Supplement to Commerce reports

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Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00070
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00075

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text





SUPPLEMENT TO

COMMERCE REPORTS
L v DAILY CONSULAR AND TR-DE REPORTS
lTlBS I ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, WASHINGTON, D. C.

Annual Series No. 23a May 9, 1919

CANADA.

BRITISH COLUMBIA.
By ('onsul Geeneral George 7. W,'e f. Vuneoin ier. Jaun. 11. .191).
The year 1918 opened with every prI)iP',t of 1ling" an oxtreiilely
active and prosperous one for tlhe Provin,.e of Briti-li (Nolilnibia.
The war situation at that date was such that nt- on0e woulhid atte Ilpt,
to say that hio-.tilities would be con cludeul Iefore tlie year wa- out.
When, on November 11, the arni-.tice wa;s signed, it. caught tlhe
business and financial world here alimot all but tiunl Prpared for the:
great changes that will occur after peace hlias come; buit in .'',neral
the forecast made at the beginning of the year wva- amniply fulfilled,
for 1918 was a l)rofitable, active year in business.
Some index of the year'.s, activities may be gained from the bank
clearings at Vancouver. For tihe twelvemonth endling I)ecember
31, 1918, Vancouver bank clearings were $54.5.3S,714, :v again-t
$419,610,898._ in 1917, and $321,ss5,7;j36 in 1916. The 191s banlk clear-
ings are exceeded only by those of 1912 and 1913, periods of great.
speculation in real estate. General mercantile and industrial line
had the best year in their experience; whole-ale and jolbing nmer-
chants are carr,'ing over no heavy stocks, while the retailer is well
supplied. If the retailer can unload hii stocks at the present level
of prices, it would seem that the buwine.ss situation is traveling- alonLg
eminently safe channels.
lumber Industry Has Varied Year.
In lumber circles the experience was somewhat mixed. Every
indication pointed at first to the largest year in tihe induitr'"s hi-ti)ly
and at most l)rofitable prices; but during the early .sulinlnr a nitch
shortened agricultural yield on tihe prairies seemed inevitable, andl
orders placed with thle mills for lumber were canceled or greatly
curtailed in amount for prairie shipments. The embargo placed
late in the summer by thle United States Government on shipments
of lumber east of the Mississippi River and north of tlhe Ohio River
and the closing down very shortly after the armistice \Va, signed of
the spruce lumber camps had a, tendency to lessen the output of
lumber for 1918.
Notwithstanding these causes, logging operation, were on an un-
precedented scale. While in 1917 the log scale was 1,047,000,000
115383'-19-23a








SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


fetet hard ie:i-iirel, it is anticipated that the log scale for 1918 will
;p ru.xiliaite( clooly, if not exceed, 1,750,000,000, an increase of at
lhast l(n:,(vuo, effect on th imannufacture of lumber, which did not keel) pace with
logging, logs in tlIe water. The outlook for manufacture, however, is not so
dlark :1i. the -ittlation would seem to indicate. Crops did not turn out
'-, 1iadly :u, was anticipated. canceled prairie orders were renewed,
tlil ciiibiirgo in shi.'ilmients of lumber to all sections of the United
States was raiet Il. :1nl shi ipmenits went forth more freely during the
l:;i-t tNwi imiontlhs of 1918 and will without doubt continue during 1919.
Tile ()ov.'-Q -,lihipnienlts of lumber for 1918 were largely inll excess
of tlioc for 1917, amniouinting to 53,403,059 board feet. and for 1917
to 1S.(3,("22 hoard feet, an increase of 35,319,437 feet. These large
shipnieint- were made possible in a great measure by the new wooden
. iling vessels constructed in British Columbia. which made initial
vv:ages witli cargoes of lumber. The destinations of the year's ex-
p)orts of lumber were: South America, 4,231,402 feet; China, 18,-
c;)1,000; Australia, fi6,035.9l34; South Africa, 7,0(61,523; Fiji, 500,000;
Japan, 00,000; United Kingdonlm, 14,022,817: United States. 2,279,-
01.0; Vladivostok, 113,383 feet.
Sale of Lumber Carriers-New Pulp and Paper Mills.
The wooden -,ailin vesels. (some with auxiliary 'tleant lower)
constricted in Britisli Coluinliia and having a carrying capacity of
over 1,500,000 feet to each ve.-ssel, which were intended for thie deep-
s.,e ctar''ying of liiniiibr to South Africa, Japlian, Australii,. and South
Amnerica f'romn this Provin'e--soine 30 vessels ill all-h;ave leen sold
to foreign pircliisers aiind their service- lost to this trade, and vessels
n11Mw under consirtiction of thi-l class arie also for foreign interests,
plin-cillly Firnchli and Italian.
The1 pulp and paper mills of the Province had a in active year.
Sonice curtailment was experienced on account of thle influenza, which
iwas very .-,veri' at the .everal 1)plants, causiing a virtalil .islspenIsion of
olperatioi,; for seviril weeks. Thle mill, have been turning out pulp
and paper to their capacities when ol)erated.
During 1918 the Sw;)iisn Bay plant cameini into operation, and the
Qliatsimio plant, is expected to start up before thle c('lose of 1919. Two
other plants are being coni-triruted but are not likely to be in opera-
tioni dliiing 1919, The future for pal)er making in tihe Province is
bright, anti tlis industry is steadily growing inll importance and is
attracting lilrge amounts of Amnierican capital.
Province Has Record Mineral Production.
With prices falling, it was not expected that the mineral output
of British Coliuibia would equal that of the previous year, when the
total value was ali)p)roxiimately $37,000,000. However, the )relim-
inary official review estimates the total value of the 1918 production
ait $41,483,093-$4,072,701 more than for 1917, or an increase of
11 per cent. Only once in the history of the Province's mineral
stliti.-tics has the 1918 output been exceeded, and that was in 1916,
helin the year's nSinhril production amounted bo $42,290,462--2 per
cent( greater than 1918.








CANADA-BRPITISH COLUMBIA.


