Monthly list of publications

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Monthly list of publications
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United States Department of Agrikulture
I
E*I

MONTHLY LIST OF PUBLICATIONS /

SEPTEMBER 1944 /
REAO CAREFULLY:
.A.y Ire of the nontechnical publications listed herein, unless indi itet "For sale only," may be
obtained free upon application to the United States Department of Agriculture, Washington 25,
D. C., as long as the Department's supply lasts. After this supply is exhausted, publications may
be obtained from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington 25,
D. C., by purchase at the prices stated herein. His office is not a part of the Department of
Agriculture.
Free distribution of technical material and periodicals is restricted.
This monthly list will be sent free on request made to the Office of Information, U. S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture, Washington 25, D. C.
Publications will not be sent free to foreign addresses, except when exchanges of publications
are made. Foreign correspondents should apply to Superintendent of Documents, Government
Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C., enclosing remittance.

AGRICULTURAL WAR INFORMATION SERIES
This new war series is presented in popular style. Each pamphlet deals with some
phase of "win the war" Information, such as food production, conservation, and use; the
care of household and farm equipment; and helpful information on health and nutrition.
Eat Wood breakfast to start a good day. Bureau of Human Nutrition and
vwme Ecomics. Illus. (AWl-107.)
Shall I be a/famer? Paul V. Marits, Farm Security Administration. 34 p., illus.
(AWI-105.)
MISCELLANEOUS PUBLICATIONS
This series includes those publications of a miscellaneous nature which do not fall within
any of the other series issued by the Department.
A consumers' guide to U. S. standards for farm products. Catherine M. Vieh-
mann, Office of Distribution. 21 p., illus. (Miscellaneous Publication 553M1.)
Price 15W.
Family food consumption in the United States. Bureau of Human Nutrition and
HOme Economics in cooperation with the United States Bureau of Labor
Statistics. 157 p., illus. (Miscellaneous Publication 550M.) Price 20.
SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS
Such notices of Judgment, decisions, and instructions as are necessary in the enforce-
ment of regulatory acts are contained in these announcements. They are issued monthly
or as necessary by certain bureaus. Free distribution is limited to persons in the employ
of the Department, to public officials whose duties render it necessary for them to have such
information, to journals especially concerned, and to manufacturers and firms whose
business is affected by the announcements.
Service and regulatory announcements. Bureau of Animal Industry. July 1944.
Pp. 39-44. (S. R. A.-B. A. I. 447.) Price 50 a copy, 250 a year, domestic;
600 a year, foreign.'
TECHNICAL BULLETINS
The Technical Bulletins contain the results of scientific and research work applying to a
special crop, industry, or locality. The editions are limited as they are intended primarily
for scientific workers and subject-matter specialists.
Investigations in erosion control and reclamation of eroded land at the central
Piedmont Conservation Experiment Station, Statesville, N. C, 1930-40.
T. L. Copley, Luke A. Forrest, A. G. McCall, and F. G. Bell, Soil Conservation
Service in cooperation with the North Carolina Agricultural Experiment
Station. 66 p., illus. (Technical Bulletin 873T.) Price 104.

I Payable to the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington
25, D. C.
Compiled by Eleanor W. Clay, Office of Information.
10 612124--44









