Service and regulatory announcements

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Title:
Service and regulatory announcements
Physical Description:
v. : ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Animal Industry
Publisher:
Govt. Print. Off.
Place of Publication:
Washington
Frequency:
monthly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Meat inspection   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Summary:
Contains Insecticide decisions and Notices of judgment under the Insecticide Act formerly issued only as a separate publication, now published in both forms.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format
Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
No. 81 (1914)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004884120
oclc - 17762165
sobekcm - AA00005308_00017
Classification:
lcc - HD9000.9.U5 A14
ddc - 630.61
System ID:
AA00005308:00118

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Preceded by:
Service announcements


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C*- T EAC PF ANIMAL IND V1
pl!:" *''JOHN R. MOHLER, CHIEF OF BUE: .



V .ICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS.

MAY, 1919.

..**:*iii *,:,, ,..'::*i:,."*

[This publication is Issued monthly for the dissemination of information, instructions.
: lings, etc., concerning the work of the Bureau of Animal Industry. Free distribution is
S mited to persons in the service of the bureau, establishments at which the Federal meat
a'p&cfton'is conducted, public officers whose duties make it desirable for them to have
': IM information, and journals especially concerned. Others desiring copies may obtain
,. ut: from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington,
D.C.,at 5 cents each, or 50 cents a year. A supply will be sent to each official in charge
of a,station or branch of the bureau service, who should promptly distribute copies to
A:libers of his force. A file should be kept at each station for reference.]
"" ,* .t '


CONTENTS.


Tie value of cooperation among em-
ee.........------..------------
, haqges: in directory-------------
Notices regarding meat inspection_
s: troy 'the fly --- ----
A lnals slaughtered under Federal
m:.aMiat inspection -- _------..
Iqpo ts of food animals and of
meats and meat food products-....
t'oil of honor-------------------
Dertment of Agriculture War
XA. norial--------------------
nspqction and testing of animals for
.Canada ---------------
ifcenses for veterinary biological
Spriiddnct -----------.........
'Results of. prosecutions for violations
of laws ........-----------.
Permitted dip------------------
Congressional increase of compensa-
tion ------------


Page.

47
49
50
50

51

51
51

52

52

52

53
53

53


Dismissal and furlough of employees.
Leave that may be granted to em-
ployees returning from military
service------------------------
Domestic telegraph rates increased--
Instructions regarding Form T-15-_
Payment of gratuity or tip in
Georgia ------------
Amendments to Administrative and
Fiscal Regulations ------------..
Status of tick eradication in various
States, April, 1919 ---------.--
Summary of tuberculosis-eradication
work in cooperation with the vari-
ous States, April, 1919 ---------.
Publications in May --------
Organization of the Bureau of Ani-
mal Industry ------------


THE VALUE OF COOPERATION AMONG EMPLOYEES.

By T. P. WHITE, Veterinary Inspector, Division of Hog-Cholera Control.

SThb high standard of bureau efficiency in the past and its status to-day as a
public institution has been made possible largely through-the loyalty and steady
iendiavors of the employees themselves, their willingness to obey instructions,
the lt uftitng efforts in advancing the bureau policies, and the mutual help
S 121340-19 47
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Page.
54


55
55
55

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48 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY. tlap.

offered one another in their daily contact. In the administration of .rles and
regulations, in the application and adaptation of necessary discipline, in tbhe.
discharge of official duties there has been, generally, a degree of uniform atti-
tude of good will and an eagerness to live up to the demands made upon them In : .
the various assignments. For this, of course, the officials intrusted with the:P
conduct of affairs are grateful.
We are entering upon an era in which cooperation and good will must con-'.'
tinue to be the watchwords. The work in which we are engaged is one of ..
mutual interest; the public functions which we perform for the welfare of the I
national health and wealth are of the greatest importance, and therefore it. s In
essential that there continue to obtain that full measure of cooperation among ..
employees that the bureau isr offering to and asking from other public institu-
tions. ,,
Relation Between Superior and Subordinate.