Thle recovery of placer gold for 1918 is e-timlated at $31ns,000, of
which 1)r:actically all is obtained in the Cariboo and Cassiar dis-
tricts, about one-tenth of the total coniing froin the other sectionn.
In 1917 the total value of placer gold aiouintedl to $4.9;,()00. During
the last four years the production of placer gold in the Province
has steadily decreased. Economic conditions and high prices for
labor and suppl)lies are cited as the principal reias,,ns for the decline.
Estimated production of lode gold during the year 1918 is placed
ht $3.250,895, as compared with 2.?67,190 for 1917, showing an in-
crease of $S3,705 or 37 per cent. In connection with this increase
credit. is given to the appearance on the prldiiucer.s' list of a new
mine-tlie Surf Inlet property of the Belmont-Surf Inlet Mines,
within an output of about 43,000 ounces. The total c.,tiinathl gold
Placerr an(d lode) value for the year 1918 is tliheref.c $.5:58,895, as
against $2,803.190 for 1917.
Lead, Copper. and Zinc.
In thle case of lead, estimnatedl 1918 returns show a production of
43,949.6(;61 pounds, valued at $2,944,627. This repre.-enii, as omiipared
with thlie previous year, an increase in quantity of C,,642,196 pound.;
but. owing to the lower market price of lead, the value of the total
output showed a decrease of $ii,393. In explanation of this it may
be mentioned that the market price of lead rose and fell during the
year; thlie average for January was 6.782 cents a pound; in July a
fixed price of 8.05 cents was established, that figure holding until tho
nrmistice was signed. Fort Steele contributed nearly half of the
lotal production of lead, heading the list with an e..timated output
for the year of 19,340,800 pounds; Slocan came next, with 11,665,700
1)olun(lds; Ainsworth, Windermiere-Golden, Nelson, and numerous
small mines supplied the balance.
Copper production in 1918 shows, as conipared with the previous
year, an increase in quantity; owing to the lower market -elling price,
however, there was a decrease in value. Production for 1918 is esti-
mated at 63,387,010 pound&, which is 4,379,445 pounds greater than
the 1917 output; the value for 1918 is estimated at $15,1;1.046. a
decrease, when compared with the $16,038,256 for 1917, of $351.,310.
On the other hand, it is pointed out that there is an encouraging
factor in the comparison, because, nothwithstandling lower market
prices, the. l)provincial production of copper rose in quantity 7.4 per
cent over the previous year.
The 1918 production of zinc is given in the preliminary official re-
port as 36,149.894 pounds; in 1917 the total stood at 41,848,513
pounds, showing a decrease for 1918 of 5,698,619 pounds. Qualifica-
tion of the 1918 zinc output is made because of difficulty in getting
information regarding shipments to the United States. It is there-
fore 'suggested that the estimated figure may be low. To the total
zinc output Fort Steele contributed 22,000,000 pounds and Slocan
13,601,945 pounds; Omineca and Ainsworth produced the balance.
Coal and Coke.
The estimated gross production of coal during 1918 was 2,572,811
long tons, of which 280,743 tons were made into coke, leaving a net
production at 2,292,068 tons. These figures show an increase corn-







SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


pared with 1917 of 174,0'08 tons gross and of 142,093 tons net. The
quantity of coke imde was abl)out 190,656 tons, or an increase of
30,751 tons as (co lI)Iared with 1917.
Tho yeVir witCnessed ain encouraging development of the mining in-
duit rvy thiroiiglioiit the Province. Now shipperss were added and
old inline- \ere extended. It i, expected that this development will
ie ;i..cclcraLted during the new year. Under decreased operating
cos(. ihe mining of gold will be expedited, but not. until costs of
iatm'ial and wages have declined. It is expected that the production
of coal will continue to increase as new properties are. brought to
the shipping point. The demand for coal for industrial and
domestic consumption, and for coke, is extremely heavy.
Salmon Pack Makes New Provincial Record.
The experience of the year in fishing has been remarkable. For
an off year the pack of salmon will exceed any year in the history
of the Province. The value of the pack will amount to about
$11,500,000. "
During the year 1,616,157 cases of ,alnion were put up by British
Columbia. canner.. Thii., is 5S,672 more than the figures for 1917.
Although the total pack shows a large increase over that of 1917,
the. percentage of .ockeyes and red springs, canned was only 21,
the balance being made up of lower-grade fish. Skeena River car-
ried off the banner for the largest pack of sockeyes during 1918,
while the Fraser River, which has been the most noted district for
s.ockeye salmon for years, dropped to 16.S49 case.-, the next to the
lowest sockeye. pack in the Province.
Vancouver ILland canned more red sp)ringp- than any other place,
but the big pack froi thliese canneries was in chumsn, pinks, and
cohoes. The Fraser River made its highe.-t mark in chums.
Whatever the new year develops it is certain that fishermen will
not. be paid the handsoinme prices that were paid during 1918, nor will
the canner receive the high prices which lie got for his pack froti the
British Governmnent. The (:anninlg of whale micat was ai new experi-
ence for the year, and a ready market Ihas been built iup in the Orient
and in the southern sections of tlie United States.
Official Prices for 1918 Salmon Pack.
The War Piirchasing Conmiis,,ion of the British Ministry of Food,
which comma ndeered the British Columbia salmnon pnck, has set the
price per c(.ase a follows:
f'.' ('w ".-1.-l-pIuIiid till.', $14.50; 1-,im ind flits, $1); -pouiiiind flal(s, $16; 1-
po) uml oval., $ h'); .-pounnl ov nl1-. $17..5>0.
Red spr7ig.m.--po1-ul tillhs, $13; 1-1('uiid Hals. $13.35; I-pounil flats, $14;
1-ptiuclu o-iu.s, $14.
Cohors.-I-poundl tails, $11.50; 1-plund flaits, $12; -puuinul flats, $15.
1'ilsL,...-. -pouiml talls, $8; 1-pimil lhaits, $S.25; -iimid flats, $9.50.
The total payment ii'ade by the British Ministry of Food hias not
yet been computed, but it i .stated to be miiore than $9,000,000, oe
whliich the caiiniery mnen 1iave received miore than half as first paynient.
The 1al;iance will be forthlicoiii ng at once. The settlement of the
prices on the 1918 salmon packl and the payment therefore will re-
liev, the financial stres-s being felt by the British Columbia canners
on Iucc.,untt of the holding up of salnion export awaiting the estab-
lishment of a .,settling lriL'.











CANADA-BRITISH COLUMBIA.


Salmon Pack, by Districts.

Tle following table shows, by districts, the total of each kind of
salmon packed during 1918:


White Blue-
DWhite backs
DRed and Chums. Pinks. Cohoes. and Tutal.
District., prmgl, pink
springs. steel-
spigheads.


