Supplement to Commerce reports

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Material Information

Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00070
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00071

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text




SUPPLEMENT TO


COMMERCE REPORTS
DAILY CONSULAR AND TRADE REPORTS
ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, WASHINGTON, D. C.

Annual Series No. 55c December 31, 1917


JAPAN.a

By Consul General Geo. H. Seidmore, Yokohama.
The total value of imports into all of Japan for 1916 from all
countries, including reimports ($714,852), was $377,079,313, as com-
pared with $263.160,069 (reimports, $1,385,449) for 1915. As usual
raw cotton was by far the principal article of import, which was
valued at $137,630,204 ($136,827,172 ginned and $803,032 in the
seed). Of the total ginned cotton, the imports from British India
were valued at. $82.329.549 and those from the United States $39,-
565,985. Another important item of import is bean-oil cake, which
comes practically all from Kwangtung Province and China. These
imports were valued at $17,234,382 for 1916 and the quantity
amounted to 1,727,079,733 pounds.
The following table shows the principal imports into Japan with
their value during 1915 and 1916:

Articles. 1915 1916 Articles. 1915 1910

Aluminum i n go t s, Cars, carriages, vehicles,
slabs, and crains....... $211,279 S1,018,811 and parts of-Contd.
Animals: Horses........ 106,750 10,452 IPa rtsof cycles....... $83,248 $192,236
Asbestos: RailJ ay carriages
Lump, powder, or and parts.......... 308,.312 149,039
tiber.............. 122,492 40S,8S3 Chemicals, drugs, dyes,
Other, including etc.:
manufactures...... 63,204 117,554 Acids-
Asphalt and pitch ....... 1, 573 68, 795 Boric ............ 90, 41 196, 455
Belting, woven for ma- Carbolic......... 107,101 1,855,659
chinery................ 94,605 124,516 Salicylic......... 71,935 110,516
Bones, animal........... 590.668 666,6.57 Ammon ium-
Bookbinder's cloth...... 129,482 154,375 Chloride......... 105, 117 124,968
Bran: Sulphate, crude.. 1,464,344 597,838
Rice ................. 15,387 12,3&3 Calcium acetate...... 157,964 102,112
Wheat ............... 368.631 199,194 Aniline dyes......... l,40s, 096 1,686, 221
Brass, bronze, and man- Cobalt oxide......... 35,314 102, 784
ufactures of: Cocaine.............. 12,$72 2SS,046
Ingots and slabs..... .33,030 7, 155,309 Extracts, tanning.... 599,467 2, 109,6t46
Other, waste or old.. 323,529 469,423 Formalin............ 131,430 170,814
Breadstuffs: (;lycerine ............ 137,726 331, 34
M ilet, Italian or Ger- Gums-
man ........ ..... 129,063 6 Arabic ........... 67,129 164,529
Rice ............... 2,433,290 1,539,177 i osin........... 3S2,456 1.162,625
Wheat ............... 16,354 676,010 Shellac........... 130,05S 337,571
Flour ................ 138,050 103,024 Hops................. 1.37,024 176,323
Bricks, fire .............. 21,552 103,794 Indigo, natural ...... 72, 20 271,337
Bristles, pig ............. 293,454 122,059 Opium: Morphine... 1,202,739 1,919,630
Building materials....... 76, 045 217,901 Phosphorus......... 203,621 1S4,807
Capstans and other wind- Potassium-
mg machines.......... 68,553 113, 637 Bichromate...... 157,347 366.016
Card clothing ............ 136,332 156,932 Chlorate......... 1,434,427 S76,337
Cars, carriages, vehicles, Cyanide......... I181, 169 323,604
and parts of: Preparations, medi-
Automobiles......... 35,202 192, 1S eal................. 32 3.3 196,212
Automobiles, parts o[ 47, 100 162, 834 Quinine and sulphate' 72.592 203, 419
Bicycles ............. 72,627 45,855 Santonin ............ 172, 72 129,377
aA report on Japan was published on August 28, 1917, Supplement No. 55a, which con-
tained preliminary figures of the trade for 1910. The tables in this report contain more
detailed information not avnilnble at that time.
327180-18-55c--1









SUPPLE11MENT TO COMMIERCOT REPORTS.


Articles. 1915


Chemil .l 'Irus. dye.s,
w I I. nl l lll l t 'd
Soda ash............. S;.N,619
Sodium-
Bicarbonate ..... 156,748
Borate .......... 108,803
Caustic soda,
crude .......... 625,713
Nitrate.......... 1,613.166
Wax, paraffin....... l,i2.'I i.
Other chemicals, etc. 1,626,258
Coal .................... 2,220,149
Coins, fr, icin (except
gold and silver)........ 243,304
Copper ingots and slabs. 84,384
Copra ................... 320,584
Cork..................... 233,279
Cotton, and manufac-
tures of:
Raw................ 108,223,399
Manufactures-
( loths-
Ducks, gray. 103,603
Italians and
satins...... 957,460
Plushes, vel-
vets, etc... 277,815
Shirting
and sheot-
ing, bleach-
ed......... 444,287
Twines and
thread......... 101,291
Yarn ............ 85,293
Other cotton
manufactures.. 559,525
Drill-, bits, rivets, etc.... 36,559
Dyewoods, crude: Log-
woo'l extract .......... 402,011
Dynamite.......... 193,498
Dynamos, converters,
etc........ ...... 249,700
Dynamos combined with
motive machinery..... 123,568
Egg-, fresh .............. 679,720
l. t I r i, lamps and parts. 91,620
Electric supplies: Sub-
marine cables ......... 154,018
En-inLe-, .-L.an.......... 27,122
T, li, i ill ., for paper
.jl.,iL ............... 164,712
Yi rt ill i i
Bone dust ........... 437,049
Manures ............. 38,705
Oil cake-
Bean............ 1i'.. -,591
Cottonseed....... j'j'j, 025
Rapeseed........ 793,154
FiIjter.- and manufac-
Iurcs of:
Flax, China grass,
and ramie ......... 324,714
Hemp, jute, and Ma-
n 1 I hemp......... 3, S6, 'J!
Manufactures-
(.mnri'. bags..... 42,866
Other ............ 26,637
Tissues, including
mixtures.......... 167,608
W .,t. or old fibers... 68,414
Fishi, salted.............. 96,202
Fishinii iut .............. 68,099
0oo .i n II' n. e. s ....... 73,438
Gas campressirs........ 64,129
4 i1.i,- irl glassware:
Plate............ .. 211,789
Sheet............... 95,062
(;lue.................... I 220,571
IT.,i, a nim al............. ,.;. '.!
ll- i. l .. .. ..... .... 52,439
1 fids ind skins:
lhuYatl and cattle...1 2, 1..613
O( lher. .. ..... .. .I 2 ,506
Iloutsevhld and 1'ersmal I
elfr. 1 ii ('. s. .. lll,660i


1916



$1,843,672
196,442
.:.' l, 1i.

1,465,340
3,083,154
2,835,223
2, 2-'.:., 796
2,111,582

82,333
S. 4,033
1,677,435
297,929

137,630,204

191,367

796,801

232,724


39, 101
160,635
126,118

444,719
115,450

174,207
958,338

195,391

220,286
564,680
317,191

645,388
115, 740

215,549

412,041
120,468
17,.?1."q2
7i.17,'.
736,960


482,138

4,065, 60

166,181
41,728
2.."., 199
200, 160
41,332
101,409
192,320
169,481

28, 922
439 574
482,739
219,457
!.*I 03f6

4, 008.024
443,68(i

191. 292


Articles.


Hydraulic presses........
India rubber and gutta-
percha
( I I .h .. ... .........
Manufactures ........
Iron, steel, and manufac-
tures of:
Ferrochromatc and
other nonmallVable
iron alloys.........
Ferromananese.....
Ferrosilicon and so-
lico-spiegeleisen....
Ore..................
Pig..................
Waste or old.........
Mann factures-
Pands and hoops
Bars rods, T-
anotes, etc.....
Iil' r -. steam,
and parts of....
Chains...........
In-ots-Blooms.
billets, and
slabs..........
Nail. not coated
with metals....
Pipes and tlibes..
Rail f r railways.
Rihhbons........
Rollers.........
Screws..........
Sheets and
plates-
al-panirpd..
Not catpd
wi h metals
Other ........
Tiiird,1. rlitfed,
-r..i shoi c. of
iron and steel..
Wire-
Galvanized..
Not coated
with met-
alq ........
Rods........
Other manufac-
tres..........
Ivory: Elephants' tusks..
Lead and manufactures
of:
In fots and slabs.....
Solder...............
Tea lead............
Leather and tanned
skins:
Bull, buffalo, horse,
etc le.Il or col-
ored .. ............
Roller.............
Sheep and *oat......
Solo leather..........
Waste...............
Otherskins, etc., and
manrifactpres of....
Locomotives and tenders
T ooms, weaving.........
Machinery and parts,
n. s .................
Malt.....................
Matting.................
Mercury..................
Metals and metal com-
positions, n. c. s.:
Bars, rods, plates,
etc.... ........
Ingots and slabs.....
Waste or old.........
Metal or wood-working
machinery.........
Meters...................
Milk, condensed.........
Minerals, n. c. s..........


1915

511,568


1,708,933
235, 964



160,142
210,925

123,383
902,532
3, 2 1. 3R2
W t.,.'3

79,181

2,789,716
283,895
104,142

163,199
267. S7.6
607, ?'S
300,485
123,340
70,469
109,589

609,798

3,851,111
117,707

2,386,500
1, 5.i,. 137


190,867
538,213

187,447
91,143

1,4490,200
36,298
161,417



117,645
55,108
440,297
216,391
41,606

269,129
113,710
171,263

1, 051,500
209, 365
201,192



57,560
3,406,120
125,109
4.3,677
14, 566
525,219
393,085


--


1910


$108, 600

3,612,134
381, 538



101,475
290,698

228,693
833,362
6,876,460-
1,048,607

298,167

11,220,184
G 1, 523
478,570

758,949

2, 094,957
1,653, 332
219,780
289, 802
15% ,043
215, 15

577,544

11,275, 698
229,040

5, C26,723

2,155,696

312,060
2,031,927

336,172
156,221

3,720. AS9
111, "407
201,390



214,203
163,914
.527, 2422
211,92)
101,405

447, 107
60,091
44,007

2, 303, 298
423,210
249,018
037,755


166, 87
3, 738, r ,-:
281,347

889,032
176, 015
5.17,198









JAPAN.


Articles.


Nickel ingots and slabs..
Nets, endless, for paper
making ................
Oilcloth or linoleum.....
Oils and fats:
Beef tallow..........
Mineral-
Benzine.........
Crude...........
Refined-
In can.......
Other........
Other............
Vegetable-
Castor...........
Soya bean.......
Volatile...............
Other................
Ores, n. 0. s..............
Paints, pigments, colors,
and varnishes:
Carbon black........
GoHl, silver, and
platinum liquid...
Lacqucr.............
Varnishes............
Marine paints.......
Other ..............
Paper stock: Pulp......
Paper, and manufac-
tures of:
Hooks, music, maps,
etc................
Japanese and tissue,
im itition..........
Packing.........
Parchment, imita-
tion ...............
P'asteboard and cird-
board ............
Photo.Traphic........
Printing ...........
W rit ing.............
O their ..............
Paper-mn king machines.
Perfumery, etc ..........
Philosophical instru-
ments and parts of.....
Phosphorite.............
Photographic films:
Plates...............
Scnsitived..........
O ther...............
Platinum ingots, slab;,
bars, plates, and sheets
Parcel-post shipments,
n.e. s.................
Pum ps ..................
Rattan ..................

Principal Countries


1915 1916 Articles. 1915 191


3797,503
72,469
117,479
660,505
215,569
355,990
2,177,404
2,037,506
630,259
84,818
13 ,0f02
490,411
672, 51
1,028,200

37,276
117,035
37.2,031
SL.701
65,376
970, C00
2,9 5,4b9


213,357
139,144
234,016

51,7:38
87,20S
130,422
550. i.00
147,932
299,844
95,093
60,731

S5, 8091
I,691,46G6
IU.5,791
02,307
91,6s8
82,334
1,074,955
132, 46f
122,117


$1,001,269

110,364
199,590

738,159
154,167
201,838

1,294,520
1,4S2,598
8-o, 103

112,851
55, 3.56
752,662
987,8141
7,223,5'2

120, 709
190, 374
3S1, 63
13 ,q 623
177,603
76t1, 807
4, 495,333


412, 590
2;70,524 '
413, 1SS

21., 5.37
2.54,501
1'I", 101

430.124
143 93 I
123.409 |

121, ;', i
1,361,2!2 i
22-.,449
137,437
154,42S

355, 630
2.33.2.630
123, 408
162, 0s4


Salt, crude ............
Saws for machinery......
Seeds:
Cotton...............
Perilla ocymoides...
Rape................
Sesame..............
Other ...............
Sewing machines........
Shells, Mollusca.........
Silk:
Artificial............
C ,coons .............
Wild ............
Spinnin"z machines......
Steam vessels............
Straw plaits.............
Sugar....................
Tin ingots and slabs....
Tissues, n. e. s........
Tobacco, leaf ............
Tools, mechanics' and
agricultural............
Vegetables:
Beans-
IRed or white....
Soya ............
Peas...............
Other...............
W atches .................
Watches, parts of........
W ines ........... .......
Wood:
Sandal wood, ebany,
ctc ................
'iine, fir, and cedar..
I.,th er ...............
Woul and manufactures
of:
Saerges...............
V>uol-
T')p...............
O ther.............
Yarns, including
mii'.ures.......
Othcrtissues, includ-
in, mixtures.......
Zinc:
lnUjts, slabs, and
crains............ .
Sheets ..............
W\\asre, ar old........
All other articles.........
Total............. .
Reimports..............
Grand total........


$172,131
74,814
552,526
183,647
2,384,746
654,548
166,554
121, 02
563,505
14S, 59o
918, b60
1,161.711
665,11S
1,312, 163
1.55, 1 38
7,372,937
010, 779
298, 509
393,069
91,761

s829, -46
3,3J2,510
42,554
417, 4-15
245, 515
1:'I, .5,
20;, 819

61, 3, 08
31)1, 874
311,777

1,587,.299
3, 071, 825
12, 151,131
373, 422
111,657


l,.1t,417
157,119
T.S,6'.
4, .Il,.304


$328, 726
124,930
402,174
259,513
1,0693,677
537,497
558, 0S
393,854
1,220,113

72,37S
6.93,362
1,153,096
1,200,658
5, 391,052
131,SSI
6,469,559
,95,3577
423,707
251,283

122,778

882,616
2, 263,504
85, 158
-122,221;
425,991
215, 24
292, 888

141,095
681, 173
36), 511

2,143,760
4,211,239
12,491,850

1,080,506
251, 396

980,277
22s,,;tiS
427,SS'J
3, 2 7,887


Articles.

Aluminum ingots,
slabs, and grains..
United States...
Aniline dyes........
Germany.......
Switzerland.....


Value.


81,01S,814
1,018,424 1
1,686,221
1,35,6136
109,552 i


Articles. Value.


Beans, red and whitci
Kw angtung
Province......
China...........
Beans, soya........
China:..........


SSS2,616
576,629
2Q5, 253
2,263,504
1,671,051


Artiides.

Beans soya-Contd.
Kwangtung
Province......
Asiatic Russia..
Beef tallow.........
Chinn...........


of Origin of Imports.


26., 774,620 376,3314,161
1,3 ", 149 744,852

263, 160, 069 377,079,313


China furnished over half the coal imported into Japan in 1910,
most of the remainder coming from French Indo-China and Kwang-
tung Province. Of the sugar, valued at $1,129,608. imported, the
Philippine Islands furnished more than half. The United States
supplied a good percentage of the imports of machinery, iron and
steel, metals, etc.
The following table gives the country of origin of some of the
principal imports into Japan for 1916:


Value.



5428,553
163,900
738,159
674,077


of Origin of Imports.










SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Articles.


rt.nc ., animal .....
China- ......
United Ptates...
A. i-i .i ......
Kw an g t ung
Province...
United i% n1.-
dom.......
Brass and bronze in-
gots and slabs...
China........
Kwangtung
Province......
Bristles, pig.........
China. .........
Carbolic acid........
United States...
Coal................
China...........
l-rrn.n Indo-
China.........
Kwangtung
Province......
Cocoons, silk........
China...........
Condensed milk.....
United States...
United King-
dom .......
Copper ingots and
slabs..............
China...........
Copra.. .........
Straits Settle-
ments.........
Philippines.....
Dutch India....
French I n d o -
China........
British India...
Cotton, ginned......
British India...
United States...
China..........
Egypt..........
French I n d o-
China.........
Dutch India....
Cotton in the seed .
Straits Settle-
ments ........
French I n d o -
China.........
China...........
Dutch India ....
Siam........
Cotton italian and
satins.............
United King-
dom ..........
Dynamite..........
United States...
Canada.........
United King-
dom ..........
Eg is. fresh..........
China..........
ExtrjaCti, tanning:
C.tecrii, etc.....
United King-
dom ..........
Dutch India ....
United States...
S'tr.,,t- Settle-
ments........
Extracts, tIr-i in g:
Cll -., oak bark,
etc...........
United States...
Australia......
British India....
China...........
Hemp, jute, and
Manila hemp)......

British dia.....
British India....


Value.


$666, 657
372,995
107,603
68,405

54,853
50, 917

7 ., ".v.

(2 *.' i

1, .' ->',
1,827,31.2
2,111 ,5S2
1,114,863

531,637

431,734
6893,62
682,629
517,198
347,621
168,998

864,033
129, 611
1,677, 435

587,463
204, 141
164,168

92,589
72,218
136,827,172
82,329,549
39,565,985
9,639,3284
4,116,250

684,505
436,149
803, 032

275,932
183,571
170,020
87,357
69,073

796,801

795,957
958,338
713,917
159, 7,4

84,637
564,680
564,113

1,595, 718
472,543
406,667
276,415
.1. l i


513,928
163,781
147,305
129,474
51, ", .2

4,065,960
2,399,681
1,225,858
426,151


Articles.


Hides and skins,
buffalo and cattle.
China...........
United S I Is ..-
Kwan tn g
Province......
British India...
Straits Settle-
ments ........
India rubber and
gut t-i-p.rrch" ri i-le
Sir' t r '.r lc-
meits.........
British India ....
UnitedKin"dom
Dutch India....
United States...
Iron bars, rods, T-
an-les, etc........
United States...
United Kingdomn
China...........
Sweden.........
Germany.......
Iron in-ots, blooms.
billets, and slabs..
United States...
UmU teI Kin-.l.nm
Sweden .........
Iron nails, not coated
with metals.......
United States...
United Kingdom
Iron ore.............
China...........
Iron, pig ............
China...........
British India....
Kwanetung
Province......
United Kinzdom
United States...
Sweden.........
Ironpipesand tubes
United States...
United KiLn;lom
Iron sheets, not
coated with metals
UnitedI itate;..
Unire?.l Kn iotin"
Sweden.........
Iron, waste or old..
British India....
United States...
Dutch India ....
China...........
Kwangtu n g
Province .....
UnitedKingdom
Iron-wire rods.......
Sweden.........
Unite I .tates..
United Kin.iomi
Iron wires, galva-
nized.............
United States...
U united Kingdom
Canada.........
Lead ingots and
slabs.............
Australia.......
United Sr ite-...
China ..........
Leather, sheep and
goat ......... .....
n Ii. i lu itU ....
Mercury............
Unii,.1lKinalorn

i.'h u ..........
Italy ...........
Metal or woodwork-
in: machinery....
United States...
UnitedKingdom


Value.



$4,008,024
3,344,943
432,561

78, 195
64,557

56, 637

3,612,134
2,476,694
741,351
239,467
82,361
67,213

11,220,184
8,093,996
2,069,665
377,241
344,407
172,609

758,949
428,933
271,919
57,999

2,094,957
1, 941, 879
89,330
833,362
818, 271
6,876,460
2,506,724
1,801,188

1,207,089
1,050,073
176,672
121,426
1,653,332
1,316,478
318,716

11,275,696
6,013,324
5,060,651
106,865
1,048,607
273,263
199,551
111, 598
105,052

80,290
58,001
2,031,927
1,201,265
761,926
68,735

2,155,696
1 892, 709
182,707
50,243

3,720,089
1,745,264
1,641,438
261,380

527,242
486,716
637,755
219,956
163,067
126,088
100,843

889,032
808,592
66,805


Articles.


Mollusca shells......
Australia.......
Dutch India...
Straits Settle-
ments.........
Nickel Ingots and
slabs ............
United Kingdom
United States...
Oil cake bean .......
Kwanetu ng
Provinee......
China...........
Asiatic Russia..
Oil cake, cottonseed.
China...........
Oil cake, rapeseed..
(C 'i .1a ..........
I1i:ri'h India ....
Oil, kerosene or pe-
troleum, other
than in can.......
United ii .
Dutch India....
Oil, volatile.........
France..........
Unite I Kingdom
United States...
Switzerland.....
Opium: Morphine..
United King-
dom .........
United States...
Ores n. e. s .........
A.stralia .......
China ...........
French Indo-
t hina........
British India....
Peru ...........
AsiaticRussia..
Paper, printing
(weighing more
than 58 grams per
square meter)...
United King-
dom ....... .
United States...
Parcel-post ship-
ments............
United King-
dom..........
United States...
China...........
Kwangtung
Province......
Phosphorite........
Put I. -iirn, chlorate.
United States...
United King-
dom..........
France..........
Pulp................
Sweden.........
United States...
Canada.........
Rice...............
Siam............
French Indo-
China.........
China..........
Rosin...............
United States...
China...........
United King-
dom ..........
Rapeseed...........
China...........
British India....
Sesame seed........
China...........
Kwangtung
Province......
S'orges (marked C)..
United King-
dom..........


Value.


$1,221. 113
451,3716
315,246
284,800

1,01i,20)i
721,316
276,923
17,234,382

9,741,924
4,246,623
328,439
707,699
73i, 1i)ti
398,655
332,481


1,482,598
I, 1)nI. .*22
2'92,375
752.ir.2
27 .,4 4
173, -'.')
141 616
67,644
1,919,630

1,850,054
53,873
7,223,582
3. 9 ",:9.'
2!, 2. 1 .

1,164,096
3t2,310
234,609
214,299



99,4669
769,931
206,166

2,382,630

1,009,703
473,6 ;
427, 2011

304,756
1,361,212
87q.337
426, NN2

19, 295
155, 6i5
4,495,333
2. 40, 166
6011, 779
327,156
1,539, 177
1,261,517

171,278
76. P8'0
1, 162, 62'
941,2711
123,144

82,194
1,693,677
1,641,431
50,931
!.37,497
.,9, 521

135,603
951,279

939,154










JAPAN.


Articles.


Serges of wool and
cotton mixture
(marked C).
United King-
dom ..........
Sheep's wool (top)..
Australia.......
United King-
dom..........
Sheep's wool (other
than top).........
Australia........
China...........
United King-
dom ..........
Soda ash............
United King-
dom ..........
K w an g t un g
Province......
Soda, caustic, crude
United States...
United King-
dom ..........
Soda, nitiate of,
crude..............
Chile............
British India....
Spinning machines..
United King-
dom ...........
United Stnte;...
Frine ..........
Steam t'oilers, and
parts of ..........
i'nited King-
doam..........
United States...
France..........


Value.


$830,108
806,26.5
4,211.239
4,007,089
189,945
12,491,850
11,3S5,1655
993,127
89,1 427
1,8,13,672
1,4-14,061

251,8 850
1,46.9,340
1,24,00'l1

217,098
3,0.1, 15.4
3,022,070
54, 8.50
1,200,658
1,009,097
97,445
92,023
GS1, 523

502,799
i), 39:.
59,733


Articles.


Steam vessels (over
10 years old)......
United States...
Kwangtung
Province......
United King-
dom ..........
China ..........
Asiatic Russia..
Sugar (under No. 11
D. S) .............
Philippines......
Dutch India....
Hongkong ......
Sugar (under No. 15
D. S .............
Dutch India-...
Plulippines.....
longkong ......
Sugar (under No. 18
D. S) ..........
Dutch India....
Philippines.....
Sulphate ot am-
mniani, crude......
United Kinz-
dom ..........
K w a n g t u n g
Province......
Anstralia.......
Rus's a ..........
Submarine cabl'es...
United King-
dom ..........
Tin ingints and slabs
Straits Settle-
mentt .........
China...........


