Supplement to Commerce reports

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Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00069
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00069

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text




SUPPLEMENT TO


COMMERCE REPORTS
DAILY CONSULAR AND TRADE REPORTS
ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, V.ASHINGTON, D. C.

Annual Series No. 68a November 9, 1916

EGYPT.
By Consul Arthur Garrels, Alexandria.
During the first months of 1915 the depression and unstable credit
basis that had characterized the internal commercial activity of
Egypt since the crisis of 1907 abruptly gave way to prosperity and
sounder financial conditions. Old stocks of merchandise were dis-
posed of and long-standing financial obligations were liquidated by
the shopkeepers throughout the country, while a cash basis governed
all new business with their suppliers. The state of general business
activity continued without interruption and was still at high tide at
the close of the year. A sound liquidation of bank obligations fol-
lowed the universal trade stimulation. The moratorium imposed
during 1914 was not renewed at its expiration. Gold, however, was
.withheld from circulation, the demand for sufficient medium being
met by extending the note circulation under the conditions outlined
in the annual report for 1914. (Supplement to COMMERCE REPORTS,
No. 68a for Oct. 25, 1915.) Undertakings of Government work, such
as extension and improvement in railroad, drainage, and irrigation
projects that had been abandoned at the beginning of the war were
not resumed during 1915.
Brisk Demand for Cotton Revives Egyptian Business.
The general betterment in the domestic trade conditions of Egypt
was no less manifest in the cotton export business. The one important
feature in the production of the economic wealth of Egypt is the
successful raising and marketing of its cotton crop. With large
stocks of unmarketable cotton ready for export at the outbreak of
hostilities the country was threatened with impending financial dis-
aster. However, a more than normal demand for cotton in the world's
markets as the result of war requirements created a ready market
at high prices for the large cotton stocks remaining from the 01914
production and provided a speedy outlet for the 11.)1 crop as soon
as it began to arrive on the market. In summing up the financial
situation of Egypt the Financial Adviser in his note on the budget for
1916 says: For the first time in recent history Egypt has found itself
able not only to meet its foreign charges in full, but to repay or at
least lend back to Europe a portion of the capital that it has bor-
rowed so lavishly in the past."
The soil in the arable districts of Egypt responds readily to culti-
vation, and ample supplies of fodder and fresh vegetables soon ca lie
upon the market. Over 75 per cent of the tilled land in Egypt is
cultivated on individual holdings of less than 2 acres, so cash assets
67110n-68a--Is







SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


of considerable proportions, in comparison with local conditions, ac-
crued to the agricultural classes. The cutting off of the arrival of
firewood from the Greek islands and Turkey made every unnecessary
Importance of Irrigation-Smaller Cotton Crop-Cereals.
The large aml and drainage project-s were again justified in 19115 when, with the
exception of 1913, the Nile was the lowest on authentic record. Be-
sides being low, the ilcoo was about 2)0 days later than normal.
Before the completion of the Assuan Dam such conditions would have
brought diisa-ter t, the yv'ar' .'ro ps. In Il.Ts, when the Nile was
very low ;ild late, l:a;n.t' UII.4f 0 ) acres rei ..:'ined uvnwatered; but last
year the unwatered 'irea i pproximated only .,0)(il acres that were
scattered in isolated plhes, on the islands .and foies.lhoir'e of the
river.
In l;rder to obviate a possible ,,ver-pioduction of c.)tton, the area
so planted in 191 wa restricted liv l icsai'tive measure ( An article
on the EIgytian cotton co, p restriction "as publis-Ihed in COMIMERCE
REPORTS for March -1, 1915.) The curtailment in the planting,
however., proved to I'e greater than had been anticipated,. and much
within the restricted limit, the acnnge heing 1,1 6.00), as against
1,775,000 in 1914. The pink boll weevil (Gccrhb'i qosiypYiella) con-
tinues to be a menace in Egypt. The combating of this evil in 1915
through Government aid was much impaired by a reduction in the
field forces of the ministry of agriculture.
As a result of the restriction in the planting of cotton the acreage
under cereals was increased beyond the average. There was also
a large increase in the area under sugar cane. which exceeded 50,000
acres, with an estimated production of 105,00:1 tons of sugar, against
75,420 tons in the 1912-13 season, and 11;36S tons in the 1913-14
season.
The locust-pest invasion in Egypt in the spring of 1915 was a
record one for the country. No extended damage to the important
crops. however, resulted, owing to the efficiency of early preventive
measures.
Changes in Egypt's Foreign Trade.
Tile foreign trade of Egypt during 19'15 underwent, temporarily
at least, many radical change'. The embargoes, restrictions, and
regulations imposed by Great Britain on its own foreign trade and
that of its colonies were also carried out in Egypt. Imports of mer-
chandise during 1915 aggregated $96.451,676 in value, against $10S.-
405,784 for 1914 and $139,047,3-4 for 1913; and of specie and bullion,
$3.601.30S, as compared with $S.SS3,41S for 1914 and $48,858,029 for
1913. Exports of merchandise during 1915 reached a value of $134,-
963,892, as compared with $1-20,.218,063 for 1914 and $157,993,705 for
1913; while shipments of specie and bullion for 1915 were valued at
$66.969, as against $31,778,801 in 1914 and $55,578,281 in 1913. Of
the amount of specie exported last year $490.802 was gold coin sent
to Syria and Palestine by the American Jewish relief associations.
Owing to the higher prices of practically all the commodities in
the world 's markets and the excessive rise in ocean freights the loss
and gain in quantities is relatively smaller than indicated by the
values.









