 and 1964:
Fiscal year
1965 1964
Number of completed voyages ---------------------------27 27
Tons of freight carried --------- ------------- 108,191 95,187
Average number of tons per voyage ---------------------- 4,007 3,525
Number of passengers carried -------------------------- 6,818 6,938
Average number of passengers per voyage ---------- 252 257
Operating margin------------------------------ $26,000 $12,000
Electrical power system
The Panama Canal Company generates and transmits electric power for
use of the Company/Government, Armed Forces, employees, and associate
activities in the Canal Zone. It operates and maintains hydroelectric and
thermal electric generating stations, substations, switching stations, and
transmission lines and appurtenances.
The workload of the Power Branch, which is reflected by the total gross
power required to supply customer load, was 16.8 percent greater than that
for 1964. This increase was provided for by increased operation of the
system generating units and increased purchases of power from Fuerza y Luz
and the military. Due to a longer dry season and increased load, system
thermal generation was 8.8 percent greater than in 1964.
The total power generated during the year was 6.1 percent greater than
in 1964. A peakload of 75,200 kilowatts, occurring on May 3, 1965, was
the highest on record. Thermal generating plant operation was increased
during the period December 7 through June 30 to permit reduced operation
of the Gatun hydroelectric generators for dry season conservation of water in
Gatun Lake. Full load 24-hour operation of the two new Miraflores gas
turbines, and operation of the Cocoli, Agua Clara, and Coco Solo diesels
as required to supplement this thermal electric generation was accomplished
with the help of loaned labor and temporary employees.
The new transmission line connecting the Panama Canal power system with
that of the Compania Panamefia de Fuerza y Luz was energized on March 25,
1964. This interconnect was used during the dry season to receive power
to assist in our dry season operation. A Service Schedule B was added to our
power exchange contract with this company to permit our purchase of their
available surplus electrical energy.
The combined generated output of the power system for fiscal year 1965
was 444,380,700 kilowatt-hours. A total of 438,442,118 kilowatt-hours was
delivered to consumers as compared with 382,028,039 in the previous year.
Further particulars on electric power generated are shown in table 28,
chapter V, page 107.
Seismology
The seismological observatory at Balboa Heights is an important link in the
worldwide network of seismological stations. Situated in one of the major
earthquake areas of the world, its records are very much in demand. All
original records, after preliminary analysis, are mailed to Washington, D.C.,


11351--5






SUPPORTING OPERATIONS


for final interpretation by computer. There were 223 seismic disturbances
recorded on the Balboa Heights seismographs during fiscal year 1965.
Communications system
The communications system consists of two main exchanges located in
Balboa and Cristobal with small exchanges at Pedro Miguel, Gamboa, Gatun,
and Coco Solo. Their respective distribution systems are connected by one
trans-Isthmian trunk cable and a microwave radio communication system
between Gamboa and Gatun. The system is independent of, but inter-
connected with, the systems in the cities of Panama and Colon, and the military
exchanges on all military reservations. The microwave facilities also provide
radio communications service for the Federal Aviation Agency, Marine Traffic
Control System, Dredging Division, and Meteorological and Hydrographic
Branch.
At the end of fiscal year 1965, there were 9,820 telephones in service as
compared with 9,400 telephones in use at the end of the preceding year, an
increase of 420.
Water system
The Water Branch continued to supply all the filtered water requirements of
the Canal Zone, including sales of water to vessels; Armed Forces installations;
the cities of Colon, Panama, and Cativa; and suburban Panama in the Republic
of Panama.
The Pacific area water system produced a record quantity of water due to
the continued growth of the suburban Panama areas and increased Armed
Forces activity within the Canal Zone. The total year's consumption for the
combined Atlantic and Pacific areas was 2,146.4 million cubic feet, an increase
of 4.3 percent over fiscal year 1964.
Included in the water system organization is a laboratory unit which performs
the necessary tests to assure the production and distribution of safe, potable
water. In addition to this primary function, the laboratory unit also performs
chemical, physical, and bacteriological tests for other Company/Government
units and outside agencies.
The following table shows the consumption of filtered water for municipal
purposes and for sale to vessels for fiscal years 1965 and 1964:
Fiscal year
1965 1964
(millions of cubic feet)
Canal Zone (including Armed Forces) --------------------- 668.6 637.5
City of Panama and suburban Panama --------------------- 1,158.1 1,119.4
Cities of Colon and Cativa------------------------------ 295.8 276.0
Sales to vessels --------------------------------------- 23.9 25.7
Total --------------------------------------- 2,146.4 2,058.6
Vessel repairs
A total of 467 vessels measuring 65 feet or over were repaired in the
Company's shipyard during the fiscal year, accounting for 1,711 ship-days.
Twenty-two vessels were drydocked during the year.
Panama Canal Company and Canal Zone Government sources continued
to provide the major portion of the division's workload throughout the entire






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


year, with a slight increase percentagewise. The Company/Government
operations and service requirements accounted for approximately 75 percent
of the total volume. Work consisted mainly of the usual floating equipment
overhaul and repairs in the Marine Bureau, the Dredging Division, and the
Locks Division. Of this total, the Marine Bureau provided approximately
30 percent and the Dredging Division 35 percent.
This year commercial work increased, particularly in the last quarter.
Repairs resulting from marine accidents in the Canal comprised a considerable
amount of income for the fiscal year. In most cases repairs amounted to those
necessary to enable the vessel to proceed to a port of call where finished,
permanent repairs could be conducted. Revenues from commercial sources
for ships repaired were $944,763.02 in comparison with $372,319 the previous
year. No major overhauls for the U.S. Navy or for foreign naval vessels
occurred during the year.
Harbor terminals operation
The prime functions of the harbor terminals operation are the movement
of local cargo and in-transit cargo across the Panama Canal Company docks
and piers at the ports of Cristobal and Balboa, and the performance of berthing
services to accommodate vessels requiring bunkers, water, stores, or to embark
and disembark local or in-transit cruise passengers.
The gross tonnage handled, transferred, and stevedored during the year
amounted to 2,389,373 tons, some 5,000 tons under the volume in 1964.
Transshipment cargo showed an increase of 12,128 tons over the previous year.
Local incoming cargo decreased 1,800 tons due to a decline in cargo imported
by the Republic of Panama (some 4,200 tons) offset in part by tonnage
increases of Company/Government and Armed Forces cargo. Local outward
shipments were down some 11,600 tons in 1965 due principally to decreased
exports by the Republic of Panama.
Comparative combined cargo movements in tons of cargo stevedored are
as follows:
Fiscal year
1965 1964
Combined cargo movements between ships and piers 1,172,357 1,173,130
On the piers ------------------------------- 1,217,016 1,221,323
Total (revenue tons) ------------------------ 2,389,373 2,394,453
The marine bunkering operation, the other major function of this division,
increased 1,280,165 barrels, or 3.6 percent over the previous year, 36,792,557
barrels being handled. This is the highest recorded workload experienced by
the marine bunkering section. This increase is attributed chiefly to bunker
deliveries to vessels, up 6 percent over 1964 volume. Bunkering require-
ments increased by 941,894 barrels, or 5.4 percent, resulting in increased
receipts. However, the number of tankers discharging decreased in 1965,
four under the number discharging in 1964. Issues of petroleum products
to the Republic of Panama decreased some 47,300 barrels in 1965 as a result
of direct delivery of Panamanian consumer requirements from the new refinery
located in Panama at Las Minas Bay.






SUPPORTING OPERATIONS


The following comparative workload data is furnished for fiscal years 1965
and 1964:
Fiscal year
1965 1964
(barrels)
Combined receipts (Cristobal and Balboa) -------18,498,416 18,160,145
Combined issues (Cristobal and Balboa) -------------- 18,294,141 17,352,247
Total barrels of products moved --------------- 36,792,557 35,512,392
Tankers discharging (Cristobal and Balboa) ------ 428 432
Vessels bunkering -------------------------------- 4,579 4,416
Printing Plant
The Printing Plant, located at La Boca, C.Z., on the Pacific side of the
Isthmus, is a Government field printing plant under the regulations of the Joint
Committee on Printing, Congress of the United States.
Production continued its steady rise during fiscal year 1965, the total
measured in production units being 8.3 percent higher than in the previous year.
This workload amounted to a total of 73,453,000 production units as compared
with 67,794,000 in 1964. Offset production continued to account for an
ever-increasing share of the printing workload. This year's figures show
offset printing was utilized for 78.6 percent of total production compared to
only 31 percent 6 years ago when the long-range program for modernization
of Plant equipment and conversion from letterpress to offset printing was
inaugurated.

PRINCIPAL ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS
Canal widening at Las Cascadas-Bas Obispo Reaches
The widening of the Canal continued during the year by contract excavation.
This is one of several projects aimed at increasing the capacity of the Canal by
expediting the movement of ships in transit and is concerned with increasing
the width of the usable channel in Gaillard Cut from 300 to 500 feet. During
the past 11 years approximately two-thirds of the 8-mile-long Gaillard Cut has
been widened. The contract for the removal of the softer overburden
materials above elevation 95 feet from the widened area of Las Cascadas-Bas
Obispo Reaches to Mandinga River was completed early in fiscal year 1965.
A total of 5,585,337 cubic yards was removed at a cost of $0.448 per cubic yard.
The remaining work required to complete the widening of Gaillard Cut
consists of the removal of 3,870,000 cubic yards of Zone I (i.e., material above
elevation 90), and 7 million cubic yards of Zone II (below elevation 90
subaqueous) material. If the extra 5-foot-depth design is used, there will be
an additional 650,000 cubic yards of this Zone II material.
Trinidad Dam
At the close of fiscal year 1965, a restudy was being made of the contract
schedule for accomplishment of this project along with the widening of the
Canal through Las Cascadas and Bas Obispo Reaches. Studies were also
underway for relocation of the Guacha-Tern portion of the dam with redesign
of the embankment so as to reduce the quantity of high cost crushed rock for






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


the filter blanket. During September and October, doubt arose as to the
eventual accomplishment of this project, and no further work was performed
in the study. In June 1965, the Company terminated the contract with
consultants, on the basis that the project was indefinitely deferred.
New locks towing locomotives and cranes
Manufacture and delivery of the locomotives has proceeded about 2 months
ahead of schedule. Fifty-eight locomotives and two cranes were in service
as of May 1965, and the remaining locomotive and No. 3 crane were shipped
from Japan about June 20, 1965.
The new locomotives were installed on both lanes of Pedro Miguel Locks
as of September 19, 1964, and the installation of new machines at Miraflores
Locks was completed January 30, 1965. In general, the new towing locomo-
tives have performed very satisfactorily. They have noticeably speeded up
lockages because of their power and speed advantages over the old machines.
Delays to lockages because of locomotive troubles have been almost negligible.
Under a supplemental agreement with the manufacturer, four of the original
test machines are to be modified, and a change order was executed for
additional locomotive spare parts.
The old locomotives and cranes were retired from service and scrapped.
Four locomotives were retained for display and two were donated to the
National Museum of Transportation and the American Museum of Electricity.
Gorgas Hospital construction
The new Gorgas Hospital building was completed and put in service during
fiscal year 1965. Alterations to the existing plant, and this new 8-story,
air-conditioned hospital building were begun in fiscal year 1962 with the object
of consolidating all Gorgas Hospital activities into four buildings connected
by two pedestrian bridges and a tunnel.
The final phase of the construction of the addition, from April 9 to completion
on October 19, 1964, was performed under a negotiated contract with the
approval of the bonding company after the failure by default of the original
contractor. Liquidated damages, covering 183 days' default, in the amount
of $91,500, was assessed against the defaulted contract.
Locks engineering
This continuous engineering program is to provide improvements to locks
operations. During the year the Corps of Engineers in Buffalo was invited
to inspect the Panama Canal Locks and recommend the feasibility of
modernizing the locks control equipment and/or improving the locks operating
procedure. An official report of their recommendations is to be submitted.
The contract for installation of center wall turntables to turn the new locomo-
tives end to end was completed as well as the construction of nine repair
shelters to be used with the new machines.
In the 24-hour-outage overhaul concept a redesign of the cofferdam became
necessary as the result of an unsuccessful attempt at dewatering. Sketches
and drawings were prepared to show rising stem and cylindrical valve
overhaul schemes.







SUPPORTING OPERATIONS


Expansion of electrical power system
This program, begun in 1961, is designed to provide a system of approxi-
mately 100 megawatts by 1980. In fiscal year 1963 two gas-driven turbine
generators were installed at the Miraflores Power Plant to enlarge the capacity
of this facility.
Upon receipt of plans and specifications for tanks, control room structures,
and the electrical and mechanical installation of work, the awarding of all
major contracts for work on this project was begun. Contracts for the installa-
tion of the steamplant, the turbine generator, the circulating water system, the
fuel storage system, the electrical-mechanical system, the 44-kv. switchyard,
and for miscellaneous building construction were in progress at the end of
this fiscal year. The turbine, generator and condenser were located in place.
The turbine control room addition was approximately 50 percent complete;
the boiler 60 percent complete; the construction of the new tanks approximately
20 percent complete, and the circulating water system construction work was
35 percent complete.
Designs were prepared for two oil storage tanks of 54,165-barrel capacity
and others were started for the interconnection with Panama power system,
Atlantic area. Plans and designs were developed to include additional power
service to Fort Kobbe, and install new oil circuit breakers, switchgear units,
and related appurtenances at other important locations.

Water system improvements
The work of installing a 20-inch waterline from Balboa to Chorillo Hill
and from Balboa Pump Station to the National Avenue manifold in Ancon
was completed during the fiscal year. This work is part of the program aimed
at increasing the potable water supply of Panama City.
New pumps are being installed under contract at the Paraiso Raw Water
Pump Station. These will aid the greatly increased demands upon the Canal
Zone water system.

Operations and capital construction by contract
New contracts awarded in fiscal year 1965 were lower by $621,100 than
those awarded the previous year. Sixty-three contracts covering capital
construction (exclusive of architect-engineering contracts) were awarded for
a total of $5,335,800. Total work accomplished on all capital construction
during fiscal year 1965 amounted to $10,781,300.
Major capital items contracted for during the year were electrical-
mechanical installations for Miraflores Power Plant, $832,500; construction
of building "E" for Curundu Junior High School, $441,200; masonry, tile, and
ceilings for Curundu Junior High School, $335,300; air conditioning Curundu
Junior High School, $292,600; furnishing and erecting storage tanks at Mira-
flores, $274,400; construction of 44-kv. switchyard at Miraflores, $226,900;
electrical work for Curundu Junior High School, $219,600; additional power
service for Howard Air Force Base, $204,800, and approach and exit ramps
for Thatcher Ferry Bridge, $183,700.






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 31

Other projects
Seven other contracts for account of the Company/Government awarded
for over $100,000 each were construction of play slabs for elementary schools,
$182,200; miscellaneous buildings and structures for Miraflores Power Plant,
$178,800; alterations and additions to Balboa Post Office, $134,200; replace-
ment of refrigeration equipment in Cold Storage Plant, Balboa, $119,000;
technical and procurement services and procurement of equipment and
materials in connection with re-powering of tug, Arraijan, $115,800; floor
coverings for Curundu Junior High School, $113,100; and air conditioning
elementary school at Balboa, $107,100.
















