Supplement to Commerce reports

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Material Information

Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00070
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00072

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text



ENT TO'

''`Rll ORITIV17197-,", N
TRAIXF PORTS
PX A",PQMESTICCOMMERCR

SO, April t9i 1

CIL
.j
AA

J, A of whiah embrbcv8 fivo D6partments
jand tart of a,, sixtli, and, which, has i total
c,' with pt-,,jq' lation of 2,500,000,
Measurm,00 _re44`IiM industrip.1 activity
betwooo-J90" au'd the pr eced iIng
kt'the, g, given 'for 1914: repre-
*,borne M' mind thi re
,,Of peace. i4 iia'tistics, -presented below
At6 T While
St Partl doomisW40 OQIVtkrison with the figures of
Show.
r, the tng I$" relmarkable.,

j4 "the impofts of military
Wnery plant0:111 the dis-
f,,q-tfiel M 16 6V 'r-lmucOon of lhi U, 9 of
ai mts7 also were oCCU_
textile etw ibf
'44)i ihe manufactire of blue, Ofi theother
ihdstxies in the M 146ct which'produce
AU 0 Ixiries 101- SU
rqig, ocoi mptioti sh wed
qh_ Fq i6ductionof Camom-
r exam],
nedicti rjjJjqtleur was well up to- the.
alth460 t4v expritt,5-of the formor. declined.
M nec6ssarily re4rided. the maritime and
of the Port of Hav-re in,1915, which has wit-
r'M'I tion foi commo-rceJn nonuAlitary.merchan-
'A.awhlokthere -,NyAs,.aAetenti0n of at jeat
port tombinecl forvessibls laden:.,with, gabds
indohng., Americah -qotton.
tu
wwM_0a-;7re Porta'ing preeminently 66 Aw
Irt t,- J4
tj t4Qtal 'a 't-
IMPO S. in 0. q'-Aw
ivj 369`,bales, as:cquipaiTo
-tftf, 'us indicating
4onA th
in 19,15.




74,
1A

2 SUPPLEX"T TO 'COMMIMOR RP4202ft

Of the 5 per cent loan made by the French Gorernmenfo
reahzed the extraordinary sum of 14^0001000 franes
,0001000) 1 101 6961000 ftun7cs ($10t627,48) was raised in the
dissement Of T6vre In 1915.
,It is a reakarkable, tribute 'to the thrifL of the French natiow
the Savinga Bank of Havre wits able in 1915 to increase the
of its depositors from 18,774 to 81,276, while most of the
withdrawn during the year were destinod for the
national defense certificates or French Government bo
The shipping movement of Havre in 1915, as rega
of vessels, actually exceeded that of 1914. The total
sels entering and clearing in 1915, exclusive of the
inent, was 12,810, with an aggregate of 6,337,275 tons, no" I
with 12,356 vessels, having an.. aggregate tonnage of 9
1914.
HRVT* Cott=xvket.
Havre isone of the foremost poA4f Europe' for1he im
of American eotton; *aAd the han. "i of this staple has 1()pg
tuted the RrijR cipal source of the busmop prosperity of the;'
uity. Beguining with 1911 the annuaJ:',bnp6rts of c
exceeded 1,000,000 bales, :with an average value of about
but for time since that year, the annual impor, a,
the first IV) 0 *t
cotton year 1914-1.5 fell materially below that avrage
to the, Bulletin des Ventes de Coton,. #:e total was 609'M
Ame''n'i can cotton,.. vhile the cottq# grts from, $00KOW
657,869 bales.
The cotton trade in the season that began, August 1 1914
lyzed at its outset, by the outbreak of war, which inaturg
all imports and caused some local merchants to reship to
,Vr part of their stock. But soon more confidence was shown
traiiers, and especially the French Lndustr
willingness to resume 'its purchases. The imports howev
slowly and increased gradiLilly) as appears in the Mowi
tion of the receipts of American cotton made by one of the
impor I ters at Havre, together with the 4eliveriis and sto'eks,
month by month, 'in the crop years 191&44 amd 1914-15:,
'Receipts-
months.
191344 M445 1913-14 M445 1#1244
Ban. Dwal Dd*t
August ....................... QODO 2,261 61,000 10,20 Sk
or ............... 6
oc 1, '51 Ban 276 579 W60
Na;;it;w ": ...... 257, SU Ik714 85$,M 90,40
Dewmber.".: .:: ............... M I W 57,341 97,667 Wfto
....................... 00,147
.................. 72,50 e6,473 99,30 M
.................. 67,767 478 W5,707 "Am"
................ 79,M 1162',8W %107 MR, 109
17218 974 W, SMM 44,03
.......... I V1, 06
Inds .......... :::::: .......... 29:3M
jwy .......................... 11,4W 84,Rg 7eMn 51
SAW ................... 49UW M7;20DI ..00,830,
In my umvIons zn=ia reporU the ftwobW cottm Year 1---m 8W. I
sUg49kjolaw ootton movement at 19swowmaprepaied an CM-1 beab. SOOMMY
to adopt Uke perW Aug. I-July al "the out&un yaw.
that parlod.






th hl hkhm~scto iprs
Noebr tewr
iotemnho ac ideewl an
461wj oteatog salyte iius
Ii4t,041 saoa opre ihtoeo
a eraeof4855ble hsdcrae hc
ii i psl ftemr 3cifl rmtecmlt tp
FinM pnigmls oabyi hmrho rne
40btb otedces n:te upyo aowihi
tofn htsvrlmls ltog ,hvn ag res
br nflltm, n 'ran einhoeean oal
O, hecniiosae bte nd h pinn ilspr
yvr 'Vt rftbemrin ecsm salsmns


hadcpe yodpathv elzdpoissca
bBdf*seea.yax at
Oe nhn a lvimrahdtei aiu i-tels
r n h.mitx. f'pi,11'.wt 8,5 aea gis