EGYPT. 3

Distribution of Imports and Exports.'
The following table shows the value of Egypt's imports from and
exports to ench country during 1914 and 1915:


Imp .rts from.

1914 1915


U nite K inzdom ................................... 1 13 ,23,., 411 43,(.1.0 '.1,
Bril i, p'- .- [ lull;:
Me ;Irr' n-iejn................................. 95 ,010 i,.. 19,077
Orienr ........................................ 6,370,374 J, %.0"i, '21
A fr i-. ......... ....... ........................ 31,372 1.2'.. :. i
G erm :.ny ..........................................I ., 5 .3. W 9 1 .14,17i
A u tri ti ... ..................................... 5..., 2 !, 71 3.2 !. ;7, i
Bel illum ........................................... 4. "' w j7 124, 431
Spa hi ... ...................................... 328,412 498,' 7
Lrml Ic te [L ........................... .. .. 2,421,507 6,231,807
F ran e... ........................................ <.. 4, 'r7, t..3
Fren,-h po.-e.4-i ,n; i( lediterr.ne m i ................. .I lu, 17 4.'.',
IG rec e ............................................. 3,466, 877 5,559,0i)0
N etherl.m ,is .......................... ... ..... 625,564 751 015
Italy.......... ..................................... 7,237,646 8,054,903
Moror-co ............................................ 78.907 .50.., 1
F ar E ast ......................................... .. 1. 7' ..si4 3, 2-~ .I ni
Afri-.:n tountrie_, n. e. s ............................ .5 4,744
Persi i ............................... .. ........... 197,:370 139,012
R oum ini ....................... ................... 2, 1., 41 19,127
R R uli i ............................................. 2, 437,765 203,427
Swe:.len .... .......................... ....... 912,297 793,919
Swirierl :n .................................. 742,203 1,089, 433
Turkey.... ............................... I 9,534,812 84,239
All other c-iinntris-......................... ....... 7, .11,.17 8,774,621
Total ........................................ 108, 405,784 90,451,676


Exports to.


1914 1915

$52, 14, 353 $69,535,940
329,460 1,158,968
:7 736il 1, 4.'. 541
S '. 9117i 53, 663
11, 71,,.-L ...........
4,791,188 I ............
307,429 i 584
2.-..'I, I.i 2,544,372
I1 ., ,"I. 24,758,00
7, 39,3,553 7,515,215
111, 1.17 193,S02
652,163 1,683,342
464,210 157,003
4, 800,884 8,922,185
324,114 1,'11,, 29 )
2,171,254 2. '31, q1
19,012 111, .3!
0,5:-7 103,155
52.210 18,698
7,.''" .'" '. '"'< 1!7
7 1 '.I., 1I 117
6,013, 783 6', 223.1
2,151,339 1,I ..1
791,303 1,033,990
120,218,06i2 1.34 ,*.'.892