Perhaps the most important factor in the interest of harmony and for the .
good of administrative work is friendly relations between superior and subordi- :
nate. It is recognized more and more that the successful supervisor or the ::
most efficient inspector in charge is the one who understands human nature and I
who can gain and retain, in a legitimate way, the confidence and respect of those
under his supervision. Giving advice or administering discipline may not always
be pleasant, but the knowledge on the part of subordinates that these duties are ,
discharged on the part of the superior with a broad-minded view of impartiality '
and not tinged with a personal feeling will often make the task less difficult and :
more effective. *,.
A rebuke for perfunctory work, which can be delivered personally with a "H
mixture of friendly interest, will do more to rectify misguided action than a
dozen written reprimands. This applies, of course, when offenses are not of so .
serious a nature as to form a part of the official record. The friendly smile and
nod of recognition to the subordinate from the inspector in charge, the super-
visor, and particularly the traveling inspector or the visitor from the Washing- m
ton office, whether in the stock pen, the killing floor, the field, or the ,
office will lighten the burden, bridge the gap, and stimulate efforts for most I
efficient service. The visit of supervision by any of the above-named officials
should be in a spirit of friendly cooperation and not primarilyto detect faults
in individual employees. The sooner the subordinate is assured of this, the 3.
sooner will the danger of possible distrust and fear be eliminated. Those in-
vested with supervisory powers, intrusted with investigational duties, or in
charge of projects should make courtesy a part of their official work among
subordinates.
Relation Among Employees of the Same Class.

The spirit of cooperation, especially, should form one of the strongest bonds of
association among fellow workers. No employee can afford to stand aloof and "
refrain from entering into mutual exchange of ideas pertaining to the work.
Each one of us at some time or other needs assistance from some one else, regard-
less of position or standing. This is of special significance in the case of new
employees assigned to a station. Their scientific knowledge of technical subjects
may be of a high degree, but there may be lacking that practical training neces-
sary to the particular line of duties involved. The instruction and assistance J01
given by older employees to those newly assigned should be offered in a broad ,'
spirit of cooperation, avoiding all action or word that might lead to suggested
superiority, bearing in mind always that the situation was reversed, perhaps, a
few years before. It is always well, of course, to impress newcomers with the. :"
H All







* .1919.] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS. 49

importance of their work, the loyalty they owe to their bureau, and the responsi-
bilities resting upon them; but these things can be done in such a friendly and
diplomatic way as to engender brotherly feeling. Sympathy in adversity, for-
bearance in cases of slow adaptability, and praise for work well done will do
wonders in creating an atmosphere of congeniality and bringing about a response
in services of a higher grade. In return the receiver of such favors should show
the proper degree of appreciation and so apply the knowledge thus obtained that
a measure of satisfaction and credit will revert to the instructor responsible for
the training.
Cooperation Among Employees of Various Classes.

We should hold to the fundamental thought that we are all bureau employees.
Each employee is classed and assigned according to his ability to discharge cer-
tain duties and perform certain work for which he is peculiarly adapted by reason
of education, training, or practical experience. His services are as valuable in a
special line as those of others in different lines. There is thus a dovetailing of
the functions of each class of employees essential to the harmonious and efficient
conduct of the bureau work as a whole.
As fellow workers all employees are entitled to mutual consideration and
courtesy. A difference of salary, of title, of activities, or of rank should not
constitute the right to assume a superior attitude or demand special recognition
or privilege. In this day there is no place in any part of official life for any
degree of snobbishness. What democracy has brought about for the small as
well as the great nations of the world, namely, equality of opportunity for all,
is a very good motto to recognize and adopt, whether engaged in official duties,
in private enterprise, or in any other pursuit of life.


CHANGES IN DIRECTORY.
Meat Inspection Inaugurated.
3-AY. Swift & Co., 2707 Minnesota Avenue, Billings, Mont.
75-A. Indian Packing Co., 643 Elmwood Avenue, Providence, R. I.
254. The International Preserving Corporation, Cypress Avenue and Wierfield
Street, Brooklyn, N. Y.
415. Lederle Antitoxin Laboratories, Middletown Road, Pearl River, N. Y.
243. American Buffalo Conserve (Inc.), 6414 Third Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y.
Meat Inspection Discontinued.
997. Baton Rouge Abattoir, Baton Rouge, La.
92. What Cheer Chemical Co., Pawtucket, R. I.
808. Purdue University Agricultural Experiment Station, La Fayette, Ind.
Meat Inspection Temporarily Suspended.
99. Burnham & Morrill Co., East Deering, Me.
255. Merrell-Soule Co., Syracuse, N. Y.
485. Thomas Harris, New York, N. Y.
985. J. T. Polk Co., Greenwood, Ind.
164. The Greeneville Packing Co., Greeneville, Tenn.
Changes of Officials in Charge.
Bridgeport, Conn., Mr. Fred Hern instead of Mr. J. F. Riemer.
Albert Lea, Minn., Dr. Chas. E. Schneider instead of Dr. G. W. Knorr.
Fort Worth, Texas, Dr. L. G. Combs instead of Dr. L. E. Epple.
Oklahoma, Okla., Dr. C. F. Harrington instead of Dr. J. P. O'Connor.