//h.6 fDcmbr 93:i hepeeigco
tottosi mtnPie tHve
cotnsao f11-5 ea ne ifcl odtos

8-oUp o cddwt ht fth uoenwrada
walAihtroetairutd
fuue eeqoe t.2fae $39)-bt'hr




















and 2 per cent discount. *.
Quotations Month by Month, 1913-19i15. .: .:
Notwithstanding the war and the resulting derangemjinut mti
cial and business affairs, the cotton trade of Havre = shove i
improvement in the early part of the 'current crop year l' W
compared with the preceding season. By reason of the d"af
the freight rates from Gulf portsin the United States to I:-
an average of $0.42 per 100 pounds to an average ofP! IP
pounds, the decreased purchasing power of Frenc& mo ::ol'
increased first cost of cotton in th 4ted. States, th&e pRj.
dJelivered at Havre was, early in February, 1916 almost d tbS
it was at the corresponding date in 1915. At this wr 4
tior of ocean freights is regarded in cotton circles as a. ,
one. Local conditions also militate against the handlng.1
quantities of cotton. Among these are the congestion of, I
and railway traffic from Havre to thS interior, and the et*
labor, both on the quays and in the warehouses. H JU
Notwithstanding these obstacles, the imports of eottouo* !
have shown a noteworthly increase thus far in the current a,
as compared with the corresponding period of the p
as is demonstrated by the following statement of thet
cotton at Havre from August 1 to February 8 of ea .i. .....y
Items. 191T4-15 1915-l6 Ite
EMMMTSf. TONEmZsmO S OLmL
zxwoz. mBal. Polt.
Amarm cotton ............7.. SW 17S 1,11 Am Wui Ntt ..............
Al othe 151............. ,7 I,T : All t pw la.............
otal................... .. 108 W1L nl ToW ...................


*
,' r
::*1i":
......


.I .
... . .. ............ .. ........ ..




3,





to the Cotton. it' sight at HavrO on


10.14 1915 1916

OWM ON R4XD
Bales.
.................. 436, 067 205,909 .28$,1901,
12,310. 28)700 2%,664
......... ...... 448,377 234,6W
q
9'2,372
Vt,9)3LE "FLY.
.................... ................ 4N 171' 248 734 318 1 M
.......................... 12,310: 28,700 29,664
.............................. 497 277,434 349,3W

'Id ip pear reasonable to.expect the. takiagsof Havre this sea-
the opinion of
jqw onsidembly *in ex&ss of last year.-, It, is
fit 'cotton ex-, frt of Havre that. this port will take about
"or Soopou: bilts- of eri6an c6tton. du-ring the, season of

A quality o the IX5-161. cotton, is: qw.tho whole satisfactory and
jiave been few'er complaints than usual on this account. The
1,:, graidels'and mlediumstaples have be'en'most in demand.
&,knt domao d for. Vloff6ii is eriatic. Merchants buy only'when
VO oidei-g from pin-ners, hovever, appd"',fo be
0.'Prosperous business'. and 'it i's believed that this will continue
to come, Many spinners ha bo months" M"' advante and, notwithstanding the high price of
rial, theirprofits are teported. to be good.
,,PWk of Hiwe-Stoeks in WarehousM
CMItinUes to hold the, dis-tinction of being the foremost of the
Ls of the world -as. regards the importance of its coffee stocks.
es to, be an active trading centex,, notwithstanding that con-
e materially! reduced, the activity of reekporta-tions front
Other cauntriesofRurop&
movement Qf the Onnsaetions. in coffeo at Havre in 1915
with 1,914, was as followed: Imports, 2,086,000 bags iR
t 210161OW bags in 1914.- exports, 2,109,000 bags in,
'2646 OOa-bA-zs:in 1914.
of coffee in bonded warehouses in Havre on December
M, were, as follows:
Ar ,* Dec. 31, Do, 31,'
1914 1915

Bags. D498.
---------- ........... ............. 11171, W
...... 370,224 462e36M
........... 6-- ...........
----------- ............... .110,998 398
...... ........ 630 12
.............. ....... .. 211 225 a45
1"11 .............
.................... 1,935 963 11819,446
..........

............ .............. 1 2, OM, 763 051,746
A





















tbCSI.,AAAAAI.A ` U "' c & .T I & ` J ,2 -- a ~ ~ w~~ n.'- -- -~ - "
in March, only to fall again to 47 francs ($9,07) in June.
then rose steadily to 55 francs ($10.61) in September, 4
($11) in October, 60 francs ($11.58) ii November, and em
francs ($11.39) in December, 1915.


Disparity with New York Prices-Last Tear's Deliveries. T:',
There is now a difference of 18 francs ($3.47) per bag beo:
value' of the coffee in stock at Havre a'id that at New Yor. $.1
in normal times this difference did ri6t'exceed 3 to 4 franc;s
$0.80). The reasons for such a large disparity may be
mainly by the increase of the various charges to whichisM
are subject, notably the insurance premiums and the '
which latter are quoted at 145 francs ($27.98) per Englishi
stead of 35 to 45 francs ($6.75 to $8.70) as in normal times.
Moreover, commerce is burdened with demurrage charges.i
from the delays in unloading, the port of Havre being enas
with merchandise of all sorts, coming mainly from the UnitdI
The rise of French exchange on London (the pound e
ing generally as the base for the regulation, of the Brazihlisat
is also one of the factors in the advance of coffee prices.
adverse elements united would doubtless have influenced |
tions much more had not the financial and economic .B.
their country caused the Brazilians to support a part of .....
minentary expenses above mentioned with a view to aeifli
their heavy crop of 1915-16. *. .:m..
The deliveries of Havre in 1915 were lower than thoee dtil
537,000 bags, the trade movement having been affected by thWl
of the French Government limiting strictly the reexpt
coffee to neutral countries (Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and
land). The rble of Havre as a coffee mart seems thus to bM
reduced until the termination of hostilities, although,
commerce should be liberally aided by finance, since the
warrants is effected at 5 per cent net.
There is still in the bonded warehouses of Havre 1i.OQ
coffee belonging to the account of the valriation ceaati