The really only important item in the exports of Egypt is raw
cotton. The gains shown in the exports in the foregoing table were
principally covered by that fiber, with the exception of Morocco and
Greece. The increase in the exports to Morocco was almviist. entirely
in new business. The exports to Morocco during 1913 aggregated
less than .'3.00. 1lorocco, being a Mohammedan country, drew its
supplies of special clothing and articles of food and adornment from
Turkey. When the supply from that source was cut off by the war
it turned to Egypt for its replacement. The increase in the exports
to Greece were made up principally by cattle, corn, hides. and vege-
table food products. England, the United Stites. Italy, and Swit zer-
land are all cotton-consuminng countries, and the a:g1.rnted activity
in their textile industries accounts for the increase in their purchases
of Egyptian cotton.
Extention of American Trade.
Nothing remains to be said in connection with promlcting the
market in Egypt for American exports that has not already been
fully touched upon in previous annual reports from this consulate.
The salient facts are still the lack of proper steamship connection
and of American banking facilities. With closer ocean freight con-
nections definite date of delivery within a reasonable time after
receipt of order can be relied upon.
With better banking facilities competitive credit terms can be
more effectively met, and the necessary direct selling to small retailers
through agents, more advantageously arranged. With the exception
of better ocean transportation facilities, no insurmountable obstacles
appear to exist to prevent an untrammelled trade in such Egyptian
products as the needs of American markets require.


CI'l I n ric; .










4 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


Articles Exported.

The following table shows the value of the principal articles ex-
ported from Egypt in 1914 and 1915:


Articles.


A animals, live: Quails ....
A.\nriml proJutlt, tin-
sf'efci ed ...............
Deans ...................
Bullion ......... ........
reall uit .iciried ......
Ciar(et le...............
S'otton ..................
Cot on-ril vrak. .........
Cot ton speed..............
Cot tonsted oil............
D ye tuT .................
L 'ggs ....................
i. Lin arabic .............


1911 1915


53". v.,

306. 1>'
1, -, 731
76. 452
1,4,0, IS0
I3,162,606
1,601.161
11,470,S'7
11.3. 1- 1
13 1, 606
1, 130,020
76, 392


$21.822
691,979
1,. 3,5t.7
3,447,252
4, 5d0,676
1,212,216
P5,536,764
2, 475 ,5
11,731:,01
36. 595
115,304
2,124, 796
94,441


Articles.


Hides and skins........
Metals, maniiLctures....
O nions.................
Phosphates, crude .......
Rice....... .. .. ...
Sugar .... ..............
Salt ..................
Vegetables and cereals,
unspecified............
W ool.. ..............
All other articles.........

Total..............


Countries Purchasing Egyptian Products.

The values of the chief articles of export taken by the United
Kingdom, France, Italy, Turkey, and the United States are shown
in the following statement:


Articles. Invited France. Italy. Tur- United


Benzine ....................................... 15,92S $120,451 $152,181 ... .. ..........
Cigarettes.................................... 261.465 120, 8 R 13,373 ........ $15,060
Cotton........................................ 44,862,363 3,706,093 6,012,094 ........ 23,338,18L
Cotton goods ................................. 191 ............ ........... ........ ............
Cottonseed.................................. 11,655,477 47,016 5,255 ........ ............
Cottonseed oil................................. 276,030 25,704 9,097 $137 ............
Curios......................................... 3,777 19,990 6,043 ........ 2,800
Eggs.......................................... 2,122,756 132,480 509 115 ............
Gold bullion................................. 2,930,976 373,796 171 ........ ............
(:um arabic................................. 14,301 210,04A 7,076 ........ 30,319
Henna........................................ 2,470 51, 65 ............ ........ 350
Hides and skins............................... 101,-117 9,793 17, 143 ........ 278,168
Oil cake...................................... 2,475,4 .... 95 ....... ............
Onions........................................ 1,496,690 110,114 52,784 788 ............
Petroleum ........................................................... 4,990 ....... .........
Phosphates................................... 112,370 ............ 11,770 ........ ............
Rice ......................................... 132,S14 169.555 210 105 ............
Senna......................................... 16,13S 7,575 ............ ........ 22,600
Silver bullion................................. 122,781 ............ 170 ................
Sugar......................................... ............ 452, 833 ........... 47,6S5 ............
Tanned hides and skins ....................... 14, 46 171, S513 52,135 ........ 4,227
Wool ........................................ 1,023,574 43,358 131,087 ........ 29,516


Articles Imported.