Chapter IV


ADMINISTRATION

PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION
A plan to reorganize the Canal Zone Civilian Personnel Policy Coordinating
Board was implemented this fiscal year and resulted in a far smoother relation-
ship between the Panama Canal Company/Canal Zone Government and
Department of Defense agencies in the Canal Zone on personnel matters.
In past years, the Board consisted of a member from the Canal agencies,
a member from U.S. Southern Command, and members from each of the local
Army, Navy, and Air Force organizations. A plan to reconstitute the Board
to consist of a representative of the Canal organization and a representative
of the local Department of Defense agencies was approved by the Secretary
of the Army on October 8, 1964. The new organization has been eminently
more satisfactory in terms of meeting the Canal agencies' special needs and
facilitating interagency cooperation.
The third phase of the three-phase Canal Zone Wage Adjustment Program
initiated in April 1962 and the Annual Review of Manual Category positions
based on changes in wages in the nine Naval shipyards in the United States
resulted in increases for all employees in the Manual category and for other
employees, particularly those on a Canal Zone wage base.
In February 1965, the Board of Directors considered a long-range staffing
program to resolve problems likely to be faced by the Canal organization by
retirement attrition of skilled and professional employees during the next
15 years whether or not any decision is made to proceed with the construction
of a sea level canal. In July the Board approved a plan submitted by the
Governor to meet long-range staffing needs. The program proposes three
basic methods of meeting the Canal's long-range staffing needs: (1) a large-
scale, wide spectrum management, professional, and clerical trainee program;
(2) the development of apprenticeships in several new occupational areas, and
(3) a significant expansion of the current apprenticeship program.
Probably the most important personnel management problem in fiscal year
1965 was the reduction and freezing of the 25-percent tropical differential which
had been added to U.S. citizen employees' pay since 1914. The amount of
the differential was reduced to 15 percent and its applicability amended to
cover only heads of household. U.S. citizen employees who were on the rolls

33


11351--6






ADMINISTRATION


of Canal agencies on the effective date of the change in the regulations had
the dollar amount of their differential fixed at the amount of differential they
were receiving on July 20, 1964. This reduction and freezing action of the
differential and the limiting of application to heads of household had a
significant impact both on employee morale in the entire Canal organization
and on pay administration in the Personnel Bureau.
During fiscal year 1965 two important items of employee legislation were
developed for submission. The first (H.R. 5990), amends the Cash Relief
Act of 1937 to increase the gratuity paid non-U.S. beneficiaries by $10 a month
to a maximum pension of $65 per month. The bill also would provide widows
of disability relief beneficiaries with a pension amounting to half that which
would be received by their husbands if still living. At the close of the fiscal
year, this bill had passed the House of Representatives and was pending in
the Senate.
The second legislative proposal would allow the U.S. Government to
participate as an employer in a group health insurance program for non-U.S.
citizen employees and retirees of U.S. Government agencies in the Canal Zone.
At the close of the fiscal year this proposed legislation was still being reviewed
by the Bureau of the Budget.
The Government Employees Salary Reform Act of 1964 provided for upward
adjustments in salaries of General Schedule and Postal employees continuing
the principle of comparability of pay between government and private industry
established by the Federal Salary Reform Act of 1962. The act was admin-
istratively implemented in the Company/Government on August 21, 1964,
effective retroactively to July 5, 1964.
The implementation of the Dual Compensation Act, Public Law 88-448,
enacted August 19, 1964, was approved by the Governor to be effective
December 1, 1964. This act was designed to simplify, modernize, and
consolidate the laws relating to the employment of civilians in more than one
position and the laws concerning the civilian employment of retired members
of the uniformed services. The act places a limitation on the amount of
military retired pay certain retired regular officers may receive while employed
as civilians in the Federal Government without reduction in their civilian pay.

MAJOR ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGES
There were no major organizational changes in the Panama Canal Company
during the fiscal year.

MAJOR PERSONNEL CHANGES
Mr. Theodore C. Henter was promoted to Chief Hydrographer, effective
July 5, 1964, vice Mr. W. Houston Esslinger, retired.
Mr. Frank H. Lerchen was reassigned to Assistant Engineering and Construc-
tion Director effective July 19, 1964, vice Mr. Edward M. Browder, Jr.,
retired.
Lt. Col. Walter W. Fade, USA, was detailed from the U.S. Army as Planning
Engineer (Canal Studies) and Assistant to the Director, Engineering and






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Construction Bureau, effective August 2, 1964, vice Lt. Col. William R.
Wray, USA.
Mr. Charles McG. Brandl was reassigned as Chief, Construction Division,
effective September 6, 1964, vice Mr. Harold H. Feeney, retired.
Mr. Ernest W. Zelnick was promoted to Designing Engineer, vice Mr. Frank
H. Lerchen, reassigned, and Mr. Daniel M. Eggleston was promoted to Assistant
Designing Engineer, vice Mr. Ernest W. Zelnick, effective November 22, 1964.
Mr. John E. Fisher was designated as General Auditor effective
November 22, 1964.
Mr. Lawrence L. Jenrich was designated as Chief Accountant effective
November 22, 1964.
Mr. Thomas H. Scott was designated as Chief, Systems Staff, effective
November 22, 1964.
Mr. Elmer G. Abbott, Captain of the Port (Balboa), retired on December 21,
1964.
Mr. Robert Lessiack was promoted to Assistant Comptroller (Chief, Budget
and Rates) effective January 3, 1965, vice Mr. LeRoy B. Magnuson, retired.
Mr. Olen A. Dietz retired as Supervisory Maintenance Engineer (Atlantic)
effective March 29, 1965.
Mr. F. R. Johnson was promoted to Management Analysis Officer (Assistant
Chief, Executive Planning Staff) effective April 11, 1965, vice Mr. Thomas
E. Burrow, resigned.
Mr. Carl J. Browne was promoted to Supervisory General Engineer (Assistant
Engineering and Construction Director) effective May 2, 1965, vice Mr. Frank
H. Lerchen, retired.
Mr. Howard W. Osborn was promoted to Supervisory Maintenance Engineer
effective May 10, 1965, vice Mr. Carl J. Browne, promoted.

FORCE EMPLOYED AND RATES OF PAY
The full-time force employed by the Panama Canal Company on the Isthmus
of Panama as of June 30, 1965, totaled 11,284, an increase of 3 over the
number employed on June 30, 1964.
The full-time U.S. citizen force of the Panama Canal Company on the
Isthmus numbered 2,305 on June 30, 1965, as compared with 2,364 on
June 30, 1964, a decrease of 59, or 2.5 percent. The full-time non-U.S. citizen
force totaled 8,979 as of June 30, 1965, as compared to 8,917 on June 30, 1964,
an increase of 62, or 0.7 percent. The decrease in Company force from 1964
to 1965 resulted largely in the operating units due to reorganizations, reductions
in workload, and force ceiling restrictions. The greatest decreases were
reflected in the Marine Bureau and the Transportation and Terminals Bureau.
In addition to employees on the Isthmus there were 156 U.S. citizens
employed in the Washington and New Orleans offices on June 30, 1965.
Of the 156 in the United States, 4 were in the Washington office, 24 in the
New Orleans office, and 128 officers and crew on the SS Cristobal.
Employments are made under the Canal Zone Merit System, established by
the Canal Zone Wage and Employment Practices Act, 1958, Public Law
85-550 (72 Stat. 405.11 now Canal Zone Code, Title 2, Section 149) assuring






ADMINISTRATION


equal opportunity for citizens of the United States and Panama to obtain
employment in all Canal Zone U.S. Government agencies, in all nonsecurity
positions for which they qualify.
Since the Canal Zone Wage Plan was placed in effect in February 1959,
there has been considerable emphasis placed on training and utilization of
qualified non-U.S. citizen employees in U.S.-based, higher-paying positions.
Since that date, the number of non-U.S. citizens in U.S.-wage-base positions
has increased from 144 to 980, an increase of 836, or approximately 600 percent.
Rates of pay are established regardless of citizenship on a Canal Zone wage
base for occupational categories which can be filled by recruitment on the
Isthmus and on a U.S. wage base for those positions which would normally
be recruited from the United States. The current Canal Zone Wage Plan
contains the following job groups:
Non-manual category-white collar positions, including clerical, professional,
and administrative type jobs.
Manual category-blue collar workers, including laborers, semi and skilled
craftsmen, and related supervisors.
Special category, administrative-includes teachers, policemen, firemen,
postal workers, pilots, and miscellaneous and fee rate group.
Special category, wage board-includes floating equipment, power branch,
printing plant, railroad, apprentices, and learnership group.
Company/Government rate group-includes positions excluded from the
Canal Zone Pay Plan, such as executives, hospital, military, and employees in
the United States.
FULL-TIME EMPLOYEES PAID AT U.S. WAGE BASE1
For several years increasing emphasis has been placed on providing employ-
ment and promotion opportunities in higher paid positions to. non-U.S. citizens.
Since February 1959 the number of non-U.S. citizens in U.S.-base positions has
increased from 144 to 980, an increase of approximately 600 percent. During
fiscal year 1965 an increase of 121 such employment occurred.
Turnover in full-time U.S. citizen Isthmian force
During fiscal year 1965 there were 501 full-time terminations of U.S. citizen
employees (including 7 military) for whom replacement employment were
made. In addition, there were 27 U.S. citizen full-time employees added to
the force. Terminations show a decrease of 40, or 7.4 percent, under the
541 occurring in fiscal year 1964.
Turnover in full-time non-U.S. citizen Isthmian force
Exclusive of student assistants, 1,024 full-time employees were terminated
in the non-U.S. citizen group. All of these were replaced and there were
194 additional employment.
Recruitment
Of the 538 U.S. citizen full-time accessions in fiscal year 1965, only 91, or
about 17 percent, were recruited from the United States, and 447, or 83 percent,
I Statistics in this section cover both Panama Canal Company and Canal Zone Government
employees.






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


were recruited locally. All of the 1,191 full-time non-U.S. citizen employ-
ments were local recruitments. These additions to the force for fiscal year 1965
represent an accession rate of 14 percent for U.S. citizens and 12 percent for
non-U.S. citizens.
The 91 employees recruited in the United States included 22 teachers for
the U.S. schools system, 12 interns and hospital residents, 18 skilled craftsmen,
and 39 medical and professional employees not available from Canal Zone
or Panama sources.
At the close of the fiscal year, there were 15 U.S. requisitions pending for
which selections had been made and 29 vacancies pending for which no
selection had been made. The 29 vacancies for U.S. recruitment included
positions for teachers, nurses, skilled craftsmen, pilots-in-training, and
pharmacists.

Pay adjustments
Virtually all employees of the Panama Canal Company/Canal Zone
Govenrment received salary and wage increases during fiscal year 1965 in six
different wage adjustments, and the third phase of the three-phase Canal Zone
base adjustment. The total annual cost to the Company/Government of
these adjustments will be approximately $3,369,976. This figure includes
6.5 percent added for retirements costs. In comparison, the annual cost of
pay increases in fiscal year 1964 amounted to approximately $4,400,000
including retirement costs.

Cash relief for disabled employees
Effective October 5, 1958, with the implementation of section 13 of Public
Law 85-550 placing non-U.S. citizen employees under the Civil Service Retire-
ment Act, the Cash Relief Act of 1937 as amended was discontinued prospec-
tively. Beneficiaries on the Cash Relief Act rolls prior to that date continue
to draw Cash Relief Act benefits.
During fiscal year 1965 monthly payments for cash relief averaged $140,328
($130,256 in the Company and $10,072 in the Government). In fiscal year
1964 monthly payments averaged $150,713, about $10,385 more per month.
The total average monthly payment per case remained about $48.
During fiscal year 1965 there were 252 removals from the rolls due to death,
221 for the Company and 31 for the Government. The number of cash relief
beneficiaries as of June 30, 1965, was 2,825 (2,612 for the Company and
213 for the Government).
Now pending in Congress is bill H.R. 5541, which would increase the
maximum cash relief benefit from $55 to $65 per month. This would produce
a new average payment of $58 per month. Included in the bill is a provision
which would entitle widows of cash relief annuitants to an annuity equal to
one-half the rate which the husband would receive if he'were alive. This bill
has passed the House of Representatives and is still pending in Congress.
During fiscal year 1965 there were no former employees eligible for
repatriation under this program.






ADMINISTRATION


INCENTIVE AWARDS1
The Incentive Awards Program for the Panama Canal Company/Canal Zone
Government is designed to encourage, recognize, and reward employees
at all levels for their constructive ideas and meritorious job performances
which result in increased efficiency and economy of operation.
This fiscal year 770 employee suggestions were submitted within the agency,
a decrease of 266 under the 1,036 submitted in 1964. During the year awards
were approved for 180 beneficial suggestions which were adopted. Benefits
were estimated to amount to about $54,790 for these employee suggestions.
Cash awards totaling $43,745 were made for adopted suggestions and 207
performance recommendations. Tangible benefits increased from $454,565
in fiscal year 1964 to $698,248 this year.
Some 212 honorary award nominations were received during the fiscal year,
in comparison with 150 award recommendations in fiscal year 1964.
In addition, a Superior Service Award was granted one employee for initiative
that resulted in an estimated tangible benefit of $360,000.
In observance of the 10th-anniversary year of the Incentive Awards Program,
seven special Presidential certificates were granted to individuals for their
beneficial suggestions resulting in tangible benefits estimated at $141,683.
Prompt processing of all suggestions has been an aid in this program.
Extensive written and pictorial publicity has been secured in Company publica-
tions and in Panama newspapers in both languages, and the presentation of
a series of 35-mm. slides during employee discussions on the program were
utilized to advantage.

SAFETY PROGRAM'
The principal duties of the Safety Branch are to supervise and promote the
application of safety measures in all units of the Panama Canal Company and
the Canal Zone Government, and to develop and improve accident prevention
programs for those organizations, including the coordination of occupational
health, sanitation and fire prevention activities with the overall accident
prevention program.
During the year full-time safety supervisors and safety inspectors, responsible
for handling safety matters in the Marine, Engineering and Construction,
Transportation and Terminals, and Supply and Community Services Bureaus,
continued their activities. The Office of the Comptroller, Personnel, Civil
Affairs, and Health Bureaus utilized the services of employees assigned as
part-time safety assistants, in addition to their other duties, for handling safety
measures.
Membership was continued in the Consejo Interamericano de Seguridad,
the Latin American counterpart and affiliate of the National Safety Council.
Such membership enables the Company/Government to maintain better safety
communication with non-English speaking or reading employees who are more
interested and responsive to such materials when provided in their native
language.
I Statistics in this section cover both Panama Canal Company and Canal Zone Government
employees.