OTHER PUBLICATIONS
Correspondence style manual. Office of Personnel. 30 p., illus. (Administrative
Series 2.) Distribution to U. S. D. A. employees only.
Let's talk about when Joe comes home and comes back to the farm. Bureau of
Agricultural Economics. (DS 24.) Price 50.1 For discussion leaders only.
List of bulletins of the agricultural experiment stations for the calendar years
1941 and 1942. Compiled by Helen V. Barnes, Library. 70 p. (Bibliographical
Bulletin 4.) Price 154.
Notices of judgment under the Insecticide Act. Nos. 1896-1910. Office of Dis-
tribution. Pp. 589-598. (N. J., I. F. 1896-1910.)
PERIODICALS
Free distribution of periodicals is definitely restricted. They may be obtained by pur-
chase or subscription from the Superintendent of Documents.
The agricultural situation. Vol. 28, No. 9, September 1944. Price 50 a copy, 500
a year, domestic; 700 a year, foreign.'
Agriculture decisions. Vol. 3, No. 7, July 1944. Price 154 a copy; $1.50 a year.'
Bibliography of agriculture. Vol. 5, No. 3, September 1944. 35f a copy, $3.75
a year, domestic; 454 a copy, $4.75 a year, foreign.
Consumers' guide. Vol. X, No. 10, September 1944. Price 50 a copy, 504 a year,
domestic; 700 a year, foreign.1
Crops and markets. Vol 21, No. 3, July 1944. Price 104 a copy, 304 a year,
domestic; 454 a year, foreign. Quarterly.
Experiment station record. Vol. 91, No. 8, September 1944. Price $1.00 per
volume (2 volumes a year) consisting of 6 monthly numbers and index.,
domestic; $1.75 per volume, foreign. Single numbers 154 a copy.
Extension service review. Vol. 15, No. 9, September 1944. Price 104 a copy,
754 a year, domestic; $1.15 a year, foreign.'
Foreign agriculture. Vol. 8, No. 9, September 1944. Price 100 a copy, $1.00 a
year, domestic; $1.60 a year, foreign.
Journal of agricultural research. Price $2.25 a year, domestic; $3.75 a year,
foreign. Each issue, 104, domestic; 20W, foreign. Separates, 54, domestic;
80, foreign.' Not distributed free to individuals.
Of primary interest to agricultural scientists and advanced students only. Issued
In 2 volumes a year of 12 numbers each. Free distribution is limited to certain
libraries and to institutions og departments doing research work.
Separates. A small supply of each separate is given to the originating bureau or
station for its staff, cooperators, and for such other distribution as can be made.
Others Interested may purchase copies from the Superintendent of Documents, Govern-
ment Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C., at 5 each. The Office of Information has
none for general distribution.
Volume 68. Index. January 1-June 15, 1944. Price 54 a copy.'
Vol. 69, No. 5. September 1, 1944. Illus. Contents:
Variation and physiologic specialization in the common scab fungus (Actfinoumuyen scabies)
(Key No. G-1314). L. A. Schbaal.
Acquired Immunity from curly top in tobacco and tomato (Key No. G-1i10). James M.
Wallace.
Vol. 69, No. 6. September 15, 1944. Illus. Contents:
Moisture retention by some Irrigated soils as related to soil-moisture tension (Key No.
G-1309). L. A. Richards and L. R. Weaver.
Deficiency, toxicity, and accumulation of boron in plants (Key No. G-13S00). Frank M.
Eaton.
For the present the policy has been adopted of issuing separates in advance of the Journal
numbers in which they will appear. The following separates are accordingly available
by purchase now.
Analysis of variation in Panicum virgatum (Key No. G-1815). Pp. 327-353, illus., from
Vol. 69, No. 8. Etlar L. Nielsen.
Deficiency, toxicity, and accumulation of boron in plants (Key No. G-1300). Pp. 287-277,
illus., from Vol. 69, No. 6. Frank M. Eaton.

Pn[y:'ble to the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington
25. l ('
2 Thrse may be obtained from the Issuing bureau.









Factors influencing embryonation and survival of eggs of the stomach worm Haemonchus
eontortus (Key No. A-214). Pp. 279-287, illus., from Vol. 69, No. 7. Doys A Shorb.
Regression of insect density on distances from center of dispersion as shown by a study of
the smaller Eurpean elm bark beetle (Key No. K-333). Pp. g99-308 from Vol. 69,
No. 7. F. M. Wadley and D. 0. Wolfenbarger.
The ring rot bacterium in relation to tomato and eggspant (KC Noro, Wis.-147). Pp.
309-825, llus.:, from Vol. 69, No. 8. R. H. Larson. '
Studies on the use of the point-quadrant method of botanical analysis of mixed pasture
vegetation (Key No. Mo.-14). Pp. 289-297, illus., from Vol. 69, No. 7. William B.
Drew.
Land policy review. Fall 1944. Vol. 7, No. 3. 300 a year.1
News for farmer cooperatives. Vol. 11, No. 6, September 1944. Price 104 a
copy, $1.00 a year, domestic.1
Rural electrification news. Vol. 10, No. 1, September 1944. Price 100 a copy,
750 a year, domestic; $1.15 a year, foreign.1
Soil conservation. Vol. X, No. 3, September 1944. Price 100 a copy, $1.00 a
year, domestic; $1.50 a year, foreign.1