The following table shows the value of the principal articles of
merchandise imported into Egypt in 1914 and 1915:


Art icles.


Animal by-products......
Animals, live...........
Beverages:
Beer .................
Liquors and spirits...
Waters of all kinds...
SW ines...............
All other ... ....
Books and printed matter.
Building material:
Cement............
ILime and plaster .....
Marble, stone, bricks,
etc..................
Candles...................


1911


$53. 67
1.350,054

337, S68
608,176
179,994
576,150
IS, 356
516,475
429. 055
237,309
400,662
91,996


1915


S55,549
129,990

767,238
871,589
170,799
647,009
54,262
435,787

208,443
149,391
220,524
88,643


Articles.


Cereals:
Barley and malt......
Chick-peas...........
Corn..................
Helbeh ................
Lupine...............
Rice..................
Sesame ...............
IWheat................
Chemicals, drugs, perfum-
ery, and soaps..........
Clothing:
Haberdashery and
furnishing goods....
Hats of all description.


1911


$1,320,858
1S6,317
1,738,406
388,886
NO1,354
1,146, 25q
11S,038
313,731
.34,51S
2,051,925
120,218,062


1915


$1,511,007
360,134
1,740,433
159,725
598,471
2,S62,311
144,246
419,310
1,273,813
1,638,209
131,963,892


$341,022
139,920
539,678
22,430
170,478
2,112,641
495,627
134,960
3,132,168

890,341
213,627


8468,462
49,087
1,183
12,161
24,786
1,262,885
47,730
90,609

3,144,698

958,535
111,767










EGYPT.


Articles. 1911 1915


Clothing-Continued.
Lingerie and clothing.
Shawls........ ......
Shoes.................
Coal ......................
Charcoal........... ....
Coffee....................
Cocoa, chocolate, a n d
preparat ions............
Copper, brass, and manu-
fact lure;.................
Dairy products:
Butter................
Cheese................
Milk and .ream, pre-
pared.......... .....
Fish, smoked and pre-
served ..................
Flour, wheat, and corn...
Flour and meals., unspeci-
fled...... ..............
Fats, animal.............
Fertifizers ........ ........
Food products, n. e. s.:
Macaroni.............
Meats, smoked and
preserved ...........
Oleomargarin.......--
Olives ................
Onions..............
Potatoes.-..........
H aricot ..............
Sugar................
Sugar, preparations of.
Spices ................
Tea..................
Vegetables-
Preserved ........
Dried and fresh...
All other.............
Fruits:
Dried................
Fresh................
Furniture:
All kinds of wood.....
Iron and metal beds..
Glass goods and queens-
ware...................
Instruments, scientific
and electrical...........
Iron and steel manufac-
tures:
Building and con-
struction material..
Hardware and houe-
furnishing..........
Tubes and tubing....
All other, n. e. s......
Lam ps..................
Leather.............. ....
Leather manufactures:
Fancy goods..........
All other.............
Lumber and timber:
For furniture and fin-
ishing ...........
For building and con-
struction..........


$2,013,515
237,095
801,115
S, 3.3,420
3.t, 33S1
1,605, 38S
291,147
S79, M52
127,179
5.3, 691



6, ', 579y

4~0, 537
103.,379
3,061,719
66,577
619, 773
41,043
267,334
.............
346, '85
.............,
715,3206
372, 70
239, 539
273,103
147,430
164, 920
39,750
1,199,511
1,00.5,450
507,124
299,754
1,095,175
743,086


1,33S, 6S2
789,847
1,056,443
2,190,390
246,900
t14,14064
74,925
230,922

122, 295

4,046, S00


(


Included in all other articles are goods received by parcel post
valued at $3,803,608 in 1914 and $2,514,107 in 1915.

