Supplement to Commerce reports

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Material Information

Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00070
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00073

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text
- -,&q 2!KIA- 6f/^

i .
SUPPLEMENT TO


COMMERCE REPORTS
\j ~ DAILY CONSULAR AND TRADE REPORTS
ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, WASHINGTON, D. C.

Annual Series No. 61a April 22, 1915

NEW ZEALAND.
By Consul General J. I. Brittain, Auekland, February 19.
Thile consular district of Auckland comprises the entire Dominion
of New Zealand, including the North and South Islands and Stewart
Island, with a coast line of 4,330 miles. The total area of the Do-
>. minion is 103,658 square miles. The leading cities are Auckland,
with a population of 120,000; Wellington, the capital, with 75.000;
Christchurch, 86,000; and Dunedin, 70,000. The last two cities are
on the South Island. Besides the consulate general at Auckland,
there are American consular agencies at Wellington, Christchurch,
and Dunedia.
Productive Capacity of the Dominion.
The-leading industries are cattle and sheep raising and the produc-
tion of frozen beef and mutton and the manufacture of butter anti
C; cheese. The production of kauri gum is an important industry in
the northern part of North Island.
... Owing to the mildness of the climate and sufficient rainfall, New
.' Zealand is better adapted to cattle and sheep raising than Australia,
as long droughts are unknown here.
Many confound New Zealand with Australia, not realizing thab
each has its separate government. It is a self-governing dominion
under the British Empire. Few countries have more natural ad-
vantages or present greater opportunities. It has magnificent deep-
water harbors and an abundant supply of coal and other mineral
wealth, aside from forests of timber.
Although the actual settlements date back less than 75 years, the
European population exceeds 1,000,000, and the per capital of private
wealth is equal to that of any country, being $1,239, or a total of
$1,344,372,383.
Increased Demand for New Zealand Frozen Meats.
Since the closing months of 1914 there has been an extraordinary
demand in the United Kingdom for frozen meat., to supply the
troops. In 191-1 the total meats exported were 2,790,722 carcasses of
frozen mutton and 11,822 pieces of mutton, all weighing 157,849,417
pounds, and 3,748,148 carcasses of lamb weighing 127,451,788 pounds.
In 1913 these exports were 2,266,282 carcasses of mutton weighing
127,875,693 pounds and 3,507,267 carcasses of lamb weighing 120,339,-
705 pounds. In 1914 the exports of frozen beef were 72,916,637
pounds and in 1913, 31,035,707 pounds. The frozen meat exports
shows an increase of 32 per cent in value and 25 per cent in weight
over 1913.
88360'-.-15








2 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

The exports of frozen meats to the United States in 1913 were
valulied at $18,528 and in 1914, $871,530, showing an increase of
$853,002.
Exports of the Country.
Since the inauguration o(if refrigerating steamers the export of
meat has developed wonderfully in New Zealand, as will be seen by
the following table of principal exports of the country for 1913 and
1914:

Art iies. 1913 1914 Articles. 1913 1914

W ool..................... 39,1(0,033 45, '-.,6, 034 ('on! ..................... $99,34S 61,371,312
Frozen meal: I weatherr ................... 155.253 199,090
LtarnJ .... ........... 1 1.335.3. 328 12.414.n53 Live stock ................. 39.,8 592.779
Million ................ 8.077.923 10.413.217 Saus-igeskins.............. 453,200 677,737
IB ef ..... ............ 1.1,,S .261 5. (N3, ') Tow. ..................... 316,570 179.898
1'rservred men ........... 4'. 794 5410.515- Oals ....................... 142, 16i5 806,420
Butler ..................... 10."',i.24 11,3' 5,479 'Who t ........... .... .... 57,425 17,399
Ch ese .....................I 4. 1u3.I 43 12, 411.47 Potatoes ................... 36. 173 34,088
Gold ...................... 7.0'.)3, ,5 4 351,4313 Rabbitsand hares, frozen.. 370,526 349,293
Skin, ...................... 1 4.5Wi -W 7 4, .13,915 Seeds...................... 293.991 357,454
Uemp..................... 3,1f.,. 55.1i 2.212,340 Hops ..................... 110,226 1011,001
Tallow.................... 3.22.A1 ns 3 374.Ssl Other arlicles............ 5,144,947 4.627.502
l ide's..................... 1.27"u, u 1,742,"WJ3
Knuri um..... ...2. 2.,I 57 2. 417.577 Total................ 111,715,471 127,630,631
'Timwlr........ ..... .... 1, -1' *U. 2,(i:y.59