Cases. Cases. Cases. Can"'. Cases. Cases. Cases. Cases.
Fraser River................ 16,849 15,192 24,853 S1I., 21") 18,388 40,111 4 1,'. 206,003
Skenna River ............... 123,322 16,013 6,828 22,573 161,727 38,7.-Q 4,994 374,216
River Inlet ................ 53,401 957 452 6,729 29,542 12,171........ 103,15.5
N us River................. 21,816 2,332 1,820 40,368 59,206 17,061 1,305 143,903
Vancorver Island.......... .9,091 25,460 4,864 251,266 57,035 40,732 4,215 392,663
Outl MiigJi-tricv ........... 51,980 5,581 3,002 90,464 *01,.17 42,331 1,007 396,212
Total.........*........ 276,459 65,535 41,819 497,615 527,745 191,068 15,916 1,616,157


Other Fish Caught and XMarketed in 1918.

The Dominion Government has issued a statement giving the
various kinds, the quantities, and the value of .Aeafihl landed in a
green state, by Provinces, during the calendar year of 1918, and the
etimiated proportion of the catch marketed or intend(lel to be mar-
keted in a fresh, pickled, or cannim(edl state. For British Columbia the
liguires are:


Kind of fish.



amnlun..................................... hundredweight..
U1ed fresh or frozen............................... do....
Calincd .......................................... cases..
Smoked................................ hundredweight..
,ailed, dry....................................... do ....
M1ld cured........................................ do....
Cod................................................... do....
Iscd fresh ........................................do .... -
C reon-salted ....................................... do....
Smoked........................................... do....do....
Black cod ............. ......................*----... do ....
Used fresh...................................... do....
Smoked...................................... ... do ...
t(; r-en-salted ....................................... do. :..
I lake :tind cusk......... : ............................... do....
'.Ped fresh........................................do....
Smoked........................................... do....
IIerring ................................................ do....
Used fresh........................................ do-....
Canned............................................ cases..
Smoked.................................hundredweight..
Salted, dry........................................ do....
Pickled......................................... barrels..
Used as bait ......................................do....
Fhad........................................hundredweight..
Usecd fresh........................................ do....
halibut............................................... do....
Used fresh........................................ do....
Smoked..... ......................................do....
Solrs .................................................. do....
Fiouinders..: .................................. ........... .dn ...
Skate .................................................. do ....
Smelts................................................ do ....
Eulaehans............................................ do....
'% citing .............................................. do....
Tomcod............................................... do ....
Octopus .................................... ...do.....d ..
Clams ................................................barrels..
Used fresh........................................ do....
Calu ed...... ....................................ea os..
Crabs. cokle. etc ........................... u irid % cmtight.
Urayfish ............................................... do....


Caught.
SMarketed,
Quantity. Value. quantity.
Quantity. Value.


1,441,641



.......



69, 447
..... .........

.... ..........
3,8"464




585, 291




.......... ...
..............








....... ...ii i"

15,057
2,423
2,408
1,044
177
6
214
7,793
5,913
4


$9,643,552
..............



8,607

" ..402, 046
..............

1,273
..... .........



.........i.....
....i,'5i,2i6.



..............




37, 973
8, 348
2.0,800
3, 857
831
18
1,319
25,805

31,255
12


...o.. .........
199,588
1, 411. 220
2', Mr
1.101
6,569
"" "473
1,486
199
151', 228
5,239
338
.............
391
36
...... ........
55,226
131,844
10,190
151,278
40,987
18,635
...........iii
....... i85867
69
12.061
LJ., 057
2,423
2,408
1,044
177
6
214
......... ...
5,1 717
2,076
5,915
4










SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Caubght.
Kind of fish.
Quantity \

Pilhli ir k ................................hundredw eight .. 74,752
t i i,1 fre..i .. ...................................... do.... ..................
(' 01niirI ........................................... ..case.. ..................
I- fok 1 ................... ............ hundredweight..1 ............. .....
I ,I ......................................... do ... .. ..............
S,111 d ......... ....... ................... barn'I' ...................
-1 ***I: I' it . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 LD Ndr i W 4cii 9 1 . ............. .....
lI.e i jr. ...................................do ..........
I-,.I fresh ............. ........... ....... ............. ..... .........
Sr,,d ...... .............................. do.... .... .....
ili i-salltd ....................................... do .........


'alue.

$200,154




1i..7,520


Marketed,
quantity.


15,705
57,541
13
2
2,409
10,309
.......... ...
5,'5 8
380
80


Tiht value of the British Columbia catch is given as $14,234,489;
that for the whole Dominion. as $31,017,'208. Nova Scotia, with a
cat(Il valued at $10,12130,775, is British Columbia's nearest competitor
in this,, regarded; New Bru.swijck's catch is placed at $3,(767,479,
Qiil'ec's at $2,097.301, and Prince Edward Island's at $698,159.

Preliminary Figures of Agricultural Production.
Agriculture in the Province hlind in general a successful season.
The marked feature of the year's activities was the increased pro-
d(1'ction (if veietalles, which lhargely went to evaporating plants and
canning e-tablishnents. The official prelimninarv estimate gives the
1!1s ;itgriltiltiil'a production of Britih (C'olumbiia as:


('tI 'asi 'i(aiitn


Qnaullily


.l' iO? k . ............... ........................... ... .......
M i, ......... ...................................... pounds. 18,1S.3,000
I r. .il i L ...................................................................
I" I II .. ....... ........... ........... ............... pound;.. 84, 990, 779
%',T'Iz.0Il .Lh. ................................................... ...............
]1t.!d'r ......................... ............ 4. I. :3:.17, 211
i; i r. ii ....................................... busic k 3. 9, 69
|hut c.111-TllUn I 1.......................................... ..111 ............
h uh m~l i 11n',dI,1i~i.- i- ............................................ ..............


T"ro I ...................................................


Value.


$96c;, ,79
3. .150.0oo
2,720.014
1,1 79.705
4,117,272
5.172, 460
11. 2: 2, 7fl4

1, 500, 00Ji


.............. 49,543,0548


Per cent
increase over
1917.