Trade with the United States.

Egypt's trade with the United States in 1915 shows increases over
1913 of $3,611,259 in imports and of $12,358,364 in exports. The
trade balance between the countries makes the United States a debtor
of $9,779,128 for 1913 and of $18,526,233 for 1915.
The increase in the imports from the United States during 1915
would be of greater interest if the value of the augmented business


S1,7206, O1
29,486
461,436
11,S41 ,734
310, 73
2,24.5,4 94.


10,0.5

331', 0S23
1,029, 31 S
501,789
112, 933
2,971,S1.5
I -), 370
174,29'1
3,2S6,874
S7, 226
3, 155,995
40,270
179,9 95
,5, 439
509, 137
109,052
1,741' 216
s69, 039
S27,512
470,113

202,056
5, 465
90,769
746,7'79
t,62, ;77
215,673
132,041

C56c, 999
512, .-35


139,017
2;1, 766
325,428
1,933, 660
92,S19
387, 155
41,373
104,571

26,907
110,544


Articles.


Machinery and parts:
Agricultural..........
Electrical ............
Explosion motors-....
Steam and traction
engines and boilers-
All other............
Metals, and manufactures
of, unspecified .........
Metals, precious, and
manufactures of........
Oils:
Olive................
Other vectable...
Perrolleum and prod-
ucts ...............
Other mineral........
Paper,and manufactures:
Cartons and wrapping
('Ciarette paper.......
Stationery and
printed matter......
Paints and colors.........
Railroad equipment and
supplies:
Locomotives..........
Rolling stock and sup-
plies................-------
Rails-.............-..
Textiles, and manufac-
tures of:
Blankets ............
Carpets...............-------
Cordage........-......
Cotton thread and
yarns-...............
Cotton cloth-........------
Silk cloth............
Woolen cloth.........
Velvets, plushes, veil-
ings, etc.........--.---..
Sail cloth.............
Tarpaulins and simi-
lar material .........
Sacks---.----.....-....--.....
Threads and yarns,
other than cotton...
Wools, other than cot-
ton..-......----....--------.
All other.............
Toys and notions.........
Tobacco:
Manufactured ........
Leaf..................
Cigars................
Vehicles:
Automobiles, carri-
rge aad parts.....
All other.............
Wood:
Fire..................
Manufai lures of, un-
speciried ...........
All other articles..........
T otal...............


$1,593,477
178,437
757, 272
600,422
1,003,778
532,583

164,730
487,693
1,045,784
2,308,179
611,525
553,526
176,197
497,523
1,038,090

136,606
457 448
825, 975

272,474
319,844
342,209
1,285, 419
15, 108,188
728,026
1, 329, 700
601,190
.............
128 343
1,127, 301
952,896
1,944,394
48,952
1,394,940
249,416
4,234,974
90,579

186,976
167, 280

70,220
502,893
5.254.,766
10), 4U5, 7S4


1915


$203,762
90,759
173, 253
184,491
445,353
350,788
20,430
482,828
1,094,332
2,949,026
1,050,091
668,436
168,927
555,882
1,028,764



205,713
19,442

251,541
226,537
438,467

1,462, 560
17,423,813
519, 539
858, 016
362,419
185,110
87,600
2,026,240
729,698
1,072,177
8,982
876,434
467,139
3,681,079
117,710

143,049
69,177
7,955
190,54
4,346,658
96,451,676








5 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


was not almost wholly covered by so staple an article as petroleum.
The gain acquired in such an article during a period of war can not,
in all probability, be maintained upon the restoration of normal
conditions.
During 1913, 2.556 tanned hides and calfskins, valued at $12,301,
and 14,254 sleepslkins, valued at $21.317, were imported from the
United St rates. whereas in 1015 the imports were 17,231 pieces, valued
-it s3l0,120, and .0,,76 pieces, valued at $79,560, respectively. The
sheepskins are used principally for native footwear.
Imports of canned fruits from the United States advanced from
57,781 pmonds. worth $4.1-53 in 1013, to 136.382 pounds, valued at
$13,454 in 1015. A large American packing enterprise is represented
by an energetic commission house that is yearly increasing its busi-
ness in American canned products.