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


The highlight of the year in safety activities was President Johnson's
inauguration of Mission Safety 70 on February 16, 1965. The goal of the
Mission is to reduce by 30 percent the number of disabling injuries to Federal
workers. It is his desire that this goal be reached by 1970. In compliance
with requirements of the program, a detailed report of a careful and critical
review of the Panama Canal Company/Canal Zone Government safety
program was forwarded to the President on May 10, 1965. As a result of
the review it was found that significant weaknesses in the execution of the
program existed, and in an effort to minimize or eliminate such weaknesses
several additional safety requirements were established in memorandum of
May 24, 1965, to all operating bureau directors.
The existence and goal of Mission Safety 70 has been widely publicized
to all employees and supervisors. The program will receive continuing
emphasis until the goal is reached.
Personnel of the Safety Branch and the Health Bureau are conducting a
feasibility study regarding the first-aid treatment of industrial injuries and
occupational diseases by a separate clinic or industrial health dispensary.
The Industrial Health Branch presently staffed by four physicians appears
to be the logical organization to head up and provide such treatments and
the study is being conducted with this objective in mind.
During the year, the Chief, Safety Branch, as Chairman of the ad hoc
committee appointed by the Governor/President to investigate the need for
and to develop suitable safety regulations to protect the health and safety of
all longshoremen employed aboard vessels in Canal Zone waters, completed
and submitted such regulations to the Office of the General Counsel. They
were published on June 28, 1965, as General Order No. 32, Regulations
Governing Stevedoring.
The Governor/President Safety Trophy, awarded each calendar year to the
bureau achieving the highest percentage improvement in disabling injury
frequency rate over its own previous 3-year average, was not awarded this year
since no bureau met the requirements. During the first half of the fiscal year
the accident rate continued higher than normal as it also was during the last
half of the preceding fiscal year. However, improvement was shown in the
last half of this fiscal year with the number of accidents for the January-June
period totaling 86 as compared to 112 for the January-June 1964 period.
Outstanding safety achievements were as follows: the Canal Zone Division
of Schools earned its ninth consecutive annual award for 100-percent participa-
tion in the National Safety Council School Safety Program which requires a
comprehensive and highly successful safety program throughout the Canal
Zone school system; and the Supply and Community Service Bureau earned
the National Safety Council's "Award of Merit" for outstanding safety
achievement for the period February 10, 1965, to May 23, 1965.
Three fatalities occurred during fiscal year 1965, two in the Transportation
and Terminals Bureau, and a third in the Dredging Division. The fatality
rate this year is equivalent to 1 accidental death for every 4,811 employees, as
compared to the national average of 1 death for every 4,662 workers employed,
as reported for calendar year 1963 by the National Safety Council. There was







ADMINISTRATION


one injury causing permanent partial disability as compared with five injuries
last year and there were no permanent total disability cases this fiscal year.
This year's disability injury frequency rate of 6.08 represents an 18-percent
decrease over last year's rate of 7.42. This is the 10th consecutive year that
the Company/Government frequency rate remained below the national
all-industry average, which in 1964 was 7.94, as reported by the National
Safety Council. This year's disabling injury severity rate of 728 represents
a 55-percent increase over last year's rate of 469. While the total number
of disabling injuries were fewer than in the previous year, the fact that there
were three fatalities as against one in the previous year accounts for the
increase in the severity rate.
Federal property damages were reported in the amount of $52,275 this year
compared to $52,161 last year.

Safety Statistics
Fiscal year


1965


Employee-hours of exposure -------------- 29,125,244
Disabling injuries ----------- ------------- 177
Injuries causing permanent partial disability 1
Injuries causing permanent total disability ------- 0
Frequency rate1 ----------------------------------6.08
Severity rate2---------- ------------- 728
Number of fatalities 3
Days charged ------------------------------ 21,213
1 Disabling injuries per million employee-hours of exposure.
2 Severity rate is the time charged in days, per million employee-hours of exposure.


1964
28,850,835
214
5
0
7.42
469
1
13,521













Chapter V


FINANCIAL REPORT AND
STATISTICAL DATA

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND RELATED SUPPLEMENTARY
REPORTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1965
The financial statements of the Panama Canal Company appearing as tables 1
through 10, with the accompanying notes, present the financial position of
the Company at June 30, 1965, and the financial results of its operations for
the fiscal year then ended.
All statements have been examined by the General Auditor of the Panama
Canal Company and are subject to audit by the General Accounting Office.
Detailed audit reports of the General Accounting Office are directed to the
Congress and are presented as congressional documents.
A brief financial review can be found on page 5 of the introduction.
Supplementary information concerning funds, operating results, payments
to the U.S. Treasury, net direct investment of the U.S. Government, and
retained revenue is presented in the tabulations and comments which follow.
Equity of the U.S. Government
The net direct investment (interest-bearing) of the U.S. Government in
the Panama Canal Company was increased in excess of $1 million during the
year primarily as the result of the reversal of excess valuation allowances for
(1) early retirement of 25-cycle plant, $751,150, and (2) possible loss on
obsolete and excess stocks, $337,269. Retained revenue was charged with
$655,000 of abandoned construction projects, the costs of which were incurred
in prior years.
Capital Expenditures
Company capital expenditures amounted to $10.6 million. The budgeted
estimate for the year was $12.5 million. Expenditures in the transit operations
exceeded $4 million, the principal expenditure being $2.6 million for locks
towing locomotives. A total of $2.4 million was expended for purchase and
installation of a steam turbine-generator for the electric power system.

41


11351--7







FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 1.-Comparative Statement of Financial


Assets
CURRENT ASSETS:
Fund balances with U.S. Treasury and cash:
Fund balance in U.S. Treasury checking
account-----------------------
Cash in commercial banks, on hand, and in
transit -----------------

Accounts receivable:
Canal Zone Government and other U.S.
Government agencies -
Republic of Panama ----------
Other-------- --------

Inventories (note 1):
Materials and supplies (principally at
standard cost) less allowances for excess,
obsolete, and inactive stocks of $602,538
in 1964----------------------
Merchandise held for sale (at average cost)-


Other current assets---- --------
Total current assets -
FIXED ASSETS (note 2):
Cost ------------
Less depreciation and valuation allowances-...

THATCHER FERRY BRIDGE:
Capitalized construction costs -
Less allowance for depreciation ------

Fund balance with U.S. Treasury-

DEFERRED CHARGES AND OTHER ASSETS----


1965


$1,439,237
4,787,148
6,226,385

3,481,936
2,391,330
2,297,340
8,170,606



7,221,165
3,821,349
11,042,514

173,008
25,612,513

662,700,296
198,544,696
464,155,600

19,059,518
998,499
18,061,019
138,427
18,199,446
652,422

508,619,981


1964


$3,837,620
5,488,425
9,326,045

1,652,034
2,264,277
1,967,761
5,884,072



6,412,868
4,479,927
10,892,795

133,930
26,236,842

658,591,459
198,103,928
460,487,531

18,751,069
690,374
18,060,695
1,315,340
19,376,035
696,118
506,796,526


Automatic Data Processing
A major change in accounting technique was inaugurated on April 1, 1965,
with the installation of a computer. The first phase, now on the computer,
is that of inventory control. Systems studies in process will shortly result in
use of the computer for payroll and personnel procedures.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
1. Inventories. Inventories of operating materials and supplies are stated
principally at standard cost. Inventories of merchandise for sale are stated
at average cost using the retail method for valuation.
Allowance for excess, obsolete, and inactive materials and supplies amounted
to $602,538 at June 30, 1964. During fiscal year 1965 this allowance was
charged with $265,000 for losses on excess, obsolete, and inactive stock. The






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY

Condition June 30, 1965 and 1964


Liabilities and equity
CURRENT LIABILrrIEs:
Accounts payable:
U.S. Government agencies-------_-_.
Other ___________________-____


Due U.S. Treasury.----------
Accrued liabilities:
Employees' leave liability---- -
Salaries and wages----- ___------
Claims for damages to vessels----------
Other ------


Other current liabilities---
Total current liabilities-----------------
RESERVES:
Overhaul of locks--------------------
Maintenance of phannels-_
Non-capital power conversion costs ---------


EQurrY OF U.S. GOVERNMENT (note 3):
Net direct investment, interest-bearing-----
Retained revenue, non-interest-bearing
Thatcher Ferry Bridge, non-interest-bearing-_


1965


$2,375,019
3,566,421
5,941,440
2,010,493

11,317,778
1,486,317
618,180
1,081,919
14,504,194
958,448
23,414,575

1,559,862

178,080
1,737,942


329,830,278
135,437,740
18,199,446
483,467,464
508,619,981


1964


$1,615,239
4,030,337
5,645,576
1,904,532

10,369,027
1,733,976
252,750
863,085
13,218,838
861,117
21,630,063

2,020,548
49,230
178,080
2,247,858


328,812,302
134,730,268
19,376,035
482,918,605
506,796,526


The accompanying "Notes to Financial Statements" are an integral part of this
statement.

balance was closed out to the Company's interest-bearing investment. In the
future, inventory losses, if any, will be charged to operations.
2. Fixed assets. Fixed assets generally are stated at cost, or if acquired from
another Government agency at original cost to such agency. Valuation
allowances have been established in accordance with sections 62 and 412
of title 2 of the Canal Zone Code (1) to offset the cost of defense facilities and
suspended construction projects-principally the partial construction of a third
set of locks abandoned in the early part of World War II-totaling $89.7 million
(both the cost and the valuation allowances have been excluded from the
statement of financial condition) and interest during original construction
aggregating about $51 million and (2) to reduce to usable value the cost of
those fixed assets transferred to the Company from The Panama Canal (agency)
at July 1, 1951. Because of historical practice and a construing of the Canal






FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA


Zone Code as not requiring the depreciation or amortization of certain assets,
depreciation or amortization allowances have not been provided on titles,
treaty rights, and excavations of channels, harbors, basins, and other works
costing about $310 million. If these assets were depreciated at the rate of
1 percent per annum, there would be an annual charge against operations of
approximately $3 million. Depreciation allowances on all other fixed assets
are accumulated on a straight-line basis.
3. Equity of the U.S. Government. The equity of the U.S. Government
in the Company consists of the net direct investment, established in accordance
with section 62 of title 2 of the Canal Zone Code, and the retained revenue.
The Company is required to pay interest to the U.S. Treasury on the net
direct investment at a rate established by the Secretary of the Treasury.
The rates for 1965 and 1964 were, respectively, 3.457 and 3.328 percent.
The act of August 25, 1959 (73 Stat. 428), amended section 71 of title 2
of the Canal Zone Code to provide the Company with authority to borrow
funds from the U.S. Treasury not to exceed $10 million outstanding at any
time at interest rates to be determined by the Secretary of the Treasury.
The act of July 23, 1956 (70 Stat. 596), directed the Company to construct,
maintain, and operate a high-level bridge across the Canal at Balboa, for
which funds were appropriated. Because of national policy the costs of
construction and of maintenance and operation are to be treated as extraor-
dinary costs and are not to be related to the operations of the Company.
Maintenance of the bridge for the year amounted to $232,668, the cost of
which was financed from Company cash and the Company's interest-bearing
investment reduced accordingly as authorized by law.
Beginning with fiscal year 1966, the Company will be required to absorb
the cost of maintenance and depreciation on the bridge by general provision
included in the 1966 Public Works Appropriation Act.
4. Contingent and other liabilities. The Company is contingently liable
with respect to certain pending suits and claims. In addition, the Company
has outstanding at all times certain liabilities of indeterminable amounts
which are recognized in the accounts on an as-paid basis. These liabilities
include, principally, monthly relief benefits payable to retired alien employees;
repatriation costs earned by certain employees; benefits payable under provi-
sions of the Federal Employees Compensation Act; and commitments for
construction work, supplies, and services.
The maximum liability which could result from outstanding claims and
lawsuits is estimated to be $2.7 million. The relief payments to be made to
retired alien employees in fiscal year 1966 are estimated at $1.5 million.
Repatriation allowances are payable to certain employees who, after comple-
tion of two years of service, are entitled to such allowances upon termination
of their employment. The maximum liability for payment of repatriation at
future dates is estimated not to exceed $6 million. Commitments under
uncompleted construction contracts and unfilled purchase orders amounted to
$5 million at June 30, 1965.
The Company held at June 30, 1965, negotiable U.S. Government securities
and Republic of Panama securities in the face amount of $1,950,000 deposited







PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


by customers and Panamanian insurance firms to guarantee contract per-
formance and payment of tolls and other charges and, on behalf of the Canal
Zone Government, negotiable securities in the face amount of $543,500 to
guarantee payment of possible judgments against insurance companies
operating in the Canal Zone.

Table 2.-Comparative Statement of Revenue and Expenses,
Fiscal Years Ended June 30, 1965 and 1964


REVENUE:
Tolls---------------------------------
Credit for tolls on U.S. Government vessels----
Commodities sold-----------------------
Service sales and rentals-------------------



OPERATING EXPENSES AND OTHER COSTS:
Payroll and related costs-------------------
Material and other operating expenses-
Cost of commodities sold ----------
Depreciation---------------------------
Net cost of Canal Zone Government----------
Interest on net direct investment of U.S. Govern-
ment --------------------


Less payroll and other costs transferred to Com-
pany capital projects and Canal Zone Govern-
ment programs ------------_
Total operating expenses and other costs- _---
Net revenue before recognition of loss on dispo-
sition of fixed assets-----------
Deduct loss on disposition of fixed assets------

NET REVENUE -----------------


1965
$65,502,769
1,651,890
24,310,613
29,735,045
121,200,317


62,807,256
11,396,153
16,589,731
5,948,495
18,443,466
11,375,288
126,560,389


7,754,299
118,806,090

2,394,227
851,788


1964
$61,146,998
1,399,393
23,281,107
27,219,173
113,046,671


58,785,601
9,375,310
15,953,752
5,524,986
16,300,215
10,950,382
116,890,246


6,504,886
110,385,360

2,661,311
499,406


$1,542,439 $2,161,905







FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 3.-Statement of Changes in Equity of the U.S. Government,
Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1965


Net direct
interest-bearing


EQUITY AT JULY 1, 1964---__-_
Additions:
Net revenues ---------
Reversal of excess valuation
allowances for:
Early retirement of 25-
cycle plant ------
Loss on obsolete and ex-
cess stock-----
Reactivation of plant....----
Loss on retirement of 25-
cycle plant charged to
operations in prior years,
instead of valuation allow-
ance established therefor-
Property transfers, other U.S.
Government agencies, net_

Reductions:
Abandoned capital construc-
tion projects---------
Reclassification of items pre-
viously capitalized ----
Thatcher Ferry Bridge:
Release excess construc-
tion appropriation---
Provision for deprecia-
tion -------
Funded maintenance
costs------------
Municipal facilities, fi-
nanced from bridge
funds, transferred to
the Canal Zone Gov-
ernment ---------


EQUITY AT JUNE 30, 1965 ----


$328,812,302 $134,730,268


Thatcher Ferry
Bridge, non-
interest-bearing
$19,376,035


1,542,439


751,150
337,269
103,248


70,571


58,977
330,062,946


136,343,278 19,376,035


654,982
250,556


850,000
308,125


232,668


232,668 905,538


18,464
1,176,589


329,830,278 135,437,740 18,199,446


Retained revenue,
non-interest-
bearing






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY!