12.4
77.6
14.0
10.3
53.1
51.5
6136.7
8.0
85.2

31.55


Inl tiransinitting these figures to the Vancouver consulate general
the provincial Department of Agriculture said:
'li" '' ,i.ii11piliii of reports d';lini with fruit iq not yet far t'noughL advanced
i, -.i\ \ :ill ti ln it izi7'1 tillz Wtatt Olln t. It iny l iv stateiltd. however, that in total
(111:1111 liv 4m1 pr. jliiaiil'.v .stiitinte is plaedl ait 0.7 per cent increase over 1917
'iin hi' to titl viltl1, owvinl to greontly ini'rei.sedt prices prevailhlig, is placed it
-$4. 117,272.
'1.'i, 1 1ti l Iquiintity of till iitunl 'iit s.oit s tShat there bits been a decrease of
0.iil i,'rc vent siinie 1917, y-t, Is ill tho e-s e nf fruits, priee, preolled .so high
tli:il ilit ttiml -1v:ilu will bi a;ln.ut $49,543,000 us against $37,661,850 in 1917.
1 iinJ i.4 ltin,' ,11';i iln siuIlly large niuiiilit'rs (it Ietf cattle were sinughtered,
\\wIi'rih :i,-c',utas for" tlio l'arg increase in the total' vanlio of nments.
'ri 'Ii, tiir.v iinulsl'ry inlmy lit., leecrilied .s in a healthy condition, for despite an
nill';\rh'.llt .,irinll', tliis lIing cold and backward, followed by prolonged
driullt wvhitli, r'lrlileil tlhe milk flow, production will show a slight Increase,
wliil. \;iihus iliq l';tml,. l llilmutit lu per ccnt.
\'i'ii-'ls will tli ll\\li iin'.rpase, alnd especially potltoes, of which there is
repit'lrit'l at prsiut a contilaritivte scarcity owing to heavy exports.








CANADA-BRITISH COLUMBIA.


Hay and other fodders, which suffered from the drought, show a falling off
in quantity of about 4 per cent, yet the outstanding Increase in prices resulted
in the large increase in value shown. Grains suffered in yield, as in the case
of hay.
Exports of Farm Products-Shipbuilding.
Exports from farm and fruit ranches in the Okanogan Valley for
1918 will exceed $4,000,000 in value. From the Vernon district alone
the returns to the fruit growers and farmers will run to about
$1,135,000. It was a banner year for orchardists of the valley, de-
spite drawbacks of a rather unfavorable spring and late frosts,
together with a prolonged period of dry weather in the early summer.
The Okanogan United Growers are authority for the statement that
prices received for apples were 10 per cent to 50 per cent higher than
in 1917. To the end of November they had shipped 1,184 cars-865
cars of fruit and 319 of vegetables and hay. There were 684,447
packages of assorted fruits sent out in 1918, compared with 561,694
in 1917. In computing the cash value of shipments an average of
$1,000 per car has been placed on the whole output wholesale. This
is considered by shipping companies as a conservative valuation.
The year in shipbuilding was unusually active. The prospect of
continuing the building of steel ships is becoming more and more
remote; in fact, it is certain that, except for possible Government
orders, no steel contracts will be let in this Province. The future of
,hipbuilding in British Columbia lies in the use of wood or con-
crete and not steel until an iron and steel industry has been estab-
lished. The outlook for the development of an iron and steel in-
dustry in no wise advanced during the year. Some iron ore was
mined at Mons and shipped to IronTale. Wash., for minanufacture into
pig iron, but this is the only tangible step to be recorded toward this
most important development. There are about 140,000 tons of ship-
ping (wood and steel tonnage combined) under contract and con-
struction in the Province, which should keep the present yards in
work until well into the summer or early fall of 1919. [See COM-
MERCE REPOIRTS for Sept. 11 and Nov. 16, 1918.]
Real Estate Activity-Labor Situation.
In general, there was marked industrial activity throughout British
Columbia during 1918, practically all factories having been fully em-
ployed at profitable rates during the year. The outlook for a return
to competitive conditions will require the overhauling of plants with
regard to greater efficiency than was possible during the war period.
In the realty field improved conditions were noticeable everywhere.
The awakening of industry and the continued shipbuilding activity
drew a large number of workmen to these centers, with the conse-
quent demand for houses. There has also been a movement from the
prairies to Vancouver and Victoria, chiefly among farniers, who have
made handsome sums from raising grain. Practically every house
in Vancouver and Victoria in good condition is now occupied, and
outside municipalities are feeling the benefit of this condition. South
Vancouver and Point Grey, Burnaby, and the municipalities sur-
rounding Victoria have most of their available houses occupied. In
fact, a considerable building movement is on foot, which would be
largely increased if prices could be established or if the builder could









8 SU'PPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

be ,i-,IIrcd that ito appreciable reduction would occur during the ye;ir.
As a re,,iilt of this condition rents have advanced, and this is especially
so for apartiiient houses and desirable homes. Prices for houses and
v;iC.int prIiperty have appreciated mnioderately, and it is expected will
appr *l..i;ite as the population increases. Ally decline, however, in
idllLii-'trial activity in the cities of Vancouver and Victoria would put
:i iiiin'ldi:;ite stop to this upward movement.
The mortgage situationn followed the realty market. The amount
of property (put-claimed and transferred during the past four years
li:i.-, ,'t-ii large, involving new owners and new covenant-s. In con-
sequence the properties affected by the mnioratori umn have been largely
eli inated, except certain business proplerties and tlhos:e l)properties
within tile 'ope of the Soldiers' Relief Act.
For the first nine months of 1918 there was a scarcity of labor
of all ela-:,-es in the Province; especially was this true as regards
labor for tlhe shipyards, mining, and agriculture. The last three
months of the year labor began to be in exce.-, of the demand. This
waI.-, due partly to the large number of retui'ned soldiers seeking em-
pl4)oiment and partly to the serious influenza epidlemic, which caused
many of the logging camps to close down through shortage of crews
but still leaving many men, able to work, without. employment.
Then the sudden cessation of the call for spruce for airplanes threw
1many men out of work. Large numbers of skilled and un.,killed men
have been returning to the United States since early in November.
Foreign Trade of the Province.
Each of the last three years (Canadian fiscal years ending Marlch
31) lia, witnessed an increase in the value of both thie imni)orts for
home conuniiption and the exports at the customs ports of British
Columbia and the Yukon Territory when considered as a whole,
though for individual ports this statement does not hold good, as is
seen below:

1916 1917 1918
Ports. -----------
Imports. Exports. Inipurvs Exports. Imports. Exports.

