Supplement to Commerce reports

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Material Information

Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00070
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00074

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text

"- 5. 7 "


SUPPLEMENT TO


COMMERCE REPORTS
DAILY CONSULAR AND TRADE REPORTS
ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE 1
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, WASHINGTON, D. C.

Annual Series No. 61b July 29, 1915

NEW ZEALAND.a
By Consul General Alfred A. Winslow, Aucklandnl, May 21.
The imports into New Zealand during the calendar year 1914 were
valued at $106,362,686 against $108,466,022 for 1913. showing a nomi-
nal loss which is more than accounted for during the September
quarter o( l-ySt"ea-ry-when shipping was so badly disturbed. The
follow 0g taf'e shows the value of the imports by quarters for 1914
comop'are~d 16ith the., preceding two yeilrs:

j A or 4uaricr. - 1912 1913 1'J4

March i... ........ . ....... $26 .133 31,650,380 $31,763,255
June... U s........U ".. ... I- ..... 23,1 S4,220 23,725,362 23,832.106
Septem"I |l l.'R i T'ft ... .... 24,179.273 30.tt67.346 27.993.14S
D e ember ...... .... ... ..... 27,865,871 22,422,934 22,774,177
Total ............... ......... ...................... 102. ('S2.497 IlUS, 466,022 106,362, S6

It is noticeable that there was a slight gain in the December quar-
ter over the same period of 1913, but this can not be expected for the
first quarter of 1915 as compared with the first quarter of 1914.
Reasons Attributed to Decrease in Import Trade.
The following extract on trade conditions is from one of the lead-
ing dailies of this city:
The falling off in imports is attributable to two distinct causes-the general
inclination of the public to economize since the war began, thus causing im-
porters to exercise a corresponding caution, and the impossibility of getting
even cautious orders executed in full. Those who c(an nrot see any.vthiin beyouil
the fact that trade is going on in New Zealand under practically normal con-
ditions can have no idea of the extent to which trade is disturbed in other coun-
tries, even in Great Britain. The war came at a time when business all over
the world was more complicated and intricate than it had ever been. anil we
ninst remember that no country in the world conducts such a large external
trade per head of population as does New Zealand. With some of our usu.1!
sources of supply cut off altogether, and with others curt;,iled from various
causes, it unavoidably takes time for trade to readjust itself. Great Britain
can not instantly supply us with the hundreds of articles we previously drew
from the Continent; orders are still unexecuted that have been in the hands of
British manufacturers for over six months. * Importers and consumers
generally must make up their minds to accept the present position and to await
patiently and hopefully the improvement which will come in time. Meanwhile
the Dominion is accumulating an enormous credit balance, which effectually dis-
poses of any possibility of prolonged financial stringency. When normal condi-
tions again prevail there will be huge credits in London for New Zealand to
draw upon. This will give a great impetus to trade generally and provide the
means for commercial and industrial activity such as the Dominion has never
before seen.
a A review of the export trade of New Zealand for 1914 and other trade conditions
was published as supplement to COMMERCE REPORTS No. rBla, Apr. 22, 1915.
99019-fllb-15




~'1


2 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Imports for the Past Two Years.

It seems clear from the above that now is the time for American
interests to get busy and more fully cover this field. With this in
view there is given below a complete list of the imports for 1914 as
compared with 1913, so far as obtainable. It is not possible to give
these by countries as yet, but this should give a fair idea of the
demand along different lines in this field.


I!
Articles.
Quantity.