* . '...l.
.... 35":.'., i"b .l


;"'


































b.tobftat3e-Exports mad -lipstti. HI .
t*. flavre lost its rank as th& pincipal pepper market
ik. the end of Diber, *4,y:...its. stocks amourid to
. 0::Ie" L"onddn 4" sec "in:, .":s: t repect, wi. isCly
2*thcimpbtt trade was lower tihi that in 1914, alfiough
as moteraly belw the average and tae, deliveries were
ethlpse o.f 19i4;a The Havre stocks on December 31, 1915,
. ,. bag as ahinst 5rT$O 6gWs at Londan and 16,700 bags


t .la t..::......... . r... .


t
&
,~, 4ivda,


fl :,, ,,.. l ../ ,.ts:-: ^ -? ,,:.,

". ...E : ;i .. .. . . . .
A*~
,fi' ;i ^ -* .,, .* h'1'
w I"J'*: "a. *." '*....
Piitt.. e:*.-'. 4 ..
0. .M:= k.:. ,.


S. i: p ts.:::
.; ^ Imports.


'NO


,flga
5,008
454

414 w-


1914 j1915


Bugs
AIS *'
11,081


17,818
'7' 1


1913


BgSS.
S39;309
7,467
25 820
3,008
S38,336
114,840


of pepper at


Exports,


Bags.
14,658
5,728
25,564
* 8,129.
32,970
87,049


B .S
429, w


in 1915 was due to the suppression oC
0 t ..F.at East. The Havre tradwv b .
tiAm p abnormIal situation thus creaeA
of ..... 't"e ye.r until pepper 'w ,.4;.::.
.. .. .. ..... RV.U?.! i

.year. 1 h t ..al del
44 a
..'.]...~ ~ ~ ~ ~~.. .... ...e~. ...... : t!.do "".::
.i"" .1" "". *. .. ...
.. ... .. ...........

.... .......... .. .. ...... .... ..." ". .. i "...!
.,, .... .. ... : :. _
ll I ; .E 4 .r ." . :: # :E. :.: :: .:.E.. "::
" :'E .. .E". '..:" :.:" .! : ..:. =:.:':: !: ::...:EEi : .:. H :1 E" :iE.. E:
: : :: ... .................. :.: :: 1 H H ,.H H H..:.: : :-
." :.::E. ::: . ". : :..::. .: ".,' .:Ea H.: EE... H:H:" E:.:::E E'..t:H:..:::H:
::. .,,..i ,,:!:.iLh. .:!:: ,! i.;': ;!:;i' i i: iii :!:*" .;:'H :. H :,, r: :


.. ... i | J


. .. .. .. .... . .... i ...


s o, U6


7.

























. . .. . . . -. . -v -... - - - - -
($20.65) as against 78 francs ($15.05), while white Sai M aH
170 francs ($32.81) as against 130 francs ($25.09). A I
ing prices arc per 50 kilos (110.23 pounds). 'i ,. ..
Copper Market of Havre. ,.... .
For some time Havre has ranked as the most importat'a".|N
market in France. At the close of 1914 the stocks at Havraib: aiu
to only 2,827 tons, as compared with 5,624 tons at the b '"
the war in August, 1914. By the end of 1915 the stocks hat
to 1,299 tons, as a result of the demands of consumption an ....
impracticability of making imports from England. K':
At the beginning of 1915 almost all the purchases of ele**
copper held by the Havre traders were resold to contractor .h.......
supplies, and as a result of the large margin between standsinat
and electrolytic copper these sales were not followed by a .. .
of the market, because the furnishers of war supplies
material directly from the country of origin.
It is probable that at the end of the war the market wil
its normal function, which is to serve as intermediary betw l|
producer and the consumer.
Condition of the Hide Market. 'I
Havre has long been an important market for hides h
Business in this market in 1915 was greatly disturbed .'
infrequent, because of the limited number of auth 'j
exportation granted by the authorities as well as the
the local stocks suitable for consumption. -
The Havre stocks in January, 1915 consisted of.
pieces; but they included few heavy skins adapted


. ... ... ... . : ......

























































lb



.
A



EdA~'~J- K


:: Kit-da
.. .

fi amd pure. ................. .......................
eSaimby_- .................... ...............
ine ud. pur'e........ .. ......... ..........
Selawm by...... ................ ...................
S .. .............
s er .kk :.. .................... ....................
Bet~ny.....................
flfts v"by,.. ........................
,5 W- 11M ... Z:; .... .:... ..... .:... ......................
App' b ..... ............................


3United States in 1915 were: co*- m:;
cnt yers e e m ". .

ecentf. years, because of the et .::n ,,':.:|
iA, rate of exchange. At thetii : : vw
I. rei -by the Havre traderNs:t d-%:r ''
to e, war' these rates wei oii :iS i
&yare4S's
~~~ ". ..... .. :" ". . i ,i" EE
,,- ,,:. .... . ., . ..... .. .... .. .. .
... .. .. H...
." :E . .. ... ... ...
~ ~~ .. .. .... ... .. . .:: .:."


~~~~~~~ ~~~ ..... .... ".... ....' :;,1:: :[:." ...i i~ ;:@: ... ;,::: :. ..rr.. ... .. i
i:,, ~ ~ M. .. .. : :.." ~~ : :[ L [::::: ". : ..::' .. ''::[:
A,~~~ R14. .
Ij '. t Oil


SFranc.
Francs.


