Supplement to Commerce reports

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Title:
Supplement to Commerce reports daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Uniform Title:
Commerce reports
Volume title page for -<1920>:
Supplements to Commerce reports : review of industrial and trade conditions in foreign countries in ... by American consular officers
Portion of title:
Daily consular and trade reports issued by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce
Physical Description:
6 v. : ; 24-26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Publisher:
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Dept. of Commerce
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Foreign economic relations -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with issue for Jan. 8, 1915?; ceased with issue for Dec. 31, 1920?
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each issue covers an individual country and bears a number corresponding to that country. Reports from the various consular districts in a country are distiguished by the addition of a letter (66a, 66b, 66c, etc.), in the order in which they are issued.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue no.52f, 1919, contains misprint, November 41.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Annual series."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004822593
oclc - 16390134
sobekcm - AA00005307_00068
Classification:
lcc - HC1 .R1981
System ID:
AA00005307:00068

Related Items

Preceded by:
Daily consular and trade reports (Washington, D.C. : 1910)
Succeeded by:
Trade and economic review for ..

Full Text




SUPPLEMENT TO

COMMERCE REPORTS
r DAILY CONSULAR AND TRADE REPORTS
ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, WASHINGTON, D. C.

Annual Series No. 65b December 20. 1916

MAURITIUS.
By Consul James G. Carter, Tamatave, Madagascar.
Mauritius is a prosperous British colony in the onllth Indian
Ocean, situated about 500 miles east of Madagascar. The area of
the mainland is about 716 square miles, and that of the .-mall neigh-
boring islets about 4 square miles.
Of the 382,740 inhabitants at the end of 1915, 261,093 were Indians,
who make up the laboring element. The industrial and commercial
activities of the colony are controlled by the Mauritian descendants
of the former French and Dutch settlers and Indian and British
merchants. Most of the commerce is carried on at Port Louis, the
capital and principal town, on the northwest coast. The population
of this place is about 42,000.
Sugar and Other Industries.
The sugar industry is the economic and commercial mainstay of
the colony. Of the cultivated lands in 1915 amounting to 210,7(6S
acres, 170,420 acres were devoted to sugar, 20,860 acres to aloe fiber,
and 19,482 acres to other crops, chiefly vegetables, manioc, maize, te;,
vanilla, coffee, fruits, etc.
The annual sugar crops average about 250.000 long tons of 2,240
pounds. That of 1915-16 was 217.000 tons, compared with about
270,000 tons for the period August 1, 1914, to July 31. 1915. The
1916-17 crop was estimated, previous to a cyclone that visited Mauri-
tius in May, last, at 280,000 tons. The probabilities are that it will
be 215,000 to 225,000 tons. There are about 60 sugar factories con-
nected with the 150 or more sugar estates whose cultivated land areas
average from about 100 to 2,500 acres. About two-thirds of the sugar
factories have an average output of 5,000,000 to 10,000,000 pounds of
sugar per annum and about one-fourth of them more than 10,000,000
pounds.
In connection with the agricultural industry, there is considerable
production, chiefly for local consumption, of luim, vinegar. and butter
and other dairy produce. Vacoa bags, used in packing the sullar, are
made by the Indian population and sold to the sugar concerns at
about 12 rupees ($3.89, at the normal rate of 3.082 rupees to the
dollar) per 100. A few tanneries are also in operation, but the
leather produced is said to be coarse and suitable only for the manu-
facture of the roughest kind of goods. There are no other industries
in the colony, nor are there any noteworthy mineral resources. The
only articles produced in sufficiently large quantities to fully supply
local demands are sugar, butter, tea, and vinegar. All other articles
for local consumption are imported.
70630"-65b-16

9








2 SUPPLEMENT -TO COMMERCE REPORTS.

The Foreign Trade of the Colony.