Value.


55,276, 81
4,351,607

700, 393
87,793
C.9,790
67,298

1,129,G08
792,RS6
255,339
72,374
4,-3.31,04.3
3,34S,g1:0 i
814,496
167,912

991 251
645, 413
3.51,775

597,y.3S
25 I, 873

141,773
116,774
8-,41S
645,:588

645,389
S.93,577
730,276
112,4,30


Articles.


Tinned plates of iron
and steel..........
United States...
United King-
dom.......
Wax, paraffin (melt-
ing point below
45 C. 1 .........
United States...
United King-
dom ..........
Wasx, praifin, ot I( r
British India....
United States...
Dutch Inia ....
W heat. ..............
China...........
K a ang tu n g
Province ......
W ild silk...........
China...........
Kwangtung
Prov ine .....
Worsted yarns......
U rlted King-
dnm ..........
Zinc ringot.s and
slab; ..............
China..........
United States...
Kwangtung
Province......
Indo-China....


Value of Principal Exports.
Raw silk constituted nearly 25 per cent of the exports from Japan
during 1916. Among the other important exports are yarns, silk
goods, cotton cloth, metals and minerals, braids, matches, buttons,
tea, paper and manufactures of, coal, toys, glass and glassware. pot-
tery, imitation Panama hats, etc.
The value of the principal exports from Japan during 1915 and
1916 was as -follows:


Articles.


Agar-agar................
Aluminum manufae-
tures...................
Antimony and manufac-
tures of:
Antimony ...........
Manufactures........
Bamboo and manufac-
tures of:
Bamboo.............
Baskets..............
Basket trunks or
bags...............
Mouthpiecesfor ciga-
rettes.............
Bools and shoes.........
Bracelets...............
Braids:
Hemp..............
Straw................
Wood sharins ......
Brass and yellow metal:
Plates and sheets....
W ire ...............
Brass manufactures..
Bronze manufactures
Breadstuffs:
Oats................ I


1915


$849,620

272,214

3,838,296
406,.S35

198,32:3
394,669

92,621

52,490
4,281,653
281,286
5,987,830
878,274
169,335

326, 442
127. 595
228,312
85, 4s2
:,X,, ;79


1916


3SI,219,761

114,861

4,724,049
479,253

220.669
533 103
115,647

110,595
1,764,132
731,614
6,2.91,911
1,517,135
2,730,071
4,016. 133
202, 16'4
1, 44.3, r',S
13.3, 3'i"1

41,29'i1


Articles.


Breadstuffs-Continued.
Rice-
Husked..........
Unhusked.......
Wheat flour.........
Other flours, me*ls,
etc.................
Brushes:
Clothes..............
H air .................
N ail .................
Tooth ...............
Uther.................
Bulbs, lily...............
Buttons:
Copper anti brass....
Horn and bone.......
Shell................
O ther................
Carpets, rues.............
Cat'.ut ...................
Cement. 1'ortland ........
Ch.'rco.il..................
Chemicile driv.s, and
dyes:
Aci.l, uilphuric......
Blen'chlinv powiler...
I ';1inrn ih r ...... .


1915 1916


$1,311,560
3,497, 531
955,764

532,307

13.3, 20)5
75')1, 202
'15), f,37
76 ., 03:5
7.-, 131'
3s7, '1S

;,. 431
M,. 7
1. 7.'7,4 147
I1, '1127
475,,0.30
112,446
1,227,71.5
112.533

2-if. 057
I. 7(.. ;5t


$2,581,751
2.995.246
1.129,654

2,470,432
13'1, 339
1.,r 3, IS2
211, R37
1,012, 537
SMS-, 'q
3 1r, 1,33
14 529
14', 877
3,031,921
416,912
1,082,237
150,332
1,355,515
114,267

..6; "'.12
-*!',i 5191
;, 1 14, 1'ils


Value.


$5,026,723
2,975,-111

2,010,229

G69, )04
506, -1429
62.960
1, IG', 419
60t, 361
2S5, 331
240,170
676,0ll1
557,817

92, 6-"5
1,1 : 09
782,085.
371,011
721,95S
706, 249
Q 1i, 277

137,661
6S, 469
64, 51
















SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Articles.


Chinrmjei., drugs, and
dyes-Cont in ued.
Dried plants for
man ufacturing g
insectifuge.........
Ginseng............
Insect powder.......
M ron lIdn. tli... .
i[ it T *rn i Il ,I .. .

Sulphur.............
Other drugs, etc.....
Clocks .................
Clois, sandals, etc.,n. e. s.
Coal:
Dust.................
Lump...............
Combs, wood, shell, etc..
Copper:
lnots and slabs.....
I I i., and sheets....
W ire.........
Coral, worked or crude..
Cotton manufactures:
Cloth-
Cambric, Tur-
key-red ......
Crepe, exceeding
20 inches width
Drill and twilled
shirtings......
Duck...........
i lannel-
Exceeding
29 inches
width ....
Not exceed-
ing 29 in-
ches width
Nankeens, imi-
tation.........
Shirting and
sheeting-
Uray.........
IV hite.......
Tissue, striped...
T-clAth..........
Other cloths.....
Beduing............
i1j I lI ..........
,'i.- :,inJ braids,
plaited...........
Handkerchiefs......
Thread.............
Thread for lace......
Towels, Turkish,
honeycomb, etc....
XX aduing............
\, aste cotton.......
N\ hearing apparel-
Undershirts and
drawers-
I rpe...........
Knit...........
Yarns-
Below No. 20....
Over No. 20.....
Electric wire, insulated..
Embroidery and drawn
work:
Tablecloths, darned
or drawn work.....
Tissues, darned or
drawn work.......
1' rn : ,..r ....... ....
i ri 1 1i :
Artificial...........
I hosphate...........
Other ........
Fish:
Dried-
JBuche de mcr....
Cod.............
Cuttlefish........


S369,535
146,063
63,411
?.1 ?, "''ql
I,,.,.'.4
1,238,842
2, 105,048
515,399
227,809

1,432,486
8,147,401
128,278

22,043.620
719, 883
235,817
167,628


97, oll

665, 100

5,301,340
305,044


449,946

484,990

2,665,341

6,745,468
420, 7i7
169,414
972,091
,h., ,, .,
;lIj, .99
241, 95

70,297
67, 1409
230, 3,1
202,445

1,016,558
141,8t.4
414,519


456,030
5,337,327

24,951,875
8,021,207
448, 086



691,003
i., n .1 .,


206,067
561,061
514,220

28S, 973
199,981
1,334,261


$359,063
196,068

%I 4u 161
I. *," 4 ';
6, 856, 528
591,237
562,405

1,510,745
8,661,630
235,856

32,960,375
466,747
1,472,647
191,236


427, 147

1, 525,406

6,549,783
722,386


1,200,857

1,859,962

2,971,502

9,220,852
930, 6 8
781,4i7
1,343, 256
1,5ou, 160
530, 128
718,420

206,703
289, ; 63
723, 493
38,; 91

1,628,330
253,520
822, t63


721,057
14,373,941

27,982,193
10,697,346
561,128



1,036,915

685,671
298,966t

165,692
1,620.813
271,121

109.1531
3560, 54
1, 52, I7')


Articles.


Fis h-Continued.
Dried after boiling-
Bonito..........
Sardine ..........
Other...........
Fresh................
Preserved...........
Salted-
T i, i ...........
Shark's fins..........
Shellfish-
Dried-
Albalones....
Scallops.....
Shrimps and
prawns....
Other ...........
Preserved-
A bal,)nes....
Crab meat...
Fuo.iiulTb., n. e. s.......
Fruits:
Apples..............
(,ranq, .. mandarin..
S'ih'r ruit.. and nuts
Furs..................
Glass and glassware:
Beads and balls.....
Bottles and flasks....
Cups...............
Mirrors.............
Tableware...........
Other..............
Grains and seeds, n.e. s..
Hats, caps, and bonnets:
Panama bats, imita-
tion ...............
Straw..............
Other.............
Hides, skins, etc., and
manufactures of.......
India-rubber tires.......
Inks...... ..........
Iron, and manufactures
of:
Pans and rice kettles.
Tubes..............
N\ astc or old iron....
Other..............
Jeweiry..................
Jute, etc.:
('Cri.isgo and rope....
i,uninr bags.........
L. n'iii, r,.l ware.........
Lamps, and parts of....
Leather, and manufac-
tures of:
Leather............
Manufactures-Belts,
beating and hose...
Machinery and parts of:
Electrical and parts
of........ .....
l.'laihjii.; l\ n :\ ilEg.
and parts of .......
Tol-., iimudihg agiri-
cultural...........
Other...............
Matches:
S'iftv................
)I Itr ...............
Mats and mattings:
Piece................
Single mats ........
Metals and minerals,
II. e. s.:
Me Ials...........
Metal manufactures.
Minerals, and manu-
factures of.........
Net, fishing..............
Oil:
Animal-Fish and
whale.............
Mineral..............


fl, 67g
ISt 1, i-1
121,001)7
In1',..39
702,639

193, 153
110,878

190,810
501,686

239,723
41,229

81,275
786,233
2h1, U96

264,380
I,", ..;'*.9
17 .;:.2
60,153

226,261
877,597
428,476
292,351
107,776
948,108
788,203


1,389,830
79,500
178,296

2,132, 245
1,699,489
90,461

32, 7S0
99,065
If6, 008
1,467,127
63,624

107, 839
16-,519
281,602
1,115,717

384,396

38,977

2i9, 7.1

479,474

100,929
674,696

5,411 635
1,917,474

441,734
694,110

3,573,568
595,266

213,132
101,302

1,113,616
173,382


$110, 230
147, 709
139,750
127,070
434,677

347,204
139,986

214,333
W6, 440

277,170
50, 133

133,818
1,647,705
486,059

199,039
5"11, ":23
118,799
271,107

480,167
1,848,04
986,342
.. .', ill 7
193,883
1,067,172
742,287

2,720,036
179,762
422,016

1,194,807
2,032,025
168,939

172,027
461 815
177, 188
4,661,028
226,646

194,250
119,551
549,642
2,540,664

833,419

127,270

721.291

819,510

152,952
2,233,940

8,062,758
2,4.7, I'11

428,609
998,794

14,270,216
398,235

588, 015
312,372

1,687,213
1,443, 47.













JAPAN.


Articles.


Oil-Continued.
Vegetable-
Camphor ........
Colza ...........
Pepprrmint.....
Soya bean .......
Other...............
Ores, n. ..............
Paints, dyes, etc., n. e. s.
Paper and manufactures
of:
Paper-
European-
Printing.....
Other.......
Japanese-
R ice and t is-
sue papers.
Packing.....
Pasteboard..
Other.......
Manufact ures-
Blank and note
books..........
Books and mnaga-
zines..........
Labels...........
Mouthpieces for
cigprettes......
Napkins.........
Other. .........
Parcel-puost shipments...
Pencil- .................
Pottery..................
Purses:
uVith frames.........
Other ........ ......
Salt ....................
Scientifie instruments:
Philosophical .......
Other ..............
Screens.................
Seaweed................
Silk:
Cloth-
Cr npe ............
aliirai--
ricitrel ....
Plain .......
Ponge"l. silk and
col ton .........
Satin-

Silk and cot-
ton ........
Taffeta.........
Other, including
cot ton mixi-
tinres..........
Clothing-
Handkerchiefs ...
Kimonos........
Nightgowns.....
Other manufactures
Cocoons .........
Floss ............
Knubs...........
Raw-
Doupion.........
Steam filature,
over 12 denier.
Steam fi at ure, up
to 12 denier...
Other .........
Spun yarns......
Waste...............
Slippers.................
Soap, toilet..............
Soy................... ..
Spirits, wines, etc.:
Beer-
Pint bottles.....
Quart bottles....
Sake.................
Water, mineral......


1915



$15.9,74.5
1,442,363
317,25s4
127, 1 16
261,544
467, 054
833,183



731,677
119,524

12q, 715
47,642
211,127
908,451

59,852

201,79S
82, 55.3

100, 587
94 ..5141
4".S, 603
6,4S,94-.-
94,173
3, 462, 571

59,004
7..,082
220,740

24, ',61
250,292
104,035
971,,.179

3.34,936
95-, 05..
IS, 2-13. 2S

2S2,6 i 1

327,544

359, 4S7
446,669

371,254
1,360, 941
330,340
359, 48
199,392
330,911
231,175
792,755

127,831

74,637, 103

964,264
1,071,473
2,171,106
59,534
G12,140
491,596

119,193
583, 088
884,207
111,208


1916




$153,675
1,& 876,9 30
420, 987
459,264
2,515,205
1. 186,534
1,992,0A14



2,32S,047
601,366

1Q, fi12
177, <.35
491,6 .0
1, 052,:.17

154,598

245,611
181,.3.56

103. 076
14 ;, 860
1,418,070
17, 280, 141'
622, 304
6,002, 11 S

177, 552
206,619
267,212

171, F04
413, 193
124,04:3
1,226, f,33

1,41?,219 I

S09, 664
19,766. -.29

986,363

S02,427

130. 010
412.,415


578,593
2,156,099
477, 887
430,121
217,306
410,692
1,280, 837
1,4S3,1S5

171,491

131,071,406

1,801,592
73,263
850,940
3,741,325
178,397
,39,359)
55.3,515

209,434
1,157,519
1,012,138
128, 522


Articles.


Sugar:
Refined ............
Rock e3nrty. ...
Ot hr sugar and con-
ieetrioneries........
Suigical instruments....
Tablleclths, n. e. s......
Tea:
Black...............
D ust ................
r-ireen-
lasket fire ......
Pan fire ........
Other.............
Telephones, and parts of.
Tissues. n. e. s-.:
St(,:kinet a n d
iunittcd............
Other ..............
Tobacco:
Leaf .......... ......
Cigarettes...........
Toilet preparations:
Powder..........
Perfumed waters
and hair oil.......
Tooth powder and
paste.............
Other...............
Toys..... ..............
Trunks and hand bags:
Baskets-
W illow .........
Rush............
Cloth l ...............
Leather. ...........
O their ..............
Twines, cordages, and
raw in teri.ilot ......
Umbrella; jiid p'irasols:
Europea.n-
(".tton ..........
Silk .............
Jap ncese............
tilmbrella sticks and
h ndlI-; ...............
V\ee i l.]ec, etc.:
Bej is. ;idncy.......
Chillie dried......
linger, dried........
Mushrooms, dried...
Onions .............
Peanut _u .............
Peas ............ .....
Potatoes ............
Preserved...........
Other ...............
Vehicles:
Jinrikisha ..........
Other, and parts of..
Vessels:
Steam ..............
Other..............
Wax, vegetable.........
Wearing apparel, n.e. s.:
European clothing...
G;arters..............
G loves...............
Kimonos............
Neckties and scarfs..
Sashes...............
Shirts ........... ...
Socks................
Other...............
Wood, and manufactures
of:
hoardIs for tea 'ox'es.
Furniture...........
M natcli slicks.. .......
Railivay lie .........
Wool shavings for
match boxes .......
Other lumber, etc...
Other maniuf'ctures.


5 1916


7;, 49.3S';
71,193.

09, 21;5
105, 783
269,391

M12,204
141, 1t3s

1, ,;4,323
5,09 ',. 13
40,164
2129)

51, 1,57
1,522,6;31

80, 7.3S
9, 100
56,514

169,7,30

SS,404
12n, 4q2
2,257,676


102, 2.66
22.S,271
.;,6,297
11b, 6276
104,050

6113, 19.3

742, S.3
16,947
52,227

209,999

2,321,72z
12.1,56,6
141.'J17
652, 433
2Lb. 974
45:.7. 872
1, h31, 171
221,522
274.273
436,307

129,015
276,217

19, 473
:i12, 299
579,532

41i, t.59
230, 311
107,0310
40,, 972
133,051
163,91 1
",0,618
712,41364
3.-0,75S


I. 1 'I'l. 1) 12
I I1', 59%
.1', I 2
1-1s. 9

1.15..S53R
2, 02-4. 62.5
irt.dg.4


$.,. 1s3, 23,;
2143,362

259,6 1
40', 794
407, 77

l,521,297
234, 13.

1, ?07,500
4,363,654
55, 281
416,727

206, 90
2,371,210

140,379
190,171
105, n"13

37j,7.52

16q,273
20S, 947
3, $0, 250

231,161
349, 116
150,953
337,051
192,457

1, 4103,976

1,025, 95
63,294
57,410

348,50,3

3,369. 19q
27.3, 16i2
212, 851
,"25,225
311, 226
4;11,071
3,924,723
267,911
391,673
539,300

170,231
S04,395

5r3, 543
20, 56
S6.5, 17

7S 1,027
34S,.541
917,464
591,t634
ISs, 761
400,43.,
149,952
1,0.30,350
.,33,960


1.379,122
200,482
:,S6,074
759, OG2

125,983
3,436,026
723,562










SUPPLEMENT TO COMME'ICE REPORTS.


Articles. 1915 1916 Articles. 1915 1916


Wool...inl manufactures Zinc ore................. $179,666 S9U1, .7
of: All other articles......... 5,341,591 4,449,300
Blankets and blan-
keting of wool, or Tot l.............. 31?5,74,789 556,697,116
cotton and wool... $94,414 $265,982 Reexports .............. 1. hi',095 5,345,741
Mounseline de laine.. 671,948 1,355,144
Cl..i and serges.... 8,051,914 2,890,116 Grand total....... 352,736,884 362,042,8.37
Yarns ............... 407,202 770,123
Other cloths......... 2i' i, ,4 179,307


Destination of Exports.
The United States took a large pelceliage of raw silk exports,
imitation Panama hats, porc-elain and earthenware, unhnisked rice,
both black and green teas, kidney beans, antimony, camphor, hemp
and straw braids, calza oil, rice, toys, etc.
The principal destination of Japanese exports during 1916 was as
follows:


Articles and coun-
tries of
destination.


A p.r-' -. r...........
I l .lr ,
L tSLed States...
Dutch India....
United King-
dom ..........
France ........
H-,.nL ,.nq ......
Asiatic Russia ..
Straits Settle-
ments ........
Antimony.........
United Ftates...
Asiatic Russia..
United King-
dom..........
Franc...........
Russia..........
Bast ets, bamboo....
United States...
Beans, I idney ......
U1it' 1I States...
France.........
United King-
dom ..........
Canada.........
Beer (in quart bot-
ties) .............
British India ...
China...........
Kwangtung
PJr.nince.....
Dutch India
Straits Settle-
ments........
Boots and shoes.....
Asiatic Russia ..
China...........
Bracelets...........
British India-....
Braids, hemp.......
niit d :-lates. ..
United King-
dom ..........
France..........
Australia.......
Canada.........
Braids, straw.......
United States...
United King-
dom ..........
I rn ic. ..........
Brass and yellow
metal, plates and
sheets.............
Asiatic Russia ..


Value



S 1,2l., .l1
".1 21
174,917

156,811
144,211
109,914
67,273

50,0.25
4,724,049
2, 1S5,576
1,951,891

333, 552
110, 69
79, A10
533,103
383,207
3,369,198
2, 170, 773
829,489
204,335
130,970

1,157,549
426, 104
277,891
140,411
103,012
100,875
1,764,132
1,332,200
314,361
734,614
696,469
6,281,911
3,L07,1l.7

2.297,966
7.K, 9M1
98,184
68,822
1,517, 135
776,953
512, q0q
166I, 161;

4,016,13.3
3,007,005


Articles and coun-
tries of
destination.


Brass and yellow
metal, plates and
sheets-Co,wid.
II. n:' n2......
British India...
( hina...........
Russia ........
Brass manufactures.
Asiatic Russia..
Australia .....
Dutch India....
Britis1h India..
llT.n.:l.ng .....
h bin.i. ........
Brushes, hair.......
United States...
United King-
dom .........
.! ustralia.......
Canada.........
Brushes, tooth......
United btates...
United King-
dom ..........
China........
Australia.......
Canada.........
Buttons, shell......
United King-
dom.........
United States...
British India....
Australia.......
Philippines.....
Fr:ancri ........
Canada........
China..........
Argentina ......
[,Dut hIndlit ....
Camphor..... ....
United tStates...
British India....
United King-
dom .......
Asiatic Russia ..
France.......
Carpets: Flower
mat United ":.1i '...
United King-
dom ..........
China...........
Cement, Portland...
Dutch Inli .....
riti.h tril ..


Value.


$398,593
327,860
95,401
56,9.;5
1,443,9 90
970.407
105, sl
73.95A
73,41 R
60, r,8S
59,102
1,09.1, 182
451,798

380,151
81,516
72,004
1,012,537
445, 183

162,407
110,156
65,637
59,478
3,031,921
853,484
771,623
286,603
241,717
146, 42.3
137,020
135,1 27
115, 461
59,3 2
59,438
3,134,466
1,557, 812
777,424

295,900
201,983
193,055

99, 794
520,890
194,4541
92,307
1,2 1 ,. '1)
12, 1,*J'2
291, 137
166,144


Articles and coun-
tries of
destination.


Cement, Portland-
Continued.
Kwangtung
Province......
China..........
Straits Settle-
ments ........
Cir.ci ..............
China...........
United King-
dom..........
ilongkong......
Clog., -:nd.,. etc...
Australia.......
United Kingdom
Canada.........
Kwangtung
Province......
Clothin.:. European.
United States...
Kwangtung
Province......
United Kiu-:dom
ClI lhin :. Kimorii.s.
olhei thin silk....
United States...
Australia.......
Coal................
China...........
Iunekon. ......
Straits Settile-
Inentq.........
Philip[pine .....
Dutch India....
l -i .aii .........
Asiatic Russia..
Fren'ch Indo-
China.........
Australia.......
British In ia....
United States...
Coal (dust)..........
C(himn.........
ion :kong ......
French Indo-
China.........
Coprp'-r -nios and
slabs .............
Asiatic Russia..
United Kingdom
'ran .ce...........
United S'ltes...,
China..........
Copper wire.........
I 'l na...........
Urit-h In'dia....


Value.


$146,330
144,233

138,72
591,237
189,645
176,067
63, 104
562, 105
104,470
104,221
69,252

55,570
784,027
398,204
85,461
75,208

584,634
346,335
82,007
8,661,630
2,271,821
2,046,853
1,582,403
1,320,983
437, 676
3,' ), .)97
174,030

110,439
86,133
78,408
55,193
1,510,745
992,916
422,552

61,423
32,960,375
19, 5.7, i3%.
8, 3',043
2,502,950
1,522', .3
12.2R6
1,172, 47
589,831
1S5, 753


--











JAPAN.


Articles and counm-
tries of
destination.


Copper wire-Con.
Kwangtung
Province......
Prance..........
Hongkong......
UnitedKingdom
Cotton blankets and
blanketings.......
British India....
China...........
Hongkong ......
Cape Colony
and Natal.....
Cotton crepes.......
United States...
Australia.......
British India....
Dutch India....
Philippines .....
Cotton drills and
twilled shirtings..
China ...........
British India....
K want ung
Province......
Hongkong......
Asiatic Russia..
Cotton ducks.......
Australia.......
China...........
Asiatic Russia..
Hongkong......
United Kingdom
Cotton flannels, ex-
ceeding 29 inches
width.............
China...........
British India ....
Australia.......
Cotton flaunels, not
exceeding 2'1 in-
ches width........
Dutch India....
China...........
British India....
Hongkong......
Straits Settle-
ments .........
Australia.......
Cotton nankeens,
imitation.........
China...........
Kwangtung
Province......
Cotton shirtings and
sheeting, gray....
China...........
British India....
Kwangtung
Province......
Australia .......
Cotton shirtings and
sheetings, white...
China..........
British India ....
Cotton tissues,
striped ............
British India....
China ...........
Dutch India....
Kwangtung
Province......
Hongkong......
Cotton T-cloth......
China...........
Hongkong......
Kwangtung
Province......
Cotton thread.......
China..........
Dutch India....
Hongkong......
British India....


Value.