K


2-MM Armour & Co., 109 Berkeley Street, Boston, Mass.,
Warren Avenue, Boston, Mass.


instead of 27-29


Changes in Names of Official Establishments.

138-A Swift & Co., and Union Meat Co., Fourth and Glisan Streets, Portland,
Oreg., instead of the Union Meat Co.
408 Acorn Packing Co., 4118-4122 Ludlow Street, Philadelphia, Pa., instead of
New England Supply Co.
Note.

Beginning June 1, 1919, Dr. Robert Jay, Nashville, Tenn., will have charge
of tuberculosis eradication and stockyard work in addition to hog-cholera
control work.

NOTICE REGARDING MEAT INSPECTION

DESTROY THE FLY.

Inspectors and establishment officials should continue a vigorous campaign
against flies. A thorough survey of the premises of official establishments
should be made from time to time and all fly-breeding material removed at
least once in 3 days or otherwise properly disposed of. Thorough screening
of all external openings, such as doors, windows, ventilators, skylights, etc.,
is necessary to exclude flies. Fly screen not larger than 20 mesh to the inch
is required to keep skipper flies from passing through. An ample supply of
properly baited flytraps should be constantly employed. Directions for mak-
ing an efficient flytrap may be found on page 2 of Service and Regulatory An-
nouncements of January, 1916.


mA


50 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY. [LW,

Stations Added.

Columbia, S. C., hog-cholera control work, Dr. W. E. White, 801 Union National
Bank Building.
Pearl River, New York, meat inspection, Dr. John P. O'Leary, post-office box
586.
Charlestown, W. Va., tuberculosis eradication, Dr. G. W. Neff, care State corn
missioner of agriculture.
Baltimore, Md., tuberculosis eradication, Dr. T. A. Ladson, care Maryland
State board of agriculture, Fidelity Building.

Stations Discontinued.

Baton Rouge, La. (substation of New Orleans, La.).
Syracuse, N. Y. (substation of Buffalo, N. Y.).
Greenwood, Ind. (substation of Indianapolis, Ind.).
Clarksburg, W. Va., Dr. W. R. Van Ness.
Greeneville, Tenn. (substation of Morristown, Tenn.).
Denver, Colo., Dr. C. F. Harrington.

Change in Address of Official Establishmeat.






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919.]


SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS.


ANIMALS SLAUGHTERED UNDER FEDERAL MEAT INSPECTION,
APRIL, 1919.


Station. Cattle. Calves. Sheep. Goats. Swine.

Chicago ................................. 141,251 87,463 223,587 1,338 572,596
Fort Worth................................. 33,926 10, 904 23,522 2,332 51,625
Kansas City................................. 71,182 17,812 109,722 6,289 269 101
National Stock Yards....................... 30,577 11,537 21,490 283 147,770
Omaha...................................... 56,024 5,760 110,072" 500 227,774
St. Louis.................................... 11,142 2,916 3 025 .......... 127 146
Sioux City .................................. 20724 3,718 11:117 261 105,999
South St. Joseph ........................... 22,477 5,548 69,773 10 137,804
All other establishments.................... 234,820 237,771 235,443 258 1,567,856
Total: April, 1919 ...................... 622,123 383,429 807,751 11,271 3,207,671
April, 1918 ....................... 914,899 351,387 613,814 5,182 3,290,489
10 months ended April, 1919...... 0,876,844 2,955,878 9,442,565 107.987 36,926,696
10 months ended April, 1918...... 9,326,970 2,653,367 7,373,136 117,711 29,573,731


IMPORTS OF FOOD ANIMALS AND OF MEATS AND MEAT FOOD
PRODUCTS.

