Supplement to Commerce reports

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Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00070
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00070

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text
.1 AA h mI N

r OF TH F






COMMERCE' REPORTS
-.. DAILY CONSULAR AND TIDE REPORTS
ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF FOREIGDL.4MD DOMESTIC COMMERCE
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, WASHINGTON, D. C.

Annual Series No. 71a March 4, 1920

CONTENTS.
Page. Page.
Industrial activHies---------------- 1 Principal exports for two years------ 5
Forelga trade returns--------------- 1 Exports by .countries of destination_-
Imports according to articles -------- 2 Declared exports to the United Sta;tes-
Imports by countries of origin-------- 4 Shipping statistics in 1'113 and 1918-- 7

EGYPT.
By Consul Arthur Garrels, Alexandria.
The commercial and industrial activities of Egypt continue to be
prosperous. The generally satisfactory economic conditions that
have existed in the country during the several years pa.t are largely
the result of the presence of large bodies of British troops in the
country. The Postal Savings Bank returns for 1918 show that the
prosperity in Egypt is general and substantial, notwithstanding
the increased cost of living. The total deposits reached 151,509 in
number with aggregate cash credits of $3,295,985. Corresponding
figures for 1917 were 146,703 and $2,353,135. Although the acreage
under cotton was restricted, the uniform and high prices estab-
lished by the Cotton Control Commission and the Cottonseed C'on-
trol -Board assured more than profitable returns to tle' cultivators
and merchants in the interior. War restrictions still hampered im-
ports and controlled the destination of exports.
Foreign Trade Returns.
Total imports aggregated $25)5,264,97 during 1918 against
$158,876,608 during 1917. In a few items only the increase was
due to augmented quantities, but higher prices generally account
for the larger figures for 1918. Exports for 191O totaled $226,396,400
while during 1917 the amount was $204,892,454. The difference in
exports is almost entirely the result of an increase in the shipments
of cotton and cotton seed. As usual the larger part of the foreign
trade was with the United Kingdom.
War restrictions prevailed beyond the end of the year. There
are no indications that the foreign trade of Egypt assumed any new
phases during 1918 that portend radical changes.
The table following shows the value of imports from and exports
to the principal countries participating in Egypt's trade during
1917 and 1918.
16671G6-20-71a










SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Imports. Exports.
Countries.
1917 1918 1917 1918

United Kingdom............................... $70,503,940 $135,117,399 $121,976,443 8152,408,742
British possessions:
Africa..................................... 113,552 2,666,337 67,694 141,032
Mediterranean ............................ 1,602,334 1,410,039 1,676,540 2,178,649
Orient ..................................... 26,044,806 35,241,795 2,626,427 2,097,312
Germany................ .. ........... ... 7 ........................... 76,06
Austria........................................ 3,93 3,303 ............. ..............
Belgium ....................................... 21,692 2,879 .............. ..............
Spain....................................... 872,177 1,585,902 2,119,682 5,110,613
united States................................ 5,276,8 50 2,451,717 25,288,402 21,388,727
France and Algeria............................ 5,290,867 9,684,607 15,035,184 12,489,486
China......................................... 2,712,744 6,238,708 .... .... ..
Grece ....................................... 12,955,846 10,831,633 4,470,855 4,349,369
Netherlands.................................... 540,212 944,817 136,122 .... .......
Ital'.......................................... 10,891,578 12,046,209 12,378,194 12,029,054
Japan .......................................... 3,3.3 ,874 12,624,495 7,095,780 4,828,643
Persia........................................ 358,846 233,811 6,133 1,158
Russia......................................... 112,370 191,900 4,586,678 ............
Sweden ................................... .. 668,286 1,358,473 .............. ..............
Switzerland.................................. 1,284,501 1,845,072 4,658,819 4,550,865
Turkey ........................................ 359,240 97,036 ............. 10,783
All other countries......................... 15,735,229 20,612,238 2,769,500 4,811,967
Total................................... 158,876,608 255,264,976 204,892,453 226,396,400