$168,156
152,573
93,912
213,001
718,420
185,761
129,408
114,067
82,814
1,525,406
651,186
295,757
131,026
115,422
65,664
6,549, 783
5,016,951
1,005,553

314,856
62,540
54,854
722,3S5
206,368
151,73lS
87,887
96,216
58,264

1, 200, '57
781,511
137,321
130,174

1,859,962
792,699
333,346
275, 2S.
226,047

95,270
66,240

2,971,502
2,072,092

843,099

9,220, 852
5,602,910
2, 9&S, 278

363,300
80,331
930,688
693,196
190,478

781,477
291,436
178,459
113,920

52,406
51,354
1,343,256
1,125,130
75,963

61,595
723,493
331,090
78,656
78,117
64,067


Articles and coun-
tries of
destination.


Cotton towels, Turk.
island huckaback.
British India....
China...........
Hongkong......
Australia.......
Dutch India....
Straits Settle-
ments.........
Kwangtung
Province......
Cotton, waste.......
United King-
dom ..........
United States...
Australia.......
Cotton yarns over
No. 20 ............
China...........
British India....
Hongkong......
Philippines.....
Kw an g t un g
Pro.ince......
Cotton %arns up to
No. 20 ............
HongLong......
China...........
K wan g t ung
Province......
Philippines.....
Crab meat ..........
United States...
United King-
dom ..........
France..........
Drawn-work table-
cloths...........
United States...
United King-
dom ..........
Australia .......
Electric machinery
and parts of.......
Ca'tina ...........
Asiatic Russia..
Kwangtung
Province......
Australia .......
United King-
dom ..........
British India....
Electric wire, in-
sulated............
China...........
Kwangtung
Province......
Asiatic Russia..
Fish: Cuttlefish,
dried.............
Hongkong......
China...........
Straits Set tile-
ments.........
Fish,shell: Scallops,
dried .......... .
Hongkong.
China...........
Straits Set t le-
ments.........
Flours, meals, and
groats of grains
(excludes w heat
flour) .............
United King-
dom ..........
United States...
France..........
British India....
Flour, wheat........
Straits Settle-
ments.........


Value.


--- -- I ii- -~


$1.628,330
332,362
321.039
253.236
246.629
117,321

84,262

58,573
822,763

389,360
166,167
92,547
10,697.316
7,50'.391
1, 58, 990
1,.194.621
174,232

151,277

27.992.193
. 2,614.963
21,317.090

882,325
51. 530
1. 647,705
922.511

525.542
101.410

1.0.36.915
681.548

246,337
66.497

721.291
1741,502
166,744-

137,755
64.343

52,027
50.410

561.12S
214,3S1
106,193
b2, 579

1,529,179
930,988
412.552

122,301

565,440
252.288
163,312

102,312


2.470,432

1,237,930
650,140
417, 133
55.021
1,129,654

325, 734


Articles and coun-
tries of
destination.


Flour, wheat-Con.
United King-
dom..........
Hongkong......
Kwangtung
Province......
Dutch India....
Glass cups..........
Australia .......
British india....
Dutch India....
Straits Settle-
ments .........
Cape Colony
and Natal.....
Class bottles and
flasks.............
British India....
Australia .......
United King-
dom ..........
China...........
Philippines.....
Straits Settle-
ments .........
Honekong......
Dutch Indnia...
Cape Colony
and Natal.....
Glass: Mirrors .....
China..........
British India... .
K w a n gt u n g
Province......
(;loves ..............
Un it ed King-
do i ..........
C hin. ...........
Hatis, l'a n ma ,
im itation.........
United States...
Australia .......
H osierv.............
C hina ..........
Briti-h India...
India-rlbber tires...
Suni ted King-
dom ..........
Straits Settle-
m ents........
China...........
British India....
Hongkong......
Iron manufactures..
Kwangtung
Province ......
China...........
British India....
Asiatic Russia..
Hongkong ......
Philippines.
Dutch India....
Australia.......
Lacquered ware.....
United States...
United Kingdom
Lamps and parts of..
China...........
United Kingdom
British India....
Asiatic Russia.
Australia.......
United States...
Ilongkong......
Kwangtung
Proince ......
Dutch India....
Straits Settle-
ments.........
Leather.............
China...........
Asiatic Russia..


32718"-18--55c--2


Value.


$306,938
195,396

110,122
103,668
986,312
356.702
219.941
93.702
89.565

57.827

1.848.804
539,749
251,334

217.096
173,027
141.494

124.248
113 216
S, 324

f4. 724
532.017
258.998
61,.419

51.641
917,461
5G2 697
220,232

2, 720 03:t
2,087.864
402,364
1.6.130.3.50
7:314 231
369.8 37
2.032.025

718,576

563,353
388,899
236,434
50 853
4. 64.026

1.176, 342
978, 93
840, 6S9
398,138
370,725
21, 208
169,649
117,410
549,642
162,543
137.962
2,540.664
446,784
435,8 67
415,791
262, 97
253,318
176,946
157,014

107,398
89,940

64,455
833,419
475,527
189,931


...,,


I











SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Articles and coun-
tries of
destination.


Leather-Con td.
Kwangtung
Provinec......
Manure. phosphatic.
Asiatic Russia..
Dutch In liia....
Cape ",louy and
N.dtl...........
llriti l; India....
Australia.......
Matches, safety.....
British India....
Hongkong......
United States...
China...........
Asiatic Russia..
Kwangtung
Pro since ......
Straits Settle-
ments .........
Dutch india....
Australia .......
Philippinesr.....
Siam............
Matches, other......
China...........
British India....
Kwangtung
Province......
Mats, flower........
United States...
United Kingdom
Menthol crystals.. ..
United'King-lom
United St.Ces...
France..........
British India....
Mushrooms. dried...
Hongk'ong......
China...........
United States...
Straits Settle-
ments.........
Oil, colza............
United States...
United 'fig1klii,
Australia.......
Kwangtung
Pro ince......
France..........
Oil, fish and whale. .
United States...-
United Kingdom
Australia........
France ..........
Asiatic Russia..
Oil, mineral.........
China...........
Kwangtu ng
Province......
]T)i~lln-',nil .....
Oranges, mandarins.
K want ung
Province......
Canada .........
Asiatic Russia..
China...........
United States...
Paper, printing, Eu-
ropean............
Mhina ...........
] i-ii-a t-iiin ......
Aci i ? n,, ii.
K w a n g t u ng
Province......
British India....
Dutch India....
Paper, other than
ljrintrin;-, l III ;ri
C hin ,...........
Asiatic Russia..
Kwangtung
Province......


Value.


$104,082
1,620, 13
69),127
272,945
23q, 997
202, 63%
63,125
8,062,758
2, 5r5, 763
1, 7,i', 173
698,397
684, 2q1
561,788
546,918
515,124
373,488
90,616
75,687
6,5382
2,457,184
1,914,729
328,648
206,129
998,794
520,890
194,454
1,211, 698
45.8,010
401,892
210,613
89,052
825, 225
414,369
201,040
72,265

65,632
1,876,930
1,037,693
59), 410
70,029

6S, 686
68, 559
1,687,213
62), 869
603,158
185, 865
148,513
60,608
1,443,473
896,005
474,205
63,605
580,923
216,921
113,274
108, S31
,-,920
875

2,328,047
1,373,875
265,051
239,579
199,297
85, 707
57,991
601,366
245,334
193,228
100,490


Articles and coun-
tries of
destination.


P'arcel-po-.t ship.
ments............
Russia..........
China...........
A',i.0i i'.'iRn ia:
Inited Ning.Iom
Kwangtung
Pro -ince......
IUnI te Staei. .
EgI t .........
lriit--li India....
Dutch India....
Italy............
Peani ............
United SLates...
Canada .........
Peas...............
United i, ingdloin
Pencils..............
British India....
France..........
United King-
dom.........
Asiatic Russia..
Porcelain and earth-
enware............
United States...
Australia.......
China..........
British India....
Straits Settle-
ments.........
Drtch India....
IHongk'ong......
Canada.........
United King-
loin.........
Kwangtung
Province......
Philippines.....
Care "olony and
'atal.........
Potassiam iodide..
United King-
(do0i...........
Asiatic Russia..
Railway ties........
China..........
Kwangtung
Pro ince .....
Rice. huisL-ed.......
United King-
do ...........
Asiatic Russia..
Chile............
Hawaii.........
Kwangtung
Pro ince......
Australia.......
P I'0, ini'nsked.....
Hawaii.........
United States...
Canada.........
T' r1 . .
Sl'iir i .'.l 'l:(l..-.. .
Australia .......
Sake................
Kwangtung
Province ......

lawaii .........
Seaweed ..........
China...........
Silk and cotton pon-
gee................
Australia.......
United King-
dom ..........
United States...
Silk (.r' :Z .........
Canada.........


Value.


~t ---------I -- t ~ II r-~


(17,280,440
11,953,666
1,597, 519
943,947
769,762
701,055
246,346
177,453
108,865
63,046
51,479
641,071
547,047
74,775
3,924,725
3,841,254
022,304
233,692
123,343

76,470
56,308

6,002,118
2,077,117
743,753
627,625
579,759
351,585
259,892
248,403
231,476

230,588

176,498
110,325

04,369
592,984
312,986
123,730
759,062
576,905
164,402
2.:.,1,751

1,665,041
406,012
122.317
96,032

58,882
52,476
2,995,216
1,212,804
1,013,299
525,991
860, 068
654,258
91,733
1,012,138

365, 884
313,010
191,255
75.214
1,226,633
1,150,731



310,921
116,428
1,418,219
361,516


Articles and coun-
tries of
destination.


Silk cr6pes-Contd.
Australia.......
British India....!
United States...1
Nei ZL/iland...
United King.
dom...........
Silk floss...........
France ..........
United King-
dom..........
Italy............
Asi rK.- u' -ia. .
Silk han P.:re ic iks..
Unmtrd St:im-'...
U11itel k ing-
do- ..........
Argentina.......
F e". t ...........
IT iit I India...
Canala .........
Cape olony and
Natal........
Silk habutai,
figured............
British India....
United h ing-
dom ..........
Silk habhtai, ulain..
United :tale....
United K ing-
dom ..........
France.........
Auistralia......
British India....
Canadla.........
Yo- Zealand...
Italv............
Argentina.......
Straits Settle-
ments.........
Egypt.........
Dutch India....
Cape .1-,,,'L.'i id
"atal ........
Denmark,.....
Silk kn; bs.........
France........
United States...
Italy...........
Sil5', raw: Steam
filature over 12
denier.............
United States...
France.........
l I .........
United King-
dom..........
Silk, raw: Steam
flilat'rc up to 12
denier...........
1' r., i ,',, .. .........
I,,- r .........
United States..,
Silk satins.........
United 1i.ir.-..
British lintia....
Silk sprn ,. ri, ..
Britislin In li ..
United States...
Silt, i .,* .. .... ..
Fr i. I. l j ........
Italy............
United King.
dom ..........
Soap, toilet.........
China...........
Kwangtung
ro, incr......
British India....
Hongkong......


_~~~. .-__ _


Value.


8201,277
235. 070
162,651
143,494

67,110
1,280,837
36, 507
347,250
334,723
1l.,385
2. 15s.090
821, 1;1

420,798
271 '.31
101,417
04,531
85,122

55,214
809,664
563,344
110,777
19,766,529
6,358,000
8,289,668
2,758,081
1,657,020
1,496,731
934,048
259,330
238, 608
137.22.3

102. q22
99, 0;D)
76,654

71,805
61. 750
1, t1',185
790,193
399,398
228,898

131,071,406
111,477,071
14,438,928
4, 0.,Y, 3 )
I, 0jd, ,I ,


1,801,592
1,340,953
344,045
8%, 071
802,427
315,182
2 1., 794
bWg 1.940
723,903
53,177
3,741,325
1,902,520
882,929


136,353
839,359
481,100

124,388
110,569
60,901












JAPAN.


Articles and coun- Articles and coun- ArticJes and coun-
tries of Value. tries of Value. tries of Value.
destination. destination, destination.


Boy ................. 553,545 Toys-Continued. Vessels, steam-
United States.. 190,292 British India... $464,648 Cofitinued.
Hawaii......... 144,124 Australia....... 446,321 Spain.......... $648,050
Kwangtung China .......... 198,401 China .......... 202,370
Province...... 72,854 Canada......... 170,619 Wax, vegetable..... 865,197
Spinning and wear- Dutch India.... 147, 649 United States... 256,259
Img machinery, Straits Settle- France......... 216,088
and parts of....... 819,510 ments........ 76,1Q6 Asiatic Russia.. 180,798
Britishrindia.... 562,156 Hongkong...... 71,591 United King-
China .......... 233,957 New Zealand... 62,520 dom .......... 83,767
Sugar, refined....... 8,183,236 Umbrellas andpara- British India... 66,021
China........... 6,137.656 sols, cotton, Euro- Wood: Boards for
British India.... 919,123 pean ............. 1,025,956 tea boxes ......... 1,379,122
Kwangtung China ........... 688,655 British India... 919,695
Province...... 824,174 Dutch India.... 111,408 Straits Settle-
Asiatic Russia.. 183,688 British India.... 99,434 ments........ 311,544
Sulphur............ 3,098,446 Underwear, cotton Dutch India.... 114,166
Asiatic Russia.. 1,358,520 crepe............. 721,057 Wood manufactures
Australia....... 625,575 British India.... 204,454 (except furm-
United States... 598,204 Dutch India.... 173,022 ture. .......... 723,.562
British India... 140,837 Philippines..... 171,296 United States... 201,335
Canada ......... 129,395 Straits Settle- China ........... 114,793
Dutch India.... 70,823 ments ........ 97.942 Kwang Lung
Sulphuric acid...... 756,532 Underwear, cotton, Province...... 73,080
Asiatic Russia. 499,415 knit.............. 14,373,941 British India... 67,572
Kwangtung United King- France .......... 62,840
Province...... &5,936 doi .......... 4,450.2?3 Woolen cloths and
Straits Settle- British India... 3,0 9,013 serges............. 2,c90,116
ments ......... 67,122 Asiatic Russia.. 1,309,5'60 Asiatic Russia... 2,524,659
Tea, black.......... 1,524,297 China ........... 1,211,914 French Indo-
United States... 1,361.754 Australia....... 1,200,911 China.......... 195,975
Canada ......... 68,776 Cape Colony China ........... 106,899
United King- and Natal..... 729,212 Woolen yarns....... 770,123
dom.......... 56,165 Dutch India.... 50,620 China........... 324,842
Tea, green, basket Philippines..... 549,443 British India... 264,436
fire........... 1,807,500 Hongkong...... 332.S23 Hongkong...... 101,523
United States... 1,537,035 Kwangtun g Woolen manufac-
Canada......... 121,014 Province...... 20i, 1S5 tures: Moucselme
China ........... 74,738 Straits Settle- de laine........... 1,355,144
Tea,grcen, p.mfire. 4,365,654 ments ........ 207,4111 France .......... 653,448
United States... 3,519,069 Egypt.......... 136,3.S0 United King-
Canada......... 820,170 New Zealand... 93,533 dom.......... 329,141
Toys............... 3, 808,250 Vessels, steam...... 8, 563,515 British India... 146,666
United States... 1,211,363 Norway ........ 5,019.142 Australia....... 59,934
United King- Egypt.......... 1,S31,9SS Kwangtung
dom.......... 657,44 Philippines..... 747,999 Province ...... 54,916


Declared Exports to United States.
There is given below a list of the principal articles invoiced at the
American consuilates and agencies in Japan, excluding Taiwan and
Dairen, for the United States and possessions during 1915 and 1916:

1915 1916
Articles.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.


TO UNITED STATES.


Antimony ore................................ tons.. 3,505
Bamboo and manufactures of ........................ ............
Beads, imitation pearl.........................gross.. ............
Blocking foils................................sheets.. ............
Books and periodicals................................ ............
Braids: Hemp, chip, and straw..................... ............
Brass ingots ................................pounds.. ............
Bristles, refined...............................do.... 5,851
Bronze powder................................do.... ............
Buttons.............................................. ............
Brushes and feather dusters.......................... ............
Catgut ....................................number.. 469,658
Charcoal.......................................tons.. 815
Chemicals, drugs, dyes, and medicines, etc:
Alum crystals..........................pounds.. 681,040
Glycerine .................................. do ............
Gum, crude and refined:
Camphor..............................do.... 1,172,972
Other ....... ....................... do ... ............


$1,751,969
448,260
..............
36,242
3,380,765
..............
19,035
..............
290,191
637,055
91,883
11,887


8,332

454,016


3,086
............
75,974
840,000
............
62,852
31,956
393,710


824

1,539,370
121,070

2,214,547
105,436


51,820,814
627,091
27,850
11,934
57,415
4,093,705
87,365
43,615
227,157
866,266
1,359,636
125,710
11,913
30,018
35,250
1,100,694
12,763


=;












SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Articles.



tO UNITED STATES-Continued.

Chemicals. drugs, dyes, and imedielnes, etc.-Contd.
Indico paste.....................................
Insect powder...........................pounds..
Medi'ines, prepared..............................
Menthol crystal........................ pounds..
Pyrethrum flowers........................ do....
Rnlphur................................... tons..
Wa.. 'egetable........................ pounds..
All other ....................................... .
Copper ingots and slabs.....................pounds..
Cotton and linen:
Piece goods.......................................
Rog.. ............................. pounds...
lRenais-anc'o, drawn works, embroideries, lace,
etc............................................ .
Wearing apparel..................................
Yarn and thread...................... pounds..
Other manufactures............................. .
Crucible...................................number.. .
Fans.......................................... do.....
Fertilizer, artificial................................... .
Fiber and manufacture' of............................
Flower, artifi r.il..................................... .
Furniture: Screens, wood carvings, lacquered ware,
etc..................................................
Glass and manufactures of ......................... .
Gold bullion.........................................
Gold leaf.....................................sheets.. .
Gold ore.......................................tons. .
Hats, bonnets, etc............................dozen..
Hiile-. furs, and skins.................................
Iridium.....................................ounces.. .
Ivory and hone manufactures........................
Leather manufactures............................... .
Manganese ore................................ tons..
Matches.......................................gross..
Mats and mattings ....................................
Metal manufactures.................................. .
Musical instruments................................. .
Oil vegetable and fish............................... .
Paper and manufactures of:
Copying paper, etc............................. .
Napkins........................................ .
Other paper manufactures..................... .
Personal and household goods........................ .
Plants, bulbs, etc.....................................
Plumbago (graphite)...........................tons..
Porcelain and earthenware............................
Pro visions, vegetable and fruits, etc.:
.\c.&r--:,ar ...............................pounds..
Bic.ii .mnd peas................................. .
Biscuits and wafers................................
Buckwheat.............................bushels..
Chili peppers.......................... poun is..
Corn................................... bushels..
F ....................................pounds..
.] h, beef. 'infl -egetables in tins.................
Fish and. li Ili it dried or prepared).. .pounds..
Fruits, fresh......................................
Millet...................................pounds..
Mushrooms................................ do....
Nuts.......................................do....
Oats....................................bushels..
Peanuts................................pounds..
Rice....................................... do....
Sake....................................gallons..
Sou .:nd vinegar................................
W'h,,t Grain, flour, and middling.............. .
A ll other......................................... ..
Rugs, of rag and jute..................square yards..
Scheelite ore.................................. tons.. .
Silk:
Piece goods and other silk manufactures.......... .
Raw and waste.........................pounds..
Tea............................................do....
Tennis rackets...............................dozens..
Timrnlr jnr lumber..................................
Ti-ilot articles........................................
Toys...........................................
Tungsten ore ...................................tons..1


1915 1916


Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.


20,095

279,132
90. ,509
3f, 176
1,828,806
...........
21,144,010


858,924o
...........
6,072,939
...........
...........
....I... ...

...........



276,892
...........


3,347
610,424
...........
...........







......... j.


68, 8......



632,005
.........





1,748,832


673,416"

41,977,996
92,238
442,500
39, 276
3, 652, 659
52,175,449
22'.. 21f


99, 559



21,117,039
33,324,508



58


$416,105
4,401
61,6568
46, ,848
154,493
460,443
177,736
28,045
3,147,339


........... 208,459


1,412,976
195, 2F.4
29,890
51,080
39,343

29,252
..............

188,377
20,976
547,800
..............
..............
984,590
57,016
7,512
6,710
75,886
173.823
825,614
115,653
7,237
1,037, 597

158,417
21,394
80,862
45, 824
219,160
8,503
1,016,776

83,360
693,484
9.116
40,258
52.041
886,521
..............
".' 587
*., 487
16, 644
567,621
29,546
27,669
15, 236
354,801
1,188.634
100,972
141,589
17,522
316,010
45,807


5,249, 237
63,984, 081
6,000, 756
227,442
5, 648
4 1'1, ,i. i8
60,842


............

....64 i6.
781,472
20,717
2,370,233

7,908,617"

............
2,537,5006

............

4,21iv.4t


............
16,177
5,714,153

............





107
512,116
781i


4,721
2,0 I1 080
............

............






3,718


556,517

S9, 070
1,628.466
18, 706
633,333

1,... ,585

6,"094,"631i
135,518
1,116,879

18,345,080
58, t, s, 477
273,776



1,"466,"766"
54


28,059,214
33, 751, 693
57,412
............


$108,049
24,3R6
110,957
3.14,963
145.963
451,756
291, 307
201,300
1,895,288

764,690
37,571

1, .2,' 72

149,338
306,517
73,690
49,400
389,066
138, 42
54,431

365,295
157,374
21,086

2,202,713
438,090
31,871
28,666
10,576
158,498
625,748
1,410,949
253,465
50.943
7,818,313

252, 595
32, 728
147, 758
35,195
457,260
90,017
1,507,436

182,101
2, 720.425
8,319
57,824
147,847
10,097
264, 736
1,152,840
124. 117
30,954
88, 506
38,780
65,423
643.460
1,517,324
149,879
177,609
18,634
1,091,132
164,461
91,284

8, 402,t1 qi
116,384,445
5, 453, 176
71,835
519,000
9, 151
1, 090, 490
798,433











JAPAN.


1
Articles.
Quantity.


TO UNITED STATES--continued.

Umbrella handles............................ dozens.. 108,924
Umbrellas and parasols ........................ do .... ............
W orks of art ......................................... ............
Wool, sheep ............................... pounds ............
Woolen and mousseline textiles ...................... ............
Zinc dust ................................... pounds.. 125,503
All other articles .................................................
Charges .............................................. ............

Total........................................... ............

TO PHILIPPINE ISLANDS.

Bamboo manufactures ............................... ............
Books and periodicals ................................ ............
Braids, hemp, chip, and straw....................... ............
Buttons.......................................gross.. 34,596'
Brushes and feather dusters.......................... ............
Celluloid ware............................ ...dozen.. ............
Cement.....................................pounds.. 47,273,992
Chemicals, drugs, etc :
Acid, muriatic, nitric, and sulphuric....... 'kI.... 332,780
Bleaching powder................. .......do. ...........
Borax crystals ............ .......... ......
Camphor and camphor oil.................do.... 3,41jS
M edic ine;, prepared.................... ..... ..... ............
Menthol rvystlils....................... pounds.. 44
Pepperm int oil ......................... .... do .... ....... ....
Soda, washing............................. do.............
Sulphur. ............................... tons.. 7
Wax, vegetable ........................ pounds.. 39, 832
All other.. ....................................... ... ...........
Coal........................................... tons.. 322,141
Coal tar................................... puunds.. 100)
Coke........................................ tons.. 54
Cotton and linen:
Piece goods................ ................. .......
Renaissance, drawn works, embroideries, lace, etc ............
Raw cotton (American)................ pounds.. ............
W hearing apparel ................................ ............
Yarn and thread....................... pouuds.. 1,492,590
W aste.................................... do.... 129.7i ,
A ll other.............................. ............................
Enameled ware............................. dozen.. ....
Fans...................................... number.. 650,-1M2
Fertilizer.................................. ton...........
Fishing articles............................ number.. i6, O
Furniture: Screens, wood carvings, lacquered ware, etc ...........
Glass and manufactures of........................... ............
Hats, bonnets, etc............................dozen.. 1,022
Hides, furs, and skins.....................number.. ISO
Ivory and bone manufactures........................ ............
Leather man ufactures.............................. .............
Matches.......................................gross.. 201,2'.0O
Mats and mattings....................square yards.. 30, 138
Metal manufactures.................................. ........
Paper and manufactures of:
Copying paper, etc...........................................
Napkins ........................................... .... ........
Paper manufactures............................. ...........
Personal and household goods........................ ............
Plants, bulbs etc ........................................
Porcelain and earthenware ....................................
Provisions, vegetables and fruits, etc.:
Agar-agar..............................pounds.. 1,978
Beans and peas............................do.... ............
Biscuits and wafers.............................. ............
Fish, beef, and vegetables in tins.............................
Fish and shellfish, dried or prepared...pounds.. 65,672
Fruits and vegetables............................ ............
Mineral water............................dozen.. 102,213
Mushrooms............................pounds.. 5, 817
Potato .....................................do.... 5,001,100
Rice.....................................do...do 339,093
Sake....................................gallons.. 5,288
So and vinegar.......................... .................
Wheat flour............................bushels.. ............
All other......................................... ............
Silk manufactures, hand kerchiefs, piece goods, etc.... ...........


