Monthly list of publications

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Monthly list of publications
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i United States Department of Agriculture

MONTHLY LIST OF PUBLICATIONS
.%.. SEPTEMBER 1943

l i Any five of the nontechnical publications listed herein, unless indicated "For sale only," may
V: .. b oe obtained free upon application to the United States Department of Agriculture Washington,
M C., as long am the Departments' supply lasts. After this supply is exhausted, publications
Aaie be obtained from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Wash-
lM a lton, D. C., by purchase at the prices stated herein. His office is not a part of the Department
... a,. i t Agriculture.
F .. ree distribution of technical material and periodicals is restricted.
i: This monthly list will be sent free on request made to the Office of Information. U. S.
.| Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
Publications will not be sent free to foreign addresses, except when exchanges of pub-
S lications are made. Foreign correspondents should apply to Superintendent of Documents,
V Washington, D. C., enclosing remittance, plus postage.
-'" FARMERS' BULLETINS
t" 'Marketing poultry. Rob R. Slocum, Food Distribution Administration. 40 p.,
illus. (F. B. 1377F., rev.) Price 100.
:. Terracing for soil and water conservation. C. L. Hamilton, Soil Conservation
: Service. 60 p., illus. (F. B. 1789F., rev.) Price 10.
i: A B C's of mending. Clarice L. Scott and Bess Viemont Morrison, Bureau of
'* Human Nutrition and Home Economics. 23 p., illus. (F. B. 1925F., rev.)
!... Price 100.
r." Preservation of vegetables by salting or brining. John L. Etchells, Bureau
|a.., of Agricultural and Industrial Chemistry, Raleigh, N. C.; and Ivan D. Jones,
", Department of Horticulture, North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Sta-
H' tion, Raleigh, N. C. 14 p., illus. (F. B. 1932F.) Price 50.
...Tomato diseases. S. P. Doolittle, Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils, and Agri-
cultural Engineering. 83 p., illus. (F. B. 1934F.) Price 150.
.. TECHNICAL BULLETINS
** .. Experiments with oils and lime-sulphur for the control of the San Jose scale
.:" .on peach trees in the South. Oliver I. Snapp and J. R. Thomson, Jr.,
; ... .. Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. 12 p. (T. B. 852T.) Price 5*.
-:^-,. CIRCULARS
Harvest sprays for the control of fruit drop. L. P. Batjer, Bureau of Plant
Industry, Soils, and Agricultural Engineering. 16 p., illus. (Cir. 685C.)
S. Price 50.
MISCELLANEOUS PUBLICATIONS
: Changes in the National Poultry Improvement Plan. Prepared by specialists
... of the Bureau of Animal Industry, Agricultural Research Administration, in
> cooperation with delegates from participating States at the 1942 conference,
tl and the Emergency Executive Committee at its 1943 meeting. 7 p. (Sup. rev.,
to M. P. 300, rev. 1941). 50.
il:i 0 Swine breeding research at the Regional Swine Breeding Laboratory. W. A.
:40i Craft, Bureau of Animal Industry, in cooperation with the agricultural
-:" : '. ^ experiment stations of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minne-
.... sota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and
'.* Wisconsin. 14 p., Illus. (M. P. 523M.) Price 50.

.. SOIL SURVEYS
2'. ". New Hampshire, Coos County. (No. 5, Series 1987). 99 p., illus. Price 850.
m'I,,.:"i 6539360-43



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2

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS
Quarantine and other official announcements. Announcements relating to
Japanese beetle quarantine No. 48. Service and regulatory announcements.
April-June 1943. Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. Pp. 17-24.
(S. R. A.-B. E. P. Q. 155).'
OTHER PUBLICATIONS


BAE Ext Flier-7.


Soybeans go to war. Folder.


5. American farmers and the United Nations Conference on Food and Agricul-
ture. The Farmer and the War. Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
12 p. Price 51.


Lunch at school. War Food Administration. (NFC-9).
Report on the agricultural experiment stations, 1942.
Price 200.


Folder.
J. T. Jardine.