The statements following show the imports of food animals and of meats and
meat food products inspected by the Bureau of Animal Industry during April,
1919, with figures for other periods for comparison.

Imports of food animals.

Country of export. Cattle. Swine. Sheep. Goats.

Mexico......................................................... 10,270 .......... 5,639 345
Canada........................................................ 22,971 727 543 .........
Total: April, 1919........................................ 33,241 727 6,182 345
April, 1918 .......................................... 23,614 12 2,907 502
10 months ended April, 1919 ....................... 382,085 23,503 172,100 24,236
10 months ended April, 1918....................... 243,170 13,589 147,712 21,886


Imports of meat and meat food product..

Fresh and refrigerated. Canned Other Total
Country of export. Beef. Other. and cured. products. weight.

Pounds. Pounds. Pounds. Pounds. Pounds.
Argentina................................. ............ ............ 8,319,182 6,576 8,325,758
Brazil..................................... ............ ............ 1,993,546 ............ 1,993,546
Canada.................................. 1,932,378 2,875,986 716,979 1,216,570 6,741,913
Uruguay .................................. ............ ............ 1,237,834 ............ 1,237,834
Other countries .......................... 655,708 1,119,817 12,334 130,084 1,917,943
Total: April, 1919 .................... 2,588,086 3,995, 803 12, 279,875 1,35.3,230 20,216,994
April, 1918...................... 680,122 509,288 7,2S6,701 509,824 8,985,935
10 months ended April 1919..... 27,673,105 7,933,377 126,624,348 6,372,OS1 168,602,911
10 months ended April, 1918.... 16,498,985 4,918,682 19,702,640 10,905,045 52,025,352

Condemned in April, 1919: Beef, 56,086 pounds; pork, 600 pounds; total, 56,686 pounds. Refused entry:
Pork, 1,000 pounds.
ROLL OF HONOR.

The following are the names of former bureau employees who were granted
leave to enter the military service of the United States and who have since died
while in that service. Their names are recorded as an addition to those pub-
lished in Service and Regulatory Announcements for November, 1918, page 96,
December, 1918, page 103, January, 1919, page 5, and March, 1919, page 25:
Wilfred Cote, of Illinois, lay inspector, appointed in the bureau November
19, 1917, entered the military service April 30, 1918, and was killed in action
November 4, 1918.








52 NURAU OF ANIMAL LDUSTEY. [ .

Walter A. Byron, of Massachusetts, lay inspector, appointed in the buriu n I
September 5, 1917, entered the military service June 20, 1918, and died of pneu-
monia while on foreign duty October 1, 1918.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WAR MEMORIAL.

The success of the Department of Agriculture War Memorial is now assured.
The Bureau of Animal Industry leads all the other bureaus in the department k
the amount pledged and we should be very proud that we have responded si
well to the opportunity presented.
All those who have not subscribed are urged to do so, as still more money in
needed in order to make the memorial what it should be. Let us not consider
the job completed, but continue the good work. It will facilitate matters
greatly if the various stations of the bureau will forward, as soon as convenient,
the sums pledged but not yet paid. So far only about two-thirds of the amount
pledged has been paid in.
Make checks payable to Ernest Kelly, Dairy Division, or to the Department .
of Agriculture War Memorial Committee.


INSPECTION AND TESTING OF ANIMALS FOR CANADA.

The following changes have been made in the list of practicing veterinarians
registered by the bureau and authorized to inspect and test with mallein horses,
mules, and asses intended for export to Canada.
Name Added to List.

Dr. A. F. Knowles, BilliDgs, Mont.
Name Removed from List.

Dr. H. D. Gill, New York, N. Y.


LICENSES FOR VETERINARY BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS.

The following changes have been made in the list of licensetsfor the manu-
facture of veterinary biological products for the year 1919 under the act of
Congress of March 4, 1913 (37 Stat, 832), and the regulations made thereader
(B. A. I. Order 196 and amendment):

Licenses issued.

License Date. Name and address of firm. Products.