13


915 1916


Value. Quantity. Value.


$25,005

225,090


481,930
3,373
............
-'28 246


... ... ... .. .. .. .
31,974 1,101,219
1,610.420 ...... .....
5.471,429 ............

108, 169,421 ............


3,261
6,708
21,508
9, t63
10,004
200,082

7,091

4,352
4, 115
99
...... .... ...

239
6,772

1,330,673
530
tC75


,42
7I,3,'i12
289,01.3
I ,2 55
131,4533

20, 2 6t
t', 114
17,I 37
121,04M
2.7;3
itI
53
37,23.3
49,902
3, 4_K4
19, 302

11,731
4,'297
1, I.0
2,241
30
4 S,319

677
12,403
43
9, 131
7,562
1S3,09t
11,205

.7, Ibl
7,759
2, Ot,5
2,921

2f6, 4 O
127.382


43,155
............
16,930
36,782,833

294,480
30,000
43, 194
10SO
.........25
25

223,770
15
122,190
.. ..
33Jb,3L.8
......... ..
3 7 0 "

. . .

139,331

a0,750
225,345

115, t-.1-
1,4119,014
925
3,277





232,341
77, 3S1
. . .

............
............




7t;




119,140
1, 7>,3
J,133,. 510
952, 524
3,872

17,,30
. .


$96, 524
10,666
265,085
7, 434
37,459
167, 293
2,116,249
10,634,671

189.052,828


5,372
3,335
34,043
7,7t.9
6, S0
9, t,73
148,406

11,476
1,513
t, 248
70
14,937
107
27
6, 126
425
9,544
b', 740
1,409,782
. ...... .....
4,ObO

S7,952
2,309
2', 2n2
5c53, t3 "2
230,1"2
17,907
199,9'29
119, 1.59
35,723
9,190
>, Sst
:,S, 572
1t -,417
7,420

97

84, t7
2, U037
7',, t,70

53,430


344
130
92, .t%7

241
I1, 149
33.1
1 ,31.3
7,109
228,407
16,805
529
43,673
72.652
2, 11
4,511
23,644
40,796
101, 17












SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


1915 1916
Articles. -- -
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.


TQ PHILIPPINE ISLANDS-continued.

Tea......................................... pounds..
Toilet articles........................................
Toys.................................................
Umbrellas and parasols-silk, cotton, and paper
..........................................dozen..
Umbrella handles and fittings, etc.....................
Work:- of art.........................................
Woolen yarn and mousseline textiles.................
All other articles.....................................
Charges..............................................

Total...........................................

TO HAWAIIAN ISLANDS.

Bamboo manufactures...............................
Buok. and periodicals.............................
Braids: hemp, chip, and straw......................
BruNhle. and feather dusters..........................
Buttons, various..............................gross..
Coal...........................................tons..
Cotton and linen:
Piece goods........................square yards..
Renaissance, drawn works, embroideries, lace,etc.
Wearing apparel................................
Yarns.................................. pounds..
Other manufactures ................... ......
Furniture: Screens, wood carvings, lacquered ware,
etc.................................................
Glass manufactures..................................
IBats, bonnets, etc........................... do/en..
Iron, pig.......................................tons..
Ivory and bone manufactures........................
Leather manufactures................................
Matches...................................... gross..
Mats and mattings....................square yards..
Medicines. prepared..................................
Metal manufactures..................................
Oil, vegetable.............................. pounds..
Paper and manufactures of:
Paper............................................
Paper manufactures..............................
Pers nal and household goods........................
Plants, bulbs, etc....................................
Porcelain and earthenware...........................
Pruvisi,,ns and vegetables, etc.:
AAg r-j Lr .............................. pounds.,
13t.1n, .L d peas ..................................
Biscuits and wafers .............................
Eggs....... .............number..
Fish, beef, and vegetables in tins.................
Fish and shellfish (dried or pre. I.i t Ii)..1 uminil>..
Mushrooms............................... do ....
Peanuts.................................. dj....
Rice....................................... do....
Sake.. ................................gallons..
Soy and vinegar................................
All other .........................................
Silk manufactures..................................'
Sulphur........................................ t. ns. .
Tea............ ...........................p unds..
Timber and lumber.....................square feet..
Toilet articles.......................................
Toys............. ...................................
ii I rell and parasols:
Cotton tissue.............................dozen..
Paper..................................... do....
Silk tissue ................ ...............do...,
Woolen and mousseline textiles.....................
All other articles........................... .........
Charges........ .......................,

Total...........................................


2,660


............

............
............
............


.............

............19

87,230

.... ..... g .
............
800


............
............
2,693
3560
............


271,348
............
............








1,891





29,318
245,816
47, 1h.I 2.5


............




............
1,880'






............
............
240,340


$562
42
31,607


9,606


276,' 419
380,817


............ 4,411,410 ........... 5,362,710


6,560
20,214
483
3,284
261
595,087

166,323
2,432
6,865
75
15,475

8,227
2,149
19,034
7,740
369
771
.. ...........
20,682
2u,693
69,393
8,630

7,649
9,3P
1,873
115
16,185

751

i, 5111
. ..... .......
135,054"
59,706
8,618
7,235
1,095,918
32,089
114,856
225,889
88S,715
14,683
36,547

13,764
7,709

..............

33,299
329,071
494,816


............
............

...........
81,0206


... .......
...........
114


............
............





















28,537
10,929

800
............
............i


............
............
18,5041







........ ...


............








1,320






220
............
............
............


.... ,720,694 ............ 4,ul,


5,330

.........1..

619


.............


|1,116
6,508
38,835

5,607
45,331
260
3,981
292,322
530,282


8,109
23,425
316
7,541
823,27S

156,064
5,331
8,942
16
21,330

15,937
1,804
13,761
18,928
1,181
1,6 574
29,692
22,986
33,027
10,962
11,992

8,194
18,878
250
2,415
20,406

069
67,002
11,122
1,2,2
171,729
82,179
8,87'
4. 710
1, l-1.2,.57
35, 5i
131, 35.
283,738
95,522
20,764
53, 117
1,079
40,759
14,256

1,589
4,396
2,213
11,567
319,021
615,Wll


_ ~_______r___ 1_~_C__ ~_______ /I (








JAPAN-KOBE.


KOBE.
By Consul IRobert Frazer, Jr.
The Kobe consular district comprises almost the whole western half
of the main island (Honshu) and all of one of the other islands of
the Japanese archipelago (Shikoku), and contains 40,035 square
miles, or 27 per cent of the area of Japan proper. Its population,
however, is nearer to one-half than one-quarter of that of the whole
country. The district contains 29 of the Empire's 72 cities, among
which are Osaka, the industrial center of Japan, with nearly 2,000,000
inhabitants, and Kobe, the twin city and port of Osaka, 18 miles dis-
tant, the second port and chief trade center of the country. Kobe
has a population of 532,000 and Kyoto, the other of the three princi-
pal cities of the district and the former capital of Japan, 509,000.
Importance of Manufacturing Industries.
Agriculture, silk-worm culture, and mining are all of consequence,
but by far the most important activities of this part of Japan are
manufacturing and foreign trade.
The. city of Osaka has 2,046. factories, employing more than 10
workmen each, a total of 131,760, and Kobe 1,102 factories, with
at least 15 workmen each, employing altogether 119,796 persons.
As the greatest amount of manufacturing is carried on here as house-
hold industries they are not included in the foregoing figures. The
figures given include only a part, and perhaps not the largest part,
of the total number of persons engaged here in manufacturing.
The principal industry is cotton manufacturing, more than
$70,000,000 worth of yarns and textiles having been exported from
this district in 1916. The other important industries are the manu-
facture of matches, glass, hats, buttons, brushes, braids, porcelain
and earthenware, and toys.
In 1916, Kobe alone imported nearly half of the total amount of
merchandise brought into Japan and exported nearly one-third
of the merchandise shipped out of the country; 2,469 vessels engaged
in foreign trade touched here, aggregating 5,708,656 tons.
In mineral production the principal article was copper, of which
about $18,000,000 worth was exported in ingots from Kobe and
Osaka in 1916.
The chief agricultural or vegetable products exported from Kobe
were: Rice, $4,507,000; camphor, $3,063,000; colza oil, $1,696,000;
sugar, $1,560,000; peas, $1.295.000; and heans. $1.178,000.
General Industrial Conditions in 1916.
The year 1916 was the most prosperous in the history of this
consular district, as it was of all Japan, and the volume of foreign
trade at Kobe was the largest on record. While imports alone in-
creased greatly over the previous year (from $135,000,000 to $187,-
000,000, or 39 per cent), the greatest gain was made in exports
(which rose from $98,000,000 to $165,000,000, or 70 per cent), in
1916 as compared with 1915. While Osaka is of less importance as
a port than Kobe, its foreign trade also grew very largely last year,
its imports increasing from about $25,000,000 to $40,000,000, or 64











16 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


per cent, and its exports from $40,000,000 to $70,000,000, or 52 per
cent, as compared with 1915.
Other evidences of commercial prosperity during the year were
the invt.a.-e of clearing-house returns, which amounted to 80 per
cent for Kobe and 77 per cent for Osaka; bank deposits, which in-
creased 40 per cent; and the average dividend rate of bank and
company shares, which amounted to 15.26 per cent on March 1,
1917. The average quotation of such shares on that day was $78.87,
as against the average paid-up capital of $27.43. A shipping firm
in Kobe and a paper-nanufacturing company in Osaka have each
declared a dividend for 1916 of 500 per cent.

Foreign Trade of Japan.

The following comparative table, which includes all of the ports
of entry in Japan, gives the approximate value of the foreign trade
at each:


District and city.


Kobe consular district:
Kcbe ........ ............................
Osaka .......................................
Y(kkai:hi .................................
Nag ya....................................
Tsuruga...................................
Taketoyo..................................
It saki.....................................
Sakai ......................................
Nanao .....................................
Fushiki....................................
Yokohama district:
Yokohama................................
Hakmdate.................................
Niigata ....................................
"q'bisu .....................................
Shimidsu. ..................................
A(;m ri ....................................
Murnran...................................
Kushiro....................................
Nemuro .....................................
Otarn......................................
Otumari....................................
Nagasaki district:
Nagasaki...................................
M i ji .......................................
H-1 '.l 'k ...............................
A\ akarmatsu................................
Ilakata ....................................
Karatsu....................................
Suminoye..................................
M iike............'.........................
Kuchinotsu...............................
Misumi ................................
Idzuhara...................................
Shikami....................................
Sasuna......................................
Nana...................................


Imports.


1915


$134,204,000
25,229,000
8, 659,000
1,863,000
905,000
2, 1.1'. 000
.7. 000
59,000
81,000
81,000
70, 175, 000
199,000
155,000
111, 000
335,000
344,000
168,000
..............i
194,' 000
11,000
3,915,000
11, .o'I. 000
;1i 1, 000
2,039,000
5,13,000
18,000
..............
45r6,000
73,000
157,000
8,000

71,000i


Exports.


1916 1915 1916


$186,488,000
40,867,000
9,462,000
1,657,000
849,000
2,425,000
1,242,000
76,000
28,000
44,000
104,869,000
408,000
156,000
78, 000
463, 000
108,000
142,000
..............i
188,000
2,000
7,051,000
15,415,000
1,175,000
2,080,000
318, 000o
139,000
1,437,60006
58,000
112,000
10,000

180,000


$98,502,000
46,770,000
1.,.0, FR o
3, 171,0 ii1
19,118,000
253,000
.......... ....

77,000

152,976,000
2,395,000
125,000
4,775, 000
58,000
807,000
456,000
40,000
2,336, 000
85,000
2,320,000
9,302,000
1,027,000
2,670,000
38,000
1,244,000
252,000
3,174,000
13;, 000l
..............
3,000
2,000
11,000
31,000


$165,055,000
70, 689,000
1,665,000
5,105,000
27,139,000
205,000
..............
..............
..............
77,000
248,827,000
2, 1.7 i x)
928,000
..............
4,414,000
57,000
988,000
505,000
191,000
3,581,000
46,000
4,967, 000
13,625,000
3,700,000
3,111,000
9, 000
1,275,000
800,000
3,770,000
192,000
..............
5,000
2,000
23, 000


There was a great increase of trade at every city of importance,
but eClpecially so in exports. These increased 59 per cent for all
Japan and 70 per cent for Kobe alone, while imports increased 42
per cent for all Japan as compared to 39 per cent for Kobe alone.

Foreign Trade of Kobe by Countries.

The foreigii trale of KoIe, lby countries, for 1916 compared to
1915, is shown in the following table:










JAPAN-KOBE.


Imports f
Countries.
1915


Argentina...................................
Austria-Hungary.............................
Belgium......................................
Chile...........................................
China................... .......................
Denmark .....................................
France and possessions:
France.....................................
French Indo-China.......................
Germany ......................................
Great Britain and possessions:
Australia..................................
Canada ..................................
Cape Colony and Natal...................
Egypt................................
Great Britain.............................
Hongkong.... .....................
India....................................
Straits Settlements.........................
Netherlands and possessions:
Dutch-India ..............................
Netherlands...............................
Italy.................................... ......
Kwangtiuig Province.........................
Mexicu ........................................
Norway.. :..................................
Peru....................... ...................
Portugal......................................
Russia and possessions:
Russia.................. ..................
Siberia....................................
Siam ...........................................
Spain ........ .................................
Sweden........ ...............................
Switzerhind ...................................
Turkey ................. ......................
United St-ites and possessions:
Hawaiian Isiands.........................
Philippine Islands.........................
United States..............................
All other countries.............................


$12
8,411
23,368
758,410
16,804,595
44, 156
1,030,247
785,462
1,663,704
8,072,719
316,397
8
1,773,564
12,882,795
403,36.5
47,172,605
2,037,044
1,361, 086
37,125
55,603
3,765,018
5
152,243
308
1,309
10,034
301,367
1,138, 368
18,517
1,466,157
S3-12, 479

II, 686
S17,131
29, 889,335
1,027,711


Total................................... 131,204.374


rom.


1916


$9
1,357
6,685
1, 5S6, 267
20,128,122
48,496
977,632
674,703
1,097,118

12,044,616
407, 898
157
2,480,683
19,697,459
138,203
59,416,031
3,614,502
1,730,921
27,379
188,612
4,963, 442
1, 275
517,742
7,111
3,290
107, 36:3
1,513
1,187,750
21,15.8
2,267,661
448,312
3
15, 895
1,218,297
49,312,167
2.115,554


Exports to.

1915 1916


$26,389 $53,610
..... ........ ..............
.............. ..............
64,923 327, .85
22,293, 105 30,533, 995
153,711 109, 580


4,133,075
157,709
..............
4,724,794
1,209,101
329,649
239,346
14,793,190
6,923,553
10, 630,536
2,893, 9S9
2, 233,336
13, 180
331,724
2,107,297
1,880
369
26, 626
4, 196
191,264
6,250, 983
209, 1,53
ES, r29
17.799
9. 425
749
2,u. ,:6s
-, 026 3
2, 38;, 263
13. S75, 506
11-S, 41


186,488,386 98,502,518


5,776,401
522,259
..............
8,306, 524
1,963, 603
1, 564, 843
551,976
23,172,281
8,849,297
18, 270, 323
4,451,504
5, 413, 626
34, 789
215,516
3,864,785
6, 168
3,275,275
86, 790
4,859
2,862,553
12,791, 68W
601,029
697,011
96,922
8,651

2,334,613
3,83.5,128
21,202, ,03
267, 57
165,055,663


Tie large increase in 1916 was shared fairly equally by nearly all
of the countries with which Japan principally trades, with the ex-
ception of Russia, which, owing to the large war orders placed here,
increased its exports to Kobe nearly 11, and its imports from Kobe
just 15 times.
The United States, however, is both the chief customer of and
principal seller to this district, the total volume of trade between
the United States (including insular possessions) and Kobe having
amounted to $S1,000,000 last year. Next in importance is India,
with which this porL did a. trade of $77,000,000, China, $50,000.000.
and Great Britain, $42,000,000.
The tonnage of merchandise (by weight) handled at the port of
Kobe in 1915 and 1916 was as follows: Imports, 1,568.717 tons and
1,941,992 tons; exports, 1,380,815 tons, and 1,710,138 tons; and total
foreign trade, 2,949,532 and 3,652,130 tons.

327180-18-55c---3


I










18 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

Foreign Trade of Osaka by Countries.

The foreign trade of the port of O-aka by c,,iintries in 1915 and
1916 is shown in the table which follows:


( 'oulni rir.


Belgium.......................................
China .........................................
France and possessions:
Franee.....................................
French Indo-China.........................
Germany.....................................
Great Britain and possessions:
Australia..................................
Great Britain..............................
S],i '. li ............................ ......
In.1h i ......................................
Straits Settlements........................
Netherlands and possessions:
Dutch India...............................
Netherlands...............................
Ilt:a v. ........................................
K v ii-..' ; I'r.. ince ..........................
Siam ..........................................
Sweden and Norway...........................
United States and possessions:
Philippine Islands.........................
United States..............................
All other countries.............................
Total....................................


Imports from.


Exports to.


1915 1916 1915 1916


8,390,474
24,071
260, 718
:9'1, .;II S

8R, 154
1,523,264
1,121
10,189,762
44,905
1,174,814
14,984
3,924
.1,14, 504
39, 04
12,272
17,072
70,472
816, 012
1,:1 144


$81
15,964,189
107,525
793, 604
-12. 762
221,288
2,444,989
31,869
11,842,797
163,120
967,903
67,314
6,039
2 ,
', i9
8,966
16,064
167,493
3, 367,326
1,620,649


25,229,561 Dl4 ,.;._


... ,,.--I.


..............
$28, 044,864
8
1,319
..............
98,257
635,998
2,010, 103
3, 24,837
3,0,634
22,040
..............
5,489, 575
5,344,342
90)2
250
35,264
646,336
345,255
46,770.584


About half of the total imports and exports of Osaka of $111,-
000,000 wern with China, the volume of trade with that country
amounting to about $'54,000,000. This was due chiefly to exports of
nearly r-0.0,00,000 of cotton yarn and textiles.
The United States and p,,s,,ions, with $4.500,000, ranked fourth
in importance in Osaka's trade; China ranking first, British India
second with $20,000,000, and Kwangtung Province (Dairen) third
with 11,000,000.
The tonnage of i,-rliandise (by weight) l ndled at Osaka dur-
ing 1915 and 1916 was as follows: Imports 460,198 tons and 480,9900
tons; exports 413:)E( tons and 479,020) tons; total trade 899,467 tons
and 960,014 ton-.

Kobe's Export Trade by Articles.

The following table gives the cii-iin,.in statistics of the exports of
Kobe by articles to all colunlri.s in 1915'and 1916:


Articles.


S:.,il drink, an tobacco:
Unprepared-
1ip o i .i pet', and pulse........i.oii. 1 ..

Cod..........................do....
Cuttle.......................do....
Ginger, dried............... .. do....
atifshrooms, dried............... do....
)nions........................... do....
Feas.......................... do....
ltice. ........ ................... do....


1915


Quantity. Value.


30,50M,543

1 1 ..' '
3, I '., -,
1' 1, ..' 1'1


9; :, ..I')

97,460
620,080
133,029
420,219
18),180
713, 28
4,161,283


1916


Quantity. Value.



29,746,782 $1,178, 622
6,257,053 167,602
9,385,029 619,727
3,! ".' ',i 151,473
2, ,,9 1.4 520,050
17, 986,953 214,966
26,570,093 1,295,347
17 1, 1 ,667 4,507,500


.............,
$38, 636, 059-
238,103
35,702
..............
408,595
1,694,550
2, 8 ,., "27
8,ill,' 17
793, 329
614,316

8,576,,86
6,250, 38
24,599

48,723
1,030,033
1,4359,919
70,689,916










JAPAN-KOBE.


Articles.


Food, drink, and tobacco-Continued.
Unprepared-Continued.
Scallops ligaments of.........pounds..
Seaweeds..................do....
Shrimps and prawns............ do....


Quantity.


1,897,780
14, 243,201
1,874,135


Total................................. .........


Partly or wholly prepared-
Agar-agar (isingFass)..........pounds..
Cigarettes..................thousands..
Foodstuffs, in tin packages.............
Mineral water..................dozen..
Pea cheese (miso)............ pounds..
Sake, or rice wine.............gallons..
Sugar, refined................ pounds..
Tea, green .......................do....


2,263,010
46, 168
..............
274, 03S
4, 649,095
706, 912
28,802 752
2,9660,754


Total.............................. ..............


Raw materials:
Bamboos........................ number..
Boards, for tea boxes.................sets..
Cotton yarn, waste................pounds..
Silk, waste...........................do....
Wood, lumber, and boards.................


Total .................................... ....


Manufactures for further use in manufacturing:
Braids-
Hemp....................... bundles..
Straw and chip..................do....
Camphor........................ puunds..
Copper ingots and slabs.......... do....
Cotton yarns................... do....
Leather..............................do ....
Match sticks or splints...... 1,000 bundles..
Menthol crystals................. ound...
Oils-
Camphor........................do...
Colza............................do....
Fish and whale................. do....
D


18,230,903
2,41t4,339
10, 67 7,5 37
*186,344


10), i., .'07
14, 122,012
4,99"1,4.S
61,199i, 9 8
116,473, I.wU
114,2.'4
4 0, 921


3, USI, 'S3
23, 71.1,; 44
24, ,SIJ
n t ..-1


Srpp r n I LIL.................. .... IJ .. .) .' .1
Soyat hean.......................do.... 2,.309,140
Pyrettirum floweri................... do.... 1,942,137,
Sulphur .............................do.... 1.3,34'., 144
Silk yarns, spun..................... do... 2q4, ,$'9
Wax, vegelable......................do.... 6, 155,19.

Total...................................................

Articles wholly manufactured:
Bamboo manufactures..................... ..............
Brushes-
Tooth ..........................dozen.. 2, 820, (1 I
Allother...... ............................... .......
Buttons, ol shell.................... gross.. 7.589, 5 S
Clocks............................number.. 1.0, 313
Coral............................ pounds.. r,1,1%
Cotton-
Crepe.......................... yards.. 1,947,200
Drills.............................do.... 9,035,9S1
Flannels.........................do.... 13,5S9,777
Nankeens, imitation.............do.... 3, .53.1, 153
Towels.........................dozen.. 1,960,447
Underwear, knit..............do.... 3,009, 417
Cotton and hemp carpets................... ..............
Fans.............................number.. 12,062, 140)
Furs ....................................... ..............
Glass manufactures........................ ..............
Handkerchiefs......................dozen.. 12, 775
Hats, caps, and bonnets.................... ..............
Hats, imitation Panama............dozen.. 241,724
Lacquered ware............................ ..............
Lamps and parts thereof ................... ..............
Lanterns, Japanese.............. number.. 2,442,350
Matches............................ gross.. 32,437,391
Mats for floor.................... numbor.. 3,449,364
Mattings for Iloor, in rolls............rolls..I 137,302


Value.