The leading exports showing substantial increases were wool,
$0.126.001 ; frozen neat, $'K,760,149); and cheese, $3,858,001.
Shipments and Prices of Wool.
Owing to the extremely dry weather iand the European demand
on account of the war, the offerings at the November and December:
sales were larger than usual and prices were satisfactory. The ex-
ports for 1914 were 210,1-1:2,S198 pounds and for 1913, 188,543,036
oIouInds, or an increase of 17 per cent in quantity and 10 per cent in
value. The average prices realized at the November sales were:
Fine half-breed mnierino, 22 to 25 cents; fine cross breeds, o20 to 24
cents; Shropshire and Romney, 22 to 25 cents; medium crossbred,
19 to 21 cents; coarse crossbred and Lincoln, 17L to 20k cents; in-
ferior log stained and cotted, 16 to 17A cents. The February, 1915,
sales showed advances of 2 to 4 cents a pound for the better grades.
American buyers were present at the early sales, expecting to largely
increase their: 1913 purchases, but owing to the embargo they were not
permitted to buy. The number of sheep in New Zealand at present
is estimated at 26(Y.( i.UOO.
Increased Exports of Butter and Cheese-Kauri Gum.
The exports of lbuttcr and cheese also increased materially. The
butter export- in 1914 were 48.615,504 pounds and in 1913, 41,712,088
pounds. Thle shipments of cheese in 1914 were 96,855,136 pounds
and in 1913, (;S,506,-36 pounds. Tihe shipments of cheese to the
United States and Canada in 19141 were 33,556 boxes compared with
115.219 boxes for 1913. The general use of milking machines in
New Zealand has stimulated the dairy industry through reducing the
cost of milking.
The kauri gum industry was prosperous until the war commenced,
but since then the business has been dull and disorganized. The
total exports for 1914 were valued at $2,417,577, compared with







NEW ZEALAND.


$2,668,657 for 1913. Of this amount thle United States took $1,491,-
374 worth in 1914 and $1,487,928 worth in 1913. In order to keep
the gum diggers employed during the depression and prevent serious
losses, the Government of New Zealand appointed agents authorized
to purchase gum from the diggers, advancing 50 per cent of the
market price ruling July, 1914, and holding the gum until the market
improves, at which time the l)roduct will be sold and the diggers will
be paid the remainder of the price realized less actual expenses.
Short Wheat Crop-Production and Shipments of Apples.
Owing largely to the dry weather in 1914 the production of wheat
in New Zealand will not meet the demand, hence the Government has
purchased 1,000.000 bushels in Canada to be delivered at various in-
tervals. The production of wheat in 1914 is estimated at about
5,000,000 bushels. Wheat has also been purchased in Australia, but
in smaller quantities. The action of the Government restricting the
sale and fixing the price of wheat has been withdrawn. One writer
says that while the price of milling wheat was fixed at $1.32 a bushel
wheat of an inferior grade used for fowl feed was sold at a much
higher price. The Government's action in fixing the price of wheat
doubtless prevented speculation and gave the people cheaper bread.
Efforts are being made to largely increase the production and ex-
portation of fresh fruit from New Zealand, especially apples. It is
claimed that the production of apples for export within the next
four years will amount from 1,500.000 to 2,000,000 cases. In 1914
there were exported 67.961 cases of apples, mostly to South America.
Recently the New Zealand Government sent a special commissioner
to that country to ascertain what difficulties past shipments encoun-
tered and to open new markets. A bounty of 2 cents a pound is paid
by the Government for apples exported when graded and packed
under Government supervision.
Complaints are made that sufficient attention has not been given
to the eradication of various pests injurious to the fruit. The pres-
ent area under fruit cultivation is placed at 42,350 acres.
Trade Conditions.
Possibly New Zealand has suffered less in consequence of the war
than any other country. Shortly after war was declared business
was disturbed to a certain extent and the banks suspended specie
payment, but the Government made the outstanding issue of paper
currency legal tender. Some firms were not able to discount their
paper and asked for extensions, but there was little serious embar-
rassment. So soon as l)rodl(ucers were assured that the ocean trade
routes would remain open, enabling their produce to reach the Lon-
don markets and permit the importation of merchandise, confidence
was restored.
With the exception of dullness in the building trade, business is
almost normal. Merchants are not. however, purchasing large
stocks. Generally speaking, there were pretty full stocks when the
war commenced.
Statistics of the import trade for 1914 are not yet available. Those
for 1913, giving a detailed list of the imports from the United States,
Germany, France, and Canada, were published in Daily Consular
and Trade Reports for November 17, 1914.







SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Extension of American Trade.
Shortly after the war began American manufacturers and ex-
porters renewed their efforts to increase the sale of American mer-
chandise here. This was done largely through correspondence and
other methods.
There was a movement organized with a view to advising the
people to trade with the Empire when possible, and chambers of
commerce passed resolutions along similar lines. Many business men,
however, fully appreciate the changes in the new American tariff,
which favors New Zealand exports, such as wool, hides, kIcauri gum,
meat, and dairy products. They realize that trade should be recip-
rocal.
The greatest barriers, however, have been lack of cargo space from
Atlantic and Pacific ports, excessive increase in freight rates, lack of
resident American salesmen, and direct banking facilities. Large
orders sent to New York could not be filled because of no available
ships. Merchandlise purchased in San Francisco did not arrive in
time for distribution.
Care Should be Taken in Packing, Etc.
There has never been a time when American exporters should
exercise as much care as at present in preparing merchandise for ex-
port. Every article should be carefully examined to see that it is in
perfect condition. No defective article, no matter how slight the
defect, should be exported. Quality should never be sacrificed to
price. The utmost care should also be taken when packing merchan-
dise. Articles should fit the cases. and these should be well bound.
American packing has greatly improved, but a large consignment of
machinery recently arrived here with nearly every crate and box
broken.
PRegardless of all difficulties, however, the exports from the United
States to New Zealand for the nine months ended Septemlber 30, 1914,
exceeded the same period in 1913 by $1PS,515. The total value of the
iml)orts from the United States for the nine months ended September
30, 1913, was $s,1.X,18;. and( for the same 1)eriod in 1914, $8,395,201.
While the import statistics for the last quarter of the year can not
be obtained for some months, it is confidently felt that the total im-
ports from the United States for 1914 will eullial those for 1913, which
were $10,239,174.
Orders for American Locomotives. Machinery, Dynamos, Etc.
Since the writer came to Auckland in August last, six cargoes of
American timber have arrived. An order has been placed in the
United States by the New Zealand Government for 10 locomotives,
costing about $200.000, and an order by a private company for mill
machinery, dlynamos, and electric appliances amounting to upward of
$200,000. One of the leading Auckland merchants has gone to the
United States to purchase plate and window glass, and two other
wholesale dealers were expected to sail with a view to making other
purchases. American manufacturers should make special efforts to
extend courtesies to these wholesalers.
There will doubtless be a disposition to increase the general tariff
on certain articles, but in view of the rapid advance in the cost of
living, which already amounts to about 20 per cent, any radical in-
creases will meet opposition. The preferential list will probably be
extended.








NEW ZEALAND. 5

Canada's trade with New Zealand is increasing, especially in
musical instruments, motor cars, fresh fruit, printing paper, grain,
and machinery. Being a part of the British Empire the tariff is
more favorable and there are direct steamship lines. Tb .-e is a
good passenger and freight service between Vancemver and Aucialknd
and a subsidized freight line from Montreal and A,,icklind.
The principal articles imported from the United States ame auto-
mobiles, electrical machliiney, hardware, wire, canned and evaporated
fruits, windmills, drugs, agricultural machinery, adding m-achine-s,
typewriters, corn flour, oils, timber, pumps, gas engiies, cash rgis-
ters, tobacco, tools, clocks, paraffin, railway locomr otives, leather,
boots and shoes, glassware, and glass jars.
Exports to United States.
The following table shows the articles- invoiced for the United
States during the past two years at the American ,consii late gcreral
at Auckland and the consular agencies at Cliristchurch, Dunedin,
and Wellington:

Artikles. 1913 1114 Articles. 1913 1914

FROM AUCKLAND. FROM DTUNEDINT.
Bulter ........................ 5494 9,1. Meit,frozen......................... 26,527
Casings ........................ 22 3 299' Velts ......................... $2-., 4 .........
Crass seed ................... :3, ........... ... ........ ... .. .. 2,812
Hemp ..................... 103..22 7i. 22 So.. I. ........................... 21,805 6,961
Hide ..... ............. ..... ... .' 2:) 171, 7. \Vfld ......................... 695,902 277,934
Kauri gum ................... 1, 46,92-'.S 1,5.1,37,4 U t.cr artieles................. 6,126 3,5i4
Meat, frozen ............................ .. ')i -----
Pelts ......................... 3,,.31.3 I., 7L I Total ................... 749,847 317,778
Skins:
Rabbit .................. l N 097 FROM WELLINGTON.
Sheep ................... 111.4",. ., 154 i
W ool .. ................. '2 5 1 tlr......2 l 91 tter .... .............. 150,944 114,309
Other art kiles ............... 4,2t.o 7. it-"j Hemp ....................... : 354,931 1 l1. fcO
_ _ H ides ..Hs...................... ,.417 12.. .i')
Total ................... 2. ,'4 0 ,1 2,0,.5. 251 Mcail, frozen ................. 692 127. ,'A
Pes......................... 2. 52, 4 2.., 33)
FROM CIHRISTCIUr.CH. Skills:
Calf ....................... 3,114 21,65,
Butter ..... ............... 2. 97Sh ep.......... Seep ...... 332,6 08 51, 6i36
Hemp ..... ............... 2u.3,;j4 21.S1 9 5 Vorl.......................... .......... 10,039
Meoat, frozen .......................... 5?S.L9 4 Other articles ................. 6,325 6,046
Pelts ..... ................ 7. 4,7. 894,' -24
Seed, grass.................. 12,223 265 Tot..l................ 926,555 59s,095
W ool ........................ 1: L-,7'.71 1 0 1,5'4.3
Other artile.3 ................. 397 lJi', 531
Total................. l,346, 57 2,409, 1,.t