A Illit, fr, .................... $S6. 523 $14,001. 792 SI I. R70 12,4 6l 9.3 $S 23-5.C5 $2. 51,0610
Cra.inl'rnok .................... 190, 9" 471i, 63 2.5, 156i 596. 042 411. 1.15 1,215, 137
Vi' rni\ ...................... .. 121, 1 ,7 1. 119.21q 26). 59.4 1, 044.001 211,372 %39,801
(.r.tii ForkI .................. 1,1W69, 447 3,724,23.35 6iii0). 719 4, 54 497 :-2. 12q 2,110.316
<; r,-,ii w,%lor .................... 237.4"1 6M4, %1 4'4. ,s1.1 37* 5. 361i 406 125 227.857
alKjia n ...................... 574, 1)l 2, 610,5)9 i, 5-) .7.S1 4, M)12..-4 2,024, L)3.' 5,365,0.6
N .n.. .................. 2 .1, 6'3 232, 94:3 117, 1'.2 329.2S7 ,. ). 291 89.097
New Westminster............. 7.36, s,67 2,9.17,428 935,778 6,.97.. 072 1,259,.09 7 F,30R, RM
Prince Rilpirt................ 1,205,322 4,232,840 1, 675. t(H 3, 3';. 33 1, 90'., 906 4,242, 710
Revelstoke .................... 323,379 ............ 2., 97 ............ 26i7. #;,7 ............
Ilossland...................... .W4, 4. 63,414 1. 511.330 1 6.834 1. 246 Qri. 13.t,476
Vancouver................... 19,'1)5,534 15,.i1.4 2S1 27, 119..171 1 22,:57 907 4'i 7t6 ,. 511 28, 48,674
Vitri. ...................... 7.269,) 533 3, ),3),'412 6, 734. -W 1 6010 523 1 (1 0 4,610,&39
Total ................... 33,02.5,9924 39,133,5r6 42,10,118S 46.9'J1,314 1 56,019,7P9 58,611,907
_________________________ ______I___________I______________
leading Articles Imported at Vancouver and Victoria.
Details of the mierchandi.,,e iml)orted into the Province are avail-
able only for Vancouver and Victoria, the entries into the other
ports not being so itemized. These, however, are the two chief ports,
and through them $4-,428,474 of the $5,039',T)"9 worth of imports











CANADA-BIBRITISH COLUMBIA.


entered for con.utimption in 1918 pn,,ed.
making up this trade were:


Articles.


DUTIABLE.
Abrasives:
Emery wheelsand manu-
factures of emery......
Polish, knife, etc.........
Animals, live ................
Ant iseppt ic suit'icat dressings.
Belting, all kinds except rub-
ber and leather.............
Blacking. ,hoe, and shoe-
makers' ink.................
Boots, shoes, and slippers ex-
cept rubber and leather....
Brass, and manufactures of...
Bread-.tuffs:
Arrowroot, biscuits, rice
macaroni, sago, and
tapioca.................
Graham flour and meal...
Brooms and brushes.........
B uttons .....................
Cane, reed, or rattau, 9plit, and
m anufat.ires of ............
Carriages, all lnd's.: iilfay
cars, trucks, and part. of..
Clocks and watches:
(Cloks, (ca,,s, mov' nit lit',
etc.......... ...........
Watches, cases, move-
m ents. etc..............
Coal, bit u rriin-n;, .ind dust...
Cocca and t'hrcoltie paste,
shell: nib, andl 'thi r'prepa-
rat ions.....................
Coffee.......................
Com bs.......................
Cork;, and ri-t her manufactures
of cork-wood ..... .........
Corsets, clasps, .tc ............
Cotton, inanuiatuurec of:
Boot. Ihoe, jnd stay laces.
Otlhler....................
Drugs, dyes, chemicals, and
medicines..................
Earrhpu, stone, and china
ware: *
Ba.thirl ..l etc............
Bri-'-k I il-, etc..........
O ther.....................
E g g ...... .... ...... ......
E last i ............. .........
Elet tric appar.tt us, motors, etc
E xplo.i\e.:
Fireworks...............
Fuses....................
GunDpowdc-r and other ex-
plosives ...............
Fani.-y goods..................
Fibers, and manufactures of:
Con dagv.... .............
Flax, hemp, and jute,
and manufactures of....
Fish (see alsofree goods).....
Fruits and nuts:
Coconut desiccated.......
Jam s, jellies, etc .........
Other (see also free goods).
Furniture, wood, iron, or
other material.. ...........
Furs, and manufactures of
(see also free goods) ........
Glass, and manufactures of...
Gloves and mitts............
Gold and silver, and manu-
factures of:
Jewelry..................
Other ....................
Oreast, axle................


Thle 1princil)l articles


Van- Victoria. Articles. Van- Victoria.
couver. c
IIer


$23,778
44,497
43,430
21,383
58,429
16,593
87,507
209,114


272,788
,13, 353
36, 524 1
16,871
1,087

604,794

25,377

3,798
33,267

40,112
263,700
3,701
9,257
32,335
20. 511
767; 888
300,038

10,979
11,305
145,825
14,24 1
J, 773
197, 44

5,959
34, S73
33,681
143,984
39,242
154,920
127,294
18,699
3,541
1,116,972
45,605
6,512
196,841
36,421

35,523
9,607
16,062


$434
700
1,2S5
2, 0.-,S
5,305

1,212
5,773
11,402


99,532
68,428
2,441
1,044
1,018
48,517

3,685
S1,643
13,053

8,067
24,364
1,249
1,638
7,972
267
119,490
623,520

2,529
4,213
81,420
16,691
S,372
38, 728
1,983

1,780
60,135
9,256
24,592
37,621
1,253
1,1 03
184,265
6, 1 75
464
35, 0:)6
7, 529