1919
9 May 3 Lederle Antitoxin Laboratories, Mid. Atihog-cholera serum; hog-cholera virus.
dletown Road, Pearl River, N. Y.
132 May 28 University of Illinois, Urbana Ill.... Botulinus antitoxin.
130 May 24 J. C. Swan-Wlliamson Co., s1 Nerth Bovine eontagioue-absrtimn baitet; bEop
Capitol Avenue, Indianapolis, Ind. hemorrhagiosepticemia bacteria; bovine
streptococcusiamstdtis bacteria; bowlasWHil
se ur mixed bactefin; anerem
mixed bacteria; equne-distemper b
equine infnuensa-pneumnts aiteE baet .be |l
equine navel-infection mixed bacteria;
equine staphylMoooseus als and sunem tai
terin; equine astph-.trepcoi bacterm ied- i
infection bacteria (swine); sVwfh-p a ::
bacteria.

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SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS.


.53


RESULTS OF PROSECUTIONS FOR VIOLATIONS OF LAWS.

S .Penalties have been imposed in prosecutions for violations of regulatory laws,
as reported to the bureau, as follows:
Live-Stock Quarantine Laws.
Wells Fargo & Co., $100 fine and $24.25 costs.
Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Co. (3 cases), $300 fines and $57.20
S fines.
Seaboard Air Line Railway, $100 fine and $17.05 costs.
Southern Railway Co., $100 fine.
Twenty-Eight-Hour Law.
Kansas City Southern Railway Co., $100 fine and $19.32 costs.
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co., $100 fine and $17.73 costs.
Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Co. (7 cases), $800 fines and $113.09
costs.
Louisville & Nashville Railroad Co. (6 cases), $600 fines and $42.90 costs.
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Co. (2 cases), $200 fines and $35 costs.
Adams Express Co. (22 cases), $2,100 fines and $290.30 costs.
New York Central Railroad Co. (47 cases), $7,850 fines and $281.98 costs.
Seaboard Air Line Railway Co. (2 cases), $200 fines and $39.10 costs.
Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis Railway Co. (5 cases), $500 fines
and $14.01 costs.
Pennsylvania Railroad Co. (6 cases), $675 fines and $17.70 costs.
Philadelphia & Reading Railway Co. (2 cases), $9.40 costs.
Meat-Inspection Law.
William Menges, Lakehurst, N. J., $5 fine.


PERMITTED DIP.
For Cattle for Ticks.
"Rogers Tick-Dip D," an arsenical dip, is permitted by the department in the
official dipping of cattle for ticks. The dilution for the official dipping of cattle
for interstate movement is 1 gallon of the dip to not more than 127 gallons of
water, which will yield a solution containing not less than 0.22 per cent actual
arsenious oxid.

CONGRESSIONAL INCREASE OF COMPENSATION.
The following instructions relative to claiming congressional increase of com-
pensation at the rate of $240 per annum will be observed in connection with the
preparation and submission of pay rolls and salary vouchers for the fiscal year
beginning July 1, 1919.
Increase of compensation at the rate of $240 per annum will be claimed for
each employee who received, or was entitled to receive, the congressional in-
crease at the rate of $120 per annum on or prior to June 30, 1919.
Increase of compensation at the rate of 60 per cent instead of 30 per cent of
basic salary will be claimed for each employee whose basic salary is at a rate
less than $400 per annum, who received, or was entitled to receive, the congres-
sional increase on or prior to June 30, 1919.
In each case where an employee, receiving a salary of not less than $400 and
not more than $2,500 per annum, entered the service of the bureau on or before
June 30, 1918, and has not since received the congressional increase by reason of


,1919.]1








BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY.