6. 75 to 7.25
4.00 to 5.60
7.00 to 7.65
4.25 to 5.80
6.50 IQ 7.40
4.50 to 5 60
6.25 to 6.60
4.00to 5 00
7.40 to 8,06
5. O0 to 69


.... .'H :.i ..
',; ,; --. ,i, : ,
7i!f.i s : : ** *


... . .....,. .... .. . ....


































founded by an American citizen several years ago. TI
reports that, as a result of the war, his establishment did
tively little business with the United States during 1915.':
imports from that source, however, were the following
goods: 3,544 cases of preserved fruit, each containing M4i
can weighing 1 kilo (2.2 pounds); 250 cases of corn, each.
24 cans of 1 kilo each; and 400 cases of cdamsp each cci
cans of j kilo each..
Vegetable-Oil Industry-Benedictine Ltquewr.
The Huilerie Lequette of Montivilliers, near Havre,.wI1
a specialty -of the production of linseed and colzajcalts; '
during 1915 it confined its manufacture to colza oil, an H
put was particularly large by reason of the activity in "0
ture of war supplies. The supply of oil seeds was at1e
difficulties during the year because of the congestiq ssit
ports of importation. The price of colza oil in
keeping puce with the increased cost of the raw i .hnim
sory products required in the manufacture. Oil cgiea
sale, notwithstanding the increase in prices, all p .otS. ...
Ing of cattle having attained unusually hig.h p..1 .
The Distillerie de li B6n6dicie, at Famp
Seine Inferieure, notwithstanding the difaaut:t
merce created by the war, increased its sae pPoC

'U
4







-14
IIX

IEFAIM.
Jit;Wscmaei530i oe
i-tteqatt cnue i rn
agis'4,0 oteo bu

$'t A *OQ&1378btlsif 11 asagis1802
IIj,,t)e oeincutisto ,3334btlo X
batel/194 h oa Pouto i
1,9tn,:saant413 os n11.Te4
ft tte o eeicie a ulyeuli
-tisIri
Of1,4 h.deaeeprsJ rmti
ne t$4,6,rpiItig 372glos l
4$4650 n11.,
i' ebe o aufcuig
! Pblidsr scnie.ams wol oteFec
Wtenlar.&dDep.Tepblscletdi n

















in 1UIo witnessed extraordinary price nuctuanone. ..:i;:
the large consumption of milk, as well as the scarcity of :I
production of cheese fell off considerably. The dem
article, however, was large throughout the year and pri"c!
20 to 60 per cent as compared-with those of prevrous'i.
July and August, 1915, the prift were low but this si...
due to the large fruit'4bps, and the prices subsequently
Camembert and other varieties of cheese produced Min
are in great demand and Lthe requirements are increasing l"
The declared exports of cheese of all kinds from theiH.
trict to the United States in 1915 were valued at $55,688, 41:
$176,190 in the preceding year, while the value of Camemb
was $52,153, as against $160,124, or less than one-third the gI
1914. ''"'. ll
Shipbuilding in Havre-Increasing Number of American Vessels.
The Societ4 Anonyme des Forges et Chantiers de la M&514"
operating shipyards and machine shops at Havre, incli *|
output in 1915 a freight boat of about 8,600 tons, and "A.j
yards two steamers, a pontoon crane, and three sets of eng ;.'
The year 1915 witnessed the arrival of no less than se ...
of the American merchant marine, as reinforced by the new. i
act, which permits foreign-built vessels' to obtain asa...
register for seven years. Not since 1894, or 21 years .:
many as seven American vessels entered the port of 1
same year. In ordinary years only one or two entered.:,.....
ing for last year is therefore most encouraging as an a
future development and prosperity of the American&,:
marine.
Bordeaux the Temporary Terminus of Freach Lie. ...
The most important event of the year in maritime eic
was the temporary transfer from Havre to Bordeaux at
and passenger service of the Compagnie GOndrale .i'
(French line) which up to 1915 had operated contin
Havre and New York since the establishment of this UICL`
It is the general belief that the substitution of Bote
as the European terminus of the passenger service .:of.U
trans-Atlantic line will come to an end at the earliest
So long as war lasts, however, the commercial i3ittl
necessarily suffer to some extbnut since the fatt pWA it.
sides carrying passengers and thea mail,"briag a4th
of merchandise of various kinds.









lkwvkaintained, andtoven increase d., it's,'
mjgh .0. vrs between
:qj Havre and, New Yb
rtosupft alAndant I", ities:in. this direction it
Britis, b6y1s.
Suqm d.
nde
ines suspetided their service.to Havre during
Co. kept up only the new service
Cunard between Man-
,#nd Havre; the Allan. bineonly the service between Havre
diali ports. The Booth Steamship Co.'s direc. services
Havre and Sout lea were suspended, altlfk& it sent
ers,'direct, to Nantes hrom -Brazilian-ports.
.London & South Wester;a Railway CO., which operates the
boat iservice betweenjIavre anif'Sout"hampton, England
fAowi iiu' b . 7
on its boats in 1915 t.4. ng m er of civilian pas-
Southamptopi, to ljav,% 11,860, as compared with 30,940,
$`Havre to !46,uthamptou- 15882 as compared with 51,989 in
I I I I .. :
jj he Havre--SoutharApto4,,bpats otoiis Ene carried in 1915
quantities of cargo.
Exports to the United States.
1,,"Wtal vklue of the exporhiU-the'Uhited States from the con-
Astrid of Havre during the calendar year 1915, according to
invoices, was $1,824,697, as against $2 349 997 in 19141 or a
of $525,300' This is exclusive of fthe exports to Porto Rim
Philippinesi hich brought: the grand total to'$1,829,408 in
against $2 368 137 in 1914. Thet&! were no shipments to the
iian Islands in either, year.
he following table shows the declared exp orts to the United States
1014 and 1%15'asi voiced t the-Hav consulate:
IJa a re
Article$. 1914 1915 Artielm 1914