3,198
2,097
1,253


DUTIL BLE-COn ti Ie.l.e.
"I!ats, caps, and bonnets...... $126,345
Ha .... .................... 4 ,7fi3
Hobey ........................ 7,219
India rubber, gutta-percha,
and manufactures of........ 247,484
Ink ........................ 18,306
Iron and steel, and manufac-
tures of (see also free E ihd ,. 3,673,706
Knitted goods ................ ,, 25l
Lead and manufactures of 1.... ': ..
Leather, and manufactures of. 217, 570
Magic lanterns, and slides for. 4I, s74
Malt. ...................... 12,902
Meat and dairy products:
Butter, cheese, and lard.. 108,241
Mid ik, condensed and fresh 17,897
Meats................... 387,640
Sausage casing- .......... 11,156
Taillow.................. 18,240
Musical instruments.......... 127,184
Oilcloths, linoleum. etc........ I 58,187
Oils, all kind-, n. e s ......... 5,019,811
Optical. phtotrra.phc. :nd
mathemuatical in-ntrunmenl-;.. 23.136
Painis and colors............. 42,9 20
Paper, and manufactures of:
Books, periodicals, and
ot her pi inted matter.... 184,350
Other ....... ........... 29.3, 166
Pencil lead ................. 15, ?33
Purfumnirv, nonalcoholic...... 19,561
Pipe,. toba,-c ................. 13,896
Plants and trees .............. 15,989
Pocketiook<. purses, .'It........1, l 4
Pulleys, belt. for power........ 12,513
Pl i b ,i n ............ ....... 37,581
Salt i ee also free goods)...... 24,137
Seeds, n. v. s................. 31,417
Silk, .an1 manLifactures of..... 123,312
Soaps ........................ 46,294
Spices:
Mustard.................. 9, 79
Other .................... i 37, 753
Spirits, wines, malt liquors,
and other beverages:
Ale. beer. and porter..... 20,610
Spintr ................... 279,109
Wines-
Sparkliu.g ........... . 3,891
Still ............. .104,949
lime antIot her fru juices. i 13,131
Mineral and aerated
waters................. 13,977
Starch ...................... 2,939
Straw, and manufactures of.. 15,649
Sugar, ani manufactures of:
Sugar, sirups, and mo-
lasses ................... 4,427,048
Candy and confectionery.. 26,890
Glucose, saccharine, ma-
ple sugar, and sirup.... 16,772
Tea ( se' aliso free gods)....... 1,284
Tin, and manufactures of.... 26,722
Tobacco, and manufa'. t ur, s of. 73,673
Umbrtellua-, parasols, :ind :im-
shades...................... 2,851
Vegetables:
Pickles ................... 11,312
Sauces, catsups, and soy.. 13,771
Other ..................... 347,6t69
Vessels:
Launches, pleasure....... 140
Ship', and repairs on .... 37,628
Materials for construction
of ..................... 840,047
Vinegar...................... 7,110
Waste or shoddy.............. ... 13,251


$23, 142
4,074
1,736
26,266
1,355
303,877
1,521
26,289
34,858
67

8,475
405
147,326
532
2,044
12,1S4
1,105
272,058
3,401
36,510

29,145
44,417
1,265
1,248
1,601
2,172
2,169
1,118
8,400
5,659
9,54q
32,622
11,245

2,357
2,203

4,792
117,250
2,710
24,295
2,.,S2

2, 570
1,453

2,346
5,329
422
323
28,243
5,726
1,671
742
17,577
65,392
2,125
44,050
181,631
1,023
1 1,605











SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Articles.

DT THI AI. I.- ,iin til tl.

WaI aind mminlifa(tures of....
wV, il. :;nil im.aiiufactures of:
l itk l.i .. ......
I'li ill.' .1iil li til-graph, ic
frames..................
Other....................
Wool, and manufactures of...
E express parcels..............
J'.. i 11 parcels.......... .......
All other.....................


Van-
coluver.


84,243
8,663
9,289
85.. 537
745, 624
(i2, 447
ti61. (il
C43. 966


Total, dutiable......... :'6, 149, I'5
FREE.


1'r. di\\r of the mine:
:0ll ....... ...............
Whiting.................
Other....................
1Prn.dit r of the fisheries.......
Produce of the forest:
Logs and round timber...
Lumber, 1 lank -, etc......
Other....................
Animals and their produce:
Fin skins, not dlebspd ...
Grease ...................
Other....................
A gri-iiltiral products:
lih,.m corn...............
F ruit-, "ri-ni..............
Indian corn..............
Rice, inneleaned..........
Tobacco, leaf.............
I other ..................


79,249
2,852
21,198
16,233
7,362
135,613
3,955
13, 05
42: i,3601
54,t88
55,204
451.237
95, t;:34
926,035
80,466
199,425


Victoria.



$1,076
1,328
2, f24
41. 3C3
Ilo1, 360
1, 098
27, n0n
102. 0i;5

3,43.1, 476



750
4.35 A
7, 111'.
9, 762
20. 440
3,462
5,717
1,037
14,643
1,541

125,843
35,305
371,555
3,73.3
P.'0 154


Declared Exports to American Mainland and Insular Possessions.
Declared exports from British Columnbia and the Yukon Territory
to the United States and insular possessions increased in value during
1918, the total (including returned Americ;in goods) for 1917 being
$.-52.54G.197 and for 1918 $57,357,458. While these figures are for the
calendar year and hence not comparable with those covering British
C(diimbia's exports to all countries, which are for the fiscal year, still
it is clear from the two sets of figures how large a part of the Prov-
ince's total trade is with the United States.
The records of the American consular offices in the Vancouver dis-
trict show the following total values for the merchandise declared for
shipment to the United States and insular possessions in 1917 and
1918:

District. 1917 1918 District. 1917 1918

'inc'iiiver consulate gen- Nanaimoagency ........... $1,911,750 $1,493,274
eral ...................... $37,541,302 3MS5, 2,66 United State- ......... 1,911,750 1,13S,645
Uriiel Sla. I .......... 35,900,801 37,291,755 Returned American
0Krinrncd American goods. ........................... 0,497
gnoi- ............. 1,587,495 2,379,365 Hawaii ............................ 44,132
M1.iiiifost likh........... 48,382 24,236 Prince Rupert consulate... 4.310.307 2,961,118
Philippine Islands..... 3,757 154,910 U niledStates ......... 4,160,321 2,822,765
ll aI.I ................. 867 ........... Returned American
goods ............... 149,983 138,353
Victoria consulate......... 2,084,967 4,419,652 Whit horse ( Yukonri Terri-
Uimir*.l Stale .......... 2,013,631 4,261,656 torv) agency ............ 4"3,319 212,624
Returned American Unitiied States .......... 450,458 196,290
goods................ 71,336 137,711 Returned American
Hawaii............................. 285 goods................ 2,861 16,334
Ferni consulate ........... 5,507,966 6,978,169
Cuml',rl-in1 iqncvy ....... 736,586 1,472.335 United States .......... 5,479,616 6,935,061
U'r.ilel Salvs .......... 604,429 1,147,b l5 Returned American
RI-i rned American goods............... 29,3.50O 43, 10S
go l os ................ 300 21
Hawaii................ 131,857 324,519 Total ............... 52,546,197 57,387,458


Articles.

FICEE--Cunl iiiced.
Manuifactured and p.irtially
manufactured articles.
C oke .......... .........
1Drugs, dlye, and chemi-
cals ..................
Fishhook%, urti, ;eines,
etc .....................
India rubber, gutta-
pcrchoa etc ............
Jute cloth, yarn., etc .....
Metalk-
B rass .................
Copper..............
Iron and steel........
Tin..................
Zinc.................
Newspapers and maga-
zines ...................
Cakum...................
(il, coconut anid palm...
( ilseed meal and cake....
'itch and tar............
Rapq and waste...........
Iesin and rosin...........
Surgical, etc., instruments
I there ...... .............
Miscellai'oui; articles:
Settlers' effects ...........
T ea......................
O ther....................