5251,283
193, i20
140, 539

7,846,990

629,710
37,216
347,272
109,123
113,71.5
454, 842
985, 6U
3u3, 720


3,243,208

18, 764
491,899
393, 843
256,595
374,763

1,703, 8,4


1, tI '.. 7
1 .27, 010
1,622. 16.9
.i.2. '".. 99
15,723,771

,394.627
477, 961

l8j, .33
1,317,920
798, 13S

123., 'r.)
142,205
13l;. .sl's
132., il .
"i I,124


I .31, 650,53S

481, S39

.S93, 315
1,OS1, 173
1,517,712
121, 623
167..22'J

132.335
44h, .'04
593,701
185,215
809,818
4,300, 3&3
493,748
170,285
16,872
1,347,330
131,758S
103,219
1,285,008
64.6-13
tS9, 975
62,420
X92. 356i
679. 745
4.32,758


Quanlily.


Value.


2,3U1,500 .329,07.,
16,312, 160 311,949
1,723,473 147,2112

.............. 9,443,511

2,710,721 870,7:.1
21,42S 22, 31-,
.............. 46.3, 14
2%2,817 119,4s,
5, 74R, 263 137, 8rli
90%, 191 5lIj, 75 i
41,631, 93- 1, 56t. 4 1.
2, 658, 848 447, 193

.............. 4,2u7.9,;

15, 0,13 58; 207,114
2, 510,429 98, 491
19, 91,872 707,22,
573, 478 392,14.2
.............. 919, .su

.............. 2, SS4, S


13, ,'Jl, 2S 1 99.3, 17'.
20, 7i),'092 1,t.0 91,'.i
7, 474, 1i4 ., 063, 9-:,
.31,45 1,724 13, 39092.1.
11 .:i l, 40. P'i, Q47, 27,i
132. 634 );,.27%
"1. 740 S.)5,i.5"
.'.11, I 3 .0 I 'I

", ,20,329 152,7.,11
26,721,240 1,i69,451
269, 64,6i00 1,25.5,-'i
12.2 lqiJ 197, 5.,,<
,3 9. 751 .i13, l31
1, 5 .*,6 91, 2,.
Y..', 4-2-,3 SC.; '13, 717
293, 125 441i. l;
.,097, 02S j .35, 1 ;

.............. 4i,67-0 201

.............. 11411, 1


2. v.!J.39

13333J.JIS
137,i023
.'1,93.j3

%, ,b2,372
12,579,876l
41, 660,4753
1,951,l160
2,396.109
39,% 742

12,'i73. 630
..............

414,35U0
.............
4 33, 121
.... .........
..............
i 2,43,6,751
31, 1:,444
4.0 30, 401
11,7. 31 1


1,45533,u02
2, 600. 171
l. 1. 'is
191,231.

207.0.31
742, 43i.
1,91?, 151
13i6, Q'
1,213,010.
10,110,431
, l167,321
269, 47.
10.1, O :1
2',378, 3*,
275,822
3:21,939
2,.547,933
137.09.
1,071,029
5.5,494
q, 05.31 6011
983 ,.5i.
425., 73.,


I I I -





I









SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


1915 1916

Articles.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.

Articles wholly manufactured-C. ,r inr ir,.
P] aper-
"Ganni" and "UIsuyo".......pounds.. I ;.,?" .'.",i :i 162,450 $42,612
I'ur vr.e nI ........................ do.... 2, I,' C4'. 87.532 7,362,962 461.557
l'o-..-.l iin I i th-* nw.i- r.. e .......... do.... .............. 1,739,493 .............. 2,6126, o00
l' il -.r 1ir,............................ d, ... 2,350.042 1, 0, '87 2, rS. 158 2,441,312
Screens................ ........... number.. 49, R5 '., 3?7 r.>, 6 80, 734
Shirting and sheetings ............ yards.. 35,741,891 1,705, 059 51,140, 800 2,650,921
Silk tissues, babntai.............. pounds.. 176.622 3T, 4?5 16i0, 0 755,060
So,'ks and stockings.............. dozen.. 1,000,120 ::., ,71 7 1,473,408 60m. TA
1-.i.. toilet......................... do.... 947,456( 381, 898 1, 1 .2,:.47 4i1. *.')
l ,.v ........I ............................. .............. 98 .0 ............... I 4'i. iS
rmnil.r lI ,. European............ number.. 1. "1. 2"7 518,182 2,598.990 :. ',,.,i
Total.................................................. 30,20f, 450 .............. 50,975, 627
All other articles............................. .............. 20, 49,468 .............. 50, 865,528
Grand total........................................... 98,502,518 .............. 165,055,663


A few of the large increases are due to higher riiarket values, one
or two of the articles which show the gre:ltest incrne:l' i in value,
suh as copper and matches, having actually deer~tsed in nam unt.
In 1916. 51,000.000 pounm ds of copper, valued at $13.400. (i0, were
exported. as cnnmared to the larg-r quantity of 61,000.000 1)ponds
worth only $9 600.000, in 1915. The same w:s true of matches. of
which 31.000.000 p-ross, worth $8 600.000. wePP exM I'rtd nlat vear. as
compared to 32,500.000 gron,. worth $.),800 000, in 1915. With the-o
exceptions, however, the exports of practically all of the important
commodities sold here increased nearly as much in qanntitv as in
value, the most notable gain' bing' in cotton yarns and textiles and
the other commodities listed below:

Increases.


A rli .'I :.


In quantity.


1- 1i


Cotton:
Varns...............................................pounds.. 3, 18,000
Te-tiles............................................ ..yards.. 47,410,000
Carpets ...................................................... ..............
Towels............................................... do-en.. 46, 000
Fnit underwear...................................... do.... 4,30.000
Hosiery.................................................... 473,000
Handkerchiefs....................................... do.... 286,000
Sulphur................................................pounds.. 19,136,000
F urs ............................................................ ..............
Glass manufactures ............................................ ........
Bats, straw ..............................................doen.. 212,000
I aeaucered ware..........................................................
Paper..................................................pounds.. 5,182,000
Poro lain and earthenware................................... .............,
Rubber tires............................................ pounds 245,000
T o.. ............................................................ .............


In value.


84,100,000
2, OM.000
674,000
404,000
5,810.000
283,000
144,000
477.000
88,000
1,231,000
1,262,000
73,000
371.000
:'7, 000
"'",000
811,000
443,000


Per rent
of value.











JAPAN-KOBE.


Goods Shipped from Osaka.

Exports to all countries during 1915 and 1916 from Osaka are
shown in the following table:

1915 1916
Articles.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.


Food, drink, and tobacco:
In a natural state-
Beans and peas...............pounds..
Fish, dried and salted...........do....
Mandarins..................... do....
Mushrooms, dried.............. do....
Seaweeds and cutseawoods.....do....

Total...............................

Partly or wholly prepared-
Agar-agar or isinglass, vege-
table...................... pounds..
Beer, in bottles.................dozen..
Bonito fish (katsuobushi), boiled and
dried....................... pounds..
Cigarettes................. thousands..
Confectioneries and'sweetmeats........
Flours, meals or groats of grains and
starches.................... pounds..
Foodstuffs, in tin package and bottle...
Pea cheese (miso)............ pounds..
Rico wine (sake)............. gallons..
Soy............................. do....
Sugar, refined............... pounds..
Tea............................. do....


524,021
279,916
8,437,288
163,783
6,544,892

..............


258, 035
143,442

77,429
65,035

1,031,913
..............
612,517
495,719
80,977
15,569,042
315,135


Total............................. ...............

Raw materials:
M anure ................................... ..............
Tim bers ................................... ..............

Total.............................. ..... .. ..... .......


Manufactures for further use in manufacturing:
Bleaching powder................pounds..
Brass and yellow mdtal, plates and sheets,
pounds................. ..............
Brass and yellow metal, wire...p..pounds..
Colza oil............................ do....
Copper-
Ingots and slabs................ do....
Plates and sheets............... do....
W ire ........................... do....
Cotton wadding.....................do....
Cotton yarns........................do....
Iron tubes...........................do....
Leather .............................do....
Soya-bean oil .......................do....
Sulphuri? acid......................do....

T otal....................................

Articles wholly manufactured:
Ankle bands.................... do-eu ....
Bags and sacks....................number..
Brushes...................................
B uttons................................ ...
Candles......................... pounds..
Cement, Portland...................do....
Clocks...........................num ber..
Clothing, European........................
Cotton-
Blankets.................... pounds..
Flannel....................... yards..
Nankeens, imitation............ do....
Nankeens, imitation, dyed....... do ....
Shirtingand sheetings........... do....
Striped tissues................ pieces..
T-cloths....................... yards..
Threads..................... pounds..
Towels.........................dozen..
Towels, Japanese................do....


1,345,392

1,765,212
235,173
201,.54S

8, 893, 4 29
2,827,154
186,349
223.590
70, 150,89S
782,617
465,833
2,SO0
1,681,858


462,684
135,94S
..............
25,946
22,868,248
99, 83

440,360
3,789,220
71,318,317
651,602
79,801,360
95,757
17,592,924
18, 125
537, 809
10,602


514,155
12,098
176,505
53,517
92,695

348,970


83,549
188,793

19,307
52,639
11,313

36,744
71,855
16,379
349,671
32,157
648,039
32. 570


836,381
27-457
9,598,126
164,308
5,983,753


363,828
169,760

67,734
140,390

,1842,420
..............
K586,2435
514,268S
73.261
20,223,997
383,964


1,513,350 ...............

24V ,579 ..............
171,90S ..............

432,4S7 ............


.1,556

329.9S0
47,s59
12.991

1.959,3.89
579, 501
.10,197
23,679
11,633,467
27,3'2
245,999
105
28,744


2.047,23.5

4,057.189
473,913
331.933

17,94S. 112
631. 562
370,684
1,101.196
56,360 071
2. 4t. 496
989,164
10,920
3,401,660


$23, SS2
17,387
185,98&1
54, 1.1
120,480

401,88SS4


128, 896
214,345

17,032
131.323
1S.209

i'4,331
95,6.3
23.26G
368,013
29,881
748,715
440,056

2, 21, 652

.34. 912
323,351

85s,166


92,Q,25

1,137, 72
132,111
25,11A

4,309,69)
191,S89-
97,472
121,339
12,433,101
137.228
194 ,03:3
1.05<
73,223


14,970,8.39 ..............I 19,254,857

11S,217 633,900 170.037
64,966 201,143 127,2;'t
75,613 ........ .. 220, lo
193,657 ...... .. ... .I 117,42-
2,277 14., 1 5.40.1
110.067 9,6 1.U2 I 47,145
116,709 :.'17.5 11. ". 33
5 99 ...... ..1172

94,411 992, 'M2 268, 70.1
246,922 14,227,5311 1,012,363
2, n7, 216 I 6>.9412.72 2. 258, 206
20,912 174,1,,;A 16,869
4,144.51103 ', 1)A, 4, 4 5,088,690
0 0,937 :2,u07.5 301,864
S48,416 21.829,.587 1,198,140
86. F.I0 6i91,103 249,341
197,532 732,716 370,011
3,595 35,443 8,445










SUPPLEMENT TO COMAIMERCE REPORTS.


Articles.


Articles wholly manufactured-Continued.
Cotton-Cont inued.
Twilled tissues.................y .r ;.
Underwear, tknit.............do .en..
Other tissues...........................
Counterpanes ..................... do en..
Fans ............................. number..
Footwear..................................
Glass bottles and flas'- s............ do en..
Glo es ........ x .................... do....
Hats, caps, and bonnets...................
Iron manufa tures.........................
Iron pans and ri'e kettles..................
Jinri'-isha........................number..
I aoruered ware...........................
I amps and parts thereof ..............
I oo" iii- glass....................dozen..
Machinery and parts thereof-
Cotton gin and parts thereof ...........
Implements and tools, agricultural,
and ma 'hines..... .............
Other machinery and parts............
Matlhies-
Safety..........................gross..
Other...........................do....
Medicines, prepared.......................
Mousseline de laine................ yards..
Oil, hair, toilet or perfumed...............
Paini ........................pounds..
Paper-
European, printing............. do....
Fnropogn, other................ do....
u, hii. ........................sheets. .
Pot cry ....................................
Ropes, bags, and mats of straw............
Sashes .....................................
Scientilq' arti-les ...........................
SiP- tissues and ,otton miktures.... yards..
Sill- and -otton satins.............do....
Soil-s and stokings............... do en..
Soap, toilet......................... do....
Toilet powder.............................
T oys................................ ......
Umbrellas and parasols, European,
number...........................
Vessels, steam...................number..
Wire, insulated electric.......... pounds..
Wood, manufactured ......................

Total ....................................

All other articles...........................

Grand total..............................


Quantity.



83,531,787
643,294
36, 069
2,300,408

1,348,041
166,010
..............
..............
470
...........237

6,499,237


391,108
11,012,365
562,145

864,252

6,762,071
895, 980
72,883,392
..............
..............


835,076
680,882
1,035,600
..............

597,562
1
341,933
......... ..


Value.


F4,3r-7, n(2
'1".', 7 ". I
527,329
139,994
55,539
127. 140
"ll, ",'**J
71,809
138, 666
418, 800
11,143
8,680
13,567
182,945
168,411

27,030

32,669
544,726

87,622
1,323,197
153,233
92,545
49,920
58,092

278,396
64,297
135,624
175,678
13,718
11,783
47,393
79,362
182,211
269,204
220,704
45,231
140,021

186,710
59,820
71,6655
71,057


Qui nti il ,.


89,397,674
1,528,602
..............
51,218
2, 1-7, 182
........ -..
3,310,182
399,122
..............

176
..............

5,190,143

..............

..............

465,872
8,614,861
8833,646
S1,050,495

14,437,492
3,109,232
74,944,896




887, 650
1,206,427
1,362,909


553,150
1
770,496
..............


Value.


$5,313,657
2,759,305
1,938,537
234, 779
36,247
42 i.63
542,720
259,790
234,009
1,325,250
28,007
4,109
22,656
350, 414
323,694

10, 889

59,633
987,596

156,882
1,504,415
221, 136
151, 95
88,370
89,971

874,926
299,636
205,265
535,467
10,603
32,740
48,098
84,461
227,466
713,906
391,605-
74,750
275, 178

195,272
124,625
189, 783
119,453


.............. 20,323,550 I.............. 33,436,681

.............. 9,141,388 i...............I 14,457,676

.............. 46,770,584 ............. 70,689,916


A-s with Kobe, the most notable increase in exports from Osaka
last year was in cotton goods. Yarns decreae-rd considerably in quan-
tity, from 70,000,000 to 46,000,000 pounds, but increased nearly
$1,000,000 (from $11,600,000 to $12,400,000) in value. Cotton piece
good-, knit underwear, and hosiery in,'roaied in value from $13,000,-
000 to $20,000,000. Cotton goods and yarn tak'.-n together comprised
slightly less th1jn half of Osaka's total exports last year.
The other most notable gains were in brass sheets, copper ingots,
and matches, although the actual quantity of the last named shipped
was smaller than in 1915.

Official Inspection of Goods Exported.

A very interc .ting development during the year in connection with
export trade was, as reported by the local press, the institution by
the Prefecture of Osaka of a system of official inspection of certain









JAPAN-KOBE.


goods destined for export. For the present it. is proposed to include
among these soap, glassware, and underwear, although later on it is
expected that the system will be extended to include other lines-.
The object of this inspection is the desire among the more progres-
sive Japanese to fully grasp their present opportunity in world trade
by assuring and improving the quality of the goods exported. It is
also reported that the Department of Agriculture and Commerce of
the Japanese. Imperial Government is at present engaged in the com-
pilation of regulations designed to prevent the export of goods of
inferior quality. The method proposed is the appointment of official
inspectors to be attached to every trade guild, all goods being sub-
mitted to their inspection before exportation.

Imports at Kobe from All Countries.

Imports at Kobe from all countries, by articles, were as follows
during the past. two years:

1915 1916
Articles. Quantity. Value. Quantity. alue.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.


Food, drink, and tobacco:
In a natural state-
Eggs, fresh....................pounds..
Beans, peas, and pulse........... do....
Rice ........... ...............do....
Soya beans......................do....
W heat......................... do....
Total............................. ....
Partly or wholly prepared-
Flour, wheat................ pounds..
Milk, condensed................ do....
Sugar........................... do....
Total .................................
Rnw materials:
Cotton-
Ginned...................... pounds..
In seed........................ do....
Hemp, jute, flax, etc ................do....
Hides, cattle.........................do....
Lacquer.............................do....
Nitrate soda, crude..................do....
Oil cake..............................do....
Phosphorite..........................do....
Rapeseed......................... do....
Rubber, India...................... do....
Sesame seed......................... do....
Shells of Mollusca....................do....
Sulphate ammonia...................do....
W ool...............................do....
W ood .................................... .. .
Total.....................................
Manufactures for further use in manufacturing:
Aluminum ingots................ pounds..
Bismuth.............................do....
Copper pipes and tubes..............do....
Dyes, atificial...................... do....
Fats, animal........................do....
Indigo, artificial......................do....
Iron:
Bars and rods................... do....
Pigs.............................do...
Pipes and tubes..................do....
Plates and sheets.................do....
Plates and sheets, tinned........ do....
Rails ..................... .... do....
Wire, galvanized................. do....
Lead ingots and slabs.............. do....
Leather..............................do ....


4,564,932
33,565.333
127,024,2136
47,575,733
30,426,933



776,933
2,959,620
20,135,733




621,04.3,4 66
10,592,533
18,826, f?07
2,97.5,700
1,352, 482
32,633,560
533,222,266
39,683,33.3
7S5,772,133
2,763,944
8,525,733
9,808, 385
27,088,933
30,750,792


$301,101
532,332
1,747,623
68, 235
620,9 81


4,102,248
36,216,933
73.996,669
23, 64, SO0
36,449,600)


3,882,272 .............

20,373 300,666
285,731 1,924, .37
522,S90 10,827,333
828,997 ..............


72,637,120 737 501, 600
324,729 20,066,400
1,299,522 17,495,193
441,203 3,.066,522
294,112 1,298,982
758,398 48,166,499
4,777,795 616,300,266
201,991 101, 964, 00
1,418,660 51,255,866
1,096,246 3,927,654
2260,611 7,781,433
825, 864 13,079,081
912,081 10,824,800
8,512,821 23,008,616
186,044 ..............


.............. 93,933,197 ..............


1,000,676
266,660
69,396
1,237,791
3,225,064
4,930
59,363,22.3
146,622.,852
4,070,0 53
110.2.3.717
13, 6O,,7SN0
1,0112,12.3
17.828, N77
19,096, 04.;
818,780


190,757
139,320
16,598
V90, 904
196,158
11,355
1,216,08.5
1,319,076
161,476
2,495,5)01
619,2.51
:'1,9 9;
00, 2'S5
877,623
403,014


948,922
85,098
.............."
467,988
1,235,889

139,368,185
142,051,166
12,05 ,. 136
224, i0, 26.3
22. 11 112
I.I o,2. v 7
12,7,S%.-;64t
3.770J. 962
1,029,210


.*27.3,344
602,451
1.118,072
352,149
642,898
2, 98.,014

7, 91
219, 183
320,471
547,545


92,060,610
649,403
1,413,268
594,227
283,691
1,575,652
5,724,026
651,228
1,074 ,206
2,014,446
198,112
1,096,680
403,073
8,881,614
481, 422
117,101,658

567,054
205,733
....... ......
989,'4SS
103,156

4,520,911
2,948,515
588,210
6,841,315
1,413,989
52,210
671,851
2,123,872
690,947









SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Articles.


Manuf 'ct ures for further use in manufacturing-
Cont inued.
Ni L+el grains, blocks, and ingots ....do....
Paper, pulp...........................do....
1 hl I .i ,;i i
I. I. ............................do....
Yellow...........................do....
Potash. chlorate of.................. do....
Sodaash ............................. do....
Soda, Vaustic........................ do....
Sillk, wild............................. do ....
Tinh i.-,1- and slabs................. do....
V.,l 1,in .I vegetable, fragrant....... do....
Wax, paraffin (free)..................do....
'1 1\ paraffin (other)............... do....
Yarns:
Cotton.......................... do....
I inen ............................do....
Wor- i-. and woolen.............do....
Zin.'-
Ingots and slabs.................do....
Plates and sheets (free).......... do....
Plates and sheets (other).........do....

Total.................................
Articles wholly manufactured:
Alpacas. W t..................square yards..
Bi'-y'les and parts thereof.................
Cotton satins... ......... square yards..
.Cotton vcivets and plushes........... do....
Fle tri motors and il, i.in1o;.... .punnd_..
Glass plates and sheets .....................
Bats, caps. and bonnets....................
Iron nails........................ pounds..
Machinery:
Spinning...............................
All other ...... ...................... .
Oil, kerosene and pr.ir,' ni...... cnllon..
Paper:
Imitation Japanese and tissue..pounds..
.1 i11 i nF ........................ do ....
Other ..................................
Pen'ils..............................gross..
Shirlings and sheetings, bleached, square
yards......................................
Toilet. and fancy goods.............. ...
Watches......................... number..
1 jr. insulated, electric.........pounds..
Woolen lotl hs and serges....souare yards..
Woolen (lot hs, wool and cotton mixed,
square yards.............................
Total.....................................

All other articles...............................

Grand t otal..............................


1915


Quantity. Value.


1,697,795
67,092,391
2n0. 873
1"0.496
5, 388, 991
33,672,282
8,577,227
121. 3333
1,37'1,991
I'l 093
3,127, 800
3,833,370
210, 017
160, 908
198,032

4,815,816
602,224
182.,035



123,048
............ -
4,307,728
441,212
4.',095

1,252,685


6,486,754
1,303,794
4,492.345


2,281,896
38,455
38,077
660,382
1.233,246


$605,512
1,618,023
140,085
55,150
1,371,836
359,051
213,080
135,000
473,268
378,787
146,013
204,357
74,5%5
13,155
118,063

487,321
86,457
22,312

15,691,443

27,263
65,440
455,232
10W,4S3
79,641
181,753
24,241
43,542
399,961
1, 584, 098
938,819
55,234
,.1% 024
31'1, 993
2,710

163.392
28,633
73,071
4,368
335,064
429, 031


.............. 5,523,993 i..............
............ 14,344,472 ..............

.............. 134,204,374 ..............


Ginned cotton, of which $!p2,000,000 worth was imported last year
compared with $72,000,000 in 19157 consiit ittd half of the total im-
ports. The principal in'cr'a-, in important. lines, however, were in
the manufacturer,., of iron, brought here for further use in manu-
facturing, the value of which iit.-rci>.-d frlnm $,;,000,000 to $16,000,000,
or 166 per cent; in lead ingots, which, though they decreased in
quantity from 19,000,000 to 3,000,000 pounds, increased in value from
$877,000 to $'2.123,000; and in paper pulp, which rose from
67,000,000 to 73,000,000 pounds in quantity and from $1,618,000 to
.-'2.:0'.000 in value.

Imports into Osaka from All Countries.

The following table shows import-, at Osaka from all countries
during 1915 and 1916. Raw cotton was the large-t article of im-


Quantity.



1,179,017
73,849,210
22q.""0
1 n, .*
2.22v8 RAR

7, 1 ,25
1,203,908
220,788
I3, 2.'7,436
4., i!014

213,404
7,252
404,233
3,116,009
233,004
579,520



76,932
3,118,340
340,440
427,025

7,303,704


3,275,605
1,922,573
6,504,8S8
7,169

1,529,860
.............
39,686
4,816
492,791

1,000,869


Value.


l127..7i7
2, 561, 5%4

108,012
75,170

F4 O. 2S3
-11 1:7
417, 177
i2? 73 1
651,524
247,668
102 437
6. 275
32-', 7

423,928
44,345
100.247

28, 758,55

21,879
81,542
361,410
91,127
100,939
452, 601
57,613
340,130
7 ;'.5 7
2, '0 141
41. i, '. .

125,600
508.298
668,496
10.634
139,586
60,711
131,501
733
367,394

461,599

8,137, 130

28,954,584
186, 488,386


~_









JAPAN-KOBE.


port at Osaka, as it was at Kobe, forming nearly one-third of the
total purchases in 1916. Notable increases are also shown in pig
iron, Chinese hides, and in many other articles of less relative im-
portance.


Articles.