$27,13o 864465 $3,866 $11,429
3" ...... Jul -------- ------------- ......
797 Leather ................ I ...... 51,540 ..........
M2 2,732 ItJr, carMgeen__. ....... 1,613 1,016
--------- ...... 810 5,W goods ------------------ 5,0-5r nt
--------- m ........ 4,2M 2,W Liqueur. Benedlet3re... ...... 145, W 146.9*
------------ 1 ........ 79r ....... w.. Machines and uwhinery. 6 269, 1.202
.......... I ...... ---------- 3, V79 Nursery stock ................ 29,697 15, M
.............. 160,124 52,1B Colza-.,.. ........ 721915 79,406
VVequk ............. 3,810 223 peanat..1.4 ............... ..... ..... 11 18,181
4 W AIM Painflng.s..i 11,309 1. 142
........ 3",608 107 Paper, cigarAte_.: .. . . . . . -22,591 84 30D
----------- 1,-167 .111 Pebbles, ftint ...... I .......... 60 573 93,261
-------- 3,151 224 Pepper ------------- --------- 111-718 287,445
4, 10,970 ...... Potash, prusslate of.. ....... 12,456 19,089
---------------- 3Q, 079 16,91S Pre0ous stones, imitation,__ 1,703 1,912
scTp_ 22 892 11 4E4 'Rabber:
3,3w CMde ..................... 436,660 24,
---------- 24,906 ft iip ...................... 6,490 ..........
23,824 3,09o Bead.
......... 43,5,52 7,384 Clover ......... .......... 119 1 554 295, 81
........ ...... 23,772 All ot1jer ----------------- 21631 1, 773
2,137 Shells .................... ... 52,446:.
...... ......... 0;505 si" ds .................. 545 1,
2 703
412 1,19. 2 Goat ........................ 114,584
532 4,111 Rsbbit. ............... 8; 513
------ 3, Z08 TeXtR03 .... ------------ 52.381 --------
......... 1,242 Ttn lngots-...w .... m 5
11iL761 Vegetables- .................. 9,450 11056
AIN Wine. CftaitLpagnp. 4WI*
Wood: F, 11 --- CM
All other M(












mobiles.
Principal Decreases and Increases in Exports. .. .':.
The most noteworthy items showing decreases in tlbsU
the United States in 1915, as compared with 1914, weroe"
cheese, which dropped from $160,124 to $52,158; crude
$436,660 to $24,232, and goatskins from $114,584 to :$
exports of pepper increased from $111,718 to $287445,'
seed from $119,554 to $295,813. Salted oxhides mere
$315,939 to $359,511, while Benedictine liqueur, another
port, maintained its own with a slight increase. H
The following new item's appei$' in 1915: Cement, co
material, optical glass, gutta-percha, jute, peanut oil, bone1
and graphite. I '0')..
fes : ....*:
Depleted Stocks-IEffo arts to Economize. ,
Outside of the cotton required by the textile industry 94
and certain temporary supplies, the importation of Amerieq
ucts at Havre in 1915 was disappointing, when it is take |.
count how important and diversified are the requiremeusa i.,
civilian population of this part of France. .;
In many lines of industry the usual sources of supply-V
factories of France or neighboring countries of Eurpe-htpqE
cut off, and consumers seek in vain to obtain what they wa"--wN
retail shops of Havre and other places in this consular distdg
most branches of the retail trade even the best equipped
most enterprising shops.have failed to replenish their stoe
the outbreak of the war, with the result that their custom. i
little choice. To a certain extent this condition of affairs
the popular movement to economize in every practicable .di
to purchase only what is indispensable, and to utilize old p(a
whether they be clothes, household furnishings, or industry "
ment. #
With respect to articles formerly imported from the"
now at war with France, there has been some attempt to4 6
like articles of domestic manufacture and to advertise:
goods. Noteworthy instances are children's toys for twie'
trade, metallic kitchen utensils, and certain well-known
ties. With respect to many other articles that were fo
chased in the United Kingdom, the importation has
for various reasons, and hence the stocks have not beei
Instances of this kind are shoes and certain groceries;, :u.
and preserves.
Great Increase in Ameriaosn Trade Zxpectod. ": .
All these conditions are favorable to the introduce
goods on an unprecedented scale as soon as peace is.
replenishment of the depleted stocks immediate
war and the resumption of normal shipping ......