Apparel, wearing................ .........
Beer, ale, and stout...................... gallons.. 293,012
Bicycles, motorcycles, etc............... number.. 10,816
Books, paper, and music, printed..............................
Boots, shoes, etc....................... doz. pairs.. 140,622
Candies .............. ..... .... ................ lbs.. 1,944,846
Carbide of calcium......................... tons.. 2,316
Carpeting, matting, and oilcloth................................
Cement (building)......................... barrels.. 40,844
Coal ..................... .................... tons. 468,940
Cocoa and chocolate ............................ Ibs. 615,965
Coffee and chicory.......................... do...do. 320,214
Confectionery ....................................... ............
Cordage and tw ine ..................................... .....
Corn sacks, woolpacks and wool pockets ........... ............
Drapery................................... ..... ............
Earthen and china ware........................... ............
Fish, preserved.............................. Ibs.. 3,167,829
Flour, wheaten.......................... centals.. 59,544
Fruits:
Dried-
Currants ..... .......... ............. lbs.. 944,053
Figs, dates, prunes ................... do .... 2,976,075
Raisins ............................. do ... 3,132,827
Other............................. do .... 534,294
Fresh-
Apples.............................. do ...............
Other ..................... .. do.... ......... i
Furniture ........................................... ............
Glass and glassware.............................. ...............
Grain and pulse, unprepared:
Beans and peas............. ......... centals.. 5,452
Other ................................... do.... 29,666
Greases ........................... ........... cwt. 7,459
H ardw are .......................................... .... ........
Hats and caps............................. dozen. 86,455
Hosiery ...................................... ............
India-rubber goods other thau tires................ ............
Iron:
Bar, bo!t, and rod....................... tons. 26,608
Corrugated galv anized sheet.............. cwvt. 400, 291
Fencing w ire, barbed................... tons. 3,2 9
Fencing wire. plain. ................... do... 10,045
Pigand scrap .........................do.. 9,619
Pipes and fittings....... ............. ...d o... 10,724
Jams, jellies, and preserves .................... Ibs.. 546,115
Lead:
P ig and bar..............................tons.. 1,114
Sheet ......................... ......... c t.. 15,094
Leather ......... ........................... lbs.. 1,293,998
Leather manufactures and saddlery............................
Machinery:
Agricultural ................................... ...........
Dairying .......................................
E electric .............................. . ....... ...........
l-.ngines, gas, oil, etc. ... ..............No.. 5,106
M ifning ....................................
Sew ing..................... .... ........ N o.. 12,919
M anure......................................tons.. 103,925
Matches and vestas............. .... gross boxes.. 208,953
Milk and cream, preserved.................... Ibs.. 273,990
M illinery........................................... ............
Nails...................... ................cwt.. 93,211
Oils in bulk:
Animal ............................... gallons.. 48,810
Benzine................................ do ............
Benzoline, gasoline, etc ..............do....
Castor ................. .................. do .... 139,848
Crude residual................ ........... do...............
Kerosene ..............................do....do 3,269,583


913 1914

Value. Quantity. Value.


$6,227,766
281,546
337,258
1,210,143
1,945,369
149,230
159,125
1,275,641
90,753
2,269, 1.1I
294, 8.6
59,997
688,956
494,534
1,354,225
1,623,326
941,0 1
414,397
129,225

53,424
154,643
213,283
50,986


303,017
1,221,375
29,292
75,830
33,024
2,273,448
653,999
1,021,215
183,885
1,255,133
1,620,514
189,9001
509,498
239,310
963,241
58,028

107,953
85,150
877,444
479,954
787,09S
34, 169
1,823, 2_S
924,518
104, 654
237,777
1,836,724
149,182
32,878
462,7S5
283,581
27,179

89, 855
520.06i5


S312,303
10,286
137,633
2,543,276
2,956
40,498
518,070
571,427
338,284




3,157,725
221,180

3,366,514
3,166,768
4,913,674
695,531
2,184,018
21,127,927


4,456
125,892
8,290
............
96, 820


22,251
317,618
5,103
14,327
11,264
17,532
688,350
1,218
24,697
877,243



4,917

8,854
139,124
206,592
969, .326
90,908

39,694
4,637,687
2,203,288
164,262
75,654
4,992.918


85,696,321
303,144
297,869
1,227,068
1,863,100
195,716
203,308
1,026,500
96,225
2,718,300
279,906
57,415
826,638
405,055
1,281,851
1,380, 777
603,714
427,717
477,559

199,332
179,058
300,549
70,924
142,695
705,914
220,822
870,592

18,390
238,604
38,309
1,791,358
653,965
976,030
233,305
881,561
1,230,027
279,09S
658,773
233,387
1,203,120
71,148
124,840
139,352
589,659
400,537
792,227
303,801
1,908,483
763,427
145,387
195,867
2,492,582
157,222
134,807
512,209
285,162
25,014
1,421,587
610,931
104,854
14,191
775,574









NEW ZEALAND.


1913 1914
Articles.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.