V'an- Victoria.
rot\'er.





12, OOG6 I6,261
261.217 964,463
814,807 6,119
4
73, 50 4
b- 0l' .........
1 ,0'7 513
30.767 4,773:
4,547,710 19s,000
12m. 3-.l 21
31,20.S 12,005
131,270 31,021
27,066 I I, 65
120,383 4,4 8
3, t0)4 5.018
2.591 1,4b7
11.395 3.'2
11,100 8,095
:3I,31 11 4,479
1 33,473 43,93SJ
158,521 35,373
3,J65.256 45,0.S9
1,89J,316 :,1JS,662


Total, fiee .............. I4,613J,319 3,226, 4S4
Grand total ............. .40, 762,514 i6, b6o, 90











CANADA-BRITISH COLUMBIA.


Vancouver's shiprlents to the Philippine Islands consisted almost
wholly of lumber; those from Cuminberland and Nanaimo to Hawaii,
of coal.
Principal Articles Sent to United States.
Copper and other metals, coal, fish, and wood are the chief articles
normally sent from British Columbia to the United States, with im-

portant quantities of agricultural products figuring in the Vancouver
returns, but over half of the total value for Victoria in the last two
years was made up of shipments of trinitrotoluol. Details of the
declared exports for 1917 and 1918 to the United States from Van-
couver, Victoria, Prince Rupert, and Fernie and their agencies appear
below:


Articles.


VANCOUVER CONSULATE
GENERAL.
Animals, live:
Cattlep ..................
Other ..................
Automobile ................
Breadst uffT.:
Bran and 3horts ........
Corn....................
O ats ....................
Rice ....................
Rice erints....... .......
Sago flour ..............
Tapioca ............ ....
Wheat ...................
W heat flr.ur.............
Brick:
Cominmon ...............


$86,690
x,J36l
.5,649
1 <, 901
I C4, 9(j3
11,03.4
213, 22',
117,3%6
4t, 43S
33. 472
37, 22R
410,909
200,611

3,321


Fire ..................... 9 126
Cann'rd icod ............. 2 070
Chemicals, ,iruiuI, n11d medi-
cines:
Bark, can-cara ............ 10,706
('l ni roipal .... .. . .. .. ...........
Glum kaimr ......................
Chrom e or' ........... ................
Circus and thealriCt iln pio,. 6, 6fM9
Coal ................. ....... U 5,.21
Cocoa Ibeans ................ 11, 830
Copper:
Cop listir ................... 10,741,467
Ore ........... ....... 1,261,01ti
Cotton aiud wool mu1m3 .ce-
lures:
Armv blanki .ls......... 39, 7ra;
Other. .................. 43,3147
Druzs, empty. ............... 12. '20
Egos ................... 6, 3
Electrical fittings ............ IS, 1
Explo.ives ................. 71,218
Feitilizers .................. 22,0 l
Fibers, and manufacturesof:
Burlap................. 11.367
Hemp................... ...........
Fish:
Fresh, frozen-
Cod ................. 2 249
Halibut ............. .16,9gq2
Herring ............. 1R.,260
Salmon ............. 160, 202
Olher .............. 17,6b2
Fresh, unfrozen-
Halibut ............. 29, 92
Salmon ............ 368,941
Other ............... 2,251
Preserved-
Herring, canned................
Herring, pickled... 7S,920
Herring, salted..... 98,711
Salmon, canned..... 92,168
Salmon pickled and
salted ............. 3.,914
Other ............... 9,044


1918 Articles.


$31.472
6. 137
14,459


223, 786
100,252
77,252
575
121,127

29,303

13, 3S2
137,731)
23,672


16, 03)5
"0, 539
p.7.703
20 5,12
20,828
120,241

10. 026,549
4,312,552


5,945



1i4, 4i1


48,604

45, 44
166,036
15.949
239,, 29
36,'649

37,957
S335,735
183

178.971
337, 3.5
416, 49
53, 053
14,393


VANCOUVER GONWL'LATE
GENERAL-cOnl inUed'.
Fruits and nut&
Fruits-
Apples ........... ..
Currant .... ........
Nuts-
Cooonit, deiccated.
Copri ...............
O ther...... .......
Purs, unrinsscd............
Glass: Waitchcryst,'l, .......
Gold:
Bullion................
Cniientrilce ..........
Greawe: Vegetrablc tallow....
HI ides and skins:
Calf ....................
Cattle ...................
Sheep ...................
I I uusehold effects...........
Tee ........... ... ............
India ruliber ................
Iron arit steel, maiiufactutes
of:
Iron, pig ................
Iron, Totuid.............
lMachinery ..............
Raik, Ftp(.I ..............
O.un]k .......................
L im o ..... ...... .... ...... .
I.iquors ........ ...........
Ment and dairy products.
Meat products- -
Be rf. fresh-. ..... .. ...
Poik, fresh ..........
Preserved meats.....
Sausaig (wa.mg- ......
Pairv produet's-
l ut ter. ... ..........
Cream, l'rsh ........
Milk, preierre.d.....
M olasscs ... ................
Oils:
Fish .................
Lubrictling............
Vegetabll---
Cottonseed .........
O live ...............
Peunut ..............
Olher mnut ...........
Seeds:
A lfalla ...................
F la\.....................
Millt ...................
Suear beet.............
Sil-er:
Bullion ................
Concentrates ............
Tea.........................
Tin containers.............
Vegetables:
Beans..................
Onions.................


$27,481
59,4-70
17,056
52, 74
17,552
135,217

3, 212, 1l1
327,460

5F. 999
523, 451
42, SiG
22r, 427
25,, ', 1


57,406
S0Q, C60
S11,03
283, 790
fi, 301
200, % 9

10, 552
16 ,473
t16, 5.s.i
29,3M8

13,572
41,485
1,443
54.202
32, 92!
1 R, 91.9
27,1.11

59. 302
132, 795
WOll, 4,9
231, 1S

49, 0569
49,569


$42,914
41,098

165,430
129,578
13,022
290,378
15,129
As. 9.V
721, S36
50,615

3,443
790,124
24,723
311, 52
23,383
1,060

14,003

t j4.3
1,I9
226, 423
72,999
15,073



21,729
>b1

21,329
45,373
S,372
18,007

82. 2i6
36, 657


2,, 64
17,729
9,4A0
110,911!
194,556
I

174, .23
62, ,552
322,737
.1.4J .....