40,
*Mf -gem, Inc) conpicnously an ever befor in
', OW;- 'a 'W" t dl-etho follo IR ialties: )Dr
eryi rea y 'd' 'clothing, dioes., Corsets, high-cla's's
Pdds,,6hlkuitsq, hoiisehold and office furniture,
writers, computing machines, stoves, refrigerators,
kit' ilft, utensils, vacuum cleaners', motorcycles, bicycles,
phir" gobds, etc.
n it be doubted that the demand in France for American-
re automobjles, motor trucks, machinery for mills and
machine toolst and geural hardware will be unprecedently
soon as, nornud. e o. m. mqW.0 conclitioig4 shall be restored.
A wtain cxteit4h'ere is 4 den-iand,,uowfor these. articles;, but,
few, exceptions,.At Js nckb commercially -practicable to supply
'A this ti i i of th',e4lAing high, freight rates and. other
n Con-di 1011S..
irarket fbr.Ake*jiU Cyclt%."
the report on I* i d Moto c France," pub-
Bicyc iiataq ' ,,ye ing in
Dail adb Reports for February
6insular ana'' T 1:4,
I 9tailed information was.*Ariven concerning the French retail
in bicycles and motorevAS, from which it appeared that out
',)0,3,200,000 cycles in France in. 1R12 the machines of American
represe w: of the
factum only- a negligible fraction., In vie
t great sides of -American rhotorcycles in France, it -may be
y expected that several makes of these machinesAhat -are
well known in France will be in great demand for private use
s;oon as the normal conditions of travel are restored.
-The same confident, assertion may be, rhade: -with reference to the
of Amer ican 'bicycles after the lwai.', -The war and life in the
os,: have: tjaught- the young manlilood of the country the .- great
Ots of fresh air and outdoor life, and!- as a Datural. consequence,
1, outdoor. sports will enjoy 7a popularity never hither-to witnessed
'Pran- Bicycli I pdrtj as well as, a practical means of
brtation, will surely profit by this new movement.
"64st of living,
Xiven" in normal, times. the cost of living. in Havre, comparedwith
of Eesize throughout the'world, was high-in fact, higher
i,RMost of the largest cities of Europe, including Paris.-
basic explanation of this anomaloasisituation was the failure
opulation of Havre.W e 'oy- ready accessto the. abundant
ral supplies of the neigliboring regions on the opposite side
andthe failure, to take advantage of the fishing output
0" waters. All these supplies were drained primaril;v -to
there-by profited by them far more than Havre. The
tno relief, since it witiiessed an abnormal congestion in
tiou of, 11ttvre, which city became the ksylum of ma4y
of r refugee from northern France and Belgium.
bo ttfnllated conservatively that the general cost of living
hais iftcrease& since the war by at least 30 per oent,, ar-,
-high as 50. per cent and even. more are 'given.
41*6 *A. cause. ofthis:'i e. is-the-scarcity of ifii
*-of merchandise for oons,=P "MI

4'



















GOO tons, of which about 4JUPWIU tons are prodUced by
collieries. The quantity required 6 supplement the
has been imported mainly from the United Kingdim, wihi
the war, shipped to France between 10,000,000 and 78
annually. About 34500,000 tons woo imported from Belguuqi
equal quantity frain Germany, whE the trifing remainder
other countries.
The total impo.ts-dmi in the elendar year 1913, the a"
Tear before the war, were as following metric tonis: United
13415,876 tons; Belgium, 3,768,713 tons; Germany, 3M,63
all other countries, 321,212 tons; total, 20,849,69 tons.
....C..L ...
Of the total imports of coal into France almost l,00,fOANfli
discharged at Havre and hene the prices in this port affd
indication of those in other markets in France.
In addition to the cost of coal in Great Britain, the ratet *
to Havre hare been, in many cases, higher than the price of l:
at the ports of sdipmment. i
Previous to the war the rate from Cardiff (whence thisa.
France imports the most of its coal) to Harv averaged 4s. 3dL
per ton. To-day the rate is 25 shillings ($6.08) for 001):c
much as 30 shillings ($7.29) a ton has been paid for 0s
equivalents in American currency are based on the value otf:
at par. Exchange on Great Britain, however, has -.
25.20 francs to 27.90 francs to the pound sterling, ma ng |
coal still higher. In other words, where an importer in ...
have paid before the war 1,000 to an English shipper .
francs, he must now disburse 27.900 francs to effect p
same bilL...
The following increases in coal prims at Havre asm
QmMthu IE AMD us,

tr ...) or . ....... ................. ... ............
8dE9 t ..........i..................... ------ --- --- ---U ........ AL
G L............................................................... 4 ..
----------------------------------- .~.-.. .. ...-----LU4 VI F


....... .....
---------- --- --------------

----------------------*e* "i.-.-e.ia.
....~~ ..':.... ......... 0 .....
......................................... ....- ...a-.... ......da

































iB=riUa ........... 4M -fr ..- .-.......... ..... ......... ,.S-
|M f(16B^ m-^- --. ---*----------- 4,M5 JlcuTfar ------- --------...-- *---- -------- l,06
---------- ---------------------_--------
: ..... ._ ..' ".. .................... U M i
.." """ ........ A ; - -
: .:... .. .... ... .... . .... ...

mi fw e', LYON.
?.1 Goaw4l ,eh. : ,,:umi _eb -L t,,
W.iag the state of war and the eIsequent closing of
^^li^l~^^^fo~r products ussualy mian factared in "hi dis-
||sop.mw n improved in 1915 s compared with the
l'%r Bm is .olowng the outbreak of the war. This is due to
i .tlsig financial .measures taken at first by the
16.ham:been mended so as to facilitate banking opera-"
a ^ t.,iel .. mad international exchange. At p1r4.
a somewh finance have no infuence upon comrmediteh
itmii sentiment of the French people has 'etam
a ~^placing pil at the disposal of merchants itd
Bi ordin ry times would have been invaid :h,:
mBP^gP^~~f^'euui::j^tiuaflI~ir X~Bigoa ^l HC^ O^~iEf^s~f1^*.:* .i::"H:!!!!
BBBBI^BBBIM|^HH^^^^>^^H[~an %BG~ fe .V^~lIJ^JC A IBTKi~frH nli ..........: ...""""!"
.. 11D pinduAtryndwe"f
..t. Ar with France have been
uure or those imported .ran neutaieA
i E'... .. ....................!.Z, E'~iiii'~i~i.
A iiM +: .:,", ...".... '' . ".... ., m m ]
H.Y ... .........................
!ii iiiiii+..... .... .... .... ..i ....... ...m i
*jH" *============== ::
EE::"EEEE, .::: .: ..:' .:. *E H ,~i~i:"ii

