Food, drink, and tobacco:
Unprepared-
Beans, soya..................pounds..
Partly or wholly prepared-
Sugar-
Raw ........................do....
Refined......................do....
Raw materials:
Bones, animal........................do....
Borate of soda.......................do....
Brisutes.............................. do...
Cotton-
Ginned ......................... do....
In the seed.......................do....
Flax, China grass, ramie, etc.........do....
Hemp and jute..................... do....
Hides and skins, battle...............do....
Wood: Spruce and pine............. do....
Lacquer.............................do....
Manures, other..........................
Phosphorite ................. pounds..
W ool ................................ do ....
Manufactures for further use in manufacturing:
Brass and bronze, old............. pounds..
Caustic soda, crude..................do....
Copper inguts and slabs.............do....
Fats, am mal.........................do....
Irons--
Bars, rods, T-angle, etc..........do....
Pigs............................ do....
Pipes and tubes................ do....
Plates and corrugated, galvanized
sheets.......................pountas..
Plates and corrugated, galvanized
sheets, tinned.............. pounus..
Plates and corrugated, galvanLzed
sheets, other................pounls..
W ire............................ do.....
Old-or scrap.....................do....
Metal,old........................... do-....
Nickel ingots and slabs..............do....
Silk, wild............................do....
Soda ash.............................do....
Straw plaits...........................do....
Zinc ingots and slabs ................do....
Articles wholly m.mufactured:
Cotton satins............... square yards..
Dynamite........................ pounds..
Liquorice........................ .. do....
Machinery and parts thereof................
Morphine, hydrochlorate of and sulphate
of............................... ounces..
Nails, rivets, screws, bolts, nuts, etc......
Vessels, steam or sailing..........number..
Woolen cloths and series of wool and cot-
ton mixed....................... yards..
All other articles...........................


- I


Quantity.


4,537,333

36,290,266
4,512.533
2.331.013
1, 021. 9A9
268.,373

119, 771,303
3,095,466
5.243,760
2,506, 192
8, 320,592
6,320,304
265,748
.............."
80.820.400
1,670,417

2,043,924
3.649,367
1.0x2,438
3. 703, 800
6,212,537
45.61a.5207
1, 893, 781
1.522,172

3,204.647
12.000,017
2.119.552
2,729,102
.............."
8,328
15%,,017
2,871,5 85
1,29b,212
562,408

1,355,795
483,236
916,636
...............
77,491


246,724
S..... .........


Total.... .................. .......... ..............


Value. Quantity.


549,935

957.904
132,036
30,349
44.209
95.377
10,657,880
95.745
300,520
90,722
1,656,545
122.594
54,0933
30,037
476,550
185,521
181.502
95.747
90,931
246,503

148.529
333. 725
53.858
51,467
133.8S3
298,716
63, 7.54
27, 32
76,749
4.227
857.244
29,344
130,007
49,2-6

132.987
76,361
38, 829
70.0354
240,701
30,599

68.025
0,716,628
25,229,561


6,332,133

16,916,133
5,0 35.933
7.021.292
2,447.118
521,364
109,825,3467
3, 38.000
8,080,705
3.917.417
10,743, 392
7,330,576
447,872
L2,1 Oc
1,262. 281
2.152,563
3,776.548
2,262, 44v
4,993,318

17,514,920
163.7,7,475
1,515,148

1,301,071

5, 323,136
7.236,577
1.408,863
11, 41,.2J5

739.965
18, 091.020
1, 131, UGO
3, 171,b77
2, 27,617
1,430,202
1,172,56.3
..............


Value.


579,628

470.213
159,642
58,655
184,993
189,978
12,634,871
138.358
470,099
118,595
2,105,068
151.012
95,569
51,087
72,701
185,678
230,971
232,939
3S6,591
379.431
663.012
2, 3S0, 34
71,653
69,S48

305,918
307,817
68,521
141.007
162.112
..............
87 0.196
454.029
88,819
412,997
239,037
43M. 033
54, 526
320,; 71


194,946 678.510
.............. 201,572
1 55, 122
280,147 81,646
.............. 14,390,202
.............. 40, 867.381


Imports from United States and Possessions into Kobe and Osaka.

The following table shows the imports of this district, from the
United States, Hawaii, and the Philippine Islands during 1915 and
1916. It will be noted that in 1916, 23 per cent of the district's
total imports came from the United States, of which ginned cot-
ton, valued at about $27,000,000, formed just one-half, and iron
bars, sheets, pig iron, etc., made up nearly half of the remainder.









SUPPL.EII'NT TO CO:M IERCE REPORTS.


Sales by the United States to Kobe increased 70 per cenL and to
Oslka 310 per cent in 1916, as compared with 1915.

1915 1916
Articles.- -
Quantity. Value. Quantity.. Value.


IMPORTS INTO KOBE FROM UNITED STATES.

Aluminum ingots and slabs.......... pounds..
Antifebrin ............................... do....
Bicarbonate of potash....................do....
hlon t, animal............................ do....
Carbolic acid.............................do....
Carbon black.............................do....
Catechu and other tanning extracts......do....
Caustic soda, crude..................... do....
Cedar wood..................... cubic meters..
Chlorate of potash....................pounds..
Cocaine................................ounces..
Condensed milk.......................pounds..
Cotton, ginned.......................... do....
Drills, bits, reamers, and screw taps............
Drugs, chemicals, and medicines, n. e. s........
Dynamite........................... pounds..
Endless felts for paper making.......... do....
Formaline.............................. do....
Galls, oak bark, and similar tanning materials,
pounds......................................
Glass plates....................square meters..
Glass sheets..............................do....
Glue..................................pounds..
Hides and skins:
Cattle and buffalo....................do....
Dyed................................do....
Iron:
Bands and hoops....................do....
Bars, rods, T-angles, etc.............do....
Ingots and slabs.....................do....
Nails................................do?...
li ............................... do ....
I'll'., and tubes......................do....
i la.- and sheets....................do....
Plates and sheets, galvanized........ do....
Rails ................. ..............do....
Screws.............................. do....
Wire................................ do....
Wire, galvanized.....................do....
Wire, rods..........................do....
Lead ingots and slabs...................do....
Liquid gold, silver, and platinum......ounces..
Logwood extracts.....................pounds..
M alt.....................................do....
Machinery:
Dynamos, electric motors.................
( as compressors............................
Metal or wood-making machinery..........
-, "' in.: 1rj3ihines...........................
.( t I., IIl.' r, parts, and accessories........
Machinery, miscellaneous.................
Parts of machinery.........................
Milk sugar............................pounds..
N ipl:1 b ii'. ............................ do....

TIl urii.L i n i', miscellaneous.......gallons..
1i r-.., i, ai i petroleum, in cans.....do....
Mineral, miscellaneous........... pounds..
Volatile, vegetable (ii ,irr.,nit ........do....
Papers:
Cardboard..... ..................do....
Imitation Japanese and tissue paper,
pounds................. .................
Match........................... pounds..
Packing............................ do....
P n ing. ..................... ... do ....
I jrafti'i v.r., .............................do....
Pine, fir, and cedar ............. cubic meters..
I'ltmmn iii..l slabs, bars, plates, and
sheets............ pounds..
Pulp............................ .... do....
Quicksilver.............................do....
Rosin....................................do....


664,296
18,217
527,625
1,082,113
..............
241,177
220,109
1,940,200
41
2, 256, 615
8, 425
1,722,177
166,239,333


23, 806
94,034

1,078, 780
8,810
44,640
..............

365,438
23,158

432,949
43,605,677
205, 884
569,773
1,129,449
2,909,988
60,530,838
717,334
1,494, 295
509,687
2, q??, 1'S
1 4, .,4
4,579,633
3,435,443
15,360
823,502
869,200

. .............
..............
..............
..............






424,357
4,115,315
8,978,589
18,836

309,836

5,166
..............














403, 789
3,878,084
6,781
6,-181


$128,037
12,770
76,789
36,904

16,437
16,000
53,375
2,313
',ls, 1 5 "
*.'_.*, 4-li 1
180,804
21,197,977
15,176
106,671
25, 064

12,086

18, S3
26,658
26,790

75, 889
31,140

13,306
853, 628
27, 951
18,276
10,935
95,071
1,160,032

24, 000
40,684
80,565
554,264
88,713
143, 884
94,045
139,267
37,982

68,900
11,822
86,881
25, 734
15,174
3,854
35, 745
167,288
26,818
..............

61,518
612,621
252,239
60,083

12,106

539
.......... ....

23,814
168,519
71,119


39,543 32,392
4,346,952 1 102,558


948,922
41,712
276,029
2,165,012
654,173
385,649
1,201,950
6,403,385
795
990, 454
17,697
1,928,952
207,888,933

236), 50
3,, 7.132
229,705

4,534,050
46,117
239,277
336,136
.." .-7
.in, "..52

1,475,497
112,745, 744
8, 872, 406
7,236,984
2,257,920
8,963,421
131, 437, 206
14, 455,166
1,401,793
605,068
3,315,524
10,572,2.54
8,872,406
13,067,895
20,473
83, 269
1,206,133

..............
..............






253, 236

530,911
2,535.960
10,609,761
65,516

830,956

645,130
553,848
671,365
1,299,114
14,126,728
10,462
52
6,509,718
93,121
9,510,901
9,510,901


$568, 760
47,296
156,839
102 883
690,579
61,185
103,758
487,041
57,117
li ':), 732
.. 1,756
219, 174
26,470,967
.57, tl 17
363,065
l !'., 59._',

33,641

84, 516
108,108
176,572
42,974

81,862
63,572

77,309
3,546,490
508, 426
296,959
45,197
419,366
3,622,011
9,,, '.
-14 IN
7i, inil

55, 857
350, 706
954,485
63,570
33,437
49,748

32, 541
342,448
111,537
97,738
61,490
231,836
75,527
37,840
41,528

175,113
365.863
344,397
116,295

47,131

54,227
33, 745
37, 135
79,874
721,800
153,987
77,363
219, 31:
95,538
375,864










JAPAN-KOBE.


1915 1916
Articles.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.


IMPORTS INTO KOBE FROM UNITED STATES-COnD.

Salicylic acid........................... do....
Tobacco, leaf............................do....
Vaseline................................do....
Zinc:
Ingots, slabs, and grains............do....
Plates and sheets....................do....
All other articles...............................

Total.....................................

IMPORTS INTO KOBE FROM HAWAII.

Coffee................................ pounds..
Hemp and jute ..........................do....
All other articles...............................

Total.....................................

Oi'ORTS INTO KOBE FROM PHILIPPIN
ISLANDS.

Copra.. .............................. pounds..
Hemp, jute, and manila hemp...........do....
Shells.. ... ............ ..................do....
All other articles................................

Total.....................................

IMPORTS INTO OSAKA FROM UNITED STATES.

Aluminum ineots and slabs..........pounds..
Boric soda.............................. do ....
Caustic suda, crude......................do....
Cotton, pinned...........................do....
Drugs, chemicals, and medicines...............
Dynamite............................pounds..
Hydraulic presses..............................
Iron.
Bars, rods, T-angles, etc.......... pounds..
Nails................................do....
Ilipcs and tubes......................do....
Plates and sheets....................do....
Plates and sheets, tinned........... do....
\\ ire, palvanized.....................do....
Lead Inrots and slabs...............do....
Oil, kerosene or petroleum............ gallon..
Parcel-post shipments..........................
Paraffin wax..........................pounds..
Pine, fir, and cedar..............cubic meters..
Sewine machines...............................
Vessels (steamer) .....................number..
All other articles...............................


26,053
849.708
285,385

1,088,323
564,859


8, 52
37,417






2,729,726
6,049,645
689,725





47,790

634,725
266
..............


1, 0'6,942
358, 798
1, 780,994
4,406,306
1, W5, 3,.3
1,223.263
39,933
2,0-14, 71
.............,



..............


Total.................................... ... .....


IMPORTS INTO OSAKA FROM HAWAII.

Hides and skiins, cattle and buffalo... .pounds..
Tallow, beef .............................do....
All other articles...............................

Total.....................................

IMPORTS INTO OSAKA FROM PHI IPPINE ISLANDS.

Sugar:
Raw............................pounds..
Refined..............................do....
All other articles...............................

Total....................................


..............
2,721i


2,795,199.............



2,795,199
..............

..............


$36,443
181, 94
21,626

110 ,058
81, 776
1,470, 259


.............. 29, 888,335


18,854
720, 74
720,337

1,016,114
522, 298


1,190 6, 562
3,0q2 5,402
10,414 .............

14,686 ............


92, 09
646,545
66.984i
10,693

817,131


12,855
..............
18,624 "
12
1,193
..............
1,074

23,379
11,6_41
41,244
101,999
41,132
37, .T9
1,5!96
238,999
20,212
5,443
..............
'21,168
23S,052"


4, .5,5, 835
9, 90.1. 104
360,488





402, 640
9n6,8 23
2,512, 1I i
2,911,:33
......... ....
785,036

7,9S 1,389
2,792,860O
1, 101, 175
2,986,322
3,727,410
903, 5
829,021
1,"90,136
.... .. .
899,205
2, 141

..............


$95,203
155. 12
47,477

145,759
q8, 195
2,362,849


... ........ ... 49,312, 167


909
360
14,626

15,S95



187,769
972, 198
31, 429
20, 901

1,218,297


253,911
81, .53
182, 789
330,349
42,361
287,232
92,413

266,054
147, 44
49,926
136,554
208, &SI
47, 146
64,320
2.53, M67
59, 32
69, i5
57, 494
96,994
55,000
576,491


816,012 .............. 3,367,326


.......... .. ........ i ..... 500
204 110,384 9,041
182 .............. 546

3S6 .............. 10,087



70,370 5,379,733 140,201
.............. 963,460 27,102
102 .............. 190

70,472 .............. 167,493


Tndustries of Kobe District-Labor Conditions.

The following figures relating to the kinds and number of fac-
tories and their. employees in Kobe, compiled by the prefectural


I








'28 SUPPI.EM.l'NT TO t'OMMERCE REPORTS.

authorities s. include only the e.tabli-lshmm., employing numore than a
c*r lain number of operative-. and therefore, as perhaps most kinds
of manufacturing are carried on here as household industries, do not
convey a ery complete idea of the number of persons engaged herein
nmanl'itliring. 1,Hyogo Prefecture, in which Kobe is situated, began
keepii,:. these statistics in 1916. The heading Special factories"
includes power and lightliw," plants and similar est;,lishwmnt.,. The
following. table shov -. the number of factories employing more than
15 persii, and operatives in Kobe during 1916:

Number of operatives.
Kind of factories. Number of-
Male. Female. Total.

Dyeing and weaving .................................. 349 8,471 24,596 33,067
Machinery, tool, implement, and other metal .......... 89 31. 07 624 34,231
Chemicals.............................................. 376 20, '.-0 18,978 39,.'.1'
Food and drink...................................... 143 0,442- 747 7, 1 s'
Other factories....................................... 135 3,387 1,652 5,039
S[, iiI factories...................................... 10 638 120 758
Total........................................... 1,102 73,079 46,717 119,796

Data publi-shed by the Department of Agriculture and Commerce
for 1914 show that the ordinary number of working hours in Japa-
ne-e factories in that year ranged from 10 to 13; that on the average
three holidays per month are enjoyed by operatives; and that the
av'era, number of working days per annum was about 305.
Somne daily average wage-, according to the same authority, were:
Weavers, male, 23 cents; female, 14.5 cents; tailors, 31 to 42; shoe-
makers, 36; carpenter.-; 43; pl-lerer.:, 45; nia-,on. 50; bricklayers,.
52.5 and day laborers, 28 cnt,-. These rates increased between 1914
and 1916, being now about 65 cents per day for mason', bricklayers,
and carpenters; 45 cents for tailors and workers in similar trades;
and 30 cents for day laborers. Wages now show a marked upward
tendency, and at present no one need be idle because of lack of oppor-
tunity to work. As everywhere else, the prosperity of the conlmmer-
cial, indust rial, and capitalist classes is reflected in the condition of
the laboring class, which is now far Ib-tter off in Japan than it ever
was before.
The Cotton Industry.
The gr. nt prosperity in the cotl on indii.,itry during 1916 was due
primarily to favorable-ii:irk.t and political conditions in China, the
gi (.t market for Jap):i .,i., cotton yarns. An important factor was
the universal advance in the price of cotton goods at a time when all
the Japanese mills had on hand large stocks of yarns made of cotton
bought when lower prices prevailed.
What is said to be the iir.-t. order from Japan for spindles in the
United States was placed by an Osaka weaving company for 30,000
spindles with a :machinery company near Boston. The supply of
spindles from England fell from 240,000 in 1914 to 200,000 in 1915,
and to 68,120 in 1916. This deficit is being met by making the
utmost use of the spindles on hand.








JAPAN-KOBE.


The following statistics of the cotton industry in this district were
published by the Osaka Cotton Spinners' Association:

1915 1916
Countries.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.

IMPORTS OF RAW COTTON FROM-
Balei. Bales.
India ................... .... .. 4,89, 7x2 869.857,761 5, 132.905 $82.594.275
United States.............................. ... 1,b16.662 27,876,861 2,206L.291 39,.6S3.5u )0
China ........................................ 591.912 7,66g.510 659.785 9,S'31. 21
French Indo-China............................. 40.589 248.597 8. U.2 871).6~8
Egypt ... ..................................... 108.320 2,901,015 145.449 4,12..6si
Chosen ....................................... 38.573 593.048 52.SIS 742.415
Dutch Indies ................................ 1b.200 62.316 50.91S 525. i82
Slam......................................... 10.079 41. 896 17,591 98,5.35
Straits Settlements ............................ 13.367 56,297 65,078 28i,983
EXPORTS OF COTTON YARN TO-
Pounds. Pounds.
China ........................................ 185.568.191 27.751,607 176.Ob3.011 31.921,244
Hongkong................................... 26.096..354 3.992.209 14. S09.197 3. 920..05
Choson ...................................... 10,675. 164 1.396,721 10, 454, 692 1,637.3204
Philippines.................................. 1. 451.911 325. 472 7.55. 173 226.412
Kwangtung.................................. 5,8.36, 532 826.683 5.914.610 1,039.221
India .......................................... 623,909 202,blS 4,697. 77 1,619.r65
All other countries ........................... 102,769 16,912 790.927 167,815

The: association's figures on the number of factories, output, and
other'information follow:

lerti. 1915 1916 Item. 1915 1916

CONDITION OF INDUSTRY. OPERATION STATISTICS.
Companies.............. 41 40 Yarn produced:
Fa tories ................ 161 161 Ringspindle..pounds.. 697,815,013 777.806,n02
Total capital............ $55,08.,200 $6S,645,075 Mute spindle.... do.... 2,992,92u 5,6di,717
Capital paid up......... 541,005,88S 150,. 70,90) Daily output per spindle:
Reserve flu ds........... $19,3.31,52 $21,476,1.40 Hinm ..........ounces.. 131 1.1
Spindles: Mue ............do.... 5M 11
Ring.............. 2,754,124 2,825,944 Cotton consumed,
Mule:............... 5 1,390 4t,6.0 pounds............... 802,651,160 889,855,143
Twi-iing......... 355, 8I 370,6%1 Op, rati.es:
Looms................ 30,068 31,2J5 Male .................. 22,674 24,195
Female ................ 92, 430 95, 349

Hats and Hat Braids.
Two of the most important exports in value from Kobe are hats
and hat braids, the combined quantities shipped having amounted
to $6,241,401 in 1916, compared to $3,968,006 in 1915.
The manufacture of hats and hat braids was an important indus-
try in this district even before the war, but since supplies from Italy,
which was Japan's principal competitor, were cut off, the output
here has increased enormously. The so-called Japanese Panama
hats were formerly nearly all made from a fiber produced in For-
mosa and the Loochoo Islands and made up into hoods or rough
unblocked hats here, but during the past few years paper has so
far supplanted fiber as a hat-making material that probably more
paper than fiber hoods are now produced. The hat braids are of
three materials, straw, chip, and hemp, those of the two former
being of Japanese and the last of Philippine production. The
Panama hoods are woven by hand in Japan, but the braids are
shipped without weaving to be sewn into hats by machinery in the
United States.









SUPPLEMENT TO COMAM !ERCE EI l'- ilTS.


The amount, of the,-, articlk.-, with their values, shipped from
Kobe to various countries during the past. two years are shown
in l;o appended table. A bundle of braid contains approximately
60 lin ar yards of material.


Articles and countries of destination.


_ Quantity.


PANAMAA" HATS.
United States ..................................
.. -1 1.r Id .....................................
Great Britain.................................
HTOi 1., n -' ....................................
1 1 nl l 11 (C'"ll iI 1 L................................
All ,. iI. r countries.............................
Total....................................
HEMP BRAIDS.
United Si ili ; ............................ ......
Great Britain..................................
Australia......................................
France.........................................
British Canada................................
All other countries.............................
Total ...................................
STRAW BRAIDS.
United States..................................
(reat Britain..................................
France...... ..................................
Australia......................................
Philippines.....................................
All other countries.............................
Total ...................................
cMIP RAIDS.

United States................................
Great Britain.................................
France .........................................
Denmark.....................................
British Canada...............................
All other countries............................
Total ...................................


Dozens.
194.lI
9,073
2,721
2,240
2,204
241,724


Bundles.
5 106 2nno
, -', 1.1
420,761
1,373,566
115, 080
90,000
10,678,507


Value.


8952,619
228,986
59,974
16,963
14,6253
12,741
1?,,.2, 908


821,046
534,006
63,548
198,759
17,629
7,599
1,642,587


', 10 1 366,637
:';.n.. IIn ; 256,197
2,339,991 177, 711
389,221 29,644
389, 750 22,404
282,942 19,060
10,369,147 871,653


559,150 17,985
2,207,780 92,381
404,100 19,692
356,565 18,706 .
122,000 3,627
103,300 3,566
3,752,895 155,957


Prosperity of Toy Industry.

The incret:-' of nearly 50 per cent in the value of exports of toys
from Kobe-from $097,038 in 1915 to $1,430.908 in 1916-is due to
ca usc arising from the war.
The toy-making industry, which existed only on a comparatively
small scale a few years ago, is one to which the manulfactring
ability of the Japanese is particularly well adapted. The cost of
tovs depends only to a .,,(tindary degree on the cost of the materials
of which they are made and primarily on the low cost of artistic
workmanship. This. combined with artistic fancy and good taste,
the Japanese have to a marked degree, with the result that when
German supplies disappeared and serious attention was turned to
lhe industry here it went forward with surprising rapidity. Owing
to this lal' of compete it ion since the outbreak of the war, the Japanese
were able to pass through the learning and experimental stage under
peculiarly favorable conditions, -, that when the world's trade re-
turns to normal channels they will have established a permanent


Quantity.


Dozens.
369,837
61,676
N,215
31, r 1
3,280
6,439
453,428


Bundles.
4,620,194
5,270,155
612,515
2,229.250
21 ', .,', i1
141,604
13,091,278


8, 003, 993
5,079,703
1, 787,195
149,756
510,165
153,321
15, 714,133


2,813,065
1,301,782
674,S800
66,000
II 1 212


5,046,859


Value.


?2,017,397
371,1 .
62,132
24,482
17,612
33,167
2,547,933


731,844
73', 149
It, 127
I':5, 071
I,, 2 4
17,742

1,993,479


777, 656
461,130
l,;. '42
10.. 1?
"I, l*.
11,085
1,460, 454


138,765
65,495
28,471
......... ....
3,060


239,535


J


I /


1 1 _


/=====------ -----


--'







JAPAN-KOBE.


industry thoroughly able, toy experts believe, to withstand compe-
tition from any source. That opinion, however, applies chiefly to
other than mechanical toys, with which Japanese manufacturers
have been less successful.
The prices of Japanese toys are still high as compared with those
of German make before the war. This is due principally to the fact.
that the cost of all raw materials has greatly advanced, and because
of the newness of the line and relative inexperience of workmen.
The latter cause, however, is fast disappearing and the first affects
foreign competitors to the same degree as Japanese manufacturers.
Exports of toys from Kobe during 1915 and 1916 are given in the
appended table:
Countries of destination. 1915 1910 Countries of destination. 1915 1910

United Stntes ................. 254.i-18 446,386 Ponlkong .................... 532,255 $4R..30
Great Britain ............... 289.S39 197.327 All other countries............. 8,.45S 2,18.,9,8
British India................ 180.933 2S. 520
Australia.................... III.7t,2 175, .371 Total ................. 987,03s 1,430,903
Philippines ................. 31,143 3t, 027

Manufacture of Shell Buttons.
The only buttons manufactured on a large scale are of various
species of trochus shells from this country, China, and the South
Sea Islands. Before the war, practically only plain so-called
"pearl buttons were produced, but of late fancy buttons are also
being made in large quantities. In this industry, as in the case of
toys, it is believed that Japan has captured a position which will
be largely maintained after the war.
The quantities and value of shell buttons exported from Kobe
in 1915 and 1916 are shown in the table that follows:

1915 1916
Countries of destination.
Gross. Value. Gross. Value.