Imports for Two Years According to Articles.
Coal for bunkering purposes is segregated under "merchandise in
ti'ansit." in the Egyptian customs returns and is not included in the
1917 figures, but it forms part, of the figures for 1918. The high
price of coal is evident by comparing the quantities and values of the
total imports of coal for the years 1917 and 1918. During 1917 the
importations of coal for all purposes amounted to 1,444,596 tons
with a value of $55,588,281, while the amount for 1918 was 1,759,084
tons valued at $94,158,117. Cotton piece goods almost doubled in
price. Imports for 1917 were valued at $34.879,342 for a quantity
consisting of 15,095 tons and 94,561,104 meters, while the figures for
.1918 were $68,290.481 for 16,555 tons and 125,923,048 meters. Im-
ports of mineral oils other than petroleum increased about $10,-
000.000 in value and fully 77,000 tons in quantity.
The appended table gives the principal articles imported into
Egypt during 1917 and 1918. showing quantities and values:


Articles.


Animal by-products...........................
Animals, live............................ head..
Beverages:
Alcohol, spirits, and liquors.....doz. bots.
Beer................................do....
Mineral and aerated water...........do....
Wines...............................do....
O ther................ ............. ... ..
Building material:
Cement ..............................tons..
Plaster ...............................do....
Other...............................do....
Candles ..................................do....
Cereals:
Barley and malt....................do....
Chickpeas.......................do...
Lupines........................... do....
Maize (corn)......................do....
Rice ............................. do....
Sesame ...............................do....
W heat ............................. do...
Charcoal................................do... I


1917 1918


Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.


.............
27,067
121,081
159,564
90,578
32,650

3,542
586
1,535
807
1,288
207
25
1,105
14,609
862
........,532
1,532


391,427
315,493
1,365,514
596,664
133,338
970,755
83,642
116,277
7,695
199,750
276,980
190,962
22,889
1,567
38,638
1,231,307
131,851
.......85,49
85,490


6,593
123,764
194,924
61,500
34,309

9,767
410
879
16
22
686
125
4,767
636
341
2,279


$203,008
263,078
1,774,719
777,896
110,90S
1,392,569
211,651
608,571
11,103
377,379
431,780
2,650
3,444
62,874
5,000
212,904
133,014
23,124-
102,300











EGYPT.


1917 1918

Articles.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.
__________.


Chemical and medicinal products and per-
fumery:
Chemical products......................
Incense and other perfumes..........tons..
Matches... ........................cases..
Medicinal plants or parts thereof .........
Medicines and specialities.............
Perfumery and soap, toilet ...............
Soap, household ......................tons..
Other............... .............. .... ..
Coal.................................... .tons. .
Coffee................ ...................do....
Dairy products:
Butter, fresh or salted .............do....
Cheese................. ................do....
Milk, condensed or sterilized.........do....
Fats, animal...........................do...
Fertilizers ..............................do....
Flour, wheat and maize..................do....
Flour and meal n. e.s...................do...
Food products:
Cocoa and chocolate preparations...........
Confectionery, jams, and preserves...tons..
Fish, salted, smoked, or preserved...do....
Haricots (dried)....................do....
Macaroni ......................... .do....
Meats, frozen, salted, or preserved...do....
Olives............................. do....
Onions.......................... ...do....
Pepper ...................................
Potatoes......................... tons..
Spices............................... do ..
Sugar, raw or refined................do...
Tea ............... ....... ...........do....
Vegetables-
Fresh or dried....................do...
Preserved..................... .do
Other................................ do....
Fruits:
D ried...............................do...
Fresh........... .................. .do..
Furniture:
Beds, iron and steel......................
Wicker and cane work....................
W ooden.......................... ........
Glassware, chinaware, and mirrors..........
Instruments, scientific, electrical, telegraphic,
and telephonic apparatus ......... .
Iron and steel, manufactures of:
Building and construction material..tons..
Hardware afd house furnishings ..........
Tinplate, in sheets .......................
Tinplate, manufactures of .................
Tubes and tubing ...................
Other....................................
Lamps.........................................
Leather, and manufactures of:
Leather ....................................
Fancy goods...............................
Other manufactures of ....................
Lumber and timber:
Furniture woods ...................tons..
Tim ber............... ....................
Machines. machinery, and parts of:
Agricultural...............................
Electrical .............................
Explosion motors and parts........ pieces..
Sewing machines..........................
Steam and tract ion engines .................
Other...................................
Metals, and manufactures of:
Copper and bronze, wrought or in
sheets.............................. ons..
Precious.............................. ...
Other...............................tons..