Oils in bulk-Continued.
Linseed .................................. do... 551,352 1397,739 339,583 &226,574
Mineral lubricating..................... do... 806,193 296,151 883,354 334,908
Turpentine and terehene................ do.... 166,766 106,007 10-,906 70,418
Onions ....................................... tons. 2,688 116,445 1,808 94,682
Paints, etc............... ............................... 775, 190 ............ 868,475
Paper:
Printing.................................. cwt.. 290,247 1,082,256 307,937 1,105,683
Other .................................... do... 69,751 455,495 67,605 457,198
Pianos................................... number.. 5,204 662,569 3,809 461,20.
Pickles and sauces ........................ gallons.. 25,667 69,98.5 26,982 67,167
Potatoes.....................................tons.. 28 1,299 17 905
Railway and tramway plant.................................. 347,964 ........... 784,933
Rice .......................................... cwt.. 79,815 229,280 124,255 339,317
Salt ............................. ............................... 362,058 ........... 323,233
Seeds, grass and clover........................ ewt.. 29,875 482,109 29,558 478,387
Specie....... .................................................. 3,088,621 ............ 3,464,310
Spirits (beverages):
Brandy ............................... gallons.. 73,623 .358,286 80,437 208,&21
Gin, geneva, and schnapps .............. do.... 12S.201 173,792 122,032 158,239
Rum .................................... do... 17,754 30,378 15,996 19,792
Whiky.................................. do.... 739,190 1,407,679 744,967 1,41S, 156
Other.................................... do.... 18,055 52,709 17,321 41,579
Stationery ......................................... ............ 715,993 ..... ...... 669, 1X3
Sugar......................... ............. c t.. 1,291,392 3,954,265 1,013,780 3,403,177
Tea.......... .............................. lIbs.. 7,068,566 1,445,024 9,951,774 2,092,600
Textile piece goods:
Canvas..................................................... 501,566 ............ 444,720
Cotton ........................... .......................... 4,632,309 ............ 4,279,712
Linen ...................................................... 290,822 ............ 216,335
Silk............... ........................................ 474,547 ........ ... 682, 80
W oolen ............ ... ..................................... 1,958,902 ........... 1,768,384
Timber:
Hewn................................ sup. ft.. 13,220,132 793,677 8,482,099 531,297
Sawn.................................... do.... 33,688,145 1,492,419 30,085,970 1,251,780
Tin:
Ingot, bar, pig, and block................cwIt.. 3,787 202,300 5,399 211,376
Tinned sheets and plates................ do.... 85,795 389,996 88,998 374,389
Tobacco:
Manufactured............................. Ibs.. 2,177,715 1,270,210 2,695,788 1,697,128
Cigars........................... do.... 61,385 127,731 77,96.3 161,295
Snuff ........... ........... . ......... do.... 1,360 788 803 525
Cigarettes.................... ............ do.... 586,721 862,864 704,088 1,122,414
Unmanufactured.......................do.... 20,8s3 6,969 18,016 6,S08
Tools .......... ............................................... 799,571 ........... 742,526
Vehicles, motor:
Bodies............................. .number.. 2,731 775,486 3,129 820,7914
Chassis............................... .....do.... 2,913 2,526,434 3,480 2,826, 565
Wine, fermented:
Sparkling.............................gallons.. 12,820 118,996 11,617 102,415
Still.................................... do.... 128,278 255,890 150,232 283,621
All other articles................ .............................. 34,143,013 ............ 29,224,195
Total.. .................... .................. ............ oS, 466,022 ............ 106,362,6.86

Of the imports for 1913 Germany supplied goods amounting to
$3,398,360, which must now come entirely from another source.

Continuous Increase in Exports.

The exports of New Zealand have materially increased during the
past few years, showing a gain of more than 50 per cent since 1903,
with a bright outlook for the next few years.
The following table shows the exports of the more important items
for the past four calendar years:

Items 1911 1912 1913 1914

Pastoral products:
Butter.................................... $7,674,066 110,165,189 $10,033,024 $11,380,6,sO
Cheese ... ................................ 5,801,145 8,177,632 8,615, 130S 12,478,314
Frozen meat............................... 17,049,325 19,025,917 21,655,599 28,532,591
Skins, etc................................. 4,435,907 5,313,590 5,8.36,758 6,395,340
Tallow.................................... 2,955,216 3,332,282 3,226,918 3,379,084
Wool...................................... 31,591,892 34,578,833 39,212,408 45,346,602
Other items................................ 2,242,468 1,800,337 1,541,814 2,306,049




-. -- -- *b. U .is


SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE


Items.