The total foreign trade of Mauritius in 1915 (not including that
with its dependencies) was valued at $33,829,616, compared with
$31.707,109 in 1914. The imports amounted to $15,591,840, against
.12,314.204 in 1914, :n increase of $3,277,636, and the exports were
valued at $18.237,770. against $19.452,905. or a decrease of $1,215,129.
In 1!14. however, the exports showed an unprecedented increase of
$8.47.8.08 over those of 1913.
While nearly all articles of import contributed to the general in-
cie:se of $3.277,630 i imports for 1915, coin and specie, imported to
the value of $2,070.118, against $741,278 in 1914, showed an increase
of $1.328,810. Other articles of import that showed large increases
in 191, were machinery and other manufactured metals, except hard-
ware and cutlery, valued at $1,355,481. against $b86,247 in 1914;
cotton piece goods, $988,576, against $489,850; cheniicals, chiefly for
manure, $1.029,589, against $821,079;. automobiles, 214 cars, valued
a;t $22,814,, against 56 cars, valued at $67,520; cigars and other
tobacco. $340,910,: against $197,647; beverages, $376,714, against
$232,054. Military goods and gunny bags were the only articles that
showed important decreases in imports.
Of the exports in 1915, sugar amounted to 225,439 tons, valued at
$17,551.822, against 289,372 tons, valued at $18,777,462, in 1914. The
exports of aloe fiber amounted to 1,334 tons, valued at $154,455,
against 1.899 tons. valued at $189.523, in 1914. These two products
made up about 98 per cent of the total exports for 1915. Articles re-
exported and included in the general exports for 1915 amounted to
$381,923, against $335,866 in 1914.
Values of Articles Imported and Exported.

The values of the principal articles of merchandise imported and
exported in 1914 and 1915 are given in the following table:


A\rl iclc-.




('ows nll oXon,
chiefly beeve; from
Madag ca r..........
O ther.................
]evei\agee<:
Whisky andl Il.indy.
W ine ........... .....
O their .......... ... .
I'cn. en t .................
( lemicals:
Apothecary ware ....
Brimstone o .:ulplui.
For manure-
Ammoni.a sul-
pha r ...........
Potash nilrate ....
Other.............
OI her chemical......
Coal ............ .... ...
.oin and specie:
Gold.......... ......
Paper ................
Silver....... ......
Farinaceous food:
Dholl.................
Flour.......... ......
f ram ...... ..........
Peas.................I
Rice .............
Ohlier...............


1914













1, 3 14
9130.047
32, 700)

179.0901
it;, 45h
11, UU29

X1, 0413
3 l, G.2']

435, M21
111,909
12.5, 33
27,3001
.124i,960
375, 123
8S22
702, 322
203, 4Q1
3JS2,413
73,029
N,OOl
.1,24X, 2440
17., 123


1915





$130,714
21,026
74,950
274,060
27, G74
;i, 212
100,295
77,048

(73, 240
75,465
-3. 613
37,928
:i46,107
83,119


242,429
451,4135
81,916
13,649
3,110.893
2197,176


Articles. 1914

iMronis-conl inued.
Fish, stalled, diied, or
pickled ................. $ 3,735
Lard and margarine...... 85,148
Leather, and manufac-
tures of:
Bools and shoe's...... 33,699
Other. ............... 20,773
Manures and fertilizers,
n. e. s.:
Animal \wasle......... 52,530
Guano................ 7,556
Nitrate of soda........ 9,759
Other ................ 50,390
Matches .............. 24,775
Meats:
Frozen.............. 7,520
Salted and preserved. 9 29,367
Metals:
Manufactured-
Haldware and
cullery......... 276,514
Mnchinery........ 353,993
Other............. 232,254
Unmanu'actured ..... 13,399
Military goods .......... 913,349
Motor cars .............. 67,520
Oil:
Castor........... ... 01,836
Petroleum and
spirits of............ 202,196
Other ................. 237,233


8107,000
88,553

44,071
33,339

63,402
39,327
71,765
28,954
75,175

47,754


207,729
938,516
416,963
77,862
41,500
222,814
112,384
198,917
398,722









MAURITITUS.


Articles.


Ill PORIS-coII intiurl.
Perfum ery ................
iiillber articles, other
than apparel.........
Soap, ordinary........ ...
Stalionerv ......... .
Textiles and y.iins and
manifiacttIres uf:
('ol on-
Piece gonil-
I ravor while.
Printed......
O tlher... .........
Cllnlly ih ags ..........
Hal'erdashery. .......
1 on0 .................
O t her............... ..
Tobacco:
Manuifacliiured-
Cigars...........
O ther.............
Unmanlfactured.....


1911
-______- I


52. 112
42. ;
lIil. :2.