The exports invoiced at the American consulate general at AucIk-
land for Hawaii during last year were valued at $,.3,701, compared
with $31,309 for 1913. The items for 1914 were: Butter, $45,164;
frozen meat, $-14,990; and other articles, $3,550. The exports to the
Philippines, as invoiced at the consulate general, were valued at $110,
made up of engine oil. The only other exports to the American in-
sular possessions were $657 worth of onions, invoiced at the a 'r cy
at Christchurch fo:r Hawaii.
Conditions in Christchurch District.
American Consular Agent Frank Graham, at Christchurch, reports
that there is no money stringency there, but that banks are accom-
modating in their advances and discounts. Money is offered freely,
for investment on real estate mortgage at 5- to 6 per cent. High-
grade stocks are advancing in price and are in demand.







SUPPLEMENT. TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Thle wheat harvest will be better than expected, and high prices
are being paid for wool, meat, wheat, and other farm products.
The cost of living has increased. chiefly the prices of food products.
and affects the working classes more particularly. With high freight
and insurance rates, the iml)ort market is unsettled and purchases
are only being mniade for immediate requirements.
The leading industries of Christchurch are freezing works and the
Kaiapoi Woollen Co. The freezing works had to close down owing
to the lack of insulated steamers, as the freezing houses are full.
The woolen mills, which manufacture the finest line of all-wool
tourist rugs. blankets, and other woolen goods, are operating to the
fullest capacity. Owing to high wages and labor conditions, it is
ditlicult to manufacture for export.
Business Activities in Dunedin District.
American ('onsular Agent I. 0. Bridgeman, at Dunedin, reports
that with the exception of the first week or two after the outbreak of
the war, when gold was withdrawn from circulation, there has been
no tightening of the money market. Trade accounts have been set-
tled with promptness and bills discounted have been well met at
maturity, requests for renewals not being more numerous than in
ordinary times. Iml)orters are operating as freely as before the war
with the possible exception of soft goods, many lines being difficult
to obtain in Europe.
The cost of living, such as foodstuffs, has advanced considerably-
some 30 per cent-since the war began. iut other goods have only
advanced to thie extent of increased freight rntes.
There has been no slump in building operations, several extensive
business houses being under construction. Thle leading industries at
Dunedin are the manufacture of agricultural implements, soap,
candles, biscuits, confectionery, beer. and aerate(d waters. At the
stock exchange shares declined about 10 to 20 per cent, but prices
have fully recovered. Generally speaking. Diinedin an,1 the sur-
rounding districts are sound financially. The city and suburbs suilb-
scribed $-250.000 to the Patriotic and Belgian Relief Funds. The
crops are expected to yield about thle average.
The Wellington District.
American Consular Agent A. E. Whyte. at Wellington, writes that
with the exception of the liilding trade, which is more or less at a
standstill, business appears to be almost as good as before the war.
Bank collections are not difficult to make. :,ntl import houses are in
consequnie having no diiiiculty in meeting their bills. Imports are not
being made as freely as before the war. The public have undoubtedly
been economizing more or less. which has somewhat restricted the im-
portation of luxuries, but apart from this business appears to be
going on as us ual.
Owing to a shortage of flour and a rise in the price of sugar, in
addition to increased freights and war insurance, the cost of living.
has advanced slightly. On the whole this district appears to be re-
markaldy prosperous, considering the circumstances.
Wellington City is more a distributing center than an industrial
one. The industries, such as woolen mills and freezing works, have
been particularly busy, the only apparent slackniess being in the iron
and building trade.
WASHINGTON : GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1915












































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