(a)

(a)
(a)
(a)

......... ....
4-61,9P87
7, 186

242
67
1,344
559
36,940
22, 162
56

..............
751
295
122
12
19,325
2't3
18
(c)
9,779
1,93S
10.921
3,0 57

48
502


7,9015
9,678


ti.....
Id )
..............



3,593


b6
..............



(I)

..............


(a)
(a)
(a)
(al
(a)
(a)
51,217,.922
1N,516,0t57
2,174.3,303

11S. 142
59,067
566. 603
15t..591
3,756. 502
3, 458, 64
81,121

274,390
292.334
126,3:,2
18,912
3,2S 3
7,001,788
109,770
4,671
(cr
495.766
903, 276
1,644.599
1,172, 823

16.901
155,369
31,10S

1,022,296
471,475

115,469
(4)
206,042
1,465,383

509,075

441,440
414,589
(e)

19), .1'it
4,202. 57.3
192,9833

687,243
33,23S
106,7616

112,410
225,219

123,512
59,411
299,370
..........."
1.1., 699
057,3-3


(I)
64,730
603,670


..............
32,744
.............

4,199

b 1,7359,'081
7,118

137
1,267
748
137
3,071
14,864
152

..............i
1,240
574
144
6
23,292
304
..............
750
135
281
18,463
2,840

..........i1.
442


7,785
8,198



.............



2,394

1"""'2,95


............I
..............

..............


.............
..............
56
..............
..............


213

937,332


$1,647,63.3
142,919
2,353,309
579.381
1,450,019
1,030,730
1,523,766
219,880
b 94,158,117
2,982,363

129,975
714,219
405,635
41,447
435,433
3,002,708
63,992

S799,488
499.210
355.897
40,451
2,740
9,484,009
139,166
394,195
17,386
199,15f
3,793,279
I, Iltt,2.49

31,313
207,781
950,511

1,395, 56I
561,330

92,681
209,899
109,900
2,648,023

1,144,636

372,544
738,725
5,940,096
52:879
513,815
2,86-5,191
345,752

986, 56
184,830
275,528

20,644
530,332

159,995
9S.717
33S S0.r.
21/0,68i
174,740
516,310


272,220
192,205
937,332


a Included in "Chemical and medicinal products and perfumery."
b Includes 1,257,304, tons coal for bunkering purposes valued at 368,439,033. Coal for like purposes not
included in 1917 statistics.
c Included under "Spices."
d Included with "Furniture, wooden."
a Included with "Other iron and steel manufaclures.'-
/ Included with "Other metals and manufactures of."


- I I











SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


1917 1918
Articles.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.
---------------- -------- _--- L ___


Oils:
Olive .............................. tons..
Other vegetable.....................do....
Petroleum........................do....
Other mineral........................do....
Paper. and manufactures of-
Cardboard and wrapping papers............
Cigaret te paper.................... tons..
Writing and printing paper......... d....
Other printed matter......................
Paints and colors..............................
Railroad equipment and supplies:
Locomotives......................pieces..
Rails...............................tons..
Railway carriages and trucks. .............
Shoes..........................................
Textiles, and manufactures oL
Blankets............................tons..
Carpets.......................... meters..

Cordage and twines................ tons..
Cotton piece goods............... mets.
Cotton laces and embroideries..............
Cotton yarn...................... tans:.
Hats of all des ription....................
Hosiery of all kinds.........................
Jute textiles ......................meters..
Linen and hemp textiles...........do....
Linoletums. oilcloth, and tarpauins ........
Mixed textiles.............................
Ready-made clothine.....................
Ready-made underclothing...............
Sarks, empty...................... tons..
Sail cloth and canvas............... do....
Shawls of all kinds.................do ....
Silk clo hs ......... ..............do....
Silk laces, ribbons, and embroideries.......
Threads and yarns other than cotton.......
Trimmings of all kinds....... ..........
Velvet and plush .................meters..
Woolen cloths .......................do....
Wools, other than cotton...................
Other........... ............. ............
Tobacco, and manulactures of:
Cigars............................. tons..
Leaf .......................... ..... do....
Manufactured, n.e.s.................do....
Toys and notions ..............................
Typewriters and accessories...................
Vehicles:
A automobiles .................... number..
Other...... ......... .............
Wood:
Fire ................................tons..
Manufactures of, n. e. s.............do ....
All other articles .............................