Table 4.-Statement of Source and Application of Funds,
Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1965


SOURcE OF FUNDS:
Revenues- -------------
Decrease in cash -------------- --.........
Reversal of excess valuation allowance for obsolete
and excess stock------------------- -------------
Proceeds from disposition of fixed assets-----------------


APPLICATION OF FUNDs:
Operating expenses and other costs
Less operating expenses not requiring expenditure
of funds:
Provision for depreciation----------------$5,948,495
Provision for maintenance of channels---- ...3,420,658
Provision for locks overhaul---- ... 987,000
Loss on disposition of fixed assets--- 851,788
Other _....... ..166,235

Capital expenditures_ ----- -----
Channel maintenance expenditures e ... .. ...----
Canal locks overhaul expenditures --------------
Thatcher Ferry Bridge maintenance ------------
Net change in other working capital--------------------


$121,200,317
3,099,660
337,269
101,613
124,738,859


119,657,878





11,374,176
108,283,702
10,614,095
3,469,888
1,447,687
232,668
690,819
124,738,859


Table 5.-Statement of Revenue and Operating Expenses,
Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1965


Revenue


Operating
expenses


Operating
income


TRANSIT OPERATIONs (table 6) --

SUPPORTING SERVICES (table 7):
Maritime services------
Employees' services ------
Transportation and utilities --
Other supporting services ----


$73,853,079 $32,299,554 $41,553,525


11,155,433
26,277,689
6,571,192
3,342,924
47,347,238
121,200,317


9,290,307
26,215,710
6,365,089
2,999,758
44,870,864
77,170,418


GENERAL CORPORATE EXPENSES:
Net cost of Canal Zone Government--------------------
Administrative and other general expenses (table 8)------
Interest on net direct investment of the U.S. Government ---


NET REVENUE ---------------------


1,865,126
61,979
206,103
343,166
2,476,374
44,029,899


18,443,466
12,668,706
11,375,288
42,487,460

1,542,439








48 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA


Table 6.-Transit Operations, Statement of Revenue and Operating Expenses,

Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1965


REVENUE:
Canal tolls-------- ----------------_ _--__-_
Credit for tolls on U.S. Government vessels---------------------------
Harbor pilotage, tug, launch, and other services ----------------------
Total revenue ------- __________-__ _ _ _-----


OPERATING EXPENSES:
Navigation services and control----
Operation and maintenance of locks
Provision for channel maintenance-
Dredging of channel and harbors-_
Diesel power generation..--------
Provision for periodic overhaul of
locks -- -------
Meteorology and hydrography serv-
ices -- --- -
Locks security force ----. ----
Annuity to Republic of Panama
(repayment to U.S. Treasury)--
Damage to vessels -------
Operation and maintenance of dams,
reservoirs, and spillways ----
Miscellaneous_ ___ ----
Total operating expenses ----


Direct
Expenses
$11,986,397
8,738,022
3,420,658
3,230,958
1,323,426
987,000
686,018
524,088
430,000
429,312
85,889
266,948
32,108,716


$65,502,769
1,651,890
6,698,420
73,853,079


Depreciation
$278,296
1,321,897
367,026


10,760


113,700
6,036
2,097,715


34,206,431


Less charges to other activities --.- ------- 1,906,877
Net operating expenses ---------------


32,299,554


OPERATING INCOME --- --- -------------- ---------------- 41,553,525










PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


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FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 8.-Administrative and Other General Expenses,
Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1965


EXECUTIVE DIRECTION:
Board of directors
Office of the president-
Information office --------------
Tourist facilities ------ ---
Office of the secretary -
Consultants and advisers
OPERATIONS DIRECTION:
General and special engineering services-
Office of the engineering and construction director-
Office of the marine director -- -----------
Office of the supply and community service
director-___ _
Office of the transportation and terminals director
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT:
Office of the comptroller-
Annual audit --.......
PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION:
Personnel bureau ---
Apprentice program
GENERAL SERVICES:
Administrative branch ------ ----
Maintenance of buildings
Public services .........
Miscellaneous ----------
EMPLOYMENT COSTS:
Alien cash relief
Employees' home leave travel-
Recruitment and repatriation -
Leave liability variation _.---- ---
Death and disability compensation -------
Contribution for employees' health benefit associa-
tion ..--....______________________
Medical and other services for alien cash relief
annuitants ------ ---_ ---____ ______
Contribution for employees' group life insurance-
Transportation of employees' vehicles-
Over-distribution of civil service retirement con-
tribution------------- --------
Miscellaneous -------- --
OTHER EXPENSES:
Loss on disposition of fixed assets -
Depreciation ----------------
Law suits and tort claims ----------
Civil disturbances---

LESS REIMBURSEMENTS AND OTHER CREDITS:
Expenses allocated to Canal Zone Government-
Miscellaneous ________-_-__ _-______

NET ADMINISTRATIVE AND OTHER GENERAL EXPENSES-


$19,764
719,168
449,897
70,780
78,723
178,069


$1,516,401


301,501
185,437
105,313


135,628
92,058

3,466,617
61,000

1,099,312
157,183

696,272
416,952
70,166
68,992

1,563,159
993,780
408,314
373,816
193,967
154,433
108,233
80,120
52,009
(38,984)
82,365

851,788
206,022
177,681
11,778


750,000
172,607


819,937


3,527,617


1,256,495




1,252,382


3,971,212




1,247,269
13,591,313


922,607

12,668,706







PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Table 9.-Inventories, June 30, 1965


MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES:
Storehouse branch:
General materials and supplies--------------------
Petroleum products---- --------------------
Scrap-----------------------------
In transit to Isthmus ------------- ---


Other divisions' stock:
Locks division------- ---------------
Vessel repair----------------- ----------------
Railroad division-------------------
Marine terminals------------------------------
Water transportation ---------------------------
Motor transportation division ---------------
Retail stores and allied operations-----------
Service centers--------------------------------
Printing plant--------------------
Dredging division-------------------
Water system --------------------------------
Power system ---------------------------------
Construction and maintenance activities-


Manufacturing and repair work in progress:
Vessel repair------------------
Other units-------------------------- ------


Total materials and supplies -

MERCHANDISE HELD FOR SALE:
Retail stores and allied operations:
In warehouses and in stores -
In transit----------------------- -------------


Water transportation ---------------------
Service centers-----------------------------------
Tivoli guest house-------------------

Total merchandise held for sale-------------


TOTAL INVENTORIES--------------------


$4,944,686
227,511
138,825
356,408
5,667,430

157,079
63,896
195,214
95,110
59,250
369
131.65-4
53,529
15,049
198,776
67,229
67,245
271,421
1,375,821

176,563
1,351
177,914

7,221,165


3,052,047
497,397
3,549,444
2,129
224,071
45,705

3,821,349

11,042,514











FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA


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FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA


Table 11.-Ocean Traffic Through Panama Canal-Fiscal Years 1955
Through 1965


Total traffic


1955 -------------------.....
1956...------------------
1957 -----------.. ......
1958 .....----------------
1959-- ---------
1960 -----------... ...
1961-- ---------
1962.---- ---------
1963-..----------------
1964 -----------------
1965.........--------------


1955 ------------------
1956 ------------------
1957 ------------------
1958 ------------------
1959 ------------------
1960 ----------------
1961 .....-----------------
1962 -----------------
1963......---------------
1964 ..--------------
1965 -------------------



1955 -----------------
1956 -----------------
1957 -------------------
1958 ------------------
1959 ------------------
1960 -- ...----------------
1961 --------------------
1962--------------------
1963 ---- -----------
1964------------------
1964 ------------.. -------
1965 .... . .. . ... .


Number
of
transit


7,997
8,209
8,579
9,187
9.718
10,795
10,866
11,149
11,017
11,808
11,834


296
266
269
279
204
182
18S
191
300
285
284



8,293
8,475
8,84S
9,466
9,922
10,977
11 0 4
11 il
11,317
12u.0'1
12,116


Tolls


Traffic assessed tolls
on net tonnage basis

Tons Number Panama
of of Canal net
cargo transits tonnage


Commercial Ocean Traffic
$33,849,477 40,646,301
36,153,842 45,119,042
38,444,128 49,702,200
41,795,905 48,124,809
45,528,728 51,153,096
50,939,428 59,258,219
54,127,877 63,669,738
57,289,705 67,524,552
56,368,073 62,247,094
61,098,312 70,550,090
65,442.633 76,573,071
Government Ocean Traffic
$1,190,367 838,305
1,215,883 1,150,121
1,117,467 922,173
972,110 791,310
965,643 1,012,S42
813,313 804,581
997,842 1,149,934
1,028,396 1,126,418
1,460,281 1,115,352
1,395,548 1,177,269
1,649,048 1,923,538

Total Ocean Traffic
$35,0329,844 41,484,606
37,369,725 46,269,163
39,561,595 50,624,373
42,768,015 48,916,119
46,494,371 52,1i5,938
51,752,741 .,(),l 2., Iii
5 125 :'721 64,819,672
s 31'.;10 68,650,970
..17,%2,., 54 63,362,446
(.,4' i,.i.i 71,727,359
67,091,681 7S,496,609


7,953
8,157
8,540
9,162
9,682
10,745
10,823
11,096
10,973
11,756
11,777


227
219
199
224
172
148
160
166
213
184
216



8,180
8,376
8,739
9,386
9,854
10,893
10,983
11,262
11. I |'J
11,',40 .1
11,993


38,567,769
41,202,961
43,628,210
47,924,345
52,153,563
58,301,926
61.'26.0sr
65.37 41
64,438,115
69,632,611
74,734,814


1,184,135
1,286,841
1 0-6 5,,4
1,020,267
1,047,674
864,177
1,088,393
1,095,074
1,387,597
1,337,065
1,733,736



39,751,904
42,489,802
44,714,774
48,944,612
53,201,237
59,166,103
62,914,395
66,473,919
65,825,712
70,t -.1.671.
7u,4t. ,'...i


Traffic assessed tolls on
displacement tonnage
basis

Number Displace-
of ment
transits tonnage


136,987
126,233
155,055
78,691
112,609
193,471
140,760
197,390
110,002
134,221
20 .21i'5


341.119
226,813
392,671
219,938
120,562
134,965
130,905
135,236
552,928
493,655
332,827



478,186
353,046
547,726
298,629
233,171
328,436
271,665
332,626
662,930
627,876
541,032


Table 12.-Traffic by Months-Fiscal Years 1965 and 1964


July---------
August ---------.
September ------
October -----------
November- ...- -
December ......-----
January ------........
February.....------
March-------------
April----------
May-------------
June-----------
Total -------
Average per month -


Number of
transit

1964-65 1963-64


1.004
1,034
970
1,018
988
1,021
921
819
1,084
1,052
1,010
943

11,834
986


944
946
923
980
946
958
1,015
997
1,077
1,011
1,012
999

11,808
984


Panama Canal
net tonnage


1964-65
6,069,346
6,273,555
6,088,409
6,251,961
6,231,182
6,425,276
5,691,902
5,196,236
7,106,826
6,723,947
6,537,708
6,138,466

74,734,814
6,227,901


1963-64
5,566,473
5,491,930
5,509,268
5,862,742
5,583,490
5,578,589
5,856,561
5,899,302
6,268,488
5,924,349
6,105,355
5,986,064
69,632,611
5,802,718


Tons of cargo


1964-6.5
6,062,061
6,604,144
6,227,125
6,248,022
6,155,639
6,644,998
5,705,541
5,160,125
7,669,785
6,997,717
6,631,196
6,466,718

76,573,071
6,381,089


1963-64
5,923,878
5,641,432
5,701,689
5,925,018
5,398,696
5,690,973
5,831,527
6,186,786
6,268,912
5,912,355
6,166,497
5,902,327


Tolls

1964-65 1963-64
$5,313,002 $4,897,955
5,497,2;2 4,841,525
5,338,810 4.836,521
5,483,920 5,153,861
5,435,138 4,879,040
5,641,252 4,897,036
4,981,492 5,139,945
4,523,274 5,192,816
6,231,396 5,480,020
5,888,034 5,202,264
5,731,746 5,355,460
5,377,307 5.221,SW9


70,550,090 $65,442,633 $61,098,312
5,879,174 $5,453,553 $5,091,526


NOTE.-The above includes only commercial vessels of 300 net tons and over (Panama Canal measurement), or of 500
displacement tons and over on vessels paying tolls on a displacement tonnage basis. Statistics on these vessels, except
as relates to displacement tonnage, have been included in the table above.








PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Table 13.-Canal Traffic' by Nationality of Vessel-Fiscal Year 1965
Measured Tonnage


Nationality
Argentinian------ -----------
Belgian --
Brazilian ----
British
Bulgarian -----------
Chilean ----------
Chinese (Nationalist) ----
Chinese (Republic) -- ----
Colombian ----------
Cuban--------------
Danish ---------------
Ecuadorian
Finnish
French-
German ------------
G hanaian ------------------
Greek-------------
Guinean -
Haitian --------------
Honduran _-- --- ----
Icelandic --------------------
Indian ------------
Indonesian -
Irish---------------
Israeli
Italian
Japanese
Korean (South) ----
Kuwait------------------
Lebanese-------------------
Liberian---------- -----
Mexican-----------
Netherlands
Nicaraguan
Norwegian
Panamanian
Peruvian __
Philippine
Spanish
Swedish
Swiss
United States -
Soviet-------------
Venezuelan -------------
Yugoslavian
Total, fiscal year-
1965 -- -----
1964 --------
1963


Panama
Number of Canal
Transits Net
1 ---------
49 264,289
3 11,016
1,339 9,441,036
2 12,988
115 675,192
103 641.259
17 102,439
246 940,690
5 34,393
283 1,892,129
25 117,420
27 166,841
172 863,809
1,186 5,323,945
1 5,393
575 4,199,496
4 28,801
1 6,265
268 327,387
2 18,044
8 113,509
2 6,763
12 90.025
59 407,761
192 1,550,597
804 4,886,276
15 80,381
2 1,904
34 181,007
1,118 9,554.288
42 104,311
618 2,680,774
62 151,273
1.446 10,992,214
518 2,300,996
153 568,942
84 550,848
11 36,452
388 2,621.579
82 141,450
1,678 12.197.141
48 294,.674
17 22.791
17 126.026

11,834 74.734.814
11,808 69.632,.611
11,017 64,438,115


1 Includes only commercial vessels of 300 net tons and over (Panama Canal measurement),
or of 500 displacement tons and over on vessels paying tolls on displacement basis (dredges,
warships, etc.).
NOTE.-In Canal traffic statistics, foreign naval vessels such as transports, supply ships, tankers,
etc., with a measurement of 300 net tons (Panama Canal measurement) and over, and vessels
of war, dredges, etc., with a displacement of 500 tons and over are classified as oceangoing com-
mercial vessels. Statistics on these vessels, except as relates to displacement tonnage, have been
included in the table above. As displacement tonnage cannot be combined with net tonnage the
following table shows statistics covering 57 vessels which transited the Canal during fiscal year 1965
and paid tolls on displacement tonnage:


