Service and regulatory announcements

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Material Information

Title:
Service and regulatory announcements
Physical Description:
v. : ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Animal Industry
Publisher:
Govt. Print. Off.
Place of Publication:
Washington
Frequency:
monthly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Meat inspection   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Summary:
Contains Insecticide decisions and Notices of judgment under the Insecticide Act formerly issued only as a separate publication, now published in both forms.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format
Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
No. 81 (1914)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004884120
oclc - 17762165
sobekcm - AA00005308_00004
Classification:
lcc - HD9000.9.U5 A14
ddc - 630.61
System ID:
AA00005308:00004

Related Items

Preceded by:
Service announcements

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-B. A. I. 205


United States Department




VICE AND REGULATORY


BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY

MAY, 1924


publication is issued monthly for the dissemination of information, instructions, rulings, etc., con-
he work of the Bureau of Animal Industry. Free distribution is limited to persons in the service
reau, establishments at which the Federal meat inspection is conducted, public officers whose
ake it desirable for them to have such information, and journals especially concerned. Others
copies may obtain them from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office,
ton, D. C., at 5 cents each, or 25 cents a year. A supply will be sent to each official in charge of
or branch of the bureau service, who should promptly distribute copies to members of his force.
uld be kept at each station for reference.1


CONTENTS


Page
Changes in directory.......-- ...-- ..--...............................--- -....................-...-- 53
Notices regarding meat inspection ....................................----...-------..--..----..... 55
Trimmings and organs frozen in blocks..---.....-.. .--....--- ------ .---.-------------. ...------- 55
Inspection of beef bones.-- -..... .......... ........................ ...........--- .--- --......... 55
The foot-and-mouth infection reduced to one herd................................................. 55
Animals slaughtered under Federal meat inspection, April, 1924.................................... 57
Imports of food animals and of meats and meat food products ..................................... 58
Foreign officials authorized to sign inspection certificates for meat and products for importation into
the United States.-..----.........-- ................... ..-.....--........---. ...............-... 58
Stockyards for noninfectious cattle ............................. ....- ........- ................--... 58
Perm itted disinfectants -.....- ....................... ..................... ........... ............. 59
Licenses for veterinary biological products, May, 1924 .........-............................. .---
Anti-bog-cholera serum and hog-cholera virus produced under United States veterinary lice in
April, 1924 ....... .............. ............... ................. ......... .... 60
Summary of tuberculosis-eradication work in cooperation with the various States, April, 1924. ,
Monthly summary of hog-cholera-control work, April, 1924 ................................. .. 61
Transportation of household goods ..--------------------------------------------..- ------ 61
Results of prosecutions for violations of laws................................................. ..
New publications of the bureau..----.......-..........------- --. ----. ---.----------.... -
Organization of the Bureau of Animal Industry ............................................ 08



CHANGES IN DIRECTORY ,

Meat Inspection Granted i

3-L. Swift & Co., Leech and Prospect Streets, Sioux City, Iowa.
NoTE.-Inspection formerly furnished this plant under official No. 153, in conjunct with that
given to the Swift plant at 615 South Chambers Street, was withdrawn, so that now f nly plant
operating under official No. 153 is Swift & Co. (and its subsidiary The O. H. Hammon -.
South Chambers Street, Sioux City, Iowa.

*116. The F. C. Stedman Co., P. O. box 506, Athens, Ohio.
*240. Gibson Packing Co., East End D Street, Yakima, Wash.
246-A. The Keefe-LeStourgeon Co., 900 East Twenty-first Street, Wichita,
Kans.
*380. Hughes-Curry Packing Co., Anderson, Ind.
624. Boston Sausage & Provision Co., 161-167 Blackstone Street, Boston,
Mass.
942. Abraham Seldner, 309 Johnson Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y.


'Conducts slaughtering.
104437-24t- 1


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UUiU. UahlUIJr LYICltb, A ILAUUUiJO %t;U., AL' I1III, 3U. .. "
*703. California Dressed Beef Co., Los Angeles, Calif.
*773. Palace Market, Fresno, Calif. 2 "
$ 4 "": ". .. .,
Meat Inspection Withdrawn

101. Crown Margarin Co., 3301 Park Avenue, St. Louis, Mo.
108. National Packing Co., Denver, Colo.
359. Bimbler Co., Kearney, N. J.
Station Added
Athens, Ohio, meat inspection.
Substations Added

Anderson, Ind., meat inspection, substation of Indianapolis, Ind.
Yakima, Wash., meat inspection, substation of Portland, Oreg.
Substation Discontinued

Lexington, Mass., meat inspection, substation of Boston, Mass.