Total..............................


1,912
1,384
50,892
6,336

325
..............

..............


796
15,095
94,561,104
4)
..............

....... ... ....

t(6)

(b)
(c)
21,8'5
20



lto
265,711
1,669,768
..............

86
6,028
643
..............


2862,581
909,627
2,974,080
1,318,393

1,050,694
380,982
594,509
712,(68
2,132,307

119,396
41,053
..............
6'7,874

434,404
394,784

448,516
34, 879,342

3,3598,978
115, 139
1,276,537
(b)
157, 435
'(b)
ie)
(c)
5,419,549
280,962
60,294.
1,309,501
(a)
2,101,528
(a)
531.315
3,318,190
2,573,28S
17,00 t

231,895,
14,384,563
555,342
1,233,024
(d
197,589
177,7791

1,961
585.197
10, 250,863


.............. 158,876, 08


1,089
6,369
76,854
83,499

.............
W91
4,713







135
134,212

%63
16,55S
125, 23,04

2,016


5 746,74i
1,405,200



17",240
..............
16
45


377,166
1,42W, 792


56
6,5033
462


2a9


246,317,331
8,947,670

..............


877,372
2,95, 812
4, ,606
11,37 733

2, 65,792
1,156,667
2,718,887
18 35,399
2 84,320

28,952
..............
77,255
1,055,221

728650
438,551

674,992
68,290,481
691,888
5,726,195
501,785
3,782,959
973, 22
630,057
354,485
2,796,650
1,991,534
3, fi3,219
5,830, 167
487,593
335,568
3,513,035
287,599
3,012,34
366,855
441,495
4,487,53

234, 480
211,067
14,738,055
524,514
3,236, 532
50,360

536,161
111,527

470
219,94
2,256,78M

3M3, 4, 010


a Included with 'elvets, plushes, veilings, laces, and trimmings."
b Included with "' Wools other than cotton."
c Included with "Lingerie and clot hing."
d Included with "Other machines, machinery, and parts nL"

Imports by Countries of Origin.

In the next table the principal countries of origin of the more im-
portant articles imported into Egypt, in 1918 are given:


Articles. ited France. Italy. tsts Ya


Anim als, live .................. .
Boots and shoe ................
Butter and cheese .............
Cloths, other than cotton........


$20.015
513,167
614
6,394,964


8249
86,626
3,293
1,461,191


$57B9
..............1
%3,882'
1,454,151 i


80,571
..............
..............


5,37
..,...........
1B ,3!i











EGYPT.


Articles.ted France. Italy. Japan.
Aries. Kingdom. France. Italy. States. J .


Clothing .........................
Coal ................... ......
Copper, brass, and manufactures
of....... ...... .............
Cotton goods....................
Cotton thread.................
Fertilizers......................
Floor, wheat and corn...........
Fruits, dried and fresh..........
Glass goods and mirrors.........
Haberdashery and furnishing
goods. .............. ........
Iron and steel manufact tres.....
Leather, and manufactures of....
Lime, plaster, and cement .......
L ingerie ....... ................
Liquors and spirits ............
Lumterand timber.............
Machinery, and parts of....... .
Matches ...................
Meats, preserved, and smoked
fish..........................
Oil:
Olive.... ...................
Other vegetable.............
Petroleum ..................
Sacksand bags.......... ......
Soap ............... ........... .
Sugar ..........................
Tobacco, and manufactures of...
Toys, stationery, and notions...
W ines..........................


81,110,619
24, 440,252

102,380
62,829, 380
2,399,232
46,387
5,654
369
219,770

1, 197,575
9.219,035
607.992
608. 261
1,742,288
1,071,672
22.460
1,499.919
5,614

633,895

249
29,521
6,722
1,113
1,374,491

310,348
1,507,918
47,934


26,048
184.610
57,280
.......... ...
2.30
48,079
95,943
302,010
1j8.338
314,914
309
341,735
41S,172
7,754
58,742

7,410


$496,300 $113, 02
. . .