at present no influence whatever upon the business, of .
as far as private interests are concerned. The same condiM9
to the chemical industry.
Review of the Silk Industry.
In common with many other industries the silk industryidl
has been affected in a pronounced way by the Europen
Although mills are now running to nearly three-quartaw t1
capacity, this has not been the case throughout the year.:
At the beginning of 1915 the silk market remained -i.*::4
state of apathy that characterized it since the outbreak of 4W:
with quotations which had dropped in four months by 90 t::
cent. Then came a deficit in French and Italian prdotlei
coons were cheap and the silk gathering in Europe was much i
to that of preceding years. Italy produced only 72,752,000
of cocoons, in comparison to 102,884,000 pounds in 1914; w"1
equivalent to a decrease of 35 per cent. Silk production iaj
fell from 11,172,000 pounds in 1914 to 3,817,000 pounds is"
These deficits, however, had no immediate effects upon the al
kets of Europe or of the Levant, as they were partially iip
extensive crops harvested in the Far East, and especially .i
which allowed quotations to remain regular until the eeM:
first quarter.
The midsummer's unexpected rise in Oriental exchange Vwat.
able to the New York silk market. Moreover, the excepti
perity of the United States stimulated the activity of Lyoni6:
facturers. A growing activity took place in the mar P
Europe and the Orient during September and October1:* '.
cipal silk markets became the centers of intense speculatibton...........
In November sudden depreciations took place almost dI
the fact that the United States ceased to purchase goods
places of origin. The last weeks of the year registered
decrease in the amount of business done. i
In summing up the various developments of the silk
1915, it may be said that the consumption contributed:
ciable extent to the reopening of business that chara ....
ond semester. It seems probable that the produ ....
silks will continue during 1916 and thus facilitateW
raw materials. .. If#*.







rl 's in the 8ft lluftstry%
p" ction-,varionsl 'm6ted at 45 to
musYlab6r, which i-ft the sft
mostly by women; but, expeA male, help and
ca,,sre waoting, and it''may be said that their lackwoulcl
t0i a decrease of about 10 per cent, in production.
of greater impart tha, other single factor in the
the industry h4s 13een the problem of dyeduff supp.-Hes.
Ao-day the situation is acute. A41he stocks that were sdzed
'Oovernment at. the -outbreak of the war and distributed i under
"rection of the Minister of War axe now practically exhausted -
seveml or-annizatiowl created search bure s for the
on OfAyestuff faXri;; and substitutes for tbei German products,
in this respect
aterial,, progress has been made,. amd the outlook In
,*ot bright for the conung year,.
in SUk Go 00- .0tftaud for VelveU and TijastL
dgeline is Alre the creation of new deiidgns. The manufac-
,Aki4g ereater elf 6tts than eyqr: glo4c-these, lineg: with a
of having meir products appeal to -the tasie of -their patrons.'
regards colors the bright *iVid Qnes have given place to darker
ades, principally navy blue and black, and they aro limitQ, more
,jjoss to the cheaper grades of silks -and not to the, costly and richer
im & of clothstthe demand-,, for, which has, gradually disappeared

Wov t4ofip-mcbes of the 4.1k- indu' stry that'hEwe henefitedivaostly
Ahe -wutare velvets and plushes.and velvet ehiflms, partly because,
articlips, to, a certain extent xeplae6 woel,.. the price of which has
aie&eoiisiderably, partly- because the blockade of Gerxnamy,,,pre-
V rom. -f com-
ts the expoxtation of elvets f Crefeld,: Lyon's chie
r in these -lines.
other branch. of the silk industry that has benefited. by the war
the tinsed industry, both because prior to the war the United
ts.received the larger paA of'these articles frain Germany. and
use this industry is not seriowly affected by the. dyestuff prcblem,
or, no:colors being used in the articles manufacturedin this
0 ..... .
of Leather-Beer ftpply.
ther is at present scarce. and high, due"to increased transporta-
and t6. th16 d e''' ktj 'o:r the Ji-ie-stcck supplies, due to
necessi No hides will be available for export forseveral
'the war, "til the live stock has been' replenished. Con-
th6 Ifnited States and SoWh Ameiica will have to furnish
wods in, bne, as they axe. already doing. .. The s&me con
to all articles Manufactured of leather such Wshoes,
Which were formejy liigely imported- from GemanYi
the F-riffleh'&M not beerdrinkih
,6'0 iget a g people,
UW-_'ffi6'sxij4 -4f` 'h 6W, foimerlv furnish6irlq Go-
Rofther4- Part of France is'.
it ajiAl -the cut Off. t& foult
bhpi in LY04.. are more than suffidmk ta, IV
A



!00,1 t

















Afllcke. 'U'!,
4-


Chemicals. dyes etc., n. a. a.:
CI of ....................................................................
8D ...... f..."......................................................
..dc al compounda, *to., not wIth alcohol-
rtar (argopyris), not over per ................................................... i .....
All other ................................................................


Church oraents, bor oz....
Tttr~r (rgol), nt OV a0 pa (Milt...i..................~m/................
Ahlrl outher.s...............................................................
CCoorch onmufentms, b Ia~ ivr m te......................................................
Church vestments........... ................................................
C gold, and silver matte....................................................
Cotton, manufactures of:
Cloth-
Bleached ...............................................................
Dy et..........s t............... .......
All oth ..........
Gold and sdiver, manufacture of, etc.:
Metal thred .......................................
Metal trn n ..........................................................
Tinsel cloth ..................................... ......................
Tinsel and silk ..............................................................
Tinsel and cotton ...........................................................
All other .................................................. ...............
Hides and skins, other than fur skins:
Cselskins ....................................................................
Rabbit sins ................................................................
fn_ s ~ lm i ...ll i ll S g....ii i ii i i li ill li, .ii
_CU-oBo, ...................................................................
Linen laces, hand made .........................................................
M n.......... ..................................................... ..
Machines, and parts of:
For dyeing and finishing tissues .............................................
For waving................................................................
Matting and mats: Made of cocoa fiber..........................................
Mieral water: Vichy...........................................................
Musical instrument .............................................................
Paper, and manufactures of:
Books, religious .............................................................
All other ....................................................................
Paper stock: Rags ..............................................................
Perfumery: Material for ........................................................
Photoraphic goods, n. e. s.:
Plate ...................................................................
All other ...................................................................
Precious and semiprecious stones, etc.:
Bort......................................... ..... ......
Pearls, Imitation ............................................
Precious stones .........................................................
Seeds, n. . s.: Cumin (from Morocco)......................................
Silk (all or part) fabrics:
All silk-
Piece dyed...............................................................
Yarn dyed-
Not weighted.......................................................
Weighted.......................................................
All other..............................................................
Silk and cotton-
Piece dyed..............................................................
Yarn dyed............................................................
All other igam, etc.)..................................................
Bilk and tseli
Piece dyed.............................................................
Yarn dyed ...............................................................
Bilk and tlise], etc ..........................................................
Bilk and wool .................................... ...........................
Velvet.., plush.., etc.-
Velvets-
Silk............................................ ........e.a..e.;.
Bilk ad cotton.............................. .. .....
All other........................................
8Ik end mianufCtures of, n. e. s.:
cw.t............... ..o ....................."........... .,,
All oher .............: 1
,and nole..........................................
Oranzl ne, dyed, ungummned ........................... ............. "
A Ilother ...............................................................