Country of Origin of Imports.

The values of Egypt's purchases of the leading articles of mer-
chandise from the chief sources of supply during 1913 are shown in
the following table:


Articles.


Animal;, live...................
Boots and shoes-................
Butter and cheese ..............
Clothes, other than cotton......
Clothing.............. ........
Coal .................... .....
Copper and brass...............
Cotton god ..................
Cotton thread.................
Fertili-er .....................
Flour, wheat, and corn.........
Fruits, dried and fresh...........
Glass good.- and mirrors........
Halerda..herv and furnishing
gooi .d... ..............
Manufactures oe iron and steel..
L ea t her .........................
Lime, plaster, and ce.nient......
Lingerie ............... ........
Liquors and spirits.............
Liunl:cr and tim l'er ...........
Ma hi nery and part ............
M itche ; ......... ....... .....
Meal<, anld preserved and
sfim o e I lish ...................
Oil, ve, ralle:
C hi e .......................
O l r hc r .......................
r e ; ro ? l .. .. ................
S I .-Mn lug; .................
Se rn .......................
Soalp ............ .............
Sug.r .... ...... ...............
o' i, jrc Tid i n iar i.A'i t rro: .....
T'u- -: il ionrt.r .!.d i notion ...
W in e .... ...............


United
Kingdom.

$1,5u7
237,509
299,909
1,008,421
397,449
10,427,560
149,486
13,932,260
6i1, 6ql
310,268
1,991,93.
13,299
40,260
117,175
2, 167, 825
24-7,170
15, 120
346, 176
535,5017
10,275
8035,29
1,752
S97, 731
2,270
181, -'9
5.3..3.17
719
265, C.n-
I. 1 i
31, 172
33,203


France. I er- Aus-
rance many. tria.


176 !. ........ .. ....
36,647 ...............
29,281 ...............
370,054 $27,.3 3,il5
234,935 ........ 1.50
... .. .. .. .. .
29.."? 5,4.53 ....
71,512 1,077 2,400
1 440 205 ........
3.029 ........ ...
3,0-19 ....... .........
57,610 ........ ........
30,055 1,063 | 864


128,038 2, &S')
125, 744 5:3, 367
10-5,973 j 893
16.3,597 ........
289,645 1S5
151,9S. ........
1,477 ........
135, S789 1,7.32
. ... ... ... ..
24,995 ........


........,
2,10)5
13.3
2,056j


28, 4 A2
21S, .317
. .........

77,7-;0

2, .10
IG),137


374
85!



1,018





: 210


1,9.2
210


Italy.


$1,717
. . ..
72,934
340, 014
41,313
............i
4,516
3,264,363
175,3359
4,227


Turkey noted
Turkey. States.


...... $16,677
S201 50
....... .. .... ....
....... 1,425,191
.......... ..........
.......... 55
.......... 105
........ 07,733


15', 471 153,742 2,376
74,:'9j .......... 1,572
2413,995 .......... 32,810
169,G'0 .......... 200,643
3,149 .......... 141,377
97,470 ....................
134,011 679 1 664
21,896 1, ti2 1, 464
2,216 6,.577 21,632
..... ....... .......... ..........
1J 5,937 .......... .. .......
57,974 155 18,224
16,507 .......... ..........
137,160 .......... 1,817
............ 2,930,852
1,857 ....................
2,b 65 9,406 9,12s
... .. "'.. i........ ... ..... .....
50, 26f 610,732 11,385
24,5 j6 '.......... 1,502
107,.3 5 27.166 ..........


In addition to the countries given in the foregoing table the fol-
lowing countries supplied the articles and the values given: Boots
and shines, Morocco $24,580, Switzerland $70,160; butter and cheese,
Greece $236.010, Netherlands $139,435, Australia and New Zealand
$26S.1.62; clothes other than cotton, China $406,600; coffee, Brazil
$1,921,779, India $2S5,678; fertilizers, Chile $2,875,942; flour, wheat,
and corn, India $350,133; dried and fresh fruits, Greece $259,979;
haberdashery and furnishing goods, Japan $227,030; matches,
Sweden $477,872; meats and preserved and smoked fish, Australia
and New Zealand $2,449,387; olive oil, Greece $422,948; petroleum,






EGYPT.