Nationality
Argentinian
Brazilian --------
British ----------------
Chilean --------------------------
French --.-
German ---- --------------
Greek-----------------
Indonesian ----- -- ------
Mexican -------- ----------
Peruvian ---------------
Spanish ------ -----
Swedish -- -------------
United States --------------
Do ----------------- -----------.
Venezuelan------------------


Type
Naval -----------
Drydock ----______
Naval ---
--do -
--do-
---do -
--do-
-- do
-- do--------
-- do--------
-- do --------
---do -------
Dredge
Barge ----------
Naval------


Displace-
Number of ment
transits tonnage
1 3,051
1 800
11 45,686
3 7,272
15 76,405
1 5,708
1 1,825
1 898
6 9,756
6 27,167
2 4,050
1 4.120
1 2,067
1 2,830
6 16,570
57 208,205 S


Tolls
$1,526
400
22,843
3,636
38,202
2,854
912
449
4,878
13,584
2,025
2,060
1,033
1,415
8,285
104,102


Registered
Gross

301,040
13,852
12,828,431
18,042
878,699
851,515
140,315
1,044,722
48,167
2,186,036
133,425
209,965
1,126,811
5,472,820
7,583
5,552,428
39,875
8,464
532,353
22,976
151,824
7,434
127,278
514,782
2,072,618
6,552,046
108,045
3,020
242,954
12,372,983
138,983
3,554,173
149,880
14,100,471
2,931,317
770,615
799,510
40,702
3,580,852
155,72 L
15,557,083
409,663
35,108
129,542

95,924,123
89,829,766
83,832,893


Tolls
$1,526
217,750
9,323
8,291,824
11,689
606,425
577,133
92,195
844,112
30,954
1,664,459
105,615
149,251
800,476
4,614,242
4,854
3,682,461
25,921
4,511
274,416
14,616
101,041
6,536
79,398
361,870
1,360,631
4,377,156
68,499
1,542
157,977
8,235,514
95,405
2,336,989
135,593
9,588,919
1,912,766
522.107
494,557
33,896
2,308,224
117,796
10,724,351
258,959
27,590
111,564

$65,442,633
61,098,312
56,368,073


Tons of
Cargo

187,124
9,969
8,846,718
22,582
827,651
823,032
134,075
395,192
52,719
1,789,141
40,370
158,873
709,310
3,520,170
8,965
5,734,249
46,518

152,223
15,904
210,758
2,166
139,266
438,729
1,223,355
4,909,656
72,675
565
246,060
13,233,873
118,465
2,612,450
93,580
13,188,315
2,260,665
774,426
347,839
31,346
2,573,845
66,915
9,986,170
388,336
28,291
150,540

76,573,071
70,550,090
62,247,094


Total----------------











56 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA



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FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA


Table 15.-Laden and Ballast Traffic by Nationality of Vessel
Fiscal Year 1965


N
Nationality tr
Belgian ------------
Brazilian ----
British -------------
Bulgarian ----------
Chilean-
Chinese (Natl.) ---
Chinese (Rep.) --
Colombian ------
Cuban -_-_-_ ...---
Danish
Ecuadorian ---------
Finnish -- --
French ..- _--
German
Ghanaian -----------
Greek __ ------
Guinean------------
Haitian_ ----- ----- --
Honduran
Icelandic --
Indian ----------
Indonesian -
Irish ----
Israeli -------------
Italian -------------
Japanese
Korean (South) -----
Kuwait -- -
Lebanese -- --- ----
Liberian ------- -_-
Mexican ---------.
Netherlands -.-----.
Nicaraguan
Norwegian ----------
Panamanian --------
Peruvian-
Philippine --------
Spanish -___- ___ ---
Swedish ----------
Swiss ___________-
United States ----_.
Soviet _-_-__
Yugoslavian ------___
Venezuelan ---------
Total, fiscal year-
1965-----
1964----
1963------


umber
of
ansits
27
1
1,136
2
108
103
17
236
5
252
24
26
135
931
1
501
4

154
1
7
1
11
55
176
787
11
1
29
893
29
451
60
1,208
325
144
83
8
347
44
1,505
43
16
7

9,905
9,826
9,098


NoTE.-Above table involves
measurement.


only commercial vessels of 300 net tons or over, Panama Canal


Laden


Ballast


Panama
Canal net
tonnage
152,569
5,508
8,174,640
12,988
648,058
641.259
102,- "39
926,750
34,393
1,678,477
117,069
161,809
779,615
4,323,041
5,393
3,655,061
28,801

214,990
9,022
107,304
6,763
81,001
379,347
1,356,674
4,772,428
59,027
952
153,624
7,535,702
85,682
2,260,179
14s.201)
". 3:2.j 14
1,422,498
549,362
544,148
31,257
2,325,706
88,620
10,777,560
259,964
115,698
16,087

64.1';-.379
60,531,787
55,097,940


Tolls
$137,312
4,957
7,357,176
11,689
583,252
577,133
92,195
834,075
30,954
1,510,629
105,362
145,628
701,654
3,890,737
4,854
3,289,555
25,921

193,491
8,120
96,574
6,087
72,901
341,412
1,221,007
4,295,185
53,124
857
138,262
6,782,132
77,114
2,034,161
133,380
8,372,623
1,280,248
494,426
489,733
28,131
2,093,135
79,758
9,699,804
233,968
104,128
14,478

$57,647,322
54,478,608
49,588,146


Number
of
transits
22
1
192

4

10
31
1
1
22
254
73

1
114
1
1
17
4
16
17
4
1
5
225
7
167

238
193
3
1
1
40
38
171
5
1
4

1,872
1,930
1,875


Panama
Canal net
tonnage
111,720
5,508
1,266,396

27,134

13,940

213,652
351
5,032
84,194
1,000,904

544,435

6,265
112,397
9,022
6,205

9,024
28,414
193,923
113,848
21,354
952
27,383
2,018,586
18,629
420,595
3,073
1,689,300
878,498
19,580
6,700
5,195
295,873
52,830
1,419,581
34,710
10,328
6,704

10,682,235
9,100,824
9,340,175


Tolls

$80,438
3,966
911,805

19,536

10,037

153,829
253
3,623
60,620
720,651

391,993

4,511
80,926
6,496
4,468

6,497
20,458
139,624
81,971
15,375
685
19,716
1,453,382
13,413
302,828
2,212
1,216,296
632,519
14,098
4,824
3,740
213,029
38,038
1,022,098
24,991
7,436
4,827

$7,691,209
6,552,593
6,724,926
















FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA


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Table 18.-Principal Commodities Shipped Through Canal
[Thousands of long tons]
Fiscal year
ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC 1965 1964 1963 1962
Petroleum and products (excludes asphalt)-- 13,914 10,988 10,828 10,228
Coal and coke-------------------------- 6,471 6,184 5,172 6,817
Phosphate ------------------------------3,123 2,212 1,803 1,878
Corn---------------------------------- 2,245 2,274 1,310 1,105
Metal, scrap---------------------------- 2,117 3,047 1,700 3,215
Soybeans------------------------------- 1,653 1,510 1,446 1,196
Manufactures of iron and steel-------------- 1,546 1,440 1,282 1,690
Ores, various---------------------------- 1,195 1,184 771 718
Chemicals, unclassified-------------------- 796 700 565 638
Sugar---------------------------------- 660 536 774 2,105
Wheat---------------------------------- 632 622 468 705
Paper and paper products------------------ 5373 491 340 359
Sulfur ---------------------------------- 472 471 285 387
Machinery ----------------------------- 444 414 422 404
Fertilizers, unclassified-------------------- 441 433 334 396
Automobiles and accessories -------------- 393 385 309 289
Cotton, raw----------------------------- 355 390 341 397
Ammonium compounds -------------------- 306 310 225 484
Metals, various--------------------------- 296 354 299 399
Rice ----------- ------------------- 260 138 145 119
Flour, wheat ------------------------ 226 207 271 237
Chemicals, petroleum--------------------- 220 222 147 N.A.
Canned food products --------------------- 212 219 194 207
Sorghum-------------------------------- 208 215 N.A. N.A.
Cement---------------------------- ---- 182 186 123 111
Asphalt ------------------------ 161 178 167 194
Soda and sodium compounds -------- 158 139 110 138
Asbestos -------------------------------- 151 130 115 134
Tinplate -------------------------------- 143 171 182 259
Resin ----------------------------------- 131 126 85 109
Glass and glassware ------- ------ 124 133 106 109
Pulpwood ----------------------- 124 154 125 104
Clay, fire and china --------112 99 60 57
Oil, vegetable ------------------ 109 116 116 119
Grains, unclassified ------------106 202 159 23
Rubber, manufactured ---- --- -- 104 104 97 87
Liquors and wines ----------------- ------- 94 88 91 91
Agricultural implements--- --- --- 89 71 58 63
Coffee ------------------ -------- 88 75 91 91
Electrical machinery and apparatus ----82 72 77 78
Potash ---------------------- --------- 77 170 144 124
Food in refrigeration ------------ 73 60 63 51
Tallow-------------------- --- --- 58 54 48 37
Salt ----------------------------53 54 47 47
Groceries, unclassified ----------52 56 40 46
Tobacco ------------------- 52 52 41 50
Textiles ------------ ----51 67 67 66
Slag -------------------- 49 53 49 58
Marble and stone -------------- 43 44 38 N.A.
Bricks and tile -------------------------- 42 26 34 38
Lumber ----------------- 41 50 47 38
Wax, paraffin --------------------------- 41 40 39 35
Creosote -------------------------------- 37 13 25 36
Molasses -------------------------------- 33 9 67 146
Cocoa and cacao beans ---------31 25 23 17
Skins and hides --------------29 25 25 26
Carbon black ---------------------------- 25 27 26 37
Railroad materials ------------ 23 42 30 16
Ammunition and explosives --------20 12 16 N.A.
All other ------------------------------- 1,403 1,032 1,024 1,099
Total, Atlantic to Pacific ------ 42.949 38,901 33.086 37,707







64 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 18.-Principal Commodities Shipped Through Canal-Continued
[Thousands of long tons]
Fiscal year
PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC 1965 1964 1963 1962
Ores, various ---------------------------- 7,418 6,876 7,036 7,760
Lumber --------------------------------- 4,724 4,204 3,833 3,617
Sugar --------------_ --- 2,460 2,223 2,121 2,476
Iron and steel manufactures ---------------- 2,297 1,134 856 478
Fishmeal -------------------------------- 1,475 1,226 1,042 N.A.
Bananas --------------------------------_ 1,319 1,291 1,083 1,082
Wheat __ ----------------------------------- 1,246 1,352 779 1,092
Metdlb, various (including tinplate) ------- 1,241 1,168 1,107 1,218
Petroleum and products (excludes asphalt)----- 1,220 2,340 1,809 1,748
Food in refrigeration (excluding bananas)----- 974 980 950 822
Canned food products -------------------- 913 950 1,011 937
Nitrate of soda --------------------------- 770 730 697 884
Pulpwood ----------------------- 554 525 496 476
Oilseeds -------------------------------- 401 243 305 330
Coffee ---------------------------------- 392 453 432 399
Sulfur -------- ------------------------- 324 122 28 14
Cotton, raw __ __________----------------------------- 272 307 366 294
Borax ----------------------------_____------ 258 239 188 174
Fruit, fresh--- ------------------------- 238 247 194 269
Wool ----------------------------------- 237 259 281 264
Barley -------------------------------- 227 360 438 1,064
Coal and coke _------------------------ 225 379 89 77
Phosphate ------- ------------------------ 222 159 156 150
Paper and paper products ------------------ 218 204 180 197
Chemicals, unclassified -------------------- 208 203 174 189
Molasses ----------------------_ ___---------- 208 222 157 111
Corn__----------------------------------- 205 --_____ 20
Oil, fish ---_------ ____--- _--- 188 94 177 119
Textiles ------ -__ ____ _____------------ 186 132 130 117
Oil, coconut ----------------------------- 180 159 142 95
Copra ---------------__--__------ __ ---------- 170 173 195 169
Rice ---- ____-__----__--- 143 150 215 241
Chemicals, petroleum------ --------------- 127 102 125 N.A.
Porcelainware ---------_____--________ -----------------115 103 83 78
Fruit, dried ------------------------------ 97 104 95 98
Beans, edible ______----------------------_____------ 76 63 68 64
Rubber, crude _____---------------------------________ 72 83 101 105
Machinery----------------------------- 70 65 57 50
Electrical machinery and apparatus -------- 57 48 35 26
Potash _----------------------------------_______ 57 45 20
Vegetables, dry ------------------------- 57 36 51 38
Wines -------------------___---------------________ 57 59 73 71
Peas, dry ---------------------- ___ 56 67 72 69
Skins and hides_______ ____ ------------ 55 60 49 56
Bricks and tile ---------_ ------------------ 54 45 32 27
Infusorial earth --------------------------_________ 54 55 46 43
Grains, unclassified ------------------------______ ____ 52 91 140 72
Oats -------------_____ ________----- 50 174 148 8
Tallow .. ---------------------------------___ __ 44 51 24 44
Seeds, excluding oilseeds ------------------- 43 51 48 33
Cocoa ------ -------------- 32 30 34 27
Glass and glassware ----------------------- 31 24 22 19
Rubber, manufactured------------------ 28 30 39 34
Flour, wheat ----------------------------- 27 41 82 59
nil, whale -------------------- 27 45 34 27
Floor coverings -------------------------- 26 16 18 14
Automobiles and accessories ---------------- 25 18 15 17
Oil, vegetable, miscellaneous --------------- 24 34 34 120
Groceries, unclassified ---------------------_ 23 30 25 42
Hemp. ------------- ----------- 22 22 20 19
Motorcycles and bicycles ------------------ 20 8 4
All other -----------------------------_ 1,033 945 900 1,669
Total, Pacific to Atlantic ---- _--------- 33,624 31,649 29,161 29,817