Meat Inspection Extended

226. Swift & Co., Kearney, N. J., to include the Bimbler Co.
545. Republic Food Products Co., Chicago, Ill., to include Clair & Co.
Change in Address of Official Establishment

183. Foell Supply Co., 3117 West Forty-seventh Street, Chicago, Ill., instead
of 331 West Twenty-second Street.
NOTE.-The inspection which was extended under official No. 183 to include the premises at 3117
West Forty-seventh Street is permanent, while the inspection given at 331 West Twenty-second
Street has been terminated.
Change in Name and Address of Official Establishment

*30. Montgomery Provision Co. (Inc.), Parallel and Race Streets; mail 225
Coosa Street, Montgomery, Ala., instead of Montgomery Abattoir Co. (Inc.),
Chandler and Race Streets; mail P. O. box 588.
Change in Address of Official in Charge

Dr. R. E. Brookbank, 119 State Office Building, Richmond, Va., instead of
418 Lyric Building.
Dr. J. J. Linter (tuberculosis-eradication work), 999 Exchange Building,
Chicago, Ill., instead of 316 Live Stock Exchange Building.
Change of Name of Subsidiary

The Goldberg-Kosher Packing Co., a subsidiary of Establishment 152, The
Schalker Packing Co., Leavenworth, Kans., instead of The Schalker-Kosher Pack-
ing Co.
Add the Following Officials

Dr. C. B. Clement (virus-serum control), Topeka, Kans.
Dr. Wm. K. Howard (meat inspection), Pittsburg, Kans.
Dr. Pleasant J. Huffman, jr. (meat inspection), Athens, Ohio.
Dr. Roger D. Hyde, inspector in charge of Canadian import and export inppeo-
tion, Vanceboro, Me.
Dr. E. A. Meyer (virus-serum control), Oklahoma, Okla. ,
Dr. J. F. Park (virus-serum control), Westplains, Mo.








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S 19241f SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 55

i Renove the Following Officials
P Dr. C. B. Clement, Oklahoma, Okla.
SDr. E. A. Meyer, Westplains, Mo.
Dr. J. E. Park, Topeka, Kans.
S Dr. H. T. Potter, Calais, Me.
Dr. Henry Singleton, Pittsburg, Kans.
Change in B. A. I. Directory

Remove word "Acting" after Dr. Lionel H. Adams, Montpelier, Vt.
Corrections in B. A. I. Directory

On page 25 of the directory: Establishment 3-J should read Swift & Co. and
The G. 1. Hammond Co., instead of The G. H. Hammond Co.
On page 51: Establishment 88 is located at North Augusta, S. C., instead of
Ga.
On page 75: The Cudahy Packing Co. of Louisiana (Ltd.), 1501-1519 Poydras
Street, New Orleans, La., should be establishment 19-H instead of 19.


NOTICES REGARDING MEAT INSPECTION
TRIMMINGS AND ORGANS FROZEN IN BLOCKS

Referring to Service and Regulatory Announcements of October, 1921, en-
titled "Frozen Trimmings Illegibly Marked," extended investigation has demon-
strated that products such as trimmings and organs frozen in blocks with coverings
of paper and cheesecloth are not susceptible of bearing the marks of inspection
legible at destination; that these coverings do not afford adequate protection
from contamination, and that the paper coverings disintegrate and adhere so
as to prevent the removal of all particles from the products when defrosted.
In view of these conditions official establishments must promptly discontinue
the use of paper in contact with the products in question and provide coverings
or containers of a more substantial character which will insure legible marking
and afford sanitary protection, as contemplated by law.
INSPECTION OF BEEF BONES

A recent reinspection of several carload lots of beef bones, particularly stifle
joints, intended for use in the preparation of edible product, showed a considerable
number of such joints to be enlarged, the enlargements ranging from slight to
extensive. The dissection of samples showed pathologic changes having the
appearance of tuberculosis. Laboratory examinations of several samples failed
to confirm this diagnosis but established the presence of parasitic nematodes
belonging to the genus Oncocerca, which may bear a casual relationship to the
lesions in question. Whatever the cause of the enlargements inspectors engaged
in meat inspection will appreciate the need and importance of performing the
rail inspection with such care that all cases of enlarged stifle joints will be de-
:" tested; also of examining bones and stifle joints which are to be used in or shipped
+, from an establishment for edible purposes and eliminating those which are
abnormal. Inspectors in charge should see that this instruction is properly
observed by the employees of their respective forces.


FOOT-AND-MOUTH INFECTION REDUCED TO ONE HERD

The following press statements issued by the department May 27 and June 2,
respectively, deal with the outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease in California:
Of 16 California counties quarantined because of foot-and-mouth disease,
; the infection is either dormant, or has been eradicated in 10 counties, and the
situation in the remaining 6 counties continues to improve. This statement,.
:.. issued by the United States Department of Agriculture on May 27, is based on
: latest, reports from field forces and department records. In 6 of the quarantined
counties no new infection has appeared for more than a month. In 4 additional
:: counties the last infected herd was buried between a week and a month ago and






.BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY i .'


no new diseased herds have been found:since. Because of the highly infectious
nature of foot-and-mouth disease, the absence of new cases for a period even as
long as a week is considered favorable evidence of eradication In two other
counties nearly a week has passed without new infection.
The remaining counties-Merced, Los Angeles, Madera, arih Orange-now
constitute an active "battle ground" in which State and Federal inspectors are
exerting the utmost efforts to suppress the foreign plague. There was only one
herd of diseased cattle, numbering 46 animals, on hand May 27. As fast as
diseased herds are found they are quickly appraised, slaughtered, and buried, all
these operations occurring generally within 48 hours.
WEATHER CONDITIONS FAVORABLE
Hot, dry weather and bright sunlight are considered highly favorable agencies
in reducing' the vitality of the virus on pastures and premises; sunlight is par-
ticularly effective as a disinfectant. With a season ahead in which the longest
hours of daylight occur, veterinary officials of the United States Department of
Agriculture regard conditions extremely favorable for suppressing the disease in
the counties still infected.
SLAUGHTER METHOD PROVES ITS VALUE

Owing to the highly infectious nature of the virus of foot-and-mouth disease,
department officials have conducted no scientific experiments with it, although
they have studied the research work which has been done in foreign countries
for nearly 200 years. The difficulty of keeping the infection out of "control"
animals has made experiments everywhere extremely hazardous, and research
work has produced no satisfactory practicable method of control aside from the
slaughter method.
Meanwhile this slaughter policy, which is known to be effective, is being
continued. Steam shovels, dynamite, and other rapid means of digging trenches
for the burial of diseased herds are in use. Inspectors are working long hours
to control the disease so that California's livestock and agricultural industries
will be restored to a normal basis at the earliest possible date.
DISINFECTION NEARLY COMPLETED AS CATTLE PLAGUE SUBSIDES

Using liberal quantities of disinfectants thoroughly applied to the barns and
equipment on farms infected with foot-and-mouth disease in California, the
cleaning and disinfecting crews are making rapid progress. In some cases in-
fected litter and equipment difficult to disinfect are burned. At the close of
May 30 all except 6 of more than 400 premises where the disease had existed
had been disinfected. Special precautions are also being taken in disinfecting
stock cars that have been in the livestock market centers of California. The
cars are disinfected at practically every movement even though only short dis-
tances are involved and whenever they carry new shipments.
Federal and State veterinary forces appear to have checked the spread of
foot-and-mouth disease, according to a statement issued by the department
May 31. All diseased herds were under ground at the close of May 27 and no
new infection appeared May 28 nor May 29. On May 30 three infected herds
were located, one of which was slaughtered and buried the same day. "Flare-
ups' of the disease are expected, and the absence of new contagion for a few
days, though highly encouraging as an indication of complete suppression, should
not give livestock owners the erroneous belief that the disease is entirely eradi-
cated. Officials can not be certain of complete eradication for several months.
MORE TERRITORY RELEASED FROM QUARANTINE

Continued improvement. in the situation has made possible the release from
quarantine of additional territory which formerly was placed under close super-
vision until the extent of infection contained could be determined. With the
exception of 4 counties of the original 16 which were quarantined, there are
in the others only small areas still subject to quarantine measures. These areas
embrace infected premises and adequate "buffer" territory around each one to
'provide the necessary safety. Inspectors are constantly patrolling the areas
where the contagion is suspected to be present, either actively or in a dormant
state.


j..4-A i,.......... .,,a ... .








SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS


WARNING AGAINST ALLEGED CURES

Close cooperation from livestock owners, State and county officials, and the
press continues to aid in suppressing the disease promptly. A study of the
hundreds of clippings received by the department through its employees and
other sources reveals, however, a rather large number of misleading and inaccu-
rate statements regarding foot-and-mouth disease and the methods used in sup-
pressing it. Numerous cures, for instance, have been advanced, some of them
even being represented to bear the endorsement of the department. There is no
dependable cure nor even a method of treatment which will aid in eradicating
the disease, department veterinarians assert. The public is warned against
placing any confidence in alleged cures for foot-and-mouth disease.
Most of the misleading and erroneous statements are so groundless or of so
sensational a character as to be discredited by intelligent readers. The depart-
ment has not considered it advisable to divert its energies in the present emer-
gency to endeavor to correct statements such as those described. Persons de-
siring accurate information concerning foot-and-mouth disease are asked to
apply for a bulletin on the subject which the department will send free on request.
With few exceptions the press has been a staunch ally in presenting the situa-
tion in its true light, as well as devoting space liberally to authorized reports on
the progress of the work.


ANIMALS SLAUGHTERED UNDER FEDERAL MEAT INSPECTION,
APRIL, 1924


Station


Baltimore....-- ...................-.
Brooklyn....... .......................
Buffalo.......--..........- .............
Chicago.......-............................
Cincinnati.................................
Cleveland.............................. ...
Detroit.....................................
Detroit.
Fort Worth.----....-........................
Indianapolis-..-....................--
Jersey City...............................
Kansas City..........- .....................
Milwaukee..............................
National Stock Yards ....................
New York...............................
Omaha ..................................
Philadelphia.......... ............ .........
St. Louis..................................
Sioux City............................... -
South St. Josepb.....-.. ......-.......
South St. Paul..............................
All other establishments ....................
Total: April,1924-...................
April, 1923........... .. ......
10 months ended April, 1924....
10 months ended April, 1923....


Cattle


7, 663
fi, 247
7, 627
149.474
10.643
7, 785
5, 023
26,175
16,813
4,825
74,871
10,076
2:3, 277
29,042
82,751
8,760
12, 615
29, 222
26.598
30, 157
119, 546
689, 190
69,. 757
7, 745, 739
7,540, 113


Calves


2,477
9, 279
6.060
83,434
10,660
8,948
8,314
15, 573
4,870
13,517
22,729
59, 027
12, 158
53,551
6.613
8. -5036
4,329
1,774
6,180
48. 338
79, 383
465,720
400, 322
3,790. 126
3, 483, 083


Sheep Goats Swine

2.201 1 100, 156
22,052 1 .....
7, 141 .......... 86, 747
163,801 1,036 548,420
3,031 7 72,468
S8,747 .......... 89,899
5,168 .......... 102,969
21,528 890 38,400
1,309 .......... 120.344
28,962 -...--..-- 72,555
93,982 3.472 238,302
3,060 .......... 99,751
15,638 16 127,041
101,993 61 109,537
110,574 33 269,640
16, 007 .......... 102,390
2,984 2 160,020
12, 117 ---------- 188,264
76,310 4 101,435
8.213 .......... 231,413
154,956 368 1,213,497
859, 774 5891 4,073,248
959,697 1,532 4,179,438
9,570,335 28, 451 45.851,364
9,517,040 21.142 39,972,406


Horses slaughtered at all establishments April, 192-1, 171. Inspections of lard prepared at all establish-
ments, 168,093,172 pounds; compound and other substitutes, 33,980,660 pounds. Corresponding inspec-
tions for April, 1923: Lard, 184,686,716 pounds; compound and other substitutes, 23,572,433 pounds. (These
totals do not represent actual production, ai the same lard or compound may have been inspected and
recorded more than once in the process of manufacture.)

Carcasses Condemned during March, 1924


Cause Cattle Calves Sheep Swine

Em aviation .... ...... ............ .... .. ... ... .............. 549 292 118 114
H og cholera ............. ......................... ............ ..... 2 073
Inflammatory diseases...................... -.........--. .-. 683 243 324 2, 676
Im m aturity......... ..-.................. .................... ...... 910 ..---- ... .
Tuberculosis... ..---- --- .--....................... .... ........ 4, 896 57 .......... 8, 576
All other causes ....................... ..................... ... 1,527 153 380 4,464
Total .......................... ....... ..... ....... 7,655 1,655 822 17,903

104437-24---2


19241








!/ VRA!AiAT' OF ANIMAL 'INDUSTRY : i '


IMPORTS OF FOOD AflIMALS ASID OF MfiAtS AND MEAT FOOD
PRDI ITTS"lQ


The statements following show the imports of fdod animals an o6 mesia sn'd
meat food products inspected by the Bureau of Animal Industr during April,
1924, with figures for other periods for comparison.

rmporls of food animals

Country of export Cattle Swine Sheep Goats

Mexico-......- ..----. ..- --. .....- ..--- ....--..-.--..- .... 3,268 4 12,449. 8
Canada ....... ... ...----................ ....... ............... 11,158 1,664 13 ......
Great Britain..----.....--...-- ....-...............-...... 156 ---- ----...............
Total:
April, 1924 -----......- ........-..... ...... .. --14,582 1,668 12,462 8
April, 1923....--- ....- .............-............--. 10,999 215 3,395 4
10 months ended, April, 1924.. --------------- 163,033 2,645 64,342 7,851
10 months ended April, 1923... ------.--.------ 261,513 3,261 71,249 7,101


Imports of meat and meal food products

Fresh and refrigerated
Country of export Fe Canned Other Total
Country export and cured products weight
Beef Other

Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds
Argentina .....----..................... ...- 713,521 848,206 570,595 .-........ 2,132,322
Canada-......-- ....- ...................--- 719,593 1,024,725 45, 868 372 1,790,558
Uruguay.. ..........-----...--------...---. 48,200 ..-.... ----404,970 ...-...... 453,170
Other countries-.......................---............ ............ --59,826 20, 121 79,947
Total:
April, 1932-........--- ......-... 1,481,314 1,872,931 1,081,259 20,493 4,455,997
April, 1923........-..- ...-...-- 685,882 766,560 897,850 31,252 2,381,544
10 months ended April, 1924.... 14,387,911 5,336,086 8,207,589 1,127,084 29,058,670
10 months ended April. 1923 .... 24,920,309 10,902,238 6,853,537 938,386 43,614,470

Condemned in April, 1924: Beef, 284 pounds; pork, 60 pounds; total, 344 pounds.
Refused entry: Pork, 2,077 pounds.

FOREIGN OFFICIALS AUTHORIZED TO SIGN INSPECTION CERTIFI-
CATES FOR MEAT AND PRODUCTS FOR IMPORTATION INTO THE
UNITED STATES

The following is an additional name, address, and facsimile signature of a
foreign national Government official authorized to sign and issue certificates of
inspection for meat and meat food products offered for importation into the
United States:


Country and name Signature


JAPAN \

S. Suzuki__ -JAPAN -t 7. *


STOCKYARDS FOR NONINFECTIOUS CATTLE

In accordance with section 4, Re'gulation 2, B. A. I. Order 273 (revised), facili-
ties at the following-named places have been provided for handling noninfetious.
cattle for feed, water, and rest in transit:
Hearne, Tex. (by the Houston & Texas Central Railroad Co.).
Hattiesburg, Miss. (by the New Orleans & Northeastern Railroad Co.).







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SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

PERMITTED DISINFECTANTS


In accordance with the provisions of B. A. I. Order 273 (revised), the bureau
has granted permission for the use of the following saponified cresol solutions in
the general disinfection of cars, yards, and other premises:
"Kresoleum," manufactured by Meyer Brothers Drug Co., St. Louis, Mo.
"Sherwin-Williams 50% Cresol Solution," under the name of "Hemingway's
50% Cresol Solution," Hemingway & Co. (Inc.), Chicago, Ill. This solution is
identical with Sherwin-Williams 50% Cresol Solution," manufactured by the
Sherwin-Williams Co., of Chicago, Ill.



LICENSES FOR VETERINARY BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS, MAY, 1924

LICENSES ISSUED


Name and address of firm


H. K. Mulford Co., Glen Olden, Pa.........
Parke, Davis & Co., Atwater & McDougall
Streets, Detroit, Mich.
The Standard Serum Co.. 9, 11, 13, 15 South
Second Street, Kansas City, Kans.
The Purity Serum Co., West of Stock Yards,
Sioux City, Iowa
The Southwestern Serum Co., 821 East
Twenty-first Street, Wichita, Kans.
Guilfoil Serum Co., 18, 20, 22 North Second
Street, Kansas City, Kans.
Jensen-Salsbery Laboratories (Inc.), 520
West Pennway, Kansas City, Mo.
The Gilliland Laboratories, Wasp Street,
Marietta, Pa.
Globe Laboratories Fostepco Heights, near
Fort Worth, Tex.
Santol Products Co., near Plainfield, Ind.
(Mailing address: 221 West South Street,
Indianapolis, Ind.)


Products


Hemorrhagic-septicemia aggression.
Rabies vaccine.
Anti-hog-cholera serum; hog-cholera
virus.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Avisepticus-sanguinarium bacteria.
Antihemorrhagic-septicemia serum;
hemorrhagic-septicemia aggression;
hemorrhagic-septicemia bacteria.
Abortion mixed bacteria (swine).
Anti-hog-cholera serum; hog-cholera
virus.


LICENSES TERMINATED

United States veterinary license No. 32, dated January 1, 1921, issued to the
Standard Serum Co., 9, 11, 13, 15 South Second Street, Kansas City, Kans., was
terminated May 13, 1924, on account of change in location of storage of products.
A new license was issued to the Standard Serum Co., as indicated above.
United States veterinary license No. 39, dated April 26, 1921, issued to the
Purity Biological Laboratories, 305-307 Exchange Building, Stock Yards, Sioux
City, Iowa, was terminated on May 29, 1924, on account of change in name of
firm. United States veterinary license No. 39 was issued to the Purity Serum
Co., as indicated above.
United States veterinary license No. 56, dated January 1, 1921, issued to the
Southwestern Serum Co., 308 East Twenty-first Street, Wichita, Kans., was ter-
minated May 21, 1924, on account of change in location of establishment.
United States veterinary license No. 56 was issued to cover the new establish-
ment, as indicated above.
United States veterinary license No. 61, dated January 1, 1921, issued to the
Guilfoil Serum Co., 18-22 North Second Street, Kansas City, Kans., was ter-
minated May 21, 1924, on account of change in location of storage quarters.
United States veterinary license No. 61 was issued to the company, as indicated
above.


L : '


License
No.


Date


1924
May 24
May 5
May 13
May 29
May 21
-..do..-..
May 20
May 29


May
May


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ANTI-HOG-CHOLERA SERUM. AND HOG-CHOLERA VIRUS PRODUCED
UNDER UNITED STATES VETERINARY LICENSE IN APRIL, 1924
H; .


SUMMARY OF TUBERCULOSIS-ERADICATION WORK IN COOPERA-
TION WITH THE VARIOUS STATES, APRIL, 1924


Tuberculin tests Total to date
during month

State H Inspector in State official
Herds Cattle Once Ac- Herds charge
r Cattle C e tested cred- under
or tested r free ited super-
ots acted herds herds vision


Ala.........
Ariz.........
Ark.........
Calif .......
Colo........
Conn.......

D. C-....--
Fla..--.-..-
Ga..........
Idaho.......
[11...........
Ind.......---
Iowa........
Kans........
Ky..........
La..........
Me.........
Md.........
Mass........
Mich .......
Minn .......
Miss........
Mo-------.........
Mont ....-..
Nebr
Ner ----
Nebr........
Nee .........

N.J .......

N. Me-.....
N. Aex -----
N. Y........
N. C........

N. Dak.....
Ohio .......
Okla .......
Oreg.-......
Pa.........-
R. I.........
S. C.......
S. Dak.....
Tenn......
Tex. .......
Utah .......
Va..........
Va.........-

Wash.......
W. Va.....
Wis.........
Wyo...-...

Total.


1,875
2,278
903
2,174
1,278
1,663
2,609

288
5.773
4, 169
16,186
34,664
29,996
32, 744
6,643
25, 192
2,025
15,447
5,684
917
50, 797
11. 880
729
45,270
17,069
5,872
1,743
2,791
1,189

2,056
27, 004
101,659

16, 526
19, 829
722
20, 729
20, 003
55
4,057
742
12,703
,69
9,233
5,751
2,316

23,886
4,090
37, 501
5.179


43,928 520, 3311 13, 308485, 679


R, E. Jackson...
F. L. Schneider.
L. E. Lyons....
R. Snyder......
W. E. Howe....
R. L. Smith....
W. 0. Middle-
ton.
J,A. Kiernan...
J. 0. Fish.......
A. L. Hirleman.
W. A. Sullivan..
J. J. Lintner..---
J. E. Gibson....
J. A. Barger.....
N. L. Townsend
W. F. Biles.....
A. F. Staub..-..
J. B. Reidy.....
T. A. Ladson...
E. A. Crofsman.
T. S. Rich......
W. J. Fretz.....
H. L. Fry.......
Ralph Graham..
J. W. Murdoch.
C. H. Hays....
F. E.Murray ..
E. A. Crossman.
W. G. Middle-
ton.
F. L. Schneider.
H. B. Leonard..
W. C. Den-
dinger.
H.H. Cohenour.
A. J. Delosset...
L. L. Allen.....
S. B. Foster.....
P. E. Quinn....
E. A. Crossman.
W. K. Lewis....
J. O. Wilson....
E. I. Smith.....
H. Grafke .......
F. E. Murray...
L. H. Adams...
R. E. Brook-
bank.
J. C. Exline.....
George W. Neff.
J. S. Healy......
John T. Dallas..


C. A. Cary, Auburn.
S. E. Douglas, Phoenix.
J. H. Bux, Little Rock.
J. P. Iverson, Sacramento.
C. 0. Lamb, Denver.
J. M. Whittlesey, Hartford.
O. A. Newton, Bridgeville.

J. V. Knapp, Tallahassee.
P. F. Bahnsen, Atlanta.
W. R. Smith, Boise.
F. A. Laird, Springfield.
R. C. Julien, Indianapolis.
R. W. Cassady, Des Moines.
J. H. Mercer, Topeka.
W. H. Simmons, Frankfort.
E. P. Flower, Baton Rouge.
H. M. Tucker, Augusta.
James B. George, Baltimore.
L. H. Howard, Boston.
H. W. Norton, jr., Lansing.
C. E. Cotton, St. Paul.
H. Chadwick, Jackson.
H. A. Wilson, Jefferson City.
W. J. Butler, Helena.
L. R. Cantwell. Lincoln.
Edward Records, Reno.
A. L. Felker, Concord.
J. H. McNeil, Trenton.

Mat Keenan, Albuquerque.
H. J. Henry, Albany.
Wm. Moore, Raleigh.

Wm. F. Crewe, Bismarck.
F. A. Zimmer, Columbus.
J. A. Whiteburst, Oklahoma.
W. H. Lytle. Salem.
T. E. Munce, Harrisburg.
T. E. Robinson, Providence.
W. K. Lewis, Columbia.
A. E. Beaumont, Pierre.
W. B. Lincoln, Nashville.
L. G. Cloud, Fort Worth.
A. J. Webb, Salt Lake City.
E. S. Brigham, Montpelier.
J. G. Ferneyhough, Rich-
mond.
L. C. Pelton, Olympia.
J. H. Stewart, Charleston.
John D. Jones, Madison.
A. W. French, Cheyenne.


60


BUREAU OF -ANIMAL INDUSTRY


I-- i I I1


87
74
42

13
281
106

121
210
1,528
3,389
2,334
5, 181
2,310
832
275
378
354
81
4, 860
1, 1341
54
696
344
1,062
87
175
106

52
1,601
3, 598

1,948
4,088
58
1,149
855

152
82
142
242
497
558
503

608
201
1,139
41


4,229
2, 374
500

531
6,041
1,419

2,488
3,175
11, 119
31,997
21,451
83,409
33,937
6,014
3, 590
4,163.
5,591
2,250
43,673
25, 117
1, 2862
9, 125
7.421
12,925
1,044
2,855
1,419

279
26,610
9,521

36,820
25,598
1, 639
8,576
10.353

1,407
2,648
3,335
7,018
2,529
11,765
7,130

6.718
2,741
25,967
533


1,247
1, 860
772
2,004
I, 088
1,333
1,335

270
4,830
3,434
14,303
1,526
24,130
18,541
5, 379
21,508
1,496
12,001
1,687
.409
42,907
6, 593
456
43,633
16,282
5,059
1,737
1, 860
529

1,849
15, 113
92,178

12, 00
15,836
253
20,631
15,240
29
716
307
147
460
8,338
1,121
864

22,597
4,486
30,709
4,588


25
66
4

31
405
190

17
21
38
1,671
378
2. 039
219
37
100
61
187
173
675
646
9
88
24
409
4
131
190

1, 705
48

566
920
16
157
486

8
86
7
79
8
589
197

116
20
482
8


43,984 644, 658







1924] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 61

MONTHLY SUMMARY OF HOG-CHOLERA-CONTROL WORK, APRIL,
1924


Public Inter- Fa Autop- Premises Out- Herds
State m s nter- Farm Autop- su^n- brek r
attended views visits sies uarn-ed re porte treated
attended tined reported

Alabama..------..... .. .......I 1 533 172 3 .......... 9 69
Arkansas ......- ...-- ..--... ..- ....----. 77 31 1 .......... 2 19
Colorado.... ..............-.... ........ 13 2 4 -...-... 2
Delaware--- ------------ ---- 1 119 3 3 ......... 16 5
Florida...-------.---.. ----.--... --------. 180 59 7 .......... 42 17
Georgia....- ........ ........... ,........ 208 132 4 .......... 232
Idaho---.....-----......- ..-.... 3 126 143 5 1 4 1
Illinois--.....................-- 5 197 110 12 10 9 ..........
Indiana----.. .....-----.. ------- 6 418 142 9 7 9 2
Iowa........................... .......... 192 98 6 ---------- 16 ....
Kansas..--..---. -----......- ..-- .....---351 226 4 .......... 7
Kentucky...................... 1 288 140 12 ..... 12 14
M aryland...................... 10 1,037 391 13 16 33 .....
M ichigan....................... 2 201 48 3 .......... 6 2
M ississippi--..........------- ........ .... 357 118 I .......... 25 8
M issouri..---............ ....-- 12 201 138 7 3 13 .........
N ebraska................ ..... ...... 69 59 3 ......... 2 .........
North Carolina..--...........-----..-- ..-- 140 151 3 .......... 5 22
Oklahoma................ ...... 429 118 10 4 4 2
South Carolina--............... .......... 130 30 2 ........ 4 31
South Dakota ---..........--.. --..---.. --113 17 9 ........ 17 .........
Tennessee..---..- ..- ........-...- .. 75 35 9 8 13 ..........
T exas -...-...- ................ ..-........ 192 10 ......... .... ... I .....
Utah........ ............ ... ...... 192 17 3 ... 2 1
Virginia-....................... 4 75 41 12 .......... 14 7
W ashington................. ... 25 7 ...... .... -....... ... 6 ........
Total.............-....... 45 5,938 2,508 165 49 298 232

NOTE.-No hog-cholera-control work was performed by bureau inspectors in California. North Dakota,
Montana, Ohio, and Wisconsin during the month of April.

TRANSPORTATION OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS

In order to comply more fully with the wish of the Bureau of the Budget in
reducing Government expenditures, all officers and employees of the bureau,
when making application for the transfer of household goods and personal
property used in official work in connection with the change of official station,
should, at the same time such application is transmitted to Washington, com-
municate with the nearest area coordinator (see page 35 of Service and Regula-
tory Announcement for March, 1924) and ascertain whether it will be possible
to have the goods transported by Government truck.
Upon receipt of the application in the Washington office steps will be taken to
obtain the correct routing, etc., but the bill of lading and necessary instructions
will not be issued until advised as to the information received from the area
coordinator.


RESULTS OF PROSECUTIONS FOR VIOLATIONS OF LAWS

Penalties have been imposed in prosecutions for violations of regulatory laws,
as reported to the bureau, as follows:
Livestock Quarantine Law
American Railway Express Co., interstate transportation of 5 calves without
tuberculin test, $100 fine.
International & Great Northern Railway Co., failure to mark waybill "South-
ern cattle," $100 fine.
Southern Railway Co., interstate transportation of cattle without tuberculin
test, $100 fine.







62 BUBEAUT OF ANIMAL .I:lBnSTREY S [Ma1

1 :. .. T: w ,." tr, E dlb.B r. '
Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Co., $100 fine.
Chesapeake & Ohio Railway Co., $100 fine.
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Co. (41'cases), $4,100 fines.
Chicago & Northwestern Railway (12 cases), $1,200 fines.
Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway Co. (8 cases), $800 fines.
Erie Railroad Co. (130 cases), $13,000 fines.
Fort Worth & Denver City Railway Co., $100.fine.
Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe Railway Co. (2 cases), $200 fines.
International & Great Northern Railway Co., $100 fine.
Louisville & Nashville Railroad Co., $100 fine.
Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railway Co. of Texas (4 cases), $400 fines.
Norfolk & Western Railway-Co. (2 cases), $200 fines.
St. Louis-San Francisco Railway Co., $100 fine.
Southern Railway Co. (4 cases), $400 fines.
Texas & Pacific Railway Co. (4 cases), $400 fines.


NEW PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU
[The bureau keeps no mailing list for sending publications to individual employees, but publications
are sent in bulk to officers in charge for distribution to members of their forces. The number of copies
sent varies with the subject or nature of the publication and the number and class of employees. Officers
i charge will use their judgment and distribute publications to best advantage. So far as possible addi-
tional copies will be furnished on request.]
Department Bulletin 1212. The Woolly-Pod Milkweed (Asclepias eriocarpa)
as a Poisonous Plant. By C. Dwight Marsh and A. B. Clawson, Pathological
Division. Pp. 14, figs. 7.
Farmers' Bulletin 743. The Feeding of Dairy Cows. Revision of a bulletin
with same title written by Helmer Rabild, H. P. Davis, and W. K. Brainerd,
formerly of the Dairy Division. Pp. 21, fig. 1.
Farmers' Bulletin 781. Tuberculosis of Hags. By John R. Mohler, Chief of
the Bureau of Animal Industry. Revision. Pp. 14, figs. 3.
Farmers' Bulletin 920. Milk Goats. Revision of a bulletin with same title,
written by Edward L. Shaw, formerly of the Animal Husbandry Division. Pp.
36, figs. 18.
Farmers' Bulletin 1069. Tuberculosis in Livestock. Revision. By John
A. Kiernan and Alexander E. Wight, Tuberculosis Eradication Division. Pp. 32,
figF. 21.
Farmers' Bulletin 1179. Feeding Cottonseed Products to Livestock. Re-
vision. By E. W. Sheets and E. H. Thompson, Animal Husbandry Division.
Pp. 14, figs. 3.
Farmers' Bullitin 1382. Fattening Steers in the Corn Belt. Revision. By
William H. Black, Animal Husbandry Division. Pp. 18, figs. 7.
Farmers' Bulletin 1409. Turkey Raising. Revision. By Morley A. Jull
and Alfred R. Lee, Animal Husbandry Division. Pp. 22, figs. 15.
Department Circular 322. Mycotic Stomatitis of Cattle. By John R.
Mohler, Chief of the Bureau of Animal Industry. Slight revision of B. A. I.
Circular 51, same title. Pp. 7.
Some Factors Which Influence the Feathering of Cream in Coffee. By L. H.
Burgwald, Dairy Division. In Journal of Agricultural Research, Vol. XXVI,
No. 11, December 15, 1923. A-68. Pp. 541 to 546, inclusive.
The Influence of Low Temperatures and of Disinfectants on the Eggs of
Ascaris Lumbricoides. By Eloise B. Cram, Zoological Division. In Journal of
Agricultural Research, Vol. XXVII, No. 3, January 19, 1924. A-69. Pp. 167
to 175, inclusive.
Amendment 7 to B. A. I. Order 287, releasing Marin, San Mateo, Santa Clara,
and Sonoma Counties, Calif., and parts of certain other counties, from quarantine
on account of foot-and-mouth disease. Pp. 2. Effective May 2, 1924.
Amendment S to B. A. I. Order 287, quarantining Orange County, Calif., on
account of foot-and-mouth disease. Effective May 3, 1924. P. 1.
Amendment 9 to B. A. I. Order 287, releasing portions of Alameda, Kern,
Los Angeles, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, San Francisco, San Joaquin, and
Stanislaus Counties, Calif., from quarantine on account of foot-and-mouth dis-
ease. Effective May 6, 1924. Pp. 2.
Amendment 10 to B. A. I. Order 287, quarantining Tulare County, Calif.,
against foot-and-mouth disease. Effective May 8; 1924. P. 1.






-_________________-_-________-- ._. AAf..i.4,',-,.







1924] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 63

Amendment 11 to B. A. I. Order 287, quarantining Tuolumne County, Calif.,
against foot-and-mouth disease. Effective May 10, 1924. P. 1.
Amendment 12 to B. A. I. Order 287, quarantining Fresno County, Calif.,
against foot-and-mouth disease. Effective May 13, 1924. P. 1.
'Amendment 13 to B. A. I. Order 287, releasing certain portions of Contra Costa,
Fresno, Orange, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, and Tulare Counties, Calif., from quar-
antine on account of foot-and-mouth disease. Effective May 16, 1924. P. 1.
Amendment 14 to B. A. I. Order 287, designating certain portions of Napa
S and Solano Counties, Calif., as "Modified area," in connection with the quaran-
tine against foot-and-mouth disease. Effective May 19, 1924. P. 1.
Amendment 15 to B. A. I. Order 287, releasing certain portions of Kern, San
Joaquin, Stanislaus, Tulare, Contra Costa, and Tuolumne Counties, Calif., from
quarantine on account of foot-and-mouth disease. Effective May 26, 1924.
P. 1.
Poster, Produce Infertile Eggs (Revised). 15 by 21 inches, two colors.
Poster, Report Suspected Cases of Foot-and-Mouth Disease. 13 by 18 inches,
two colors.

ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY

Chief: JOHN R. MOHLER.
Administrative Assistant: CHARLES C. CARROLL.
Chief Clerk: J. R. COHRAN.
Editor: D. S. BURCH.
Animal Husbandry Division: LEON J. COLE, chief.
Biochemic Division: M. DORSET, chief.
Dairy Division: C. W. LARSON, chief.
Division of Hog-Cholera Control: U. G. HOUCK, chief.
Division of Virus-Serum Control: D. I. SKIDMORE, chief.
Field Inspection Division: A. W. MILLER, chief.
Meat Inspection Division: R. P. STEDDOM, chief.
Pathological Division: John S. BUCKLEY, chief.
Tick Eradication Division: R. A. RAMSAY, chief.
Tuberculosis Eradication Division: J. A. KIERNAN, chief.
Zoological Division: B. H. RANSOM, chief.
Experiment Station: E. C. SCHROEDER, superintendent.
Office of Accounts: GEORGE F. TUCKER, in charge.
Office of Personnel: GEORGE H. RUSSELL, in charge.



*






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