Russia $18,174; rice, India $1,131,022; sacks and bags, India
$1.939,149; soap, Greece $188.348; sugar, Far East $1,719,G84; to-
bacco and manufactures, Greece ,S-)8,6.)1, Russia $168,912; wines,
Greece $94,256, British Mediterranean colonies $201,292.
Petroleum, Cardboard. Shoe Polish, Etc.
Imports of petroleum from the United States in 1913 a mounted
in 21.491 cases, valued at $3,3ii, and 155 tons of bulk oil, valued at
3.-479. In 1915 L 92.L" tons of American bulk oil valued at $2.9;>,.826
were received. During 1915 practically the total importation of
petroleumlI1 into Egypt was from the United State-. Formerly it
came tprincripally from Rus-ia and Roumani:i, in accordance with the
nire n 1' -s under.tiood division of selling territory.
Th-.' 1.. ., pounds of cardboard from the United Statc:-.- in 1915
aplea.':; as initial business. Germany and Austria were foirmneily
the chief supplitr- of this article. The imports of cardboard from
Italy, the chief suppli;i last year, were valued at about $81,500;
from the Netherlonds, h .-_,.000; England, $24,000; and the United
State-. $S.,00. In Egypt cardboard is used principally as a substi-
tute for sole leather in the cheaper grades of native ;hnoe.. A certain
quantity is al-o used for cigarette cartons and in the printing trade.
If the interest of the American exporter is sufficient, the increased
business no doubt can be min.inmtailel.
In 1913 Egypt purchased $1','201 worth of shoe polish from the
United States, out of a total valuation of $.s9,076, $21,517 of which
represented imports from Germany, the chief country of origin.
Imports of American pharmaceutical preparations (including
toilet prepa rations) increased in value from $19,600 in 1913 to $59,400
in 1915. This importation represents almor-t wholly toilet prepi)ra-
tions, the product of a large Anmerican corpl)orition that is represented
in Egy -t by an energetic agent.
Declared Exports to United States.
The declared value of the exports to the United States from all
of Egypt during 1915 -was $25.<'747.T23, against $1i.674,522 in 1914,
a gain of 9,000,171. Rawv cotton made up from 9u to 95 per cent
of the total. The following table shows the declared value of the
principal articles invoiced at the consular offices in Egypt for ship-
ment to the United States in 1914 and 1915:

Artickle i 11 11'.13 A rl i r I 191l I'll.
Aniique-; and i.. rios... .. 15,931 5-,,7 1 R ng; i p3p r ttock i ........ &31,213 ), ,0ls
Beeswax ... ....... .. l..... li9 Se n ........... ...... .2, -i :,0, 11
Cotton............... ...... r).,2, 7it 21, 4.11,03; Tag ia '-or 1 l-, ........ 27.. 1,2 ," 0
Egyptian goods........... 4. 4 1' .. .......... Toba' co' cid Ma nuiact.Li(.irep :
G lue slock ................ 4,11 <,' 2 ( igare ttt s ............. 57, 3cI 1,;i
G um arabie................. 34t,, i4b :.2ti,u25 i f................... .. 23, S41 .', ;
H ides and .-kins ........... 2'0), 721 113. 5 W ool ............... ....... 7, 4I 42, s1
Iron ore ................... .... ........ 2,720 W oolon rw.'. .......... ..... 14, 2 In, .'i
Ivory........... .......... 99, l11 170.274 A ll other arlicle ........... 12,7753 1-, 172
O nions................... 57,226 ...........
Palms and e2derates ...... 12,771 ........... To'al ........... 16,674,.552 2.5,674,72.3
Exports of cotton during 1915 showed an increase in invoice values
over 1914 of $8,828,073. The last three months of the year comprise
a period of heavy cotton movements. During 1914 all exports were
suspended and the quantity usually moved during that period was




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

11111 111111 III I 11111 1111111 111111 IIiii 1 111 11111111111
3 1262 08491 2673