The tenth annual report of the Farm Credit Administration, 1942.
119 p., illus. Price 20W (paper).'


Forage for fall
Engineering.


122 p.


A. G. Black.


AGRICULTURAL WAR INFORMATION
feeding. Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils, and Agricultural
(AWI-62). Folder.


Preparing
tural


home-grown vegetables and
and Industrial Chemistry.


fruits for freezing.
(AWI-63). Folder.


Bureau of Agricul-


Why feed the insects? Extension Service and Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine. (AWI-64). Folder.


Cut victory timber but cut it wisely.
(AWI-66). Folder.


Forest Service and Extension Service.


Legume cover crops to boost production in the South. Roland McKee,
of Plant Industry, Soils, and Agricultural Engineering. (AWI-67).


PERIODICALS
Free distribution of periodicals is definitely restricted.
or subscription from the Superintendent of Documents.


Agricultural situation.
Price 50 a copy; 50W


They may be obtained by purchase


Vol. 27, No. 8, August 1943; No. 9, September 1943.
a year, domestic; 70c a year, foreign.2


Bibliography of agriculture. Vol. 3, No. 3, September 1943. Limited free dis-
tribution. 350 a copy; $3.75 a year, domestic; 450 a copy; $4.75 a year,
foreign.'


Consumers' Guide. Vol. 9, No. 10. September 1943.
50 a copy, 500 a year, domestic; 700, foreign.'


Limited free distribution.


Experiment station record. Vol. 89, No. 4, October 1943. Price $1 per volume
(2 volumes a year) consisting of 6 monthly numbers and index; $1.75 per
volume, foreign. Single numbers for sale only. Price 150.'
Extension service review. Vol. 14, No. 9, September 1943. Illus. Price 104
a copy; $1.00 a year, domestic; $1.40 a year, foreign.'
Foreign agriculture. Vol. 7, No. 9, September 1943. Illus. Price 104 a copy;
$1.00 a year, domestic; $1.60 a year, foreign.'
Journal of agricultural research. Price $3.25 a year, domestic; $4.75 a year,
foreign. Each issue, 150, domestic; 20, foreign. Separates, 51, domestic;
80 foreign.' Not distributed free to individuals.
Of primary interest to agricultural scientists and advanced students only. Issue
in 2 volumes a year of 12 numbers each. Free distribution is limited to certain libraries
and to Institutions or departments doing research work.
Separates. A small supply of each separate is given to the originating bureau or
station for its staff, cooperators. and for such other distribution as can be nMade.
Others interested may purchase copies from the Superintendent of Documents. Wash-
ington, D. C.. at 5* each. The Office of Information has none for general distribution.
I These may be obtained from the issuing bureau.
I Payable to the Superintendent of Documents. Government Printing Office. Washington,
D.C.
I May be obtained from Farm Credit Adnministration. Kansas City, Mo.


Bureau
Folder.








Indicate below, by numbers IN NUMERICAL ORDER, bulletins desired. In order to assure
prompt delivery detach this frank and return in stamped envelope to United States Department
of Agriculture, Office of Information, Washington, D. C. List no more than five publications.
H more are desired, please apply to Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office,
Washington, D. C., enclosing remittance to cover cost of publication. Foreign correspondents
should include postage with their remittance. Requests for change of address must show old
as well as new address.
Before to write your name and address plainly on reverse side of this form.
Farmers'
Bulletins AWl Other publications











- Vol. 66, Index. January 1-June 15, 1943.
- Vol. 67, No. 6. September 15, 1948. Illus. Contents:
Type of seed formation as indicated by the nature and extent of variation in Kentucky
bluegrass, and its practical implications (G-1285). William H. Brittingham.
Cleistogamy and the development of the embryo sac in Lespedeza stipulacea (G-1291).
Clarence H. Hanson.
Land policy review. Vol. 6, No. 3, for Fall 1943. Price 104 a copy; 30 a
year, domestic; 454 a year, foreign.2 Quarterly.
News for farmer cooperatives. Vol. 10, No. 5, August; No. 6, September, 1943.
Price 104 a copy; $1.00 a year, domestic.'
Rural electrification news. Vol. 9, No. 1, September 1943. Price 104 a copy;
750 a year, domestic; $1.50 a year, foreign.2
Soil conservation. Vol. 9, No. 8, September 1943. Price 104 a copy; $1 a year.
domestic; $1.50 a year, foreign.'