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72 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 21.-Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Atlantic to Pacific
[Thousands of long tons]
Fiscal yIear
EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO- 1965 1964 1963 1962
West coast United States -- ------- 3,021 2,077 1,447 1,750
West coast Canada --------------- 36 8 7 9
West coast Central America/Mexico--- 306 284 187 142
Balboa, C.Z ------------------- 51 46 25 22
West coast South America ----------- 1,655 1,612 1,398 1,557
Chile ---------------------- 773 665 702 733
Colombia ------------------- 171 235 196 254
Ecuador --------------------- 171 179 85 75
Peru ----------------------- 511 518 411 490
Other-------------------------- 29 15 4 5
Hawaiian Islands -----------------160 192 207 218
Oceania ---------------------- 1,714 1,069 771 741
Australia ------- ---------- 1,257 835 603 521
New Zealand -------------- 428 215 154 199
Other-------------------------- 29 19 14 21
Asia --------------------- 17,612 17,802 13,529 16,397
British East Indies ---------- 34 52 44 39
China ---------- ---------- 25 --- 10
Formosa ------- --------------- 611 381 314 365
Hong Kong ----- ---------- 184 183 123 143
India -------------------- 55 47 19 5
Indochina ----------------- 416 384 207 242
Indonesia ----------------------- 49 121 239 206
Japan -------------------------14,644 14,979 11,483 13,901
Pakistan ------------------ 52 66 24 10
Philippine Islands --------- 432 482 371 512
South Korea ---------------- 805 822 533 753
Thailand ------------------------ 96 108 68 65
Other ---------------- 209 177 104 146
Total ----------------------- 24,555 23,090 17,571 20,836
EAST COAST CANADA TO-
West coast United States ------37 18 121 12
West coast Canada --------------22 13 18 16
West coast Central America/Mexico-- 21 29 12 17
Balboa, C.Z -------------------- -------- ---- 10
West coast South America -------------- 37 34 44 33
Oceania -- --- ---------------- 260 187 193 183
Australia -------------------- 230 158 163 151
New Zealand -------------------- 29 29 30 32
Other ------------------------- 1 -- ------
Asia --------------------------- 592 621 324 689
China ------------------------------------- ---- 89
Hong Kong --------------- 24 26 11 13
Japan ---------------- 495 544 277 555
Philippine Islands ---------------- 21 30 13 13
U.S.S.R --------------------- 19 4
Other --------------------- 33 17 23 19
Total------------------------- 969 902 712 960
EAST COAST CENTRAL AMEIcA/MEXIco TO-
West coast United States -----------16 4 33
West coast Central America/Mexico--- 34 27 29 23
West coast South America ---------- 24 12 6 5
Oceania --------------------------- 88 111 83 79
Australia ---- -------------- 57 78 51 46
New Zealand ------------------ 31 33 32 28
Other-------------------------- 5------






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 73

Table 21.-Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Atlantic to Pacific-Continued
[Thousands of long tons]
Fiscal yewar
EAST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICO TO- 1965 1964 1963 1962
Continued
Asia -------------------------------- 85 38 30 50
Japan ------------------------- 63 30 25 36
Formosa ------------------22
Other -------------------------- 8 5 14
TotaL ------------------247 188 152 190
EAST COAST SouTH AMEBICA TO-
West coast United States -------- 2,684 2,177 2,812 2,323
West coast Canada -------------------- 110 56 53 45
West coast Central America/Mexico-- 979 809 472 241
West coast South America-------------- 1,941 1,150 1,227 1,272
Chile -------------------------- 829 388 505 565
Colombia ------------------212 172 23 146
Ecuador ------------------------ 340 280 177 142
Peru --------------540 310 522 419
Other ------------------- 20 --- __--_ ----
Balboa, C.Z -----------------294 252 219 193
Hawaiian Islands ------------ 143 63 89 56
Oceania ---------------------206 325 234 260
Australia 119 153 100 140
New Zealand 84 172 134 119
Other -------------------------- 3 ------------1
Asia------------------------------- 1,480 1,301 1,222 719
Japan---------------- 1,464 1,259 1,199 705
South Korea--------- ------ ------ 10 1
Other --------------------------- 6 32 23 13
Total ------------------------ 7,837 6,133 6,328 5,109
CIUSTOBAL, C.Z., TO-
West coast United States--------------- 17 50 48 33
West coast Central America/Mexico--- 48 52 18 3
West coast South America------------ --- 3
Balboa, C.Z ------------------------- 223 263 183
Asia (Japan)------------------ 28 7
Other territories ----------- ------------- 3 13
TotaL -------- 316 375 252 49
WEST INDIES TO-
West coast United States --------- 1,615 1,147 1,017 1,669
West coast Canada ---------- 425 301 272 250
West coast Central America/Mexico-- 292 265 589 586
Balboa, C.Z ------------------------- 221 208 190 364
West coast South America -------------- 952 1,016 997 1,056
Chile -------------- 596 733 778 825
Colombia -------------9 1 1 3
Ecuador -----------------45 9 41 35
Peru --------------------------- 263 272 176 186
Other -------------------------- 39 1 1 7
Hawaiian Islands --------142 177 103 89
Oceania ---------------------------- 194 269 272 334
Australia------------------------ 72 96 103 101
French Oceania ----- ----1 2 1 1
New Zealand ----------- 103 171 168 214
Other-------------------------- 18 --...._ 18

11351--11






74 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 21.-Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Atlantic to Pacific-Continued
[Thousands of long tons]
Fiscal year
WEST INDIES TO-Continued 1965 1964 1963 1962
Asia ------- -------------------- 1,376 1,164 1,014 2,363
British East Indies --------- 10 16 11 --
China ---------------- 123 212 335 779
Hong Kong -------------- 4 3 9 2
Indochina ----------------------------------- 4 ----
Indonesia ------------- 6 18 7 14
Japan -------------------------- 1,122 860 570 1,152
Philippine Islands ---------- 13 15 20 1
South Korea --------------------------- 5 ---- 70
U.S.S.R__------------------ ------- 98 22 57 344
Other------------------------- 13 1 1
Total------------------------- 5,217 4,547 4,454 6,711
EUROPE TO-
West coast United States --------- 882 853 769 850
West coast Canada ------------------- 260 229 179 196
West coast Central America/Mexico ..- 376 359 317 299
Balboa, C.Z --------------13
West coast South America ---------967 976 1,128 1,170
Chile --------------------------- 299 274 407 400
Colombia ----------- 121 142 157 181
Ecuador ----------109 109 105 78
Peru --------------------------- 394 413 440 480
Other ---------------- -44 38 19 31
Hawaiian Islands --------------------- 12 17 28 23
Oceania --------------------------- 903 879 826 926
Australia ------------------------ 26 27 49 44
British Oceania ------------------ 33 21 18 18
French Oceania ----------- 225 157 103 138
New Zealand ----------577 647 625 654
Other -------------------------- 42 27 31 72
Asia.-------------------------------- 88 109 116 138
Formosa -----------1 2 1 4
Japan -------------------------- 73 98 110 113
South Korea ------------------ --------------- 1 4
U.S.S.R------------------------- 4
Other -------------------------- 10 9 4 17
Other territories ---------------------11 1
Total------------------------ ----3,499 3,422 3,364 3,615
AFRICA TO-
West coast United States -------- 180 151 157 134
West coast Canada ------------ 12 19 7 9
West coast Central America/Mexico --------34 ------------
West coast South America -------- 53 13 42 11
Oceania ---------------------------- 34 14 1 3
Asia ------------- 17 6 33 41
Total ----------------------------- 296 237 240 198

ASIA (MIDDLE EAST) TO-
West coast United States --------------- 12 6 6 34
Asia ------------------------------ 1 1 7
Other territories ------------------ ----- ----------- 5
Total ----------------------------- 13 7 13 39
Total cargo, Atlantic to Pacific-------- 42,949 38,901 33,086 37,707







PANAMA CANAL COMPANY

Table 22.-Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Pacific to Atlantic


[Thousands of long tons]


Fiscal year


WEST COAST UNITED STATES TO-
East coast United States------------
East coast Canada------- -----
East coast Central America/Mexico ------
Cristobal, C.Z --------------------
East coast South America-----------
Argentina -------------------
Brazil--- ------------------
Colombia----- -----------
Uruguay------------------
Venezuela------------- --
Other -----------------------
West Indies----------------------
British West Indies -------
Cuba --- --------------
Haiti-Dominican Republic-----
Netherlands West Indies-------
Puerto Rico---------------
Other-----------------------
Europe---------------
Belgium---------------------
British Isles-----------
Denmark ------------
Finland------------------
France---------- -------
Greece ------- -------
Irish Republic ----------
Italy-----------------------
Netherlands
Norway- ... .
Poland
Spain-Portugal-- -----
Sweden ------------
West Germany
Yugoslavia -
Other-----------
Asia (Middle East)-
India. ------------
Israel ------
Lebanon ------------
Syria -------------
Other
Africa- ------
Kenya------
Egypt -- --------
Mozambique -
South Africa-
Tunisia- --- -------
Other
Total
WEST COAST CANADA TO-
East coast United States-
East coast Canada -----------
Cristobal, C.Z----------
East coast South America
Argentina -------------------
Brazil----- -----------------


1965
2,177
12
2
6
155
21
24
6
1
102
1
295
33
20
5
236
1
2,411
108
352
41
15
197
35
11
340
725
29
15
90
63
311
10
69
18
4
8
5
1

97
7
4
13
56
10
7
5,173

1,184
9
1
340
8
44


1964
3,284
38
4
7
179
20
18
17
122
2
253
33
1
9
3
207

2,628
188
453
38
16
191
28
12
345
786
26
91
52
294
7
101
17
13
3
1
108
7
6
9
40
46
6,518

1,255
10
1
194
4
6


1963 1962


2,818
28
4
10
127
11
19
14
1
82

268
31
7
5
221
4
2,404
180
410
31
19
182
13
8
320
550
54
40
16
65
394
9
113
20
14
3
1
2
73
3
14
7
35
14
5,752

1,003
23
2
191
5
3


2,961
31
6
8
122
16
24
17
1
61
3
219
24
4
5
183
3
2,557
132
381
36
16
146
49
12
196
631
32
102
88
56
594
5
81
91
7
24
44
16
257
4
3
10
26
33
181
6,252

1,098
26
2
126
5
6


. i







76 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 22.-Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Pacific to Atlantic-Continued


[Thousands of long tons]


WEST COAST CANADA To-Continued
East Coast South America-Continued
Colombia -------------------
Venezuela--------------------
Other-- -----------
West Indies----------------------
British West Indies ---------
Cuba -----------------------
Haiti-Dominican Republic -----
Puerto Rico -
Other-----------------------
Europe----------------------- --
Albania----------------------
Belgium -------- -------
British Isles ------------
Bulgaria---------------------
France -
Greece -
Irish Republic
Italy
Netherlands -- -------
Norway
Poland
Spain-Portugal -
U.S.S.R ---------------
West Germany-
Yugoslavia ------------
Other ---------------
Asia (Middle East) -
Israel ----- -----
Lebanon -------
Other -------.--- ----
Africa ----------------
Egypt --------------
Mozambique ----
South Africa---- --------
Tunisia_---------
Other ---- ----------
Total---------------
WEST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICO TO-
East coast United States
East coast Canada -----------
East coast Central America/Mexico --
Cristobal, C.Z
East coast South America-
West Indies -----------
Europe--------
Belgium --------
British Isles ------ ---
Denmark ---------------
East Germany
France -- -
Italy
Netherlands
Poland- -------------
Spain-Portugal ---------
West Germany
Other-------- ------
Other territories
Total--------------


Fiscal year


1965 1964


286
2
122
28
91
91
2
3,329

109
2,075
79
23
40
210
292
1
82
14
53
215
13
123
37
27
10

269

39
212
12
6
5,291

639
88
8
27
11
912
26
32
25
25
36
57
509
22
159
21

1,685


180
4
103
23
8
67
5
3,333
12
155
1,849
90
63
13
30
113
413
1
136
43
25
270
3
117
28
27
1
199
9
25
127
38
5,123

540
61
11
36
14
407
25
16
22
20
19
34
71
13
147
40

1,069


1963 1962


1
181
1
127
24

10
86
7
2,399

164
1,545
52
2
26
118
242
3
20
11
112
3
101
15
14
1
307

39
224
44
4,067

438
57
10
24
11
368
20
15
24
17
43
68
6
121
54
8
916


5
105
5
142
22
17
25
75
3
2,296

131
1,452
40
1
10
124
144
9
21
26
277
61
21
19
2
176

31
101
44
3,887

517
2
39
8
19
11
296
13
15
30
8
12
59
16
119
24
1
893


- A .







PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 77

Table 22.-Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Pacific to Atlantic-Continued
[Thousands of long tons]
Fiscal year
WEST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO- 1965 1964 1963 1962
East coast United States---------- 6,169 5,419 5,669 7,219
East coast Canada -------------------- 103 212 268 256
East coast Central America/Mexico--- 43 38 24 10
Cristobal, C.Z ------------------------ 6 4 6 6
East coast South America -------- 42 32 37 45
Brazil--------- 9--------------- -------------- 9 16
Colombia -----------18 8 8 6
Venezuela ------------- 23 22 19 20
Other --------------------------1 2 1 3
West Indies ------------------------ 33 33 45 73
British West Indies --------------- 1 7
Cuba--------------------------- 5 14 47
Netherlands West Indies -------1 1 2------
Puerto Rico ----------------------- 27 32 28 18
Other ------------------------------------ 1
Europe----------------------------- 6,186 6,097 5,803 4,927
Belgium -------------- 542 539 324 381
British Isles 517 825 988 770
Denmark ---------------------- 59 54 48 33
East Germany ----- ----- 24 3 14
France ----------------463 441 430 192
Greece --------------- 6 21 1 3
INetaly-----------.. 359 686 835 363
Netherlands ---- ----- 1,730 1,481 1,265 1,493
Norway ----------------- 6 11 21 20
Poland_ ---------- ------ 75 74 47 22
Rumania ------------------------ 6 5
Spain-Portuga -------------- 207 197 165 157
Sweden --------.-.. 102 111 111 87
West Germany- 1,722 1,312 1,294 1,225
Yugoslavia ------- 68 49 35 19
Other ------------------------ 300 288 225 162
Asia (Middle East) ---- --------28 15 9 46
India --------------- 17 9-----
Israel---- 2 ---- ------
Lebanon ------ -------- 8 5 9 46
Other--------------- 1 1 ____________
Africa--------------------------- --- 10 18_____
Total ---------------------------- 12610 11,860 11,879 12,582
BALBOA, C.Z., TO-
East coast United States- -----25 11 12 7
East coast South America------- 3 8 3
Europe ---------------------------------- 2 1
Other territories --------------------- ---- --- 1 1
Total --------------------------- 28 21 16 9
HAWAIIAN ISLANDS TO-
East coast United States ----------------_ 465 536 438 633
East coast Canada ----------4 9 9 3
Europe ---------------------------- 27 37 30 24
British Isles--------------------- ---- 2
Netherlands --------------------- 2 10 7 7
Spain-Portugal------------------- ----- 5---- ---
West Germany------------ 7 11 8 5
Other -------------------------- 18 11 13 12
Other territories -----------------.. 3 3 2 3
Total----------------------------- 499 585 479 663







78 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 22.-Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Pacific to Atlantic-Continued
[Thousands of long tons]
Fiscal year
OCEANIA TO- 1965 1964 1963 1962
East coast United States --- ------ 721 781 729 615
East coast Canada -------------- 201 175 215 189
East coast Central America/Mexico -- 15 10 7 7
Cristobal, C.Z --------------------- 4 2 2 2
East coast South America -------------- 12 22 22 12
West Indies ------------------------ 72 60 46 40
British West Indies --------- 67 59 40 36
Netherlands West Indies --------2 1 2 1
Other ------------------------ 3 ---- 4 3
Europe ----------------------- 1,476 1,279 1,206 1,200
Belgium ------ ------------ 27 21 27 25
British Isles ---------------------- 1,195 1,031 942 984
France ------------------------- 80 81 97 77
Netherlands --------------------- 26 23 27 24
West Germany -------51 42 48 31
Other -------------------------- 97 81 65 59
Other territories ---------------------- ------ ---- ------1
Total --------------------------- 2,501 2,329 2,227 2,066