8 SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

deferred in shipment until after January. This, with the increased
demand and higher prices, accounts for the augmented invoice values.
Higher prices and better market conditions were responsible for
the increase in hides and skins. The iron ore is manganese ore; it
is not n product of Egypt o0 the Sudan, but comes from the Sinai
Peninsula.
Shipping Movements-American Merchantmen.
The maritime movement in Egyptian ports and the Suez Canal
has declined steadily since the beginning of the war. The number
and net registered tonnage of merchant vessels, by nationality, enter-
ing the various ports of Egypt and passing through the Suez Canal
during 1914 and 1915 is shown in the following table:

Alexandria. Port Said. Suez. Suez Canal.
Nationality. | N tn e
Nationality. Vessel. Net ton- Ves- Net ton- Ves- Net ton- vessels. Net ton-
nage. sels. nage. sels. nages. nage.

Austro-Hungarian.... 14 126 277, 76 70 138,997 2 7,184 176 516,787 S
i 1191 ........ .......... .... ........ ........................................
British .. fl1914 604 1,2,50,(997 438 75.3,277 305 264,233 2,597 8,763,01i9
t h............l1li 41S 7W7, 823 190 247,592 159 164,944 2,111 7,049,612 -;"
Duch............. 914 29 62.039 10 1.,8 3 11 15,434 344 1,165,586
-u ... ..... ...... 1913 8 20,3341 3 10,039 24 40,974 331 1,135,451
French ............. 1'14 88 27q.,394 44 137,704 2 1,064 244 691,812
(1915 44 1253,028 13 36,940 ................ 162 550,046
German........... l14 114 21, 3 21 52,523 ................ 472 1,642,990
C reek ................ ,5 .1 ... .. i. 5 .... ..... .... ...... ................. 49 ........i 47
Creek .l.914 22 211,510 46 55,396 ................. 49 91,479
..... ...... 2.4. 245, 6 37 28,912 ...... .......... 47 68,320
Italian .............. 1 231 .50?,914 61 111,800 435 35,32 100 242,703
i. I. 14s, 266,696 l9 41,294 4-5 41,99S 105 260,601
R sia.......... 1914 91 234,802 68 162, 123 2 3,010 69 156,794
ian...1913 17 41,u27 2 3,236 ...... .......... 16 46,774
United States ........ i ....... .... ...... ........... ............... .:s .:::::: ........"..
1913 14 40,042 2 3,094 1 3,850....... .........
Alloti!ers iJl-. 1 l0 195,874 24 24, 76 11 16,068 195 675,604
Voters ............ 1191.5 61 80, 9 4,144 6 6,975 275 769,782
----.-. ----
Total.... 1914 1. 67- 3, 290, 099 782 1,457,579 378 342,375 4,246 13,946,774
T ....... 1'J13 938 1,576, 7 10 2S5 375, 051 235 258,741 3,047 9,880,586

A notable feature in the 1915 shipping returns of Egypt is the ap-
pearance for the first time of the American flag on merchant vessels,
14 of which, of a net registered tonnage of 40,042 tons, entered the
harbor of Alexandria during 1915. These figures comprise principally V
the regular visits of the two newly American built steamers of the
Coastwise Transportation Co., under charter to the Consolidation
Coal Co. and the steamers of the Vacuum Oil Co. -
Decline in Suez Traffic.
As a result in the falling off of the commercial traffic of the Suez
Canal the receipts for 1915 totaled $18,958,023, a decrease of
$.,.1'0.35.0 from those of 1914. The decrease in transit dues alone
S n-':~.egated $3,551.251. Receipts from other sources showed a profit
(f #3'G0,.875. In spite of the unusual conditions, work absolutely
necessary for the maintenance of the canal and approaches was satis-
factorily carried out. The earth removed amounted to 59,380 cubic
yards and the volume of dredging,'4,1S8,590 cubic yards. This shows
a decrease from the figures of 1914 of 2.15-2,826 cubic yards, prin-
cipally in the work at Port Said.
[A review of the n 1915 was published in CoMME.CE REPORTS
U S wASH INGTON: GOVERNMENT PRINTING OVFICE:1 ; : ..





U.S. 0d I