United States .................................. 976, 170 $223,S43 3,1.59, 439 5732, 259
Great Brit in...................................... 3,t 5.3,S24 t,23,20.1 4,i.81,824 79% ,293
British India ................................. 914.9.1 212,349 1.010.023 21i, 1 03
Australia...................................... .20,375 140,507 1,041,X7.2 231, 77
Philippines................................... 293.306 19,023 549,505 141,, 50
France .. ..................................... 24.4,111 3,.594 555,792 120,033
All other countries ........................... SuG,851 185.193 1,ti34,8 3 35t, 240
Total..................................... .............. 1,517,712 |.............. 2,.00, 170

Prosperous Year for the Brush Trade-Glass Exports.
The brush trade, one of Kobe's leading industries, enjoyed a most
prosperous year. Exports of various classes of brushest to all coun-
tries in 1915 and 1916 were as follows:

1915 1916
Kind of brushes.
Dozens. Value. Dozens. Value.

Hair........................................... 402,585 $710,014 713,304 81,036,698
Tooth........................................ 2, 820,684 683,315 2, 880. 389 797,0S7
Nail .......................................... 573,472 194,020 418,487 208, 40
Clothes....................................... 75,024 103,099 101,764 80.705
All other ...................................... ............... 4., 140 .............. 129, 229
Total.................................... ........... 1,767,488 .............. 2,252, 4.59








32 S I'1'I.1i.'M:NT" TO COMM 'E[iE REPORTS.

The United St;I<'" piircla-ed hairbriishel. valued at $14S,616 and
toothbrushes worth $-1"40,822 in 1916, which were nearly double the
respective amounts for 1915. Increa-es in American puircha-es of
other kinds of brushes were rel:itively -mall.
Although exports friini Kobe of glass of all kinds in 1916 reached
the sum of ,.*Th,.;,, only an insignificant part went to the United
Staie,. The various kinds of glass exported in 1915 and 1916, to-
gether v, iIlh the quantity and value, are shown in the following table:

1915 1916
Kinds.
QI ,rtii y.I Value. Quantity. Value.

Bottles................................. dozen.. 5,864,427 $563,451 10,412,056 $1,096,300
Tumblers and goblets.................... do.... 2,072,485 '.0 3,044,679 730,229
MItIrr ..r...............................number.. 4,776,079 121, IM 6,772,847 1,0,231
Spectacles...............................do.... 1,664,801 29, 911 2,151,683 53,940
Beads............................................... ........ 100,535 .............. 226,932
Other glass............................. ...... .... ....... 174, 713 .............. 271,754
al.................................... .............. 1,317,3. .............. 2,578,385

The IKatch Trade.
The three g:netral classes of matches exported from this district
are (1) the cheap.-t. grade of sulphur matches, which are shipped
principally from Osaka to China, (2) phosphorus matches -eilt prin-
cipally to India and the Dutch East Indies from Kobe, and (3) the
best potash matches, which are the only kind senil from Japan to
the United States. This latter trade is still relatively small, but is
growing, and in view of the diminution of match export:, from
Sweden, has been plreo',-fed from attaining far greater importance
owing to high freight rates and the diticiulty of obtaining cargo
-place.
Prices for the best grade of double impregnated matches have
incr':i-cd from $12 to $13 per c-.:- of 50 gross of boxes f. o .b. Kobe,
before the war, to as high as $23.50 in March, 1917. Freight to the
United States. however, is very high and space is obi.aiied with
great, difficulty.
It will be noted from the following table that the total exports in
1916 slightly dc,'reased in amount, although they iincr'...:-d over 40
per cent in value. This is said to be due to increased cost of produc-
tion in Japan because of a shortage of pa t;!. and other ingredients,
and of aspen wood for sticks from R -iia.

1915 1916
Countries of destination.
Gross. Value. Gross. Value.

China ......................................... 6,073,988 $829,857 5,702,510 $1,245,449
11o1 .,,iLr...................................... 6,985,131 1,311,429 6,093,821 1,784,597
1:ril' i.-h i i i................................... 13,627,721 2,630,313 10,646,781 2,854,495
British Straits Settlements.................... 1,895,270 332,541 1,748,414 513,684
Dutch Indies.................................. 1,573,235 271,182 1,456,355 371,642
All other countries .............................. 2,282,046 517,034 5,468,563 1,835,823
Total..................................... 32,437,391 5,892,356 31,116,444 8,605,690








JAPAN-KOBE.


Increased shipments of Porcelain and Earthenware-Paper Xarket.
The increased exports of porcelain and earthenware in 1916 of over
50 per cent, as shown in the following table, were due chiefly to the
cessation of exports from Germany and Austria:

Countries of destination. 191 191 Countries of destination. 1915 191

United States................. 38,681 481,801 Dutch Indies................. 1109,728 $225,836
Great Britain. .............. 291,267 17,559 China................... 79,947 161,80
Australia....................... 19,691 573,783 All other countries............ 233,627 332,398
British India................. 166,978 846,637
iritish Straits Settlements... 128,231 178,072 Total................... 1,732,423 2,626,600
Hongkong................... 124,283 201,206

The principal paper market in Japan is Yokohama. The grades
exported from this district are tissue, tracing, rice, and copying
papers, chiefly of the sorts known as Mino and Tosa."
The largest gain in 1916 was made in low-grade papers, which in-
creased largely in both price and quantity exported. This was also
a line of business very favorably affected by the cessation of German
and Austrian competition. The total exports from Kobe and Osaka
together amounted to $1,885,512 in 1916 as compared to $600,333 in
1915, more than half this amount being purchased by China and
Kwangtung Province.
Colza and Fish Oils.
As shown by the following table, exports of colza (rapeseed) oil
from Kobe to the United States in 1916 were more than six times,
and exports of fish and whale oil more than twenty times the ship-
ments in 1915:

1915 1916
Destination.
Pounds. Value. Pounds. Value.

RAPESEED OIL.
United States................................ 2,741.590 $156 SR7 15.840.172 $1,017.412
Great Britain................................. 16.394.603 907 0R8 7,971.616 4S5 037
Australia...................................... 1.803.498 100 672 964.742 70. 240
France....................................... 1,776 453 95 906 763 55M 48.649
K wanntune Province ......................... 601. 796 32. 785 699.601 44.446
Hawaiian Islands ............................ 421,321 27,665 384,465 29,744
YISa AND WHU.LE OIL.
Great Britain................................ 17.212.421 550.969 9.945.591 388.662
Australia..................................... 3.338,358 114 731 4.475.188 174.377
France....................................... 2,547.733 79.010 2.260 228 103.067
United States ................................ 776.739 25.092 11.918.866 504.127
italy.......................................... 672,448 20.774 .......... .. ..............

These large increases are attributed by local exporters in the case
of rapeseed oil to the shortage in the United States, due to stoppage
of shipments from Russia and Germany to the east coast, to the
comparative difficulty of shipping from Japan to Europe, and to
unusual purchases of the highly refined grade of rapeseed oil (called
here "Shirashime") by a single company in the United States.
As prices also have been high for a long time, a larger crop of the
seed was grown last year to take advantage of them.
The principal supply of rapeseed comes from the northern part of
this country, but large quantities of it, and some of the oil itself,











34 SUPPI.EM1.ENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

are brought here from Manchuria and North China. The oil is ex-
pressed from the seed in this district in many small plants.
The price of rapeseed oil varied between the extremes of $5.48 and
$7.94 per 100 pounds during 1916, but rose during the early months
of 1917 to $8.50 in April.
The great increase in the exports of fish and whale oil was due
to the demand for them in the United States for the manufacture of
glycerin and for new purposes for which discoveries of methods of
hardening their fats have made them available. It is also reported
here that an unusual shortage of these oils existed in the United
States owing to the partial failure of the catch of menhaden her-
ring.
The price of fish oil here varied from a minimum of $3.'1 to a
maximum of $5.10 per 100 pounds during 1916, but, like rapeseed,
has since advanced.
Exports to United States and Possessions.

The following table gives the quantities and values of the principal
articles invoiced at this consulate for the United States, Hawaii, and
the Philippine Islands during the past two years. About 16 per cent
of the total exports of this di trict were destined for the United
States and its insular possessions in 1916, as compared to about 14
per cent in 1915.


Articles.


TO UNITED STATES.
Antimony ore........................... tons..
Art, works of, more than 100 years old..pieces..
Braids:
Chip and straw...................... do....
Hemp .............................. (do....
Brass ingots......................... pounds..
Breadstuffs:
Buckwheat.......................bushels..
Millet........................... pounds..
Oats ............................. bushels..
Rice............................. pounds..
Bronze powder....................... do....
Brushes..... ......................dozen..
Buttons.................................gross..
Chemicals, drugs, dyes, and medicines:
A carT-ar........................pounds..
1 .er, and leaves; Pyrethrum flowers
pounds..................................
Camphor gum....................pounds..
Ir.10l o paste.........................tons..
Menthol crystals ............... pounds..
Wax, vegetable................... do....
Copper .................................. do ....
Cotton, manufactures of thread and yarn waste
pounds. ............... ........
Earthen, stone, and china ware:
Crucibles............. ..... ...p.. ieces..
Porcelain and earthenware......... dozen..
Eggs: Yolk and albumen of duck and poultry
eggs............................... pounds..
Foodstuffs, miscellaneous:
In tin packages.................... dozen..
All other.........................pounds..
Fruits and nuts:
1'(anu 1 t.............. ..........do. ...
Pine nuts...........................do ....
Walnuts...... ..................do....
Furs and skins...................... pieces..
Fibers, and manufactures of: Gunny tares
pounds......................................
Gut, cat................................. coil..


Quantity.



3,505
33,909
4,574,199
4,968,130

68, 811
41,977,996
39, 276
43,723,953
1,269,776
1,048,075
254,538
908,509
2,172,972
90
201,532
1,711,992
2,843,543


...... -
288,798 "


67,018
1,203,038
1,665, 165
58,200
384,300

000
*.1', 65S


Value.


$1,751,969
168,115
419,669
752,431

40,258
567, 621
15,236
985,179
547,963
290,191
65,257
154,493
454,016
116,202
316,496
166,748
431,694
29,778


76,999
74,170
47,130
5,793
21,876
21,569
15,291
91,883


Qinij it'v.


3,086
25,785
10,132,607
4,876,088
62,852
89,070
6,091,631
35, 703,980
392,410
2,359,102
3,660,118
449,890
781,472
2,214,547
44
110,900
2,192,910
5,062,551
4,233,144
16,177
446,425
633,333
105,459
3,458,065
4,198,022
947,330
416,281
2,308,400
879,279


Value.


$1,820,814
141,011
928,896
766,096
87,365
57,824
88,506
828,773
226,477
1,301,600
864, 520
146,003
145,963
1,100,694
89,119
239,894
245,512
1,072,542
145,941
73,690
296,779
264,736
104,100
294,142
150,274
...........
55,418
204,716
88,211
122,306










JAPAN-KOBE.


1915 1916
ity. Vales. -_Quatty. Value.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.


TO UNITED STATES-O--Otinued.
Hats of paper, Panama straw, rush, etc. dozen..
Manganese ore...........................tons..
Matches................................. gros..
Mattlnrand mate.............. square yards..
M al ware, misoellaneous............. pieces..
Oils:
Camphor oil, waste...............pounds..
Castor.............................gallons..
China-wood.................... pounds..
Coconut..................... ...... do....
Cottonseed..........................do....
Creosote ..........................gallons..
Fish................................ do....
Peanut..............................do....
Rapeseed............................ do....
Soya-bean........................punds..
Vegetable (Shirashime)..........gallins..
Oil cake:
Linseed......................... .pounds..
Soya-bean..........................do....
Plumbago (graphite)................... tons..
Rugs, of rag and jute............square yards..
Scheelite ore.............................tons..
Seeds:
Hemp...........................pounds..
Linseed............................do....
Muslard.............................do....
Rape................................do....
Bilk goods............................. pieces..
Spirits, wines, and beverages: Sake...gallons..
Starch, potato.......................... t ins..
Tea.................................. pounds..
Tennis rackets.........................dozen..
Toys....................................do....
Tungsten ore............................tons..
Vegetables, crude and prepared:
Beans and peas...................bushels..
Chili peppers.....................pounds..
Wood, and manufactures of;
Bamboos...........................pieces..
Bamboo ware.......................do....
Baskets............................dozen..
Umbrella handles................... do....
Wooden.vare, miscellaneous........pieces..
Zinc dust............................ pounds..
All other articles..............................

Total ............. ......................
TO PmUH.PPINE ISLANDS.

Cotton. and manufactures of:
Piece goods........................pieces..
Shirts..............................dozen..
Yarns............................pounds..
Other..............................dozen..
Earthen, stone, and china ware: Porcelain and
earthen ware.........................dozen..
Enameled ware..........................do....
Glassware..............................dozen..
Matches................................. ross..
Metal manufactures................... pieces..
Vegetable and fruits, raw and prepared
bushels.....................................
All other articles...............................


269,928
2,435
381,346
8,969,263
115,484

2, 137,912
,..............
830,902
76,220
10,000
104,088
12,065,830
168,600

4,168,213
9,213,963
1,659
99,559
........... ...
1,887,910
975,300
82,060
814,520
43,385
229,104
........... ..
4,172,000
.......... ..
4,790,833
58
272,136
632,005
7,935,125
2,005,575
540,000
108,924
764,601
78,442
..............


.............. 16,889,827 .............. 33,906,413



80,300 66,128 155,993 80,373
814,929 759,473 834,579 845,405
1,412,663 277,817 815,364 208,632
106, 154 124,510 179,328 192,636
136,082 47,594 284,128 90,414
.............. ............. 115,0 G61 119, 159
453,621 106,730 538,959 145,319
201,260 49,903 282,341 84,167
873,765 43,770 W67,902 64,492
427,005 183,096 189,813 227,528
.............. 904,374 .............. 1,317,621


2,563,394


36,460,775 839,151 34, 885, 101 848,610
267,449 112, 48 152,439 74,069
06,847 48,488 78,057 51,857
1,162,010 92,556 1,392,815 108,521
55,487 64,597 36,277 53,128
.............. 683,706 .............. 595,097


1959,542
54,568
94,523
808, 54
37,081
119,686
..............
24,496
4,177
13,714
..............
54,820
531,047
68,959
43,737
89,660
5,074
45,807
..............
23,777
17,131
3,190
7,485
43,146
100,838

631,405
162,693
60,842
156,002
52,041
93,543
GR,472
196,408
25,005
39, 565
9,591
4,468,864


Total............. ............. ...... .............


TO HAWAIIAN ISLANDS.

Breadstuffs: Rie. ....................pounds..
Cotton piece goods .....................pieces..
Foodstuffs, msoeullaneous:
In tin packages.....................dozen..
Other............................pounds..
Bilk goods..............................pieces..
All other articles ...............................


Total....................... ............. ..............


498,355
2,033
1,179, 111
11,837,275
155,934
3,573,254
210,670
1,249,446
2,910,835
3,430,409
292,983
1,374,330
1,457,974
483,000
72,417,616
1,906,600
6,791,473
11,005,415
3,333
1, 46, 766
54
4,361,488
4,370,098
1,948,261
1,830,482
207,919
273,776
2,225
5,287,691
24,313
6,756,412

1,410,723
1,628,466
5,944,879
5,301, 588
657,153
481,930
1,575,337
585,859
..............


$2,131,030
71,881
360,584
1,378,038
88,726
154,348
108,545
92, 741
213,412
189,689
82,691
416,510
609,566
267,738
8,080,589
661,893
76,885
120,635
71, f08
164,461
91,284
71,768
66,433
51,096
57,680
109,583
149,879
241,315
561,997
56,335
398,058
202,784
1,081,936
147,847

88,489
96,928
323,764
96,524
84,450
71,766
6,663,005


3,375,746


1,730,746


1,731, 282










SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Declared Exports from Yokkaichi.
The following table gives the quantity and value of the principal
articles shipped to the United States and possessions for the years
1915 and 1916, according to the invoices certified at the consular
agency at Yokkaichi, Japan:

1915 1916
Articles. Q n y ---Q tt- V u
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.


Bamboo ware..................................dozen..
Basket ware................................... do....
Bows, violin...................................do ....
Cotton goods....................................do....
Fans, paper .................................... do....
Flowers, artiftcial............................... do ....
Glassware...................................... do....
Grassware .......................................do....
Guts ........................................ .. do....
Indigo paste .....................................kegs..
Instruments, musical...........................dozen..
Lacquered ware .................................do....
MatUhes, safety..................................gross..
Matting....................................... dozen..
Metal ware ......................................do....
N i-tt inii, ,Ji ui. ..............................pounds..
Sll1, \ ,'J i.bile .................................... do....
Oranges....................................... boxes..
Paper ware...................................dozen..
Peanuts ..................................... pounds..
Pencils..........................................gross..
Porcetain and earthenware.....................dozen..
Rackets, tennis................................. do....
Rattan ware..................................... do ....
Rice..........................................pounds..
Silk goods. ............................... dozen bolts..
Slippers........................................ pairs..
Tea...........................................pounds..
',, -% ......................................... dozen..
Violins....................................... number..
Willow ware...................................dozen..
Woodenware ....................................do....
All other articles.......................................

Total ...........................................


Goods to the value of $7,875 were invoiced at Yokkaichi for ship-
ment to the Philippine Islands in 1915, and $5,218 in 1916. Ship-
ments from Yokkaichi to Hawaii in 1916 were valued at $50.

Banking Returns of Kobe.
The report of the Kobe Clearing House for December 31, 1916,
gives the following information concerning its constituent banks
on that date as compared with December 31, 1915:


Name of bank.


M itsui...............................
Dai Ichi Ginko......................
Yokohama Specie ...................
Sixty-fifth..... .....................
Thirty-eight h.......................
Nippon Shogyo......................
Sumitomo ..........................
Mitsu Bishi.........................
Kishimoto...........................
Kajima..........................
Naniwa...........................
Thirty-fourth.......................
Taiwan.. ......................
Konoike..... .......................
Kawasaki..........................
Kitahama..........................
Chosen...... .......................
H iogo Noko........................
Total, 1916....................
Total, 1915....................


115,343
33,092
84
16,900
123,024
10,288
14,465
2, 853
2,740

7, 777
329,078
14,796
21,709

16,613
96,744
25,000

1,572, 8903
43
361,528
15,589
41,213
2,250,773
128,216
284
10,936
86,483
............


$27,274
11,206
29
10,020
14,165
2,450
4,206
1, 027

300,6393
............
2, 495
79,300
2,334
6,278

......8,301......
7,014
750
736, 484
124
9,192
3, 300
1,090
477,709
14, 471
534
6,003
17,069
241,893


56,713
26,249
6,262
71,9095
118,079
14,516
792
6,647
2,821
143
13,367
15, 901
854,505
18,812
88,534
11,876
40,978
55,228
170,815
91,661
14,620
2,165, 954
33,069
2,097
702,178
32,321
14,325
2,252,365
1,313,970
3,986
20,359
89,390
............


$28,254
21,308
12,093
12,722
8,540
3,290
477
4,805
3,404
18, 930
3,318
10,893
258,976
2,460
11,855
4,726
2,298
12,949
18,080
3,874
1,636
1,031,260
15,500
3,828
20,134
11,872
2,585
440,839
87, 138
12,792
11,419
28,930
225,989

2,337,180


1,985,111 I............


I Deposits.


$1,512,270
6,447,126
3,295,368
3,708,230
3,835,686
3,659,537
3,843, 593
5,571,898
4,792,981
1,946,957
2,895,503
3,127,723
2,354,288
1,286,172
7,697,341
60, 799
93,068
1,528,928
60,657,468
39,612,993


Loans.


$2,694,679
854,920
291,223
781,126
2,306,655
347, 723
3,004,699
1,361,500
2, 701,008
521,731
7,629
8,136
4,975
23,500
6,362,244

10, 969, 482

32,241,230
15,651,841


Overdrafts.


$146,034
454,160
283,104
306,777
981,525
133,024
63,422
99,082
633,100
265,352
474,586
120,399
435,784
376,754
649,672
14,..0'
A,003

5,445,344
3,734,662


Bills dis-
counted.


$2,871,077
7,795,507
1,064,082
2,404,826
1,177,494
3.5,i1. 399
5, 185,273
573,162
1,089,887
2,766,280
2,377,902
1,759,191
1,377,109
1,950,016
24,501
106,275
11,172

39,136,491
34,067,344


Cash on
hand.


$420,653
499,713
1, 101,818
522,530
276,876
298,931
291,186
334,081
509,484
148,088
133,469
223,036
189,436
76,978
632,509
38,675
18,078
8,725

5,724,266
4,011,322









JAPAN-KOBE.