Agricultural products:
Barley ..............................
Beans and peas ............... ..............
Oats................... .... .............
Potatoes ............... .............
Seeds f(grass and clover) ....................
W heat ........... ....... ..........
Other items...... .................
Coal............................................
G old ...........................................
K auri gum .....................................
Phorm ium fiber................................
T im ber................. .....................
Other New Zealand produce ...................
Total New Zealand produce..............


1911


$111,516
383,504
44,825
31,019
196,203
1,066,717
175,179
994,610
8,833,919
1,925,708
1,460,967
2,138,111
2,289,805


91,402,102


$236,614
545,705
2,354,198
731,449
339,166
465,734
488,567
1,051,991
6,546,080
1,952,951
1,831,089
2,387,057
2,197,775


I I -


103,522,156


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA



3 1262 08491 1584


$4,667
433,722
142,355
36,221
294,384
57,502
393,651
997,681
7,102,652
2,672,224
3,513,243
1,5.52,681
2,552,645


109,875,329


$44,236
443,231
807,498
34,134
357,936
17,422
476.688
1,373,146
4,357,303
2,420,811
2,215,299
2,056,339
2,031,958


126,454,661


Of the above the United States took less than one-half of 1 per
cent during 1914, while the United Kingdom took about 80 per cent
and British colonies about 14 per cent, leaving less than 6 per cent for
the remainder of the world.
This largely explains why the United Kingdom and colonies sup-
ply the major portion of the imports into this country. The United
States took New Zealand products to the value of $4,526,088 and
shipped to the country goods to the value of $10,258,248.

Shipments of American Goods to New Zealand.

According to United States statistics, the exports of American
goods to New Zealand during thle fiscal year ended June 30,1914. were
valued at $S.915,434. compared with $9.074.-279 for the preceding fiscal
year. Some of the principal items and their value during the year
ended June 30, 1914. were as follows:


Articles.


Agricultural imple-
m ents ...... ..
Autoimoliles and
pars. ............
Books, music, etc...
Canned truits......
Cash registers ...
Cotton cloths... ...
Cotton wearing ap-
parel ....... ..
Clovci seed ........
Furniture, wood ...
Lamps, chandeliers,
etc ......... .. ....
Lumber:
Fir ..... .....
Oak .........
Redwood......


Value.


3265,09S
1,0S9,951
70, 093
95,263
60,009
t64,0,1
131,905
76t. 210
41,5b3
51,S04
70, 96
37,76S
30,723


Art miles.

Oils:
IlJuminating....
Lubricating ....
Gasolene ........
Naphtha, etc...
Oranges ..........
Paints, colors, etc ..
Paraffin and paraffin
w ax ......... ....
Prunes .............
Patent medicines...
Raisins...........
Sewing machines...
Salt ........... ....
Soap ..............
Sausage casings.....
Structural iron and
st,.-el ........ .....


Value. 1


$630,292
179.880
630,947
593, 25
51,246
109,93S
44,209
46,992
86,970
71,125
113,283
49,363
72,563
64,956
90,911


Articles. Value.

Tools ............... 300,414
Tobacco:
Plug .......... 163,766
Smoking ....... 180,862
Wire:
Barbed......... 105,749
Other .......... 165,825
Wire nails......... 88,100
Wire manufactures,
n.e.s .... .. ... 65,428
All other articles ... i 2,822,726
Total ......... 8,915,434


Business of Auckland Post Office.

During the past 10 years the mail business of Auckland, New Zea-
land, has increased greatly, as shown by the following figures: The
number of letters and post cards sent out increased from 6.853,420 in
1904 to 15,427,65)0 in 1914. The receipts of the office in 1904 were
,200,8S4, with $422,757 for 1914, and in 1904 the saving-bank depos-
itors numbered 29,303, while in 1914 they numbered 72,610.


WASHINGTON : GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1915