3,11w



~mm


. 3 3*6 ::"'"...::: <
213,3S9,wJ
SI

mu as ...


.5.4


44


*


uu


-- -- 3: ..


"EV


Article.




-A


A#A 1$14


...... .......... ............... $441,692
........ ............. ........ 7 ............... M 371 1,009,353
........ ...... ............. 8,520 16,2W
12 mehES ...... ............ v ................ 107y 363 4% 795
................................. ........................... 16,448 di 4M
............ 18,142 29,W8
------------------- ......... ......... .................. 11, wl 21,440
4 : - I ,
......................... ...... ................. ............ .71,
------- .............. 13,364 k 991
......... ........ .................... $13,461 6,966
........ .................. .................... ....... 10,499,97, 10"M I M

"1161M. invXACed for the Philippines, during last year were
at U51301 as compared with $31,052 for 1914. The principal
s mere mineral water _(vichy) -veiN and v6lings, shawls silk
'oAt,&,,mixed, goods, and -;Wtai trimmingii6 The, declAWA ex-
to: -4 -to $2,275, mad -- i i1DAlly Of
.,s to...Por Rico amount e Up princ .
and striL* braid. Refhvhed American goods amounted to

_;Wysia of Declaxed ExportReturns.
no greateA increase in declared-. exporfts is that in piece-dyed
fabrics amounting to $1, --118 860. This increase is attributed to
fe r. ol Ai:oerican buyas that. the, paucity: of dyestuffg ': Would
Wiously A fibet the future supplyof colored materials.
mere4ge in value of $140,555 over 1914 is shown, in the ib46A,
argols. This gain is dueprimarily to the greater prices obtained
('4thi4 -Inaferial because o u diminished output due to th!O 'Oor
e crOPR in France, Italy, and Spain.
largoincrease in- the value of metal tru'nmings and metal thread
is noted. Exports of, metal trimmings, in 1915 were vafiiie'd at
8 389 In increase of. W8 0 N over the previous year. The export
metal thread showed an in&,6ise.of $'71,571,over the preceding'year,
expoils.. Amounting to $104,69T.- This incre ; ft*se is explainea by
fact that the German mirket 'Was cut oft amd the demand be-
naftixally greater, especially from the United States. The
cturers were well, equipped with raw material, and theex-
in this partimlax.ae would have been materially augnented
,.A4A the 1french, Governmentsequestrated the plants, in whole. or
neral *wAers showed a decrease in exports of $214,933. Anr
important decrease was in velvets, the loss, as compared with
being'$204,445. This was due in a large measure to the lack
uffs and also because of the decrease in employees, plants
at about 50 per cent of their normal equipment.,
r decrease, amounting in value to $116,544, occurredin the
D. photographic films, none being exported to the United

of the fact that ptacticOly no mining was done during
of gold, silvor,.. and copper matte showed a'Ae-
"'o0 06, m compared with, 1914.



"41

























To take advantage of the splendid opportunities that -W4.lp ". "
to American trade, even in this conservative inland part .fi .. ..W. ,.. ;
it is necessary, first of all, that the American merchanitmZ atj 0
developed so as to be able to carry all, or at least the la-g- 4 ::.11
of the goods exported from America into France, in omtr A ..l.....
the cheapest freight rates. ......
.: i !: +.+,i ~ ~... .. ....... ..!P;ii!i~
Declared Exports from Dijon to United States. ,' .":'
The following table shows the articles and their value ..::i.."....
at the American consular agency at Dijon in 1914 and UISlirH ... l ll
United States:. .:::.......:......:. ..:.. :::.
: i,. .4.1 ". ih ". :;:i:.
Articles. 1014 1915 Articles. 1914 I .i i:
- -. -- -y"i-':...
.. W AS ;P'' ":.;.. "
Automobiles ............... 18,485 .......... Smnokers' arti les ............ mh. '4
Brandy ...................... 1,268 51,020 Steel, mMnufaCotureaot........ aW .
Enamel.................. i 2116 123 Tools...................
alres a .t ................. 37m 1,578 W..es: . .
a r................. 6 ,849 3,71 Sprkng W
J.en lase........... ... 60,341 32,062 Sil.................... a : i
Liqueurs.....................%,065 2,769 All other artclesa................ Efl pW *
Preciusstones... .................. 9,4 16 M...
.................... 33,622 6,0 Total................... ane

The declared exports from Dijon to the Philippine Island& ."y
mainly wine, were valued at $986; in 1914, at $4,989 (aut so .i..lx:i...
wine). There were no declared exports to Porto Rico or Ha*IW-R :-::::,,- ..
no returned American goods. : '...' ,..'.". ;
'~



: :: :: .. ....



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N 9
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