These figures show an increase of 53 per cent in deposits and 100
per cent in loans in one year.
Besides the foregoing Japanese banks here there are three foreign
banks, of which one is American and two British. The returns of
these are not published, but there is reason to believe that they en-
joyed quite as prosperous a year as the domestic institutions.
During 1916 there was a large and general increase in the opera-
tions at the clearing houses of the whole country, those at the four
principal commercial centers being as follows, as compared with
1915:
Per cent
Location. Year. Number. Value. increase
in 1916.
S. .......................................1916 1,005,572 974, 224,582
ob&e.................................................. 1915 985,520 538,752,744 80
Oaka 1916 3,9905,666 3,017,580,220 7
Oska.................................................. 1915 3,214,261 1,699,438,308
Tok 1916 5,548,811 4,041,559,530 75
okyo..... .......................................... 1915 4,657,708 2,593,705,029
1916 788,174 846, 505, 450 57
Yokohama ............................................. 1915 626,082 537,909, 176 57

The average net returns to investors in securities were higher at
the beginning of 1917 than at the beginning of 1916, the increase
being due partly to the decline in quotations on the stock market
toward the end of the year and to the increase in dividend rates. The
Hypothec Bank of Japan is quoted as stating that on March 1, 1917,
the average quotation of bank and company shares on that day stood
at 157.75 yen (yen, approximately $0.50) as against the average paid-
up capital at 54.87 yen. The average dividend rate on that (lay
amounted to 15.26 per cent per annum, and investors could therefore
obtain net returns of 5.92 per cent. This figure is an increase of 0.74
per cent over the corresponding date in 1916.
Company shares are mainly responsible for this increase, the
average return on these being 6.40 per cent on March 1, 1917, and 5.16
per cent on March 1, 1916.
The average for bank shares was 4.59 and 4.97, respectively.
Merchant Tonnage Entering Kobe-Congestion at Ports.
The following table shows the number and tonnage of merchant
vessels entering Kobe from foreign countries in 1916, compared to
1915:
1915 1916
Nationality.
Number. Tonnage. Number. Tonnage.
STEAMERS.
American............................................ 39 207, 794 36 86,134
Japaneso............................................. 1,822 3,674,936 1,954 3,944,616
Chinese................................................ I 326 10 4,674
British............................................... 297 1,136,508 280 1,164,375
Prench............................................. 41 147,950 44 214,916
Dutch................................................ 18 61,867 21 69,371
Swedish.................... ........................ 13 35,463 10 30,367
NorweRlan.................... ..................... 2 6,576 12 31,157
Russian..................................... ....... 43 06,613 83 119,065
pj anish.............................................. .... .... .............. 2 4,063
Danish ........................... ..................... 5 15,332 12 38,551
Total............................................. 2,2&3 5,412,365 2,464 5,707,289
SAILING VESSELS.
Am erican.............................................. 2 5,551 ...............
Japanese............................................... 2 432 3 401
Other.................................................. 1 1,976 2 966
Total........................................... 5 7,939 5 1,367








SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


The total number of vessels in the foreign trade entering Osaka
in 1916 was 450 of 685,437 tons, or about 12 per cent of 'the tonnage
entered at Kobe. Of these vessels, 395 were Japanese, 39 Russian,
and 16 of other countries.
The above figures show a very small increase in the tonnage of
vessels calling at Kobe in 1916 as compared with 1915, whereas the
quantity of merchandise handled here increased 24 per cent by
weight in the same period. The result has been so great a conges-
tion of cargo and lack of freight space as to very seriously interfere
with trade. Nearly all the large exporters state that they are re-
fusing a large amount of business owing to inability to secure -pace
on vessels. Conditions, however, have improved as the result of
additional landing accommodation and new storage sheds. Accord-
ing to one statement, published on February 20, 1917, there was on
that date about 100,000 tons of outward-bound cargo awaiting ship-
ment at Osaka and Kobe. The customs authorities calculate(1 at
the end of the same montli that there were 161,183 tons of mer-
chandise in Kobe Harbor, ashore and afloat, awaiting delivery.
Accumulation of Freight at Railway Stations.
It was estimated early in December that there were about 400,000
tons of goods accumulated at all of the railway stations of the Gov-
ernment lines. The Railway Bureau announced that the Government
railways, which include all the principal lines in the country, cn r-
ried 28,200,000 tons of merchandise during the first 11 months of
1916, for which freights amounting to $22,400,000 were received.
Compared with the corresponding period of 1915, these figures are
increases of 3,600,000 tons and $4,250,000. It is stated that increased
facilities in the way of cars, etc., were furnished in 1916 amounting to
3 per cent, but that the merchandise offered increased about 13 per
cent.
Freight and Charter Rates.
During the greater part of 1916, and until February, 1917,
freight rates from Kobe to United States Pacific coast ports
were from $9 to $11 per ton of 40 cubic feet by unsubsidized ships
and 20 to 25 per cent less than those rates by certain Japanese
steamers receiving subsidies from the Government. The latter
v.-sels comprise a third to a fourth of the total Japanese ton-
nage in the North American trade. Early in March, 1917, however,
there was a sudden advance in rates, started by the independent com-
panies, which later culminated in more than doubling the prices rul-
ing only a few weeks previous-that is, from $9 to $11 per stowage
ton to $20 to $2. per ton at ship's option (40 cubic feet or per ton of
2,000 pounds as the ship may prefer). The ca iise. of this increase are
the congestion of cargo heri. on account of which owners have not
been able to move goods long awaiting shipment, which have there-
fore been incurring heavy interest and warehouse charges; the higher
rates heretofore ruling in other ports of the Orient than here; and
the competition caused by the large quantities of Indian and other
Asiatic merchandise for the east coast of the United States, which is
now being sent eastward to the Pacific coast owing to the danger of
navigation via Suez and between the Cape of Good Hope and New
York.








JAPAN-KOBE. 39

Charter rates to the United States were quoted in May, 1917, at
17.50 yen (about $8.75) per dead-weight ton per month on yearly
charter, or $9 to $10 per dead-weight ton per single trip to the
United States. Charterers provide fuel and water and pay insur-
ance and port charges.
Tea and Rice Production-Grain Crops.
Although nearly half of the total quantity of tea produced in
Japan is grown in this consular district, the tea trade has chiefly cen-
tered at Shidzuoka and Yokohama and comparatively little of the
leaf is now exported from either Kobe or Osaka.
Figures for 1916 are not yet available, but the tea produced in this
consular district in 1915 amounted to 30,584,169 pounds, valued at
$2,684,715, as compared to 73,385,160 pounds, valued at $8,076,641,
produced in the whole country. These figures include the three varie-
ties of green tea (Gyokuro, Sencha, and Bancha), black tea and
oolong tea, but not tea dust, of which Japan produced 1,926,000
pounds, valued at $86,402, in 1915.
The total yield of rice for all of Japan is reported as having been
289.176,332 bushels compared to 277,385,966 bushels in 1915. As this
district produced just 40 per cent of the whole crop in that year, its
share of the 1916 crop must have been in the neighborhood of 115,-
000,000 bushels.
Last year's crop was the largest on record, showing an increase of
about 6.448.000 bushels over the previous bumper crop of 1914, and
about 30,700,000 bushels as compared to a normal crop.
Prices during the greater part of 1916 were depressed, but from
June, when the average price was $1.30 per bushel, it rose rapidly
to $1.85 before the close of the year, which was the highest recorded
for some years past.
The production of the three other chief food crops last year was
about normal and, as shown by the following table, varied little from
the 1915 production:
1915 1916
Production.
Bushels. Value. Bushels. Value.

WHEAT.
Kobe district................................. 8,398,192 57,40.3,116 9,079,838 58,165,884
All Japan.................................... 27,389,506 23,968,740 30,052,408 26,145,352
BARLEY.
Kobe district ................................. 11,165,004 5,013,445 10,453,995 4,5 8,461
All Japan...................................... 52,498,508 20,583,395 48,943,319 19,589, 100
RYE.
Kobe district................................. 23, 7&3,383 15, 171, 225 22,685,624 14,050,500
All Japan ...................................... 41,872,967 25,895,824 40,560,389 24,985,617

Mining Activities Show Increase.
The mining industries of this region have been active ever since
the outbreak of war in Europe. The Mining Affairs Office of Osaka,
which is the central market for mineral products in Japan, has made
public the following information.
Applications received by that office for prospecting rights in 1916
numbered 3,724, as compared with 1,444 for 1915. The output of







SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


nietals during 1916 amounted to about $13,000,000, as compared with
$7,500,000 in 1915. The principal products were copper, $11,000,000
(an increase, of 22 per cent over the previous year); silver, $800,000
(an increase of 9 per cent) ; gold $300,000 (an increase of 12 per cent).
The number of men engaged in the business altogether was 28,000,
or 8,000 more than in 1915.
NAGASAKI.
By Consul Edwin L. Miller.
The N'aga:idki consular district embraces all of Kyushiu Island and
the port of Shimonoseki on the main island of Japan, and has a
population, according to the latest statistics, of 9,069,719. The largest
cities are N;igasaki, Fukuoka, and Moji in the order named, none of
which exceeds 200,000 in population. The district is, like most of
Japan, mountainous and well watered. Rice, oranges, and grape-
fruit are produced in considerable quantities.
Kyushiu has large porcelain interests, the most noted being the
Satsuma and Arita wares. There are large coal deposits, and the
ports of the district are important coaling stations for shipping in
the Far Ei-t. For some years there has been a large shipbuilding
yard at Nag;i-'ki equipped to build or dock practically any of the
ships of the -ize seen in the Orient. There is also a Government-
owned steel plant at Wakamatsu, a town near Moji at the Strait of
Shimono.-k!i.
The island of Kyushiu has a number of good natural harbors.
Na'g:i-.kli has a fine harbor, with no strong tidal currents, and is the
most westerly port of Japan. It is the first Japanese port readied
by steamers from Europe, and the port of departure for vessels
leaving Japan for China or other points we-t and south.
Foreign Trade of District.
The total foreign trade of the Nagasaki district amounted to $39,-
577.059 (exports, $20,150,846; imports, $19,426,213) in 1915 and to
$58.871,895 (exports, $:;i0,980,131; imports, $27,891,764) in 1916, an
increase of $18,294,836. While much of the enhanced value of the
trade is due to higher prices, there has also been an increase in quan-
tities, especially of cotton goods, .cin iit, and paper. The export of
coal has been restricted by high freight rate. and tonliage scarcity.
The principal gains in exports are nearly all in manufactured goods.
While there is a long-established porcelain industry in the dis-
trict, the products of which are exported, this does not appear in the
export stati:.tics, as the local makers work very largely on orders
from merchants and general exporter-' in Osaka or Kobe who are
in touch with outside markets.
Imports consist of foodstuffs, particularly salt and sugar, and
unfinished materials for further use in manufacturing, such as pig
iron and shipbuilding materials. Raw cotton and fertilizers of vari-
ous sorts are also important imports.
Foreign Trade of the Port of Nagasaki.
The total foreign trade of the port of Nagasaki for 1916 amounted
to $11,9-2,873 (exports $4,952,854, imports $7,030,019), against
$6,215,892 (exports $2,312,877, imports $3,903,015) in 1915. The
gain in exports consists of foodstuffs, coal, and manufactured arti-







JAPAN-NAGASAKI.


cles; and in imports of raw cotton, fertilizers, and iron and steel for
further use in manufacturing, nearly all of the latter being used for
shipbuilding. The imports from the United States, $3,024,484, are
not only the largest on record, but amount to more than the com-
bined imports from any other two countries. In 1915 imports from
the United States amounted only to $678,068. The three largest
items of this trade were kerosene oil (2,828,505 gallons, worth
$340,752, in 1915, against 2,606,900 gallons, worth $352,442, in 1916),
iron bars (1,521,157 pounds, worth $28,429, in 1915, against 3,470,367
pounds, worth $105,397, in 1916), and iron plates (46,270 pounds,
valued at $993, in 1915, compared with 3,083,438 pounds, worth
$86,180, in 1916).
Nagasaki's exports to China amounted to $934,629 in 1915, and to
$1,231,389 in 1916. The principal items are cuttlefish and bWche de
mer ($120,512 in 1915 and $114,832 in 1916), cotton yarns (1,229,923
pounds. worth $188,843, in 1915, and 673,596 pounds, worth $119,700,
in 1916). and coal (76,120 tons, valued at $236,915, in 1915, and
141,771 tons, valued at $418,163, in 1916). Imports from China
show a slight falling off-$937,681 in 1915, against $873,677 in 1916,
and consist largely of fertilizers of one sort or another-bone
(32,420,694 pounds, worth $315,266, in 1915, against 26,634,216
pounds, worth $282,794, in 1916), oil cakes (19,341,568 pounds, worth
$163,103, in 1915, and 20,050,404 pounds, valued at $216,499, in 1916),
and beans and peas (6,672,732 pounds, valued at $88,545, in 1915,
and 2,756,424 pounds, worth $38,859, in 1916).
Exports to Hongkong amounted to $1,001,329 in 1915, and to
$983,584 in 1916. The principal items were cuttlefish (4,344,895
pounds, worth $262,520, in 1915, and 2,708,614 pounds, worth
$254,059, in 1916) and cotton yarns (3,590,136 pounds, worth
$552.124. in 1915, and 2.919,312 pounds, worth $527,981, in 1916).
Imports from British India rose from $492,081 in 1915 to $792,676
in 1916. The principal item was raw cotton (4 203,012 pounds worth
$456,467 in 1915 and 6,411,768 pounds worth $784,415 in 1916).
Imports from Great Britain increased from $957,760 in 1915 to
$1,602,342 in 1916, while exports to the British Isles which were
negligible in 1915 amounted to $215,959 in 1916. The import items
consisted of raw iron and steel, shipbuilding material, and submarine
cable supplies, the value of the latter being $147,635 in 1915 and
$645,388 in 1916. The gain was due largely to increased prices.
Trade of Moji, Shimonoseki, and Wakamatsu.
The total foreign trade of Moji in 1916 amounted to $28,970,805
(exports $13,584,029, imports $15,368,776) compared with $20,839,968
(exports $9,274,282, imports $11,565,686) in 1915. Over half of the
imports-$8,505,366--are classified by the customs as raw materials,
which includes cotton, iron and other ores, and fertilizers of all
sorts. Iron ore and pig iron imported into Wakamatsu amounted
to 565,432,692 and 90,542,240 pounds, respectively, of a total value
of $1,478,810. Sugar was imported at Moji to the amount of
89,021,032 pounds, valued at $3,272,305 in 1916 while exports of this
commodity refined, amounted in 1916 to 85,671,847 pounds, valued
at $4,113,022.
Exports of cotton goods of all sorts from Moji and Shimiionoseki
reached the total of $1,389,003 in 1916 compared with $896,528 in






SUPPL]-.MI-I'T TO CO 1M.I:;UE HLPOHTS.


1915. Coal from Wakamatsu w a-; exported to the amount of 799,279
tons valued at $2.419,755 in 1916.
Cement shipments from Moji rose from 140,271,810 pounds, valued
at .!19,187, in 1915 to 154,931,041 pound-, worth $873,037, in 1916.
With the development of cement factories in various parts of the
district this article will ,.-,irii, a more important feature of local
foreign trade.
The United i;i ales, next to British India, \\ais the large' -1. seller to
Mloji in 1916, with a value of $3,149,390, agai-t $1,072,703 in 1915.
Of the imports, "- .300,263 repl-i.--oents 13,9 10,,92 pounds of raw cotton.
Other imports from the United States wi're, machinery and parts,
$1._,.,--, in 1915, against $8413, ::'. in 1916, and hen'-ce. oil (848,780
gallons, $:;;,i0 '0; in 1915, and 829,763 gallons, $102,083 in 191;). Heavy
lubricating oils from the United State were imported to the extent of
1.6525,93 gallons in 1915 and 1.2',2.08 gallons in 1910. Despite the
nmaller quantity, the 1916 imports of this commodity weVe9 worth
$47,474 again-t 8.7,818 in 1915. The %iin in 1916 imports from the
United States appears to a great extent to be the v'.-~iit of inr'!'c;'ed
purchases of American cotton. Exports to the United S.i ., fromn
Moji amounted only to $52,020 in 1915 and to $2-,013 in 1916 and
th.-,, were none from Shimonoseki or Wakamatsu.
Importance of Trade with China.
The trade of this section with China is important. The iron ore
and pig iron imported at Wakamatsu is obtained there,, as \ell as
fertilizers, bone, and even coal of the anthralite variety. Imports
from China into Moji were $1,216,306 in 1910 against i.10)9,090 in
1915.
Imlp)r, into Shimonoseki from China were $346,344 in 1915 and
$895,877 in 1916. The principal items were oil cakes, .K-i0,903 in 1915
and .$537,149 in 1916, and wild silk, $158,180 in 1915 and $162,041 in
1916. The imports at Wakamatsu fi,;oi China were $2.023,158 in
1915 and $1,970,015 in 1916. Aside from coal ($309.902 in 1915,
s:).9,001 in 19160). they consisted almost exclusively of iron ore and
pig iron.
Exports to China from Moji were $4,114,712 in 1915 and .' ,158,308
in 1916; from Shimonoseki, $921,946 and $1.5.14.919: and from
Wakamatsu, $1,594,229 and $2,050,761, respectively. They con-
sisted principally of cotton goods of all sorts, valued at 1,938,716 in
1915 and $2,398,806 in 1916; coal, $1,603,904 in 1915 and $1,338,734
in 1916; glass, $251,487 in 1915 and $327,872 in 1916; and refined
sugar, $1,874,579 in 1915 and $:1,281,245 in 1916.
Moji's Trade with Japanese Leased Territory, Great Britain, and Chosen.
Moji's trade with the Japan-e-e Lea e1 Territory of Kwantung
was $2,589,2-47 (exports $1,470,814, imports $1,118,433) in 1915 and
$7,374,614 (exports '01,158,308, imports $1,216,306) in 1916. It is
really part of the trade with China, as Dairen is only a depot for
North China co(mnver v. The important exports were cotton goods.
fish, paper, rice, and sugar, and imports beans, oil cakes, and salt.
European commerce was principally with Great Britain, Moji's
exports to that country being $375,040 and $1,414,275 and imports
";62.467 and $084,465 in 1915 and 1916, respectively. The main
imports were machinery and iron and steel manufactures, and ex-
ports, beans, rice. and vegetable wax.










JAPAN-NAG ASAKI.


The commerce of this section with Chosen (Korea) amounted to
$6,417,999 (exports $1,859,000, imports $4,558,999) in 1915 and
$7,416,681 (exports $2,929,992, imports $4,486,697) in 1916. The
principal items of export are cement, cotton goods, refined sugar, and
iron manufactures, and the imports are mostly raw materials, such
as beans, rice, anthracite coal, and iron ore.
Large gains were made in the development of the district's foreign
trade in manufactured goods. Cement to the value of $140,758 was
exported in 1916 from Moji to British India and $379,251 worth to
Dutch East Indies; cotton goods to the value of $100.563 was sold
to British India, as well as $93,157 worth of glass. A few years ago
Japanese competition in these lines was practically unknown.
It is stated that by the end of the current year the steel plant at
Wakamatsu will have a capacity of 300,000 tons.
Hakata is the only other port of the district having any consider-
able direct trade with the United States. It received 4.765,59-2 gal-
lons of'drude oil, valued at $356,347 in 1915 and 2,739,390 gallons,
valued At $356,347 in 1916. The principal cause of the higher price
per gallon is the high freight rates.

Declared Exports to United States and Possessions.

The following table shows the value and quantity of the principal
articles exported to the United States and its possessions from the
Nagasaki consular district during 1915 and 1916:


Articles.


TO UNITED STATES.
Purs, animal.........................number..
Graphite ................................. t us..
Ri e, un leaned.......................pounds..
Wax, vegetab e......................... d ....
Zine pnwder.............................du....
All other articles...............................
Total....................................
TO HAWAH.
Diving apparatus...................packages..
Medicine, patent........................ caes..
Provisiuns..........................packages..
Rice:
Cleaned...........................pounds..
Un:ieaned ...........................do ....
All other articles..............................


I Quantity.


.............
176
116,813
47, 01
..............


..............
3.
..............
..............
..............
..............


Value.



..............
$3, 429

10,9 .S
22,3S3
4,590


.............. 41,390 I............. I


..............
462
.............
..............
..............
M95


Total.............................................. 1,057 ..............


TO PHILIPPINE ISLANDS.
Acid, muriatic, nitric, and sulpharic.. .pounds..
Bleaching powder.......................dou....
Cement..................................do....
Coal.....................................t,.ns..
Coke ....................................do....
Glass, window.......................... cases..
Minjet jeuy............................pounds..
Potatoes................................. do....
Rice, dried, boLed.......................do....
Toys ....................................do....
All other articles..............................
Total. ....................................
Total exports...........................


332,780 7,091
.............. ..............
25,968,210 117,776
314,121 1,275.883
54 673
.............. ...... ...... ...
463 23
5,001,100 57,161
.............. ..............
4,502 567
.............. 4,011
.............. 1,463,217
.............. 1,505,664


Quantity.



272
384
220,000
177,323
..............
..............


6
5
39
6,915
137, 60u
..............


Value.



32,026
18, -09
6,5531
20,795
..............
3,'959

51,740


208
527
138
232
4,033
94
5,232


11,476
1,513
75,723
1,347,140
4,060
3,603
764
43,673
1,466
242
2,804
1,492,464
1,549,436


294,480
30,000
15, 753. 6t30
326, OnS
370
520
25, 68
3,133,51k
65,741
1,308
..............


Quantity.


-------! 1 ---.









LIST OF PUBLISHED SUPPLEMENTS.

The annilial report, from consular officers are i-.sued as supple-
mn-,lnt to (I.1 \rE:i;C, REPORTS as -qnonl as pus-ible after their receipt.
Each supplement is so nuibere,1 that at the end of the year they
nimay le assembled by countries and bound. A definite number is
assigned to each country, and the reports from the various consular
districts in that country are distinguished by the addition of a letter
in bhe order in which they are issued. Following is a list of the
suppllements i--i:'d during 1917:


A. .r ... r l r ...... I' r



A .l m ...... .. .


B "

ano I aulo., naltiuS, tulahn, Pleiati-
buco, Rio Grande do Sul............
For all of Brazil....................
Brilish Vast Africa.................
Bril ish (' uiana..........................
Brit ish Honduras.......................
British India:
Madras and Mysore ...................
Bombay and Madras .............
Burma ..... ...... ...................
British South Africa:
Iort Eliiabeth, Durban, Johannme~!urg
Rhodesia..... ....... ............
1 or all of lii1 ish South Africa.........
British West Africa: Nigeria, Gold* *, :.
Sierra Leone..... ...............
British West Indies:
Bermuda and Jamaica................
Trinidad, Tobago, and Bahamas......
Canada:
British Columbia and Maritimne Prov-
inces ................................
Prairie Provinces.....................
Q( ..l...- Province......................
I o i ,I of Canada............. ........
China:
:-h l] .1. iloiuik.l.n, und Canton.....
1in L I-1t, I ....... ................... .
HI:].' ,'l i ........ .. .... .........
.iii .i. 'hi 'n.-i.ii hlim L lri:, .watow
Al l I, l,.,,, I-":..i. h,', N anking.....
VA -i In-. Dairen, and Mukden.........
'lT 1' i .............................
S. II kuI ..............................
For all of China .......................
Colombia:
Cartagena.............................
For all of Colombia....................
Costa It ica:
Port Limon............................
For all of Costa Rica..................
Cuba....................................
Denmark................................
Dominican Republic....................
Dutch East Indies: Sumatra............
Dutch West Indies......................
Ecuador. ...............................
F I.I .... .............................
"i iir'
] lavre, Calais, Grenoble, La Rochelle,
I i..... Lyon, Rouen, Dieppe, St.
i i and N ice............ ...
M ar.eille.. ...... .. ................
For all of France......................
IFrenc h Indo-China......................
French We, t Afri'a: St negal, Dahoncey,
Freno i (uinca, and Ivory Coadt......
Ficihii ''- Indies: Marniliq'ue..


I '


.; ,
*li





40a
40b1
C5a, 5b
44a
21a

50a
501)
50c

66a
66b
66b

67a

22a
22b


23b
23c
23d
23a

52a
52b
52c
52d
52o
52f
".-1:
52h

42a
42b

24a
24a
25a
4a
26a
53a
27a
43a
Gia


5b
5c
5a


28a


('n ..in a r ,4 v, ll,, lu d i P'i,'l.


i 'r ** i I'
S I' tr and. 1 n 0i l i .....].l....... .
I 1 l r.... .
I I1! .' 1 l .. .. .. . ..
I i'l1, t il
S I ill..... ...' ............ ..... .....
I, .\I' ll .-1 ....................... ...
I .' 1 il f Honduras ...................
Italy:
Catania, Florence, Milan, I.i'lriho,
Rome, Venice.......................
For all of Italy.......................
Japan:
Chosen and Taiwan..................
Kobe and Nagasaki..................
For all of Japan ...................
Malta ..................................
Morocco............ ...................
Netherlands:
A In terdam ..........................
For all of Netherlands................
New Zealand:
U li rini. Dunedin, and Christ
church .............................
For all of New Zealand...............
N icaragua..............................
Norway: Bergen and .- i 1 i.........
Panama:
Co!on ............ ...................
For all of Panama....................
Paraguay..............................
Peru ...................................
Philippine Islands..................
Portugal:
A zores.................... ............
For all of Portugal.....................
Pussia: Petrograd and Odessa..........
St. Pierre...............................
Siam ....................................
Spain:
Malaga and Almeria...................
Madrid and Seville....................
Canary Islands........................
Barcelona.............................
For all of Spain.......................
Straits Settlements......................
Sweden:
Goteborg..............................
For all of Sweden.....................
Switzerland:
St. Gall...............................
Basel, Berne, and Geneva.............
For all of Switzerland.................
Tunis...................................
l liii,'dl l, llil:',l ni:
I:irnii, h, 1n in r ,,li...r.I, Huddersfield,
Leeds, Nottingham, Leicester, Shef-
field, and Stoke-on-Trent............
Bristol, Hull, Liverpool, Newcastle,
and Plymouth......................
irdiltf and Swansea..................
IDundee, Duiinfermline, Edinburgh,
S a ..... and T .. ........... .
i'-!i.i I ondonderry, and Cork.......
For all of United Kingdom............
Uruguay................................
Venezuela..............................


WA SITIIN;T''' : (OVErI:Mi:NT PRINTING OFFICE : 1918


Nn. of


N i, 1a


7 a
.il l
I .111
,l b
31 b

8a
8a
55b
550
55a,55c
20a
75a

9a
Ob

61a
61a

10a
35b
35a
45a
46a

lla
llb
13a
37a
53,

15a
15e
15d
15e
15b
56a

16a
16a

17a
17b
17a
79a


19a
19b
19e

19o
19C
19a
47a, 47b
48a






ii"'


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