4,586,194
133,577
......497.......7i3"
497,713
83,632

95,269
10,694
8,752
.. .... .. .. ..
406,795
30,389
..............
31,347
336,221

10,394


21,587 j 17,016
1,247 ..............


8,268

3, '92
779, 184
287,698


..............i

132,230
166. 357
277,090


$9,461
50, _204

77,640
2,710


160
7,804

232, S84
568,685
240,458

788
4,197
22. S54
199.311
225

1,487
i..... 4S7. .




65,1419
102,1355
..............


In addition to the above, Abyssinia supplied coffee worth $381.810;
Brazil-coffee $431,630; British possessions in the Far East-coffee
$2.096,309, cotton thread $3,130,977, flour $2,994,439, preserved meats
and smoked fish $9.061,032. vegetable oil other than olive $2,102.057,
sacks and bags $6,928,055. sugar $1,196.098, tobacco and manufac-
tures of $502,019; British possessions in the Mediterranean-wines,
$643,974; Chile-fertilizers $389,045; Greece--olive oil $917,656,
tobacco and manufactures of $9,228,286; Morocco-boots and shoes
$97,758; other Far East countries-sugar $2,595,169; Sweden-
matches $570,247; Switzerland-boots and shoes $254,141.

Principal Exports for Two Years.

Raw cotton is the predominating item in the export trade of
Egypt and usually makes up more than 80 per cent. of the total
exports. Exports of cotton during 1917 amounted to 814,740 bales
worth $167,141,013 and in 1918 to 994,393 bales worth $189,791,990.
The next table gives the value of the articles exported in 1917 and
1918:


1917 1918
Articles.

Quantity. Value. Quanlity. Value.


Alcohol............................... tons..
Animal products....... ................
Beans....... .. ...... .....................
Bullion, gold and silver .......................
Chemical and medicinal products..............
Cigarettes........................ ...... ton ..
Corn.................................bushels.
Cotton................................. bales..
Cotton-oil cake.........................tons..
Cotton seed.........................bushels..
CottonsEed oil.......................... .tons..
Dyestuffs....................................


17S
..............

.......... .
285
527,371
814,740
82. 299
9,210,093
2,206
..............


$170,972
335,468
106,442
479, 23

2,024, 71;7
762,5t07
It.7,141,013
2,932,57.S
9,073.102
.593,401
79,96,5


518

....... I ......

405
4 ,,154
994,393
5
15,674,679
432
..............


$204,303
599,514
25.,902
291. .11
t50, 247
3,653,454
95.,83
189,791,990
250
13,258,804
141,007
32,176


$162,914

61,048
460,093
4,740
............
903

874,278

1,742,468
162,819
58,348

1,072,476#

17,889

1,441,002

30,145

......... ."6;6
10,070
... ... ... .....

1,766
1,536,'56
931,383
.............










SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Articles.


Eggs............................... thousands..
Flour, wheat and corn..................tons..
Ground ts ...................................
Gum arabic.............................tons..
Hides and skins ..........................
Metal manufactures...........................
Onions ................................. tons..
Phosphates, crude......................do....
Quails .................................. head..
Rice................................... tons..
Sall........... ...........................do....
Sesame................. .................
Vegetables and cereals, n. e. s..................
Wheat............................... bushels..
Wool.. ...................... ......... tons..
All other art iles..............................

Total...................................


Quantity.


188,004
4,750
..............
7. 165

62,008
25.915
16,800
9,324
157,321

371,722
1,486


Value. Quantity. Value.


$2,2M6,981
572,288
1.848,071
3,813.588
89,042
1,442,370
234,725
1,008
969,133
118,542
1,453,342
340,722
795,137
7,249,107


204,892,454 ..............


83,620
2,077
1,083
7,556

158,819
9,346

13,081L
243,762
555
21,220
800


$1,478,033
334,360
194,061
2,359,931
3,038,980
83,478
792,507
99,371
...... i.j.i..
1,471,292
187,275
150.578
405,842
71,502
518,167
6,231,852
226,390,100


Exports According to Principal Countries of Destination.