the fact that he entered the service after June 30, 1917, or by reason of his
having received an increase in basic salary in excess of $200 per annum since
that date, the $240 congressional increase of compensation will be claimed for
such an employee provided the increase in basic salary in excess of $200 became
effective on or before June 30, 1918, and provided further he is not a cooperative
employee receiving part of his pay from any outside source. The same instruc-
tions will apply to employees receiving less than $400 per annum to whom the 60
per cent instead of 30 per cent increase is to be paid.
The congressional increase will not be claimed for any employee who entered
the service after June 30, 1918, nor for any employee whose salary has been
increased in excess of $200 since that date unless he has been duly certified
therefore by the Secretary.
In cases of employees promoted or increased in salary in excess of $200
during the year beginning July 1, 1919, but who were at any time previously
certified, it is not necessary that they be certified again, and the congressional
increase will be claimed for them.
Employees receiving a salary of more than $2,500 and less than $2,740 per
annum are entitled to sufficient congressional increase to make their total com-
pensation $2,740 per annum provided they come within the classes above
referred to. Examples:
Salary $2,560 plus $180 congressional increase of compensation........ $2,740
Salary $2,600 plus $140 congressional increase of compensation --------... 2,740
Salary $2,700 plus $40 congressional increase of compensation --------- 2,740
All congressional increase of compensation except that of employees com-
missioned to use their automobiles and which is included in the total salary
rate specified in their commissions will be entered on rolls and salary vouchers
separated from basic salary in the column and space provided thereon for the
purpose.
Employees whose rate of total compensation now includes basic salary, con-
gressional increase, and allowance for automobile or other conveyance, will be
changed by the bureau to include the $240 instead of $120 congressional in-
crease and inspectors in charge, until further advised, will claim salary for
them on their pay rolls accordingly.
It is clearly not the purpose of Congress to provide that every employee
without exception should be given the $240 increase of compensation; other-
wise the limitations in the law would not have been included. Inspectors in
charge should, therefore, exercise discrimination in making recommendations
regarding the increase and recommend only those cases in which it is clear
that the employees on account of "ability and qualifications personal to them"
should be granted the increase. This is particularly true in the cases of those
employees who have received promotions aggregating more than $200 per
annum since June 30, 1918. It was undoubtedly the intention of Congress, as
indicated by the use of the words ability and qualifications personal to them,"
that the additional compensation in such cases, as well as in cases of employees
who have entered the service since June 30, 1918, should be allowed only when
the employees have special qualifications for the task upon which they are en-
gaged and have exhibited special ability in the performance of their work. It
is not felt to be in accordance with the spirit of the law for officials to recom-
mend that the increase be granted to every employee or to all employees other
than those whose work is below a fair standard of efficiency.


DISMISSAL AND FURLOUGH OF EMPLOYEES.
The attention of inspectors and others in charge is called to the fact that
they have no authority either to suspend or dismiss an employee or to grant
leave without pay. All such action is administrative and can be taken. by the


I .


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2019.] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANIOUiTCEMENTS. 55

. Secretary of Agriculture only. Requests to suspend, dismiss, or furlough
,employees should be'referred to the chief of the bureau.

LEAVE THAT MAY BE GRANTED TO EMPLOYEES RETURNING
FROM MILITARY SERVICE.
In the case of employees who resigned or were furloughed on account of
military service, upon their honorable discharge and return to duty in the
bureau they may be granted such annual and sick leaves as accrues to them
from the date of their restoration to the rolls.


DOMESTIC TELEGRAPH RATES INCREASED.
General attention is invited to the following excerpts from order No. 2,940,
Office of the Postmaster General, March 29, 1919:
Effective from April 1, 1919, the telegraph rates for domestic
United States Government telegrams are increased 20 per cent over the present
Government rates.
Government leased wires shall be charged for at an advance of 20 per cent
over existing leased-wire rates, whether such wires be furnished by a telegraph
or a telephone system under Government controL
In the audit of telegraph accounts against the Department of Agriculture
for service on and after April 1, 1919, the rates indicated in Appendix D of the
Fiscal Regulations will accordingly be increased 20 per cent. The Fiscal Regu-
lations are amended accordingly.

INSTRUCTIONS REGARDING FORM T-15.
Inspectors in charge and others forwarding Form T-15 reports to the bureau
are Instructed to discontinue placing them inside of or attaching them to
accounts. These forms have to be detached from the accounts in the mail room
and it wastes considerable time if the clerks in that office have to search through
each account for the forms.

PAYMENT OF GRATUITY OR TIP IN GEORGIA.
The second section of Appendix F of the Fiscal Regulations of this Depart-
ment, as amended by Memorandum No. 271, dated April 1, 1919, is hereby
further amended to read as follows:
In Georgia, payment of a gratuity, tip, or other thing of value or of valuable
consideration to any employee of any hotel, restaurant, or other public place,
or to any employee of any person, firm, partnership, or corporation, or of any
public service corporation engaged in the transportation of passengers, is pro-
hibited by law.
The State of Iowa is omitted from the above-mentioned amendment, due to
the fact that the antitipping law in that State has been held to be unconstitu-
tional by the State supreme court.