FOOD FOR FREEDOM MONTH
The month of November has been designated as "Food For Freedom Month"
as part of a long-range educational program on food sponsored by the War
Food Administration in cooperation with the Office of War Information, the
Office of Price Administration, and the War Advertising Council.
The "Food Fights For Freedom" program is essentially a program of helping
people to understand why it is important for each individual to produce, con-
serve, share, and play square with food. The program erects a background
of, general information on the food situation, so that people will have a better
understanding of why they are being asked to meet farm goals, grow Victory
Gardens, can food at home, eat the right food, and not waste food.
It is vitally essential that all Americans continue to do all of the things
necessary to make food fight, and in the belief that they will do so if they have
the facts, November will signalize the opening of an educational program to
bring to every man, woman and child the facts about our food.
The facts about our food supply which every American should know include
facts about the amount of food we produce, the amount of food that goes to
civilians, the armed services and our allies, the effect of increased purchasing
power on our food supply, the amount of food wasted every year, the necessity
for rationing and price control, and the need for being ready to accept constant
change in our diet. a
If every American gains a deeper appreciation of these facts, he will be in a
position to take these actions more readily:
1. Produce more foods of the right kinds.
2. Conserve food, avoid waste.
& Eat the right foods.
4. Substitute plentiful for scarce foods.
5. Share food cheerfully. Accept no rationed foods without giving up ration
stamps.
Payable to the Superintendent of Documents. Government Printing Office, Washington,
D.C.
May be obtained from Farm Credit Administration, Kansas City. Mo.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

IIII3 IIII112 I 0801IIIII02iliIIIII111
3 1262 08903 8102


U. & DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
OFFICE OF INFORMATION
WASHINGTON, D. C.

OFFICIAL BUSINESS


PfNART T rOl PRIVAT3f U TO
AVOmD PAYMENT Or POXM%4 S


Nane --......... ....
Rural Route or Street No.------..... .---- ---- -__._-
City or Town9.....
State t-t-

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6. Help keep food costs down by paying only legal prices.
7. Take part in community food projects by serving on the nutrition com-
mittee, the ration board, the Victory Garden Club, or the community
canning center.
The task of educating people in the reasons why they need to take these actions
gets under way in November through the newspapers, magazines, radio stations,
outdoor-advertising facilities, and the governmental and private community
organizations.
All of these facilities will concentrate on the job of giving people more back-
ground information on food, and will ask people to help make food fight for
freedom by doing these our things:
1. Study the facts about the use of American food In wartime.
2. Help in the task of making each Individual In the community conscious
of the role he or she can play in the battle of food by taking on the
responsibility of acquainting them with the facts about food. The
citizens' food information committees include community service mem-
bers of the War Price and Ration Boards, Nutrition Committee chair-
men and Consumer Interest Committee chairman of the Local Defense
Councils. Guided by Information available In the Community Mobiliza-
tion Handbook, these people will organize citizens' food committees to
undertake the educational job on food. They will be vitally In need
of help.
3. Pick up at the nearest retail food store and post in the kitchen a copy
of the official pin-up chart which will serve as a daily reminder.
4. Make this Thanksgiving more of an occasion for expressing gratitude for
our food and giving thanks that there is enough food to fight fr
freedom.

AVAILABLE PUBLICATIONS RELATING TO
"FOOD FIGHTS FOR FREEDOM" PROGRAM


AWI-2.
AWI-3.
AWI-16.
AWI-34.
AWlI-47.
AWI-54.


Vitamins from farm to you.
Fight food waste in the home.
Cheese in your meals.
Fats in wartime meals.
Dried peas and beans In wartime meals.
Green vegetables In wartime meals.


, OVEIEEUIT PaInIEnr iPPJIi tMf


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