The bulk of Egyptian goods was sent to the United Kingdom in
1918 according to the following table, which shows the share of
Egypt's products purchased by the United Kingdom, France, Italy,
the United States, and Japan* the leading countries of destination:


Articles.


Cigarct tes......................
Co tton..........................
Cotton seed......................
Eggs.............................
Gold bullion...................
Gum arabic....................
Henna.........................
Hides and skins...............
Hides and skins, tanned........
Onions .........................
Phosphates ......................
Senna.........................
Silver bullion...................
Sugar.........................
Wool............................


nied Frnc
Kingdom. France.

-I


5$07, 637
13:1, 074..i
12,947, 18
1, 4.5 S01
290,413
627.627
14, 895
147,539
691
712,762
36, 312
54, 4b3
599
.549
517.56S


$1,227, 78.1
8,195,591
2135, 743
599
472,313
6, 133
106, 362
25, ,Ui
..............,

4,0516
2,163,900
..............


Italy.


$2,136
10,915,224


2:3.1,527

571,879
57, 136
..............


united Japan.
States. Japan.


$1, 15q 135,773
20,706,823 4,589,842
.............. ..............
.............. ..............
610, I_58_ 164,236
.............. ..............
14,087 ..............
.............. ..............

.............. : 19, 81
44,2 ..............

....... ...... ........... ..


Besides the foregoing, hides and skins worth $1,055,393 were
shipped to Greece, and lsigar worth $1,197,894 to the British posses-
sions in the Far East.

Declared Exports to the United States.

Goods invoiced for shipment to the United States from the whole
of Egylpt in 1918 were worth $25,405,850, as compared with
$21,539338 in 1917. This increase is due to the increased purchases
of cotton, which were worth $24.626,569) in 1918 and $20,939,225 in
1917. The following table sets forth the values and quantities of
declared exports for the two year-:


--~-











EGYPT.


Articles.


Chemicals, drugs, and dyes-
---- ---- Ib-de. ....
Senna.................... ........ nd ..
Colocynth pulp ......................do....
Hyoseyamnus mutieus................do ....
Cot ton ................................. bales.
rbacs .
Gum arabic.......................... .ponds..
G Tts ...................................barrels..
Hides and skins:
Hides............... ..........bales..
Skms ............................. { oi s
Household effects............. ..... boxes..
o pounds..
Ivory............................. P bundles.
Ivory, manufactures of (Sudanese goodsi......
............... ................... parcels..
Pipes and smokers'articles: Narghilc parts....
........ ........ .................... cases..
Tobacco, and manufactures of:
'igarettes......................packages..
Leaf................................ balts..
Tumbak......................... poud.
Wool, manufactures or- Rugs...........pieces..

Totol....................................


1917 1(


Quantity. Value. Quantity.



S $34, 569 15307
47.2419 J 1.59.644
3, 5m 2,779 10,004
....... .... .. ......... ..... 1.933
79,542 20,939,225 73,895
3,161 { 7. 897
474,550 J 179,620 2,512, 60
.............. .............. 20

759 75,672 ..............
M6 9 142,216 ..............
............. ............. 8
29'1 5} 664,909 2:3, sl


6 76i ............

3 184 .......... ...

i,846, 00 23,435 124, 000
38i 49.993 .............

2,20 22,340 ...........
85 1,630 .............

.............. 21,.539,33S ............
I


)18


Value.



\ S81,722


3,772
420
24,626,169
615,720
13,469


5, SMO
51i, S12

..............

..............

1,490)




23,405.8j0


Shipping Statistics in 1913 and 1918.

The net tonnage and nationality of ve-,sels entering the principal
Egyptian ports during 1913 and 1918 are given in the following
table; the figures for 1918 mark the extent of the dimiinution in
merchant shipping occasioned by the war:


Nationalities.




Austro-Hungarian.......
British..................

Dutch..................

French ..................
Gerrr an................
Greek .................

Italian...................

Japanese.................

Russian................

All other................

Total..............


Years.




1913
S1913
1918
( 1913
1918
1913
1918
1913
1913
1918
S1913
1918
1913
1918
1913
1918
1913
1918

1913
1918


Alexandria. Port Said.


Ves-
sels.


233
705
273
,36

110
23

129
11
211
36

24
143
1
182
27

1,932
395


Net
tonnage.