AMENDMENTS TO ADMINISTRATIVE AND FISCAL REGULATIONS.
Amendment 1 to the Administrative Regulations, effective March 1, 1919,
and Amendment 1 to the Fiscal Regulations, effective April 1, 1919, have been
issued in pamphlet form the size of the bound original issue of such regu-
lations. Copies of these pamphlets have been sent to inspectors and others in
-charge and necessary additional copies for employees desiring the same can be
had on stores requisition form P 1.








66 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY. Cy,

STATUS OF TICK ERADICATION IN VARIOUS STATES, APRIL, 1910.


State.


Alabama..............
Arkansas..............
Florida................
Georgia................
Louisiana..............
Mississippi.............
North Carolina........
Oklahoma.............
South Carolina.........
Texas (Fort Worth)...
Texas (Houston)......
Total............


Dipped during
month.


Herds.

131,990
60,055
16,957
51,466
184,944
44,800D
228
29,350
16,486
71,986
13,561


Cattle.

068,835
350,774
240,600
397,231
1,528,346
435,613
929
313,996
96,504
1,061,724
244,463


Amount of
infection.


Herds. j Cattle.


14,517
22,418
13,037
6,821
9,166
181
227
8,802
1,960
21,256
9,394


73,908
134,640
174,735
66,110
67,431
1,107
896
110,056
7,838
315,359
127,710


621,823 15,339,015 107,779 1,079,790 1380,039


SUMMARY OF TUBERCULOSIS-ERADICATION WORK IN COOPER-
ATION WITH THE VARIOUS STATES, APRIL, 1919.

Tuberculin Em-
tests. ployees.

Station. States. 2s Sortate official.
A,


Albany, N. Y.......
Atlanta, Ga.........
Birmingham, Ala...
Bismarck, N. Dak..

Boston, Mass........

Chicago, Ill..........
Clarksburg, W. Va..
Columbia, S. C......
Des Moines, Iowa...
Harrisburg, Pa......
Helena, Mont.......
Indianapolis, Ind...
Jackson, Miss.......
Jefferson City, Mo...
Lansing, Mich.......
Lincoln, Nebr.......
Little Rock, Ark....
Madison, Wis.......
Montpeher Vt......
Nashville, Tenn.....
New Orleans, La....
Oklahoma, Okla....
Pierre, S. Dak.......
Portland, Oreg......

Richmond, Va......

St. Paul, Minn......

Salt Lake City, Utah

Tallahassee, Fla.....
Topeka, Kans.......
Trenton, N. J.......
Washington, D. C...


65(
80E
1,011
1,5
39E
86E
1C
276
15C
1,57f
4C
42G
1,231
1,30E
1,66%
951
2,495
851
1,12Z
139
1,473
691
79
3,305
1,590
1,526
1,496
382
1,201
95M
1,486
2,501
. 712
114
2,611
1,723
221
14S
48
92E
763
27E
1,037
S4


H. B. Leonard..
W.M.M'cKellar.
R. E. Jackson...
H. H. Cohenour.
E. A. Crossman.
.....do...........
.....do...........
.....do...........
.,...do...........
J.J. Lintner....
W. R. Van Ness'
W. K. Lewis....
F. H. Thompson
P.E. Quinn....
R. Snyder.......
J. E. Gibson....
.....do...........
.....do...........
J. A. Barger.....
Ralph Graham..
T. S. Rich......
S. E. Cesford....
M. Gregory ......
J. S.Healy ......
A. J. DeFosset..
W. B. Lincoln..
R. W. Tuck.....
W. C. Drake, jr.
J. O. Wilson....
S. B. Foster.....
.....do...........
R. E. Brookbank
-....do...........
....do...........
W. Frets.....
...do...........
F. E. Murray...
.....do...........
.....do...........
. G. Fish.......
H. M. Graefe....
W. G. Middleton
J.A. Kiernan...
.....do...........
.....do...........