17,3'. ;
231. 'i7

574, :1.1,
2019. I t9
4.1, %7
15,.51

21,364
164, )10
1:773


ii


$53,.541
1:. 721
11;i. 2w.1I
49.9.5U


All ih -". 1914


IM POR'I -con i i t rJ.
Wearing apparel Pe ... 57.'.576
WVorid and ilir, : I
Mditlilj s mr i I .... .I 11 0.021
l nlilnt.j f Ic l f1I-...... 1.-.. 998
.!l other ai cle- ... j ',,..454A


Total ..... .


12. 14,204


EI Pt IT.
4111, N07
52.13. 4'J .Aloe il.er....... ........ 1,9. 523
7 i; C,7 oco ii Jll ........ l. 381
247. 2311 M olaj -ep .... .... .. .; '
'276. 'J; un..m ...... :\.
... 2 Sug r....... ........ 1 4 2
411, 16 \V an illa ...... .... ... ...
S All other aj ir l I s..... .... 1i 421
4 7 Tu al.. ........... 1', 4,2 905
2". 4t,0
2, 68%


1913



$113,633
R3, 570
1,:2, 7:34
I. 41,439
1",,591, 40


15.1, 455
29,485
59
11,331
17,.51,822
9,265
481,359

18,237,776


Trade, by Countries.
About one-half of the imports into Malluritius coime from British
possessions and consist chiefly of rice. dholl. flour. and other.food-
stuffs, coin, cotton goods. gunny bags. etc., from India. coal from
Natal, and flour from Australia. Englantl supplies the greater por-
tion of the remainder of the imports, which are mainly chemicals,
machinery, and other nmnuifactured and iunmi anifan toured metals,
beverages. and various textiles and manufactures thereof. In normal
times about two-thirds of the Mauritius sugar crop is shipped to
India; but. since the beginning of the war the output, except certain
of.the lower grades, has been going to England or other designated
British possessions.
The following table gives the values of the imports fromn and the
exports to the principal countries in 1914 and 1915:


I,


Bril ikh po ;c; si,,u :
( apc 'lonv ........................................ $108,754
India ...... .. .............................. .. t .70l7
N aiS l..... ............. ................... .. '..11
Silinaore ... ......................... ..... '11
O)1 her........ .. .... .... ... ... ... ..... 4.'. .
I n ited K in,:dl o n ............ ......... ............ 3 72, 71)
Foreign r r, nt ric .-.
I'lilt'd Siarc ........ .... ........................ 222,748
nBlgiumi .................. ............... I I, ',14
C( h i I ... ..... ...................................... 11. 2. '11
("och n China. .................................... .. ,21 '
I)crpm rk ...... .................. ..... ....... ..... 13. .57
I'pr ..c............................................. 77
Fraynt e ..... ........................................ 774,477
rran an ................................... ... ln. 4
Madagascarly .............................................. 9 1,;1
TIjphn and pos............................. ......... l.
MN rdagscar .................................. .... 2.
N ei herlands. ............................. .... ..... 21 .
N oun '\ .................................. ...... .'I 0. i-
I'orI I i al ........................................ 2..2.' ,
RIounion .......... ..... .................. ........ 1 il 'iil
Sunatra ........................................... 116, I2.1
Sweden ............................................ 24,097
Other............................................ 74,470
Total...........................................12,314,204


Imports from. Exports to.


1914 1915 1914 1915
------------


E.11,7.627 42. "iAl .lo, 2.35
7, 41;. 20 7,i2i.422 5, 11., UiJ2
21 1. 34,210 10. 'u2
11.11. "'2 1 ...........
N. 4'1 Itl;. ': 1 ,.i 74
4. '-1.214 10,il" 1,7 11, 7n '..31

7t1. ". 893 23,729
9, 'j4 18,720 ............
t'1.. 'l ............ 68

S "l'l..... ... .. .......
7 710 l2: .,7, 0ll2
1.,1112 I.. *,',
1 ,, 42,. .,-.1 1
42, .. .
2*1 4. 4 I 44 12,1
28,039 .. ... .. .... ... ..
1. 15
28 039' ..... ...... ...... .. .. .
.',_ l 7'U.'Jlb 1 7y,',
5. 152 3............ ............
58, 701 ....................... ..
02,558 5-3,25.3 10.l78

15,591,840 19,452,905 1 8,2.37,776


Countries.


mL


f j I






SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


The imports from France into Mauritius in 1915 consisted chiefly
of wines and other beverages, foodstuffs, metals, textiles, wearing
apparel. Iandl Iholehold goods and furniture, and the small quantity
of exports to tlat country were aloe fiber and sugar. Madagascar
sent rice. Ieeