Supplement to Commerce reports

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Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
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federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00070
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00077

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text

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SUPPLEMENT TO

COMMERCE REPORTS
DAILY CONSULAR AND TRADE REPORTS
ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, WASHINGTON. D. C.

Annual Series No. 64a September 21, 1916

SBELGIAN KONGO.
4 KATANGA.
.i. ..... By Vice Consul Harry A. McBride, Bonma.
;- The vice government of Katanga, with the capital at Elizabeth-
'' ville, is in many ways independent of Belgian Kongo proper. It
j has been set apart from the rest of the colony on account of its great
:. 'distance from Boma, the residence of the governor general, and be-
cause direct means of communication between Lower Kongo and
Katanga are lacking. When the Cape-to-Cairo Railway is linked
up with the Kongo River and Grands-Lacs Railway route the two
sections of Belgian Kongo will be brought into closer relations, but
.- at present, owing to its situation, practically in the heat of central
Africa, Katanga is dependent for an outlet upon the railways run-
-: ning south through Rhodesia to Beira, Portuguese East Africa, and
r,: I to Cape Town.
X,.. Mining Industry.
Katanga derives its industrial importance from the great copper
""""deposits now being exploited by the Union Miniere du Haut Katanga,
S a; Belgian company, about 40 per cent of the shares of which are
o; wned by the Tanganyika Concessions (Ltd.), a British enterprise
.n .. gagedd in the industrial development of Central Africa. There
A re several other small mining companies. but of little importance
S. compared with the Union Miniere.
^ :::The L)rophIecy set forth in previous reports that the Katanga cop-
S'. per mines would soon become one of the wor-ld's important sources
of copper supply seems about to be realized, and even the war has
^"-p not interfered in any serious degree with the mining (op(raItion's and
i production. When the war broke out the headquarters of the Utnion
Y Miniere at Brussels were removed to the London office of the Tan-
ganyika Concessions for the purpose of continuing operations and
furthering the sales of copper.
.:. The report of the Union Minier2, which has charge of the copper
5;.: mines and smelters, states that active mining work hld been carried
on during 1913 and 1914 on the Star of the Congo, Kambove, and
S: Luushia mines, and on the Musoshi iron deposits for ironstone flux.
.. The total ore and flux mined during 1914 amounted to 360,000 metric
.' tons, as compared with 170,000 metric tons in 1913.
S ; The cost of the ore on trucks at the mines is being gradually re-
S duced. The average cost per metric ton at each mine in March'
.... .1916, was: Star of the Congo, $1.64; the Kambove, $1.06; and the


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2 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS. :.

Luushia, $1.84. The improvement in mining costs is expected to'-
continue as the exploitation progresses and the low-grade treatment '..3
schemes come into operation and it is estimated that by the end of
1917 the high-grade ore at the Kambove should not cost more than
48 to 60 cents per ton and the low-grade ore about 30 cents per ton
on trucks at the mine.
Ore Reserves.
The following information regarding ore reserves in Katanga is
taken from the African World:
The ore reserves and stocks already opened up above the present working
levels at the Star of the Cougo, Kambove, and Luushlua mines, as estimated for
the end of 1914. alnount to a total of 6.026.500 metric tons, while the approxi-
mate flux reserve estimated for the Star and Musoshi mines amounts to 900,000
metric tons. Of the ore reserves estimated, above about 20 per cent of the total
is direct smelting ore of about 15 per cent copper average, while the remainder
is low-grade ore of about 7 per cent average. Some 25 per cent of this re-
mainilder will. when subjected to concentration, yield concentrates of about 18
per cent copper, which, added to the direct smelting ore, will give 1,600,000
metric tons of 15.5 per cent smelting ore and 4,400,000 metric tons of 6 per cent
low-grade ore. tihe average grade thus being over 8.5 per cent pure copper.
The work of iuvestigaring the reserves below the water levels on the Star of
the Cdngo anti Luushia mines is being pushed ahead as the mining progresses;
at Kambove, also. the investigation of the reserves in the nest 100 feet below
the adit level (which is some 135 feet above the bed of the dry Livingstone
Creek) is being continued, and It was on this section of the mine that an ex-
pert, as the result of his preliminary drilling work, estimated that there were
some 3,000,000 metric tons of ore similar to that in the superficial part of the
deposit. Up to the present the expert's estimates have turned out remarkably
accurate.
Arrangements are being made to open up the Likasi and Chituru mines, which
are close to the line of railway joining Kamnbove to the smelters. In 1903 it
was estimated that some 700,000 metric tons of 13 per cent average ore had
been exposed in Likasi.
Besides the nilues already being exploited, there are at least some 150 copper
deposits of importance (without including the mere copper prospects that have
been located). Ten of the most important of these on which preliminary work
had been done were examined in 1907. and the following estimates were made:
Ore in sight, 7.300,000 tons of 8.6 per cent; ore in prospect adjoining last,
8,100,000 tons of S.6 per cent; possible ore extensions, 7,100.000 tons of 5.6 per
cent. It has also been estimated that the probable ore on the whole of the
Katanga mines above the water level Is well over 40,000,000 tons, averaging
some S per cent of copper.
Transportation and Treatment of Low-Grade Ores Chief Problems.
It has been difficult to bring the Katanga mines up to their present
state of development, and considerable money has been necessary to
open up these ore deposits in Central Africa, but now that their rich-
ness has been proved, the operations gotten under way, and the smelt-
ing plants erected the greatest drawbacks have been overcome and
the chief problems are now the proper treatment of the ores and
better transportation to the sea. The latter is to be solved by the
construction of the Benguela Railway that will run east from the
port of Lobito, Angola, to Katanga. [See Daily Consular and Trade
Reports for Sept. 30, 1914.]
Engineers claim that the ultimate success of the mines depends on
the development of an economical scheme for low-grade ore treat-
ment. The Union Miniere, under the direction of Messrs. Wheeler
and Horner. American experts, is now experimenting with the elec-



S.4







: BELGIAN KONGO-KATANA. 3

Strolytic leaching treatment of these ores, and the results aire said to
'" be promising. The product of this method is known as electrolyte'
copper," which commands the highest market pri.,.
Smelting Plant-Cost of Production.
I
The smelting plant at Lubumbashi is now operated wAith tlret'
blast furnaces, but two more, which were to have been completed in
1914, will not be ready until some time in 1916. owing to (ieltvs caiisedl
by the war. Two additional ones are to be added in 1917. The new
furnaces are longer than the ones now in operation and lhave' one-
third greater smelting capacity, so that when the entire pl:nt is il.
running order it is estimated that the annual output will be about
40,000 tons of metal and matte. The present mining prog'ramn will
keep the plant supplied utip to 1920 or 1921.
The following figures show the smelting costs in 1912, 1913, aindl
1914:

Item. 1912 1913 1914
Item. rjj ly

Furnace days worlrked..................................................... 171 443 fi671
Charge per furnace dsay...................................... metric tons.. 17. 19S 212
Total charge smelted .............................................. do.... 3 ,2 2 S74,. 113,67u
Total oUtput ................... ..... ....................... ..do .... 2.7l 7, 410 10,720
Average cost of fuel ............................................. per Ion. *44. 'i, 1 -'. 2 0 121.7"2
Average coot of flux ................................................ do.... $3. 72 I 2.20 $2.14
Average costof output at smeller .................................. do.... I 1231.3') 1 F.O.1 S141.02

Copper Output.
The production of copper in Katanga increased by one-third dur-
ing 1914, the amount of ore smelted having been 92,381 tons. result-
ing in a production of 10,72"2 tons of copper, as against 7,407 tons in
1913.
During 1914 two blast furnaces were in operation. After the
early part of 1915, however, there were three.
The Union Miniere produced 997 tons of copper in 1911, 2,492 tonls
in 1912, 7,407 tons in 1913, 10,722 tons in 1914, and 6.932 tons in the
first half of 1915. The estimated total production for 1O)15 is 14,-
000 tons, but during 1916, if it is possible to operate with the two
additional furnaces, having 30 to 35 per cent greater capacity than
the present ones, it is expected that the output Will reach 2,1,(IPI) tIMons.
The 1914 production was less than had been estimated. but thi.s \\;-,s
due to delays in receiving machinery, caused by the war.
Amnerican and other mining interests and copper consIiinr- ;ir,.
now giving considerable attention to the Kataingra mines. an,1 it
seems quite possible that the estimated production of copper there.
from, which is placed at 40,000 tons for 1917 and thereafter, may be
realized, in which case Katanga would be near the hend of the list
of the world's greatest copper suppliers.
Finance and Banking.
As the prosperity of the district is dependent largely on the min-
S ing industry, the steady progress of the copper industry had a;
favorable effect upon all other branches. During 1914 only four,
bankruptcies occurred, as compared with five in 1913.
Considerable credit is due to the administration for the energetic
manner in which financial confidence was restored after thle out-






4 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS. .. .
break of war. The only bank-Banque du Congo Beige'--was forced *'
to restrict the sale of drafts, on account of the limited amount of ..
gold on hand, and was obliged to issue bank notes in denomination. ,?
of 1 and 5 francs ($0.193 and $0.965). However, the GovernmentVs
action in enforcing the acceptance of the notes'of the bank; the favor- .
able reports received concerning the bank's gold reserve; the arrival ?
at Elizabethville of a shipment of gold from the State mines at Kilo, '
in northeastern Kongo; and the appointment of a financial commis-
sion by the Government, had the effect of easing local financial re- b
straint. The inability of the merchants to obtain drafts on Cape
Town, where a great part of Katanga's supplies is purchased, had
the effect of reducing trade to some extent, as the Cape firms refused i
credit and would not accept the Kongo bank notes. 3|
Railway Extension. il
In the annual report on Kongo for 1914 a review of the progress
in railway construction was given. The Cape-to-Cairo Railway is
now operating through trains from Cape Town to Kambove, north ,I
Elizabethville. The next stretch is from Kambove to Bukama, a
distance of 204 miles by the newly adopted route. At the end of A!
March, 1915, 86 miles of this had been entirely completed, and tha
roadbed finished some 10 miles more, but work is progressing' slowly
on account of the difficulty in receiving materials. From Bukama
there is an all rail-and-water route to Boma, and when the Kambove-
Bukama section is completed, it will be'possible to travel in comnpara-
tire comfort from Cape Town through Central Africa to Boma and
Banana on the Atlantic coast.
Agriculture and Cattle Raising.
No great interest is taken in agricultural pur',uits in Katanga,
chiefly because of the small white population, about 1,500 (the num-
ber of white inhabitants of Elizabethville in 1914 was 871, as corn-
pared with 921 in 1913). and on account of the fact that the district
is too far from the seacoast to warrant the exportation of agricil-
tural products. Rubber is gathered to some extent, principally by
the natives in the Lomami district.
The Agricultural Department has made efforts to encourage farm-
ing. but it is claimed that the soil is not sufficiently rich for profit-
able results. At the end of 1914 about 2,270 acres were under culti-
vation iy the Department and by immigrants that had been induced'
to take tip this work. These farmers, who now number 37, receive
free land from the Government and are given assistance in procur-
ing seeds, clearing the land, and even in plowing with steam tractors.
There is an experimental station near Elizabethville, where exten-
sive investigations have been carried out in crop raising and irriga-
tion, but until the demand for farm products is greater the results
will have little value.
There is a more )promising future for cattle raising, and the Biano
Plateau, which is free from the tsetse fly and has abundant pastur-
age, offers a good field for this industry. At the end of 1914 the -
Government breeding station at Katentania on the plateau had
1,737 head of cattle, 734 of which had been imported from northern
Rhodessia. It is planned to start .zheep raising in the near future.


1A
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*| "BELGIAN KONGO-KAANUA. 5

SLabor Conditions.
The labor supply is of great, import.a'ncie ili K[atangi, for it i., nec-
Sessary to recruit natives frorn other districts in older tA) ineet the
demand. The large number now retiredd will probably increase to
Some extent until the railway fron Kanihmove to lHiukaiim':i is. finished.
when the large force of railway laborers will ie availale, for mining
l-" purposes. The recruiting and repatriating of native laborers is now
Largely in the hands of the Bourse du Triavail du Knt.neig.. which
I: in its last report showed that 1.527 men were needed in :1913. DuIr-
: ing the working year 1914-15 further demands for 6,847 laborers
E were received, making a total of 8,374, of which the Bourse was able
Sto provide 7,549. Owing to the war, however, demniands for 743 men
S were canceled.
S During the working year 2.049 native laborers passed through the
S compound of the Bourse at Elizabcthville; of thesc, 1,177 were new
:. recruits and the remainder repatriated laborers. In 1914 the Union
SMiniere employed 2,670 natives in the copper mines and smelters;
S- of these. 1,608 were recruited in northern Nigeria, 542 in Portuguese
Nyassaland, and 286 by the Bourse dui Travail. The Portuguese
natives have recently been repatriated, as they did not resist the
S climate, and Kongolese laborers are steadily gaining in favor.
The principal food of native laborers is maize meal (95 per cent
S of which is imported from Rhodesia). mineat, salted fish, rice, pea-
S nuts, sugar, salt, and beans. Beans and tobacco are raised locally.
Foreign Trade of Katanga.
Commencing with 1914, the tables of iml)orts of Katanga have
been made up according to thle new system of classification adopted
at the International Statistical Conference held at Brussels in
S 1913, and this, together with the fact that complete statistics for
1913 were not published on -account of the war, makes comparison
of the foreign trade of the years 1913 and 1914 difficult.
So far only provisional tables for 1914 are available, but these
show the value of imports into Katanga to have been $2.742.814.
In 1911, the imports reached a value of $2,053,523.' and in 1912,
$2,602,767. Although figures for 1913 are lacking, this indicates a
slight increase, which is quite creditable in view of the disturbed
conditions.
S As to the export trade, statistics show that 1,239 tons of mer-
chandise, valued at $560,144, were exported from Katanga in 1911,
t and 2,527 tons, valued at $871,441, in 1912. The incomplete tables
S for 1913 and 1914 give only the quantities exported, which were
7,750 tons and 10,474 tons. respectively, but it is estimated that the
value of the 1914 exports was approximately $3,800,000. Thus, it
will be seen that a steady increase in exports has also taken place
S notwithstanding the effects of the war, and that Katanga now en-
joys a favorable trade balance.
K"; .The combined value of imports and exports for 1912 was $3,474,-
S208' and that for 1914 about $6,542,814, also showing a large gain
r in the aggregate foreign trade of the district. From these totals
* it will be seen that the foreign commerce of Katanga is -very large
..... for a newly opened country so far removed from the usual trade
2 routes and from thle large world markets.

1-
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. -. ..-


SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Articles Imported.
In the following table is shown
imported into Katanga in 1914:


the value


of the principal arti
of the principal artioll


Articles. 1914 Articles.


A nim als...............................
Arms and ammunition................
Bevernres:
Spirits ................. .... ........
V inTe ........... ...... ....... ......
Beer ...............................
.%' 11 other ...........................
Candles ............. ...................
Cemen t ............ .'..................
Cereauls .................................
Chemical products....................
Ci'-rs. cigarettes, etc..................
Coal....................................
Coke...................................
Flour ..................................
Hardware.............................
Hats. caps. etc........................
Instniments. scientific .................
Jewelry, watches, and clocks...........
Leat her goods.........................
Foot wear ..........................
Machinery .............................
Metal goods:
Iron and steel lbars, etc............
Steel rails..........................


$318,334
27,645
46,968
34,477
20,125
S, 3RO
6,395
15,006
100,030
S,671
36,639
73, S09
84,368
91,665
20,420
11,469
34,082
9,299
7,281
21,3.6
203,068
81,897
295,310


Provisions:
B-itter and cheese..................
Fish. preserved and canned.......
Fruits, preserved and canned......
Me-its, prepared....................
Milk, preserved and canned........
Ve-etables. preserved and canned...
Other, preserved and canned........
All other provisions................
Rubber goods...........................
Soap ..................................
Textile roods:
Cotton cloth-
Printed........................
Dyed ...........................
Other...........................
Linen goods.........................
Hoisery............................
Drvroods, n.. s....................
Clothing ............................
Allother...........................
Vehicles................................
Automobiles.......................
Wood and lumber......................
Furniture..........................


-yr




87 4
...6 " ."'A


9,9S :. =:*
16,23.., 2 g
90,778 ..
'14, 874"
1) -37&.;a
70,073 M
34,070 : ::
43,530 '
13,36 82.
8,261
60,742
63,360 v
7,432
93,259
6,755
14,0I O 1
11,974,


Iron and steel manulactures......... 145,242 Other wooden objects............... 10,224 "".
Copper: Wire, bars, etc ............. 4,324 All other articles ........................ 41,028 >.=j|
All other ............................ 6,316 -
Oils: Total............................. 2,540,164 1 ,'l
Petroleum .................. ..... 10, R97 Bullion and specie:. -
All other .......................... 12,059 Gold ................................ 185,280 ..
Paper and st it ionery ................. 27,1 Silver.... ..................... 17,370 .",
Pharmaee icalM products ............... 19,349
Pottery and glassware .................. 14,579 Grand total....................... 2,742,814

Iron and steel goods formed the principal articles of import, rails
being the chief single item because of the activity in railway con- 4
struction. Machinery imports were also considerable, owing to the
large mining industry. After these classes of goods came foodstuffs, -,
provisions, and textile goods. The large importation of cereals and
textile goods-mainly cheap cotton goods-was for the native trade. '
Imports by Countries.
In the following table is shown the value of the imports from the -::
relief countries of origin in 1912 and 1914:

Countries. 1912 1911 Countries. 1912 1911 .

.el.ium... ............... $1,127,018 $90.5,267 France ..................... 538,660 !34 151 1.
Rhndei .ia .................. 331,760 849,420 Italy ................... 14,557 23,045
_'niie.l Kinel.om........... 302.403 315,201 Mozambique............... 6,679 15,436 :
Soumh African Union ....... 274,i462 331,935 German East Africa ........ 15,998 11,0
m.v ................ 66,898 69,705 All other countries.......... 62,009 43,958 .
1 l i i i r I S l~ a i e .. . . . . . . 5 5 1 5 8 6 3 2 5 1 -------- : 3
.nola ..................... 4,133 49,771 Total ............... 2,602,767 2,742..8 ".


From the foregoing figures it will be seen that Belgium was the ^
chief supplier of Katanga's imports, but that there was a strong ..:;,
tendency tow:ird purchasing in South Africa. Of course the de-& '.
"ease in Belgian imports was mainly due to the inability to procure
Belgian goods, but even discounting the effect of the war, it is no-..;:: 4,.
ticeable that Katanga, as it becomes more developed, is furnishhif'fl
ail increasingly large market for British goods. Imports from thtid.:.s


.. ......:.
7.
-' -"-"p.




II*


I;BELGIAN KONGO-KATANU'A. 7

SUnited Kingdom and its colonies reached a raliue in 1914 of $1,;543,-
956, or considerably more than one-half ifl the total. A large part
c of the foodstuffs for natives in Katanga ct ues from Rhodesia, and
it is natural that quantities of inanufactl-redl articles should l)e bought
from South African wholesale merchants, owing to their proximity
and to the direct rail connections.
During the first seven months of 1914 there w;i ; large trade inII
.. German goods in Katanga. but after Augnust 1 ipmports fronn t ,ei-
S many were prohibited. On account of the war considerable quantities
of grain, vegetables, and cattle were imported during the latter l)art
of 1914 from Portuguese Angola. It is probable that the trade with
Angola will increase to a great extent when the Blenguela Railway
is completed and Lobito becomes the seaport for I(Kat nnga.
S Articles, Exported.

S Owing to the absence of complete statistics for 1913 the export
.. movement of Katanga for 1912 is coml)ared with that for 1914, but
S as the values for 1914 are not available, only the quantities are given.
The following table shows the quantities in metric tons of the prin-
cipal articles exported from Katanga for the two years:
lArtices 1912 1914 Arti.Lies. 191i2 1911

Tons. Tons. T1,0n. Tobrs.
(Clothing............................. .. 1.921 Rublher....................... . .61 24.95
Copp er....................... 2.4A0. '2 In,33S. I Salt ......................... ...... 1.
orapper ore ............... 4. SO Tin o-e ................................ (03
Furniture and wLodcn oo, ............. 2. 'ol'a'co ...................... ........ ..S3
Hardware ............................. 3. 03 W heat ................................. 2. R?
H !i ie ........................ 23.05 3.5. G All olher article.; .............. 9 4M3.4'1
Instruments, scient tlc................... 191 .
Ivory ........................ 1.63 ; Tot.al .................. 2,527. 10 10,473.92
Potatoes and other vegetables. ........... 1.57

The foregoing table illustrates clearly the large part copper hlias
to do with Katanga's industry and commerce. In fact, the only
other exports worthy of mention are rubber, the trade in which is
decreasing, and hides, the shipments of which, though small, showed
an increase. The ivory trade is also falling off, but there were small
shipments of tin ore, showing that sonime of the tin deposits were
being worked to small extent. Such articles as scientific instruments,
hardware, clothing, etc., are not produced in the country and figure
Sin the statistics merely as reexports.
Statistics showing the countries to which Katanga's exports are
sent are not published, but it is known that copper shipped to Bel-
gium before tlhe war has now been diverted to markets in the United
Kingdom. The same may be said of rubber and ivory.
In 1912. of a total export value of $2,602.76T all but $,4.400 worth
was sent to Belgium; the l)roportion was about the same in 1914 up
to the outbreak of war, after 'which the shipments destined for Ant-
werp went to Liverpool and London.
h Trade With the United States.
There are no direct exports from Katanga to America, but the
United States was sixth on the list of countries from which the im-
. ports were purchased in 1914, thd value of goods having been $63,251,
as comlp)ared with $55,158 in 1912, an increase of $8,093 in two years.




UNIVERSITY OF PLORIDA


.... .. ... .

SUPPLEMENT TO COMMENCE


3 1262 08491 2954

BEOKPRS." :0i


Practically all of this amount is made up of machinery
for the copper mines, and it is quite probable that some
mining machinery purchased in South Africa and Belgimas" '
itecd in the statistics to those countries. :i
From $2.OO0 to $3.000 worth of American petroleum is
nually, and small (iizantities of American hardware are also
Scientific instrument- for the mining industry are imported frw4
United States to some extent and are quite popular. The fA
American goods have been imported in small amounts -and an
sale in some of thie stores: Firearms and ammunition, clocks,
canned provisions, flour, and cotton goods.
Except for bulky merchandise, such as machinery, there in- f
opportunity for American firms to secure much direct trade in ::|
tanga, and it is recommended that American exporters desi"o'.
marketing their products to merchants in this part of Africa et
touch with the large wholesale houses in Cape Town, Johanes.u
and other industrial centers in British South Africa with which;
Katanga firms do business. *.
U ".S D.E POT"


UNIV. OF FL LU.
AOGy^EMTS DEPD. D



U.S. DEPOSITORY


WASHINGTON: tEURNMENT PRINTING Om*".B:*
Ei '
*: : ..* ... -^ ...:" .