D. W. McLaury, Albany.
P. F. Bahnsen Atlanta.
C. A. Cary, Auburn.
W. F. Crewe, Bismarck.
L. H. Howard, Boston.
Boyden Bearce, Augusta.
1. S. Pollard, Providence.
J. M. Whittlesey, Hartford.
A. L. Felker, Concord.
A. T. Peters, Springfield.
J. H. Stewart Charleston.
R.O.FeeleyClemson CoDege.
R. D. Wall, Des Moines.
C.. Marshall Harrisburg.
W. Butler, Helena.
L.E. Northrup, Indianapolis.
T. A. Burnett, Columbus.
S. F. Musselman, Frankfort.
E. M. Ranck, Agricultural
College.
D. F. Lackey, Jefferson City.
H. H. Halladay Lansing.
W. T. Spencer, Lincoln.
R. M. Gow, Little Rock.
C. P. Norgord, Madison.
E. S. Brigham, Montpelier.
M. Jacob, Nashville.
E. P. Flower, Baton Roug.
J. A.Whitehurst, Oklahoma
A. F. Beaumont Pierre.
W. H. Lytle, Salem.
E. F. Benson, Olympia.
J. G. Ferneyhough, Rich-
mond.
Wm. Moore, Raleigh.
Do.
C. E. Cotton, St. Paul.
Do.
R. W. Hoggan, Salt Lat
City.
Y. D Adams Boise.
Edw. Records, Reno.
J. W. DeMlley Tallahasse.
J. H. Mercer, Topeka.
J. H. McNeil, Trenton.


N.Y...
Ga.....
Ala....
N.Dak.
Mass...
Me.....
R.I ....
Conn...
N. H...
Ml......
W. Va..
S. C....
Iowa...
Pa.....
Mont...
Ind ....
Ohio...
IKy.....
Miss....
Mo.....
Mich...
Nebr...
Ark....
Wis....
Vt.....
Tenn...
La .....
Okla...
S. Dak.
bOreg...
aWasn..
Va.....
N. C.I..
...do.*.
...do.s.
(Utah...
Idaho..
Nev....
Fla.....
Kans...
N.J....
D. C...
Md.....
Miscel..


Total.......... ......... 2,258J42,860O1,525 158 62j |


' Accredited-herd work.


SArea work.


AI
*


State
inspeo-.
tors.


-1
,.


Square
mile
being
worked.

47,637
31,322
50,032
21,585
45,164
34,664
7,807
20,135
16,340
68,766
36,587


B.A.I.
inspeo-
tors.

27
28
15
19
38
18
7
24
23
31
16


County
inspec-
tors.

407
33
59
92
442
173
9
120

625
65


1,725


Vata
able.

7,7510
Si ;M
251

4,8O
3,

4,114
1,108


30,100


R. C. Reed, Baltimore.


1 I I I I I I I


i


I


I


i


g


n







'29.1 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS. 57

PUBLICATIONS IN MAY.
[The bureau keeps no mailing list for sending publications to individual employees, but
publications are sent in bulk to officers in charge for distribution to members of their
forcesa The number of copies sent varies with the subject or nature of the publications
and the number and class of employees. Officers in charge will use their judgment and
I distribute publications to best advantage. So far as possible additional copies will be
furnished on request.]

S. Amendment 4 to B. A. I. Order 259, Regulations for the Inspection and
Quarantine of Horses, Cattle, Sheep, Swine, and Other Animals Imported into
S the United States-Revoking Regulation 39. Effective on and after July 1,
i1919. P. 1.
Amendment 5 to B. A. I. Order 259. Changing the period of quarantine on the
S Importation of Horses from Continental Europe. Effective July 1, 1919. P. 1.


ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY.

S'hief: JOHN R. MOHLEB.
Assistant Chief: B. H. RAWL.
SChief Clerk: CHARLEs C. CARBOLL.
Editor: D. S. BUeCH.
Animal Husbandry Division: GEORGE M. ROMMEL, chief.
Biochemic Division: M. DORSET, chief.
Dairy Division: B. H. RAWL, chief.
Field Inspection Division: A. W. MILLER, chief.
Meat Inspection Division: R. P. STEDDOM, chief.
Miscellaneous Division: A. M. FARRINGTON, chief.
Pathological Division: JOHN S. BUCKLEY, chief.
Quarantine Division: RICHARD W. HICKMAN, chief.
Tick Eradication Division: R. A. RAMSAY, chief.
Tuberculosis Eradication Division: J. A. KIERNAN, chief.
Zoological Division: B. H. RANSOM, chief.
Experiment Station: E. C. SCHBOEDER, superintendent.
Division of Hog-Cholera Control: U. G. HOUCK, chief.
Office of Virus-Serum Control D. I. SKIDMORE, acting in charge.
Office of Accounts: A. C. DAvis, acting in charge.
Appointment Section: GEORGE H. RUSSELL in charge.






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