459,151 S 2,746
53, 90 1..........




IIIIIIIIIIIIII1111111111111111111111111111111111 111111111111111liii
3 1262 08485 2168


SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Articles. 1917


%'ANi'C,'LVER rONSULIATE
GENERAL-Continued.
Vcget ables-Cunt inuied.
Peas .................. 121,424
Potatoes .............. .. 37isx,'4
'oitl res, ,tehyi ratid .... ...........
V'essek. S1t, niariiie.,, fabrn-i
rat oLi ......... ...... . .........
WVood, nidJ 1ian11ij( I tires i9I
I.:lit ............. ....... 1 17. 173
Logs .... .......... ... .s2,19,30
L.um er .... ............ 2. L '-.79
iPaper ................... 1,u22, 933
I'dilig ................... 119,042
l'ol s .................... 14 ,738
Ti's ................... 12, 19
.hh i le ................. 5 12, -56
Siblilm ................... 5l7,735
T i.'s .. ....... .... ...... .. ,, .: ,
Other ................... 12,687
Wool....................... 311,553
All other .................... 173,274


1918 Articles.


643,837
655
507,305
269, 446

9,178
13(1,2-J
1, 93', 449
3,7N,441
If(I, 157
7'., 103
775, 3S6
6, 154,321
3u', 232
1., 4 14
3,,,533
83,341
232,512


Total .................. 135,901,801 37.291,755
VICTORIA CONSULATE. i


Animals, live:
Animals, wildd ..........
Birds, wild.............
)Iorses ...................
Other live stock.........
Art works ................
Automobiles...............
Bones......................
Lrejalii ulfs:
Oats....................
W heat..................
Brick.......................
Chain .......................
Coal.......................
Contractor's outfit...........
Copper ore..................
Drums.....................
I.l' S ........................
Fertilawrs..................
1 iali .
Clams..................
Oysters ..................
Other........ ..........
Furs, raw..............
hiJel ........................
Household effects............
Junk ........................
Kelp ash ....................
Liquors.....................
Machinery..................
Meat, whale ................
Oils;
Dogfish.................
W hale...................
Paper, waste................
T i' iIit n-it r Iulliol ................
Vi gt'a I bli'-:
eijns ...............
Potatoes .................
Wood, and manutai( tures of:
LI.U -; .....................
Liinlhu r .................
,.Zh IiEll .f h .. .. .. .. .. .. ....
All other...................

Total................
CUMBERLAND AGENCY.
Coal and cokle:
Coal...................
I ,i '- ................. ...
Milk, condensed ............
WV- l. niil' mInaillfilcilir(. of:
l.izntir. cprlcr. rough ..
Lumb..r, fir, rough .....


2,274
3,103

2,584
2,413
5,m10
33,745

2,895
28,083
4,213
151,151
1m,4 m
1S, 499
50,093
....,.......



2, uO5(
4, R21
31,936
lx, S74
8,815
7,061

14, S07
5,5.2
4,178

60,401
2,S.49
1,332,518


C55

3,120
21,000



377
4, 6.3

2uO, '99

59,342
11,420
t., 337
151,455

15, 90

112, Q12
1, %26
'2, 716
43, 28-5'
3,013
2, "60
7.76, 067
8,269
5,114
123,928

2, 784. S.0


.. .. 3,100
..........


21,997
R ,930
;. 9.3'-
:V5,956
52,774
2,013, 031


603,662



767


Tnr ..l................0 604,429


28,4451
532,940
4c, 225
9,868

4,281,656


1,113,348
707
6,552
5,774
21,434

1,147, 815


NANAI3IO AGENCY.
Coal ........................
Fish: Salmon. frefh ........
Household erfects...........
Ores .........................
Wood and man ufac Iu res o[f:
Lumher ................
Shingles................
A ll other ...................

Total .................
PRINCE RUPERT CONSULATE.

Copper:
Blister ..................
O re ......................
Fertilizers ...................
Fish:
H alibut ................
Salmon, canned........
Salmon, fresh...........
O ther...................
Fur- raw...................
Household effects..........
Oils: Fish ...................
Paper, news print...........
Sil\ er ore ...................
Silver-lead ore.............
Wood, and manufactures or:
Lumber...............
Pulp ...................
Shingles ................
Tics .....................
Zinc ore ......... .........
All other ...................

Total .................
WIHITERORSE AGENCY.

Animals, live: Foxes ........
Copper ore .................
Furs, raiw. ..................
Gold-sil c r ore .......... ....
Hunting tro[phies............
Wood: Cordwood..........

Total .................

FERNIE CONSULATE.

Automobiles................
Breadstuffs: Oats...........
Coal and coke:
Co:il .....................
Coke ...................
Copper plates, unmanufac-
I ured ......................
Furs........................
Gold ......................
H ay. .........................
Hides .......................
Household ffeert; ...........
Iron and steel: Rails........
Lead ore ....................
Manganese..................
Silver (contained in copper,
lead, and zinc ores i........
Wood, and manufactures or:
Lath ...................
Logs ....................
Lumber................
Piling, cedar...........
Poles, cedar.............
Posts, cedar..........
Shingles................
Zinc ore....................
All other...................

Total ..............


i1,7S7,304
25,200
2,000

30,670
65,920
656
1,911,750


$1,109,4913
5,163

159, 453
102,068
46,486
15.980
1,438, 65


1,259,832 261,620
161,077 15: ,819
........... 23, 196

2, 126,604 1,566,217
191,421 167,175
37,696 75,327
44,626 39,088
46, S26 22,580
5,926 5,438
........... 22,786
....... ... 9,750
15,277 ..........
8,773 3,690

22,969 145,761
91,221 146,527
111,461 1.54,392
........... 1,053
31,088 20,727
3,497 1,619
4,160,324 1 2,822,765


326,040
118, 845
4, 5&S
865
120

450,458


9,815

1,277,417
194,795

1,465,370

S46, 765
2.5,981
30,527
12,488
579,711
.... ..o.....

550,286

4,551
.........ii.
855,114
85,286
73,565
14,706
671
569,442
32,120

5,479,616


1,300
&3,306
129, 80W4
700
1,080
100

196,290


13,915
4,551

1,930,963
144,990

1,481,351
1,44%
159,131
8,460

49,204

1,437,i44
25,256

906,996

5,629
346,927
42,512
67,765
31,801
39,668
226,950
10,464

6,935,061


I JlMI J I N WASIINGTON.: GOVERNMENT PfINTING OFFICE: 1919


_U.. DFPgcTRoi,u.