"FOR THE SAKE OF AMERICA'S FUTURE"
The Grocer-Consumer Anti-Inflation Campaign
Now Is the time when we must carefully guard against an inflation that would
prevent the return to a peacetime balance between supply and demand. Looking
back over the inflationary experiences which followed World War I, we must
face the fact that the most critical period in our present price control program
may arise in the months just ahead. The time to control living costs is now.
Military victories do not immediately remove the dangers of inflation. Almost
half of the inflation of the World War I period occurred AFTER THE ARM-
ISTICE. For 20 months after World War I prices rose faster than during the
war.
Thanks to the amazing production of American farmers and the cooperation
of the majority of food manufacturers, wholesalers, retail growers and house-
wives and thanks to the unstinting patriotic efforts of local War Price and
Rationing Board volunteers, food prices in this war have been controlled far
more effectively than in World War I. Today America has a firm grip on food
prices. So long as there are any wartime scarcities and so long as large portions
of our income comes from war production, heavy price pressures will remain.
These pressures continue to be a serious threat to the economic security of
American families and of the food industry. The grocery trade, women's organ-
izations, and OPA, have cooperatively planned a nation wide series of GROCER-

Payable to the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington
25, D. C.





Indicate below, by numbers IN NUMERICAL ORDER, bulletins required. List no more than
five publications. If more are desired, please apply to Superintendent of Documents, Government
Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C., enclosing remittance to cover cost of publication. In order
to assure prompt delivery detach this frank and return in stamped envelope to United States
Department of Agriculture, Office of Information, Washington 25, D. C.
Individuals residing in foreign countries will be required to furnish remittance for the cost of
the publications selected, plus postage, amounting to one-third of the cost of the publications.
Requests for change of address must show old as well as new addresses. Be sure to write your
name and address plainly on reverse side of this form.

BuFarmers' AWI All others
Bulletins









KEEP THIS LIST. FREE SUPPLY OF SOME OF THE PUBLICATIONS
ORDERED MAY BECOME EXHAUSTED BY THE TIME YOUR REQUEST
REACHES US. IF YOU CARE TO PURCHASE SEE INSTRUCTIONS ON
ORDERING AT THE BEGINNING OF THIS LIST.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

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CONSUMER ANTI-INFLATION DRIVES for October, November and December
of 1944. The theme is "LET'S ALL TEAM UP TO KEEP PRICES DOWN FOR
THE SAKE OF AMERICA'S FUTURE."
Reticence on the part of both grocer and customer on the whole subject of .i
ceiling prices is unquestiomably the most difficult problem we have to face in
getting compliance with retail food price control. The average housewife, either
because of insufficient knowledge of her rights and her responsibilities or because
of fear of embarrassment or petty reprisals, does not check and question prices
freely and candidly.
While the vast majority of grocers are perfectly honest and willing to comply
with the regulations, they hesitate to invite questions about ceiling prices and
often fail to post ceiling price lists where they can be seen easily by the greatest
number of people at the most opportune time, in spite of the abvious merchandis-
ing advantages of doing so. The result is that many overcharges, intentional or
otherwise, go uncorrected.
As long as this reticence exists, it seems apparent that we cannot count on
adequate support of the food price control compliance program on the part of
either consumers or grocers. THE JOB IS TO OVERCOME THAT RETICENCE.
GROCERS are conducting a nation wide drive to do three things:
1. Be sure that all of their prices are at, or below, ceilings.
2. Post ceiling price lists where they can be read easily by the public.
3. Display store posters and run advertisements inviting customers to use the
ceiling price lists and frankly ask questions about apparent overcharges.
WOMEN'S ORGANIZATIONS are asking their members to:
1. Use copies of "ANTI-INFLATION GROCERY LIST" to compare the prkQes
of their regular grocery purchases with the prices on the official ceiling price lists
displayed in grocery stores.
2. Question grocers frankly about apparent overcharges and commend them
when their price lists are well posted and all prices are at, or below, ceiling.
3. For the protection of the vast majority of honest grocers, report uncorrected
overcharges to the Price Panel of War Price and Rationing Boards.
Local War Price and Rationing Boards will be glad to assist local grocers,
organizations, and individuals wishing to participate in this campaign.
The Department of Agriculture is asking all state and local agricultural
agencies to cooperate with local GROCER-CONSUMER ANTI-INFLATION
CAMPAIGNS. All of Agriculture's Food Fights for Freedom media will be
devoted to this campaign during October, November, and December "FOR THE 7:
SAKE OF AMERICA'S FUTURE."












U. 8. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PENAWTY FO PIUVATI US 2O
OFFICE OF INFORMATION AVOID PAYMENT 01 POSTAL, 01 0
WASHINGTON 25, D. .
a

I
OFFICIAL BUSINESS


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