462,640
1,408,597
67S, 34
43,065

353,027
64,790
450,155
105,116
13,875
332,115
65,226

49,25S
287,719
4,740
276, 226
23,469

3,718,660
900,192


Ves-
seli.


120
496
73
2

61
9
37
28
5
39

8
119

20


922
95


tonnage.


23i, 104
st-, 145
101,009
3,621

i81, 91wi
27,757
78,504
2A, 675
6,725
66,363

13,311
208,025

23,282


1,626,623
148, 802


Ves-
sels.


1
361
270
6
3
3

3


21
7

26


9

401
315


Snez. Sue;


Net Ves-
tonnage. sells.


3,779 344
226.362 2,902
364,954 697
12.944 238
7,399 1
5,491 355
. ........ 74
1914 771
. .......... 17
. .......... 935
14,378 89
6,054 141
. ....... .. 68
S 51,2.55 15.
. .......... In
. ..... ..... ..
3. 840 8 A
22,126 75

274, 988. 4,981
451,788 1,241


No American vessels entered Egyptian ports during 1918.


z Canal.


Net
tonnage.


677, 501
9. 748, 619
2,621.,51
I, OS7. 399
2.763
814,I11
291,3-.3
2,69.3, .- i
37.350
141,3.43
215, r3
227.771
304,363
404, 1 ti
272, 537

398, 046
161,642

16,200, 390
3, 00, 702




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

11111J1111rr111r11f1111 llllllll rrr111 1 1111111111111
3 1262 08491 4133












CHANGES IN SERIAL NUMBERS FOR SUPPLEMENTS.


Owing to the changes in the cou tties of Europe caused by the war,
the serial numbers under which lIr supplements to COMMERcE RI-
PORTS have been published have bsi revised and are now as follows:

No. of No. of
Country. supple- Country. supple-
meat. ment.

Europe: South America:
Austria ................... ........ 1 Areentina ......................... 41
Beleium ............................ 2% Bolivia............................ 42
Bulgaria........................... 3 Brazil................. ............. 43
Cze:hoslovakia ...................... 4 Chile................................ 44
Denmark ........................... 5 Colombia........................... 45
Finland............................. 6 Ecuador................ ......... 46
France.............................. 7 Guianas............................ 47
Germany........................... 8 Paraguay........................... 48
Greece.............................. 9 Peru................................ 4
Italy............................... 10 Uruguay............................ 50
Netherlands......................... 11 Venezuela.......................... 51
Norway............................. 12 Asia:
Poland.............................. 13 Aden............................... 52
Portugal ............................ 14 British India ....................... 53
Rumania ........................... 15 Ceylm.............................. 54
Russia.............................. 16 China.. .......................... 55
Serbia............................... 17 Dutch East Indies .................. 56
Spain .............................. 18. French Indo-China .................. 57
Sweden............................ 19 Japan............................... 58
Switzerland........................ 20 Malay................................. 59
Turkey............................. 21 Persia............................... 60
United Kingdom.................... 22 Siam................................ 61
Other Europe ....................... 23 Other Asia......................... 62
North America: Oceania:
British Honduras................... 24 Australia........................... 63
British West Indies ................. 25 New Zealand....................... 64
Canada............................. 26 Other Oceania ...................... 65
Costa Rica......................... 27 Africa:
Cuba ............................... 28 Al1eria .............................. 8
Dominican Republic................ 29 Belgian Congo ...................... 67
Dutch West Indies.................. 30 British East Africa .................. 68
French West Indies................. 31 British South Africa ................ 6
Guatemala ......................... 32 British West Africa ............... 70
Haiti............................... 33 Egypt............................. 71
Honduras.......................... 34 French Africa.......................
Mexico............................ 35 Liberia.............................
Newfoundland ...................... 3C Morocco ............................. 74
Nicaragua .......................... 37 Portuguese Africa ................... 75
Panama ............................ 38 Other Africa ........................ 7
Salvador ........................... 39 United States Possessions ............... 77
Other North America.............. 40


WASHINGTON : COVNMNT P TIN OFFICE:
WASHINGTON : GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1920


UNIV. OF FL LU.
DOQCUM.NTSI DE


APP O .T,


U.S. DEPCXoTOPr