AsIA TO-
East coast United States ----------4,928 3,551 3,255 2,956
East coast Canada -------- 147 92 75 77
East coast Central America/Mexico--- 19 5 6 5
Cristobal, C.Z ------------------------- 35 38 39 38
East coast South America -------- 369 222 237 198
Argentina -------------- 41 27 28 54
Brazil ---------------------- 38 37 75 38
Colombia ----------------------- 62 42 38 27
Netherlands Guiana--------- 4 8
Venezuela --------------- 202 99 81 78
Other ---- ---------------- 22 9 15 1
West Indies ------------------210 155 158 138
British West Indies -------- 25 23 20 16
Cuba --------------------------- 122 82 102 96
Haiti-Dominican Republic -------16 16 13 6
Puerto Rico ------------ 38 26 16 16
Other --------------------------9 8 7 4
Europe ----------------------127 80 55 53
Belgium ------------------8 7 6 5
British Isles ------------- 28 14 19 14
Netherlands --------------------- 60 33 17 17
West Germany ------------ 13 16 12 14
Other ---------------- -18 10 1 3
Africa -------------------2 1
Total ------------5,837 4,144 3,825 3,465
Total cargo, Pacific to Atlantic -------- 33,624 31,649 29,161 29,817







PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 79

Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific
[Thousands of long tons]
Fiscal year
EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO WEST COAST ,14 1
UNITED STATES: 1965 1964 1963 1962
Bauxite ----------------------- 217 230 42 ---
Canned food products ---------1 4 6 5
Cement ---------------- 27 42 14
Chemicals:
Petroleum ---- --------- 127 99 76 N.A.
Unclassified ------------------- 137 114 103 185
Confectionery---------------------------- 1------
Electrical machinery and apparatus---- 2 2 3 4
Floor coverings ----------------- ----- ----- 1 1
Groceries, unclassified ----------------- 5 5 2 2
Iron and steel manufactures --------609 476 442 660
Liquors ------------------------ 1 1 3 9
Machinery ------------------------- 1 2 3 3
Metals, miscellaneous ------------------ 26 4 2 20
Paints and varnishes_------------ ---- 1 1 3 4
Paper and paper products -------------- 1 2 1 6
Petroleum and products:
Crude oil ----------------------- ------------ ----- 47
Fuel-diesel oi ------------------- 61 39 --- 14
Gasoline ----------------------- 830 522 326 374
Kerosene ----------------------- 295 33 --- 37
Lubricating oil------------------- 272 219 266 217
Other and unclassified ------------ 86 29 22 12
Pharmaceutical products ---------------2 2 2 5
Phosphate ---------------- 74 38 1
Soap and soap products ---------------5 1 3 ------
Soda and sodium compounds ----------- 48 18 13 39
Sulfur ----------------------- ------------ ----- 40
Vegetable oil, miscellaneous ------------- 1 8 28 18
Al other and unclassified -------------- 192 185 86 47
Total----------------------------- 3,021 2,077 1,447 1,750
EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO WEST COAST
CANADA:
Canned fruit------------------------- ------ 1 2 3
Phosphate --------------------------- 28 -- ---- ---
Rice ------------------------------- 5 7 6 6
Soda and sodium compounds ------ 3-----------
All other and unclassified -------- ------ ------ ----- ----
Total ----------------------------- 36 8 _8 9
EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO WEST COAST
CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICO:
Ammonium compounds ---------------- 10 15 6------
Chemicals, unclassified ---------------- 14 13 15 13
Canned food products --------------- 15 13 8 1
Corn------------------------------- 16 18 11 16
Fertilizers, unclassified -------- 18 25 21 10
Iron and steel manufactures -------13 6 8 2
Lime ---------------------------- 1 --- 1
Machinery ---------------------- 7 7 6 5
Paper and paper products -------------- 55 38 19 5
Petroleum and products:
Lubricating oil ------------------- 11 10 6 6
Other and unclassified------- 5 4 5 5
Phosphate -------------------------56 26 8 4
Potash----------------------------- 5 16 2 1
Rice -------------------6 11 6 3
Wheat ------------------- ------ 11 20 5 35
All other and unclassified ---- --_- __ 63 62 60 37
Total ------------------ ----------- 306 284 187 143







80 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued


[Thousands of long tons]


Fiscal year


EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO WEST COAST
SouTH AMERICA:
Agricultural implements----- ------
Ammonium compounds-------------
Asphalt-----------------------
Automobiles and accessories-------
Bricks and tile ----------------
Canned food products-----------
Carbon black--------------------
Chemicals, unclassified -- -------
Clay, fire and china----------------
Coal and coke--------- --------
Corn---------------------------
Cotton, raw-------------------
Electrical machinery and apparatus ---
Fertilizers, unclassified ---------
Flour, wheat -------------
Grains, unclassified-----------------
Groceries, unclassified--------------
Iron and steel manufactures -
Machinery-----------------------
Marble and stone ---------------
Metals:
Miscellaneous ---------------
Scrap-----------------------
Paper and paper products----- ---
Petroleum and products:
Gasoline----------- ----
Lubricating oil----------------
Other and unclassified -
Phosphate---------------------
Potash----------------- ----
Resin ---------------------------
Rice---------------------------
Rubber, manufactured -
Soda and sodium compounds
Sulfur--------------------------
Tallow--------------------------
Tinplate------------------------
Vegetable oil, miscellaneous------
Wax, paraffin------------
Wheat--------------------------
Woodpulp-----------------------
All other and unclassified-
Total------------
EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO HAWAIIAN
ISLANDS:
Automobiles and accessories-
Canned food products ----------
Chemicals, unclassified
Corn--------------- ------------
Electrical machinery and apparatus ----
Grains, unclassified------ ---
Iron and steel manufactures -
Liquors --- ----------
Machinery-----------------------
Metals, miscellaneous .----
Paper and paper products -------
Phosphate-----------


1965 1964 1963 1962


20
17
9
47
15
46
9
48
8
176
16
5
14
12
89
12
4
77
76
23
6
41
56

60
6
116
15
10
46
15
10
29
19
10
40
16
293
10
134
1,655


3
3
2
8
2
25
3
5
2
1
22


12
19
8
44
10
49
8
45
5
164
41
9
13
26
98
11
10
69
75
25
7
18
73
2
56
5
104
8
9
43
13
16
16
22
17
37
15
276
16
118
1,612


3
4
4
14
5
3
28
3
7
1
2
22


9
5
15
44
14
30
6
45
5
143
13
6
9
5
84
1
5
65
59
22
10
14

1
53
3
108
8
6
9
14
16
18
19
15
25
19
369
17
89
1,398


5
5
3
32
4
27
3
6
1
2
16


15
15
10
49
10
30
5
39
6
159
62
6
10
7
78
8
7
92
66
N.A.
11
12

1
70
4
66
1
8
11
14
13
11
21
19
41
16
419
20
125
1,557


2
4
3
32
4
2
33
3
9
1
3
16







PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued


[Thousands of long tons]
Fiscal year


EAST COAST UNrTED STATES TO HAWAIIAN
ISLANDS-Continued
Soybeans ------------------------
Textiles------------------------
Tinplate--------------------
All other and unclassified --
Total----------------------
EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO OCEANIA:
Agricultural implements----- --
Ammonium and compounds-------
Automobiles and accessories ------
Bauxite----------------
Bricks and tile------------
Carbon black ------------
Chemicals:
Petroleum --------------
Unclassified -
Clay, fire and china -
Coke ---
Cotton, raw --------------
Electrical machinery and apparatus ---
Fertilizers, unclassified ------
Glass and glassware-- ------
Iron and steel manufactures
Machinery--- -- ---
Metals, miscellaneous -
Ores, miscellaneous----------
Paper and paper products --------
Petroleum and products:
Gasoline ----------
Kerosene -
Lubricating oil
Other and unclassified-
Phosphate -
Potash -----------------
Resin--------
Rice_ ---
Rubber, manufactured-
Soda and sodium compounds ---
Soybeans -
Sulfur -----
Tobacco ------
Vegetable oil, miscellaneous ---- ----
Wax, paraffin -------_._
Woodpulp_ --------- --
All other and unclassified
Total-------------
EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO AsIA:
Agricultural implements -------
Ammonium compounds --------------
Ammunition and explosives -------
Asphalt --- ------------
Automobiles and accessories-
Barley-
Beans, edible----------
Canned food products--- ------
Carbon black--- -----


1965

1
1
36
46
160

32
5
42
41
6
4

7
61
30
3
18
5
12
8
26
63
14
7
23


83
11
720
20
18
7
13
8
9
258
11
11
6
7
125
1,714

7
77
9
15
47
10
11
90
10


2
3
36
54
191

25
6
46
80
2
4

7
34
30
24
4
1
8
28
50
8
6
17


C


12
2
49
40
207

16
1
23
48
2
5
14
31
20
11
15
6
3
6
25
49
11
5
14


34 4
2
108 117
10 7
47 13
18 16
14 13
7 6
16 15
5 2
8 9
297 174
12 12
6 5
6 5
7 7
94 59
)69 771


7
112
2
19
54
6
95
14


5
38
3
7
34
11ii
68
14


11351--12


1964 1963 1962


7
2
42
55
218

13
2
19

1
6
N.A.
47
11

16
4
1
4
12
37
14
11

1
128
10
2
23
13
3
17
1
5
241
14
5
1
4
76
742

3
267
N.A.
28
37

6
75
24







82 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued


[Thousands of long tons]
EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO ASIA-Con-
tinued: 1
Cement------------------------
Chemicals:
Petroleum-------------------
Unclassified-------------------
Clay, fire and china ----------------
Coal and coke-----------------------
Cocoa and cacao beans --------
Corn---------------------------
Cotton, raw------------
Electrical machinery and apparatus ---
Fertilizers, unclassified
Fishmeal------------------------
Flour, wheat --------------
Glass and glassware --------
Groceries, unclassified ---------
Grains, unclassified
Iron and steel manufactures-
Lumber
Machinery
Metals:
Miscellaneous ----- ------
Scrap ----------------------- 1
Ores, miscellaneous -
Paper and paper products --------
Petroleum and products:
Gasoline -
Kerosene -
Lubricating oil -----------
Other and unclassified-
Pharmaceutical products
Phosphate----------------- 1
Potash ------- ----------
Rags and waste -------------
Railroad materials -
Refrigerated food products --------
Rice- -------------------
Resin -- ----
Rubber, manufactured -
Skins and hides--------------------
Soda and sodium compounds ------
Sorghum ------------
Soybeans ------------------------ 1
Sugar ----------
Sulfur -----------------
Tallow --
Textiles -- -------------
Tinplate -------- ----___
Tobacco -------------
Vegetable oil, miscellaneous ------ -
Wheat_
Woodpulp -----------
All other and unclassified-
Total ------------------------- 17
EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO BALBOA, C.Z.:
Corn ---------------
Wheat
All other and unclassified _-
Total


Fiscal year
965 1964 1963 1962
7 8 3 2


78
283
54
3,280
9
J,189
316
15
79
5
107
6
9
71
134
9
92
39
,910
7
66
31
1
381
44
6
,997
7
7
1
19
180
83
53
19
29
208
,515
67
33
19
64
37
41
304
60
365
,612

2
23
26
51


101
261
49
6,004
6
2,162
348
15
85
5
83
5
13
167
151
22
93
60
2,760
55
55
14
363
49
4
1,893
16
9
13
13
68
87
51
16
22
N.A.
1,408
29
27
30
99
34
43
294
77
326
17,802


23
23
46


53
158
28
5,002
5
1,253
302
12
16
142
4
7
145
141
14
127
85
1,603
32
38
15
1
324
17
4
1,515
14
13
2
7
117
58
51
19
25
N.A.
1,399
6
26
24
75
25
31
83
60
268
13,529


7
18
25


N.A.
108
29
6,553
3
982
359
11
95
N.A.
108
4
7
4
147
12
124
139
2,853
38
57
30
309
41
5
1,655
12
N.A.
1
8
94
77
42
18
24
N.A.
1,182
1
11
11
20
127
33
38
149
53
381
16,397

1
21
22






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued


[Thousands of long tons]
EAST COAST CANADA TO WEST COAST UNITED
STATES: 1
Asbestos-------------------------
Petroleum and products: Gasoline-
Paper and paper products --------------
Ores, miscellaneous ----------
All other and unclassified ---------
Total------------------
EAST COAST CANADA TO WEST COAST CANADA:
Bauxite-------------------------
Chemicals, unclassified ---------
All other and unclassified
Total------------------------
EAST COAST CANADA TO WEST COAST SOUTH
AMERICA:
Asbestos --------------- ------
Chemicals, unclassified----------------
Iron and steel manufactures ------
Metals, miscellaneous---------------
Paper and paper products --------
Woodpulp-----------------------
All other and unclassified
Total-----------------------
EAST COAST CANADA TO WEST COAST CENTRAL
AMERICA/MEXICO:
Iron and steel manufactures -
Petroleum and products: Gasoline-------
Railroad materials ----------
Total -----------
EAST COAST CANADA TO OCEANIA:
Asbestos -
Automobiles and accessories-
Chemicals, unclassified
Iron and steel manufactures-
Machinery ---------------
Metals, miscellaneous-
Paper and paper products --------
Tinplate ----------------
Woodpulp ------------
All other and unclassified-
Total
EAST COAST CANADA TO ASIA:
Asbestos---- --------- ---
Chemicals:
Petroleum -----------
Unclassified -
Coal------- -------------
Corn --------------
Grains, unclassified
Metals:
Miscellaneous
Scrap -------------
Ores, miscellaneous ----------
Paper and paper products -------
Resin------------------------------
Rubber, manufactured -


1
1

3

1
2
]

C-
~4


1
3


1
_]


7 3
1 -
1
.8 13
1
36 18

6 ----
4 11
2 2
122 13


9 8
1
1 1
4 3
9 12
1 2
3 7
37 34


9 10
11 19
20 29


23
13
22
10
4
6
114
14
4
50
260


17
13
11
8
7
8
82
2
4
35
187


86 82 69 88


2
5
14
5
18
145
55
66
9
6


24
236
72
36
9
7


Fiscal year
65 1964 1963 1962


111
1
8
1
121

5
4
8
17


9
1
1
6
15
1
11
44




11
11

16
18
8
7
4
26
78
10
5
21
193


2
5
5
12


10
7
17


8
1
2
3
11
1
7
33



17

17

16
7
3
5
3
28
94
14
2
11
183


N.A.
8
14


42
326
25
13
6
2


7
2


10
87
49
16
3
2







84 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued


[Thousands of long tons]


Fiscal year


EAST COAST CANADA TO ASIA-Continued:
Slag---------------------------
Soybeans------------------------
Wheat --------------------------
Woodpulp--------------
All other and unclassified -
Total------------------
EAST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICO TO
WEST COAST UNITED STATES:
Molasses -
Ores, miscellaneous
Petroleum and products:
Fuel-diesel oil ------------
Gasoline
All other and unclassified -
Total -------------------
EAST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICO TO
WEST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICO:
Iron and steel manufactures -
Petroleum and products:
Fuel-diesel oil-
Gasoline ------
Kerosene ---------
Railroad materials --- --------
Sulfur
All other and unclassified -
Total -

EAST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICO TO
OCEANIA:
Sulfur
All other and unclassified
Total-------------
EAST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICO TO
ASIA:
Ammonium compounds -
Fertilizers, unclassified ---------
Metals:
Miscellaneous
Scrap -
Ores, miscellaneous -
Petroleum and products: Gasoline ---- -
Phosphate
Sulfur ----------
All other and unclassified-
Total--------- ---------
EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO WEST COAST
UNITED STATES:
Bones and bonemeal -
Canned food products -----
Coffee------------------
Iron and steel manufactures-
Ores:
Bauxite ---- ---------
Manganese ---------


1965
35
121

3
22
592


1964
25
88
4
7
23
621


7
8
1
16


1963
25
20
8
26
324



3




4


1962
24

100

41
689


2
33


1 3


29


16


5 8
3
----__ 3
34 27


88 111

88 111


5
8
3
1
4
7
29


15

3
2
23


80 79
3 --
83 79


-- --- 9
4 __- -----


5


2

8




1

3
1


1 10 15
0 17 9
7 ---------_
7 ----
3
2 -- 1
5 3 5
5 37 30


2
.1

4
5


3
26

41
40


26
8



7
50


5
4
37
8


2
29
2


42 44


I







PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued


[Thousands of long tons]


EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO WEST COAST
UNITED STATEs-Continued:
Petroleum and products:
Crude oil-------------------
Fuel-diesel oil---------------
Gasoline --------------
Kerosene------- ----------
Other and unclassified ------
All other and unclassified------------
Total-------------------------
EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO WEST COAST
CANADA:
Coffee------------------------------
Ore, bauxite-------------------------
Petroleum and products: Fuel-diesel oil-
All other and unclassified --------
Total-------------------------
EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO WEST COAST
CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICO:
Ammonium compounds ---------
Asphalt----------------
Cement-------------------------
Chemicals:
Petroleum --------------------
Unclassified-------------------
Petroleum and products:
Crude oil -
Fuel-diesel oil-----------------
Gasoline_ -------------
Other and unclassified-
All other and unclassified -
Total -------------
EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO WEST COAST
SOUTH AMERICA:
Ammonium compounds -
Bauxite -.....--------------
Cement ----------------
Fertilizers, unclassified -
Petroleum and products:
Crude oil-------------
Fuel-diesel oil-----------
Gasoline-------------
Kerosene------------
Lubricating oil -----------
Other and unclassified-
Salt-----------------
Wheat__ -----------------
All other and unclassified-
Total-
EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO BALBOA, C.Z.:
Petroleum and products:
Fuel-diesel oil -
Gasoline
Kerosene ------------
Other and unclassified-
All other and unclassified -------
Total--------------


Fiscal year


1965
2,257
121
111
121
12
2,684


1
27
77
5
110


21
27

1
5
789
56
18
59
3
979


8
7
22
20

951
645
159
43
13
34
11
28
1,941


279
1

3
294


1964 1963 1962


1,810
61
70
105
13
8
2,177


5
51


56


3
25
12


2,339
49
216
121
12
2,812


3
47
3
53


3
20
5


3 ----
6 6


599
77
23
55
6
809



6
16
11

743
169
130
32
8
12
12
5
6
1,150


234
14
2
2

252


213
206
15
3
1
472


8
1
2


1,801
348
59
8
9
2,323


4
39
2
45


19
3
N.A.

18
186
14
1

241



5
15


716 642
445 458
31 93
22
-- --- -


11
13

1,227


11
26
1,272


178 160
35 24
4 7
1
1 1
219 192


__







86 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued


[Thousands of long tons]


EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO OCEANIA:
Chemicals, unclassified ---------
Petroleum and products:
Crude oil ---
Fuel-diesel oil ------------
Gasoline-------------
Kerosene ---------- --
Lubricating oil -----------
All other and unclassified-
Total ---------------
EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO HAWAIIAN
ISLANDS:
Petroleum and products:
Fuel-diesel oil
Lubricating oil -
Kerosene -
All other and unclassified-
Total ------------------
EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO ASIA:
Corn------- -
Cotton, raw----------------
Grains, unclassified -
Metal, iron -
Ores:
Bauxite -
Iron
Manganese
Tin
Petroleum and products:
Crude oil------------
Fuel-diesel oil------------
Gasoline
Lubricating oil------------
Other and unclassified-
Sugar
Wool
All other and unclassified
Total------------
CRISTOBAL, C.Z., TO WEST COAST UNITED
STATES:
Coffee-
Petroleum and products:
Fuel-diesel oil ----------
Gasoline --------------
All other and unclassified
Total -
CRISTOBAL, C.Z., TO WEST COAST CENTRAL
AMERICA/MEXICO:
Petroleum and products:
Fuel-diesel oil ---------
Gasoline
Kerosene -- ---- ---
Other and unclassified-
All other and unclassified-
Total -----_--


1965


9
170
11
13
3




8

134
1
143


14
14
69
36
78
63

346
767
15
28
28
2
20
1,480


12
17 20
270 150
1
31 49
3
325 234




18 89
45 89


63 89 56


38
92
7
6
315
629
51

5
27
1,301


10
106


252
674
60
6
7
24
1,222


1


17


17


16
20
7
5

48


49

50


13
33
5


51


48

48


5
10
3


18


Fiscal year
1964 1963 1962
6


102
20
119
17
2
260



7
49


1
14
1
20

50
156


181
245
13
13
12
8
6
720


33

33


3
3







PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued


[Thousands of long tons]


Fiscal year


CluSTOBAL, C.Z., TO BALBOA, C.Z.:
Petroleum and products:
Fuel-diesel oil-----------------
Gasoline--------------------
Kerosene---------------------
All other and unclassified-
Total---------------------
CRISTOBAL, C.Z., TO ASIA:
Petroleum and products: Fuel-diesel oil-
All other and unclassified-------
Total -----------------------
WEST INDIES TO WEST COAST UNITED STATES:
Coffee------------------------------
Molasses---------------
Ore, bauxite--------------
Petroleum and products:
Crude oil-------------
Fuel-diesel oil -----------
Gasoline--------------
Kerosene -------------
Other and unclassified-
All other and unclassified-
Total---------------
WEST INDIES TO WEST COAST CANADA:
Bauxite
Petroleum and products:
Fuel-diesel oil ----------
Kerosene
All other and unclassified-
Total --------------
WVEST INDIES TO WEST COAST CENTRAL
AMERICA/MEXICO:
Ammonium compounds---------
Chemicals, unclassified -
Petroleum and products:
Crude oil--------------
Fuel-diesel oil----- ------
Gasoline ---.-----------
Kerosene -- -------------
Lubricating oil -----------
Other and unclassified-
All other and unclassified
Total ------------
WEST INDIES TO WEST COAST SOUTH AMERICA:
Asphalt -- --------------
Fertilizers, unclassified
Petroleum and products:
Crude oil------------
Fuel-diesel oil
Gasoline -----------
Kerosene ---------- __
Lubricating oil-
Other and unclassified
Salt -. -----------
Sugar -_
All other and unclassified-
Total-----------------


1965 1964 1963 1962


180 232
36 24
5 6
1 1
222 263

28 7

28 7


8
401J

73
676
622
160
7
29
1,615

337
76
8
4
425


1i


43
4 i5
442
130
18


11
,147

301


301


97
54
32

183





5


30
621
295
60


6 11
1,017 1,669

252 220


20


272


16
3 -


43
124
63
31
4
6
292


11
75
90
53
15
2
265


266
218
87
3
12
3
589


2 18 28
5 --- ---


626
181
72
10
14
3
6
951


891
63
34
10
1
3
5
2
1,016


704
91
52
11
14
2
101
4
997


5
4
2
2
13


198
980
376
71


18
12
250


13
261
205
88
6
8
5
586


17
672
119
64
11
1
1
141
2
1,056







88 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued


[Thousands of long tons]


WEST INDIES TO BALBOA, C.Z.:
Petroleum and products:
Fuel-diesel oil------------------
Gasoline---- -------------
Kerosene----------------------
Other and unclassified-
All other and unclassified -------
Total------------------------
WEST INDIES TO HAWAIIAN ISLANDS:
Petroleum and products:
Fuel-diesel oil------------
Gasoline-----------------------
Kerosene---------------------
Total --
WEST INDIES TO OCEANIA:
Asphalt-----------------------
Petroleum and products:
Fuel-diesel oil------------
Gasoline ------------
Kerosene--------------
Lubricating oil -----------
Other and unclassified
Sugar-------------------------
All other and unclassified -
Total
WEST INDIES TO ASIA:
Ammonium compounds --------
Fish, refrigerated -
Machinery---- -----------
Metals:
Iron
Scrap-
Molasses
Ores:
Bauxite
Copper
Petroleum and products:
Crude oil
Fuel-diesel oil
Gasoline
Kerosene
Lubricating oil --
Sugar --___ --------------
All other and unclassified
Total _-___ ------
EUROPE TO WEST COAST UNITED STATES:
Ammonium compounds ---...
Asbestos .__.__.
Automobiles and accessories-
Beer ..____ __ __
Canned food products -
Chemicals, unclassified ----- ---
Creosote
Electrical machinery and apparatus ---
Fertilizers, unclassified _____
Food in refrigeration ---.- ____


Fiscal year


1965 1964 1963 1962


188
29
3
1

221



2
140
142


168
31
3
3
2
207


16
161
177


211
109
21
23

364


17
72
89


151
29

10
190


11


92
103


31 68 64 66


45
32
11
32
17
18
8
194


42
75
15
41
23
5
269


9
125
18
27
2
22
5
272


60
123
31
40

10
4
334


19
8 8
1


28
610
3
44
607
2
1,376

20
8
119
9
11
29
24
7
58
9


454
24
51
45
487
4
1,164

21
9
104
8
9
32
12
5
65
9


123
10
122
44
602
16
1,014

19
10
89
7
12
26
12
5
62
12


21
108

15
10

197
34
69
23
1,851
7
2,363

26
7
69
5
16
25
29
4
55
5







PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued


[Thousands of long tons]


Fiscal year


EUROPE TO WEST COAST UNITED STATES-
Continued:
Glass and glassware ---------
Groceries, unclassified-------------
Iron and steel manufactures ------
Lumber--------- ------------
Liquors and wines-----------
Machinery ---------------
Marble and stone------- -----
Metals, miscellaneous --------
Nitrate of soda------------------
Paper and paper products -------
Rope and twine------------
Soda and sodium compounds
Woodpulp---------------------__
All other and unclassified ---------
Total -------------------
EUROPE TO WEST COAST CANADA:
Asphalt------------------------
Automobiles and accessories ------
Chemicals, unclassified--------------
Clay, fire and china----------------
Creosote--------- --------
Glass and glassware----------------
Iron and steel manufactures ------
Liquors and wines-----------------
Machinery-----------------------
Metals, miscellaneous ---------
Ore, zinc------------------------
All other and unclassified -------
Total-------------------------
EUROPE TO WEST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/
MEXICO:
Ammonium compounds -
Automobiles and accessories-------
Canned food products ---------
Cement ----------------
Chemicals, unclassified-- ------
Fertilizers, unclassified---- ---
Glass and glassware -----------
Iron and steel manufactures -
Machinery ---------------
Metals, miscellaneous ----------
Paper and paper products -------
Petroleum and products: Fuel-diesel oil-
Phosphate -------------
Potash -------------
Soda and sodium compounds -
All other and unclassified-
Total ----------
EUROPE TO WEST COAST SOUTH AMERICA:
Agricultural implements --------
Ammonium compounds --------
Ammunition and explosives -
Automobiles and accessories
Barley--------------
Bricks and tile ------------


1965 1964 1963 1962


54
7
111
10
53
31
13
35
10
103
5
2
2
152
882

41
13
6
6
12
13
92
8
10
12
7
39
259


45
7
7
5
24
129
7
61
13
4
9
8
7
3
47
376

11
71
4
20
5
5


57
7
175
14
52
22
13
32
2
82
9
2
4
108
853

37
12
6
5
12
87
7
12
12
39
229


47
7
6
25
21
101
6
45
8
8
9
26
3
5
42
359

9
59
4
19
8
3


40
7
155
11
45
21
12
37
7
60
4
1
2
113
769

29
9
6
3
12
13
44
7
8
3
45
179


54
6
6
16
17
85
4
38
7
7
9
21
1
4
42
317

9
89
8
19
14
4


48
8
228
7
44
18
N.A.
50
66
N.A.
2
8
130
850

25
16
5
7
5
7
65
9
9
4
44
196


55
5
5
15
12
84
4
41
7
9
6
12

5
39
299

14
75
N.A.
24
8
3


11351--13







90 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued


[Thousands of long tons]


Fiscal year


EUROPE TO WEST COAST SOUTH AMERICA-
Continued:
Canned food products------------
Cement -------------------
Chemicals, unclassified -- -----
Coal------------ -------------
Coke .----------
Electrical machinery and apparatus -----
Fertilizers, unclassified------ ----
Flour, wheat- ------
Glass and glassware -------------
Grains, unclassified ----------------
Groceries, unclassified ---------
Iron and steel manufactures ------
Machinery __ -- -------
Metals:
Iron------------------------
Miscellaneous ----------------
Oats-----------------
Paints and varnishes---------------
Paper and paper products----------
Petroleum and products: Other and un-
classified-----------------------
Phosphate---------------------- -
Potash--------------------------
Railroad materials -
Rice---------------------------
Slag ------ ------------
Soda and sodium compounds ----
Sugar ---- ----
Textiles--- ----------------
Vegetable oil, miscellaneous-
Wax, paraffin----------
Woodpulp __----------
All other and unclassified-
Total------------------
EUROPE TO HAWAIIAN ISLANDS:
Fertilizers, unclassified
Ores, miscellaneous
Sand ------
All other and unclassified
Total -------------------
EUROPE TO OCEANIA:
Agricultural implements
Ammonium compounds -
Asphalt
Automobiles and accessories-
Beer ----------- -------
Bricks and tile --------------
Canned food products ----------
Cement
Chemicals, unclassified
Clay, fire and china -
Coke ----------------
Electrical machinery and apparatus ---
Fertilizers, unclassified-
Flour, wheat -------------
Floor coverings


1965 1964 1963 1962

18 16 37 40
16 21 27 17
85 71 75 64
4 5 2 2
4 9 1 35
17 14 18 22
61 84 117 118
9 9 22 19
12 15 12 12
5
9 9 8 8
182 193 182 206
69 66 70 64


33
6
5
4
47
3
33
5
7
8
1
32
11
5
5
11
27
122
967


18
8
4
6
59
5
32
13
3
5
37
4
5
4
10
26
123
976


21
5


4 3
59 57
11 9
8 4
10 7
33 32
43 72
5 5
11 6
9 9
18 6
110 141
1,128 1,170


9 5 11
14
3 12 3
12 17 28


9
13
6
74
3
6
8
66
52
11
12
14
10
5


6
6
4
78
3
4
5
56
46
3
10
12
11
4


5
14
4
23

12
8
7
54
7
12
12
47
38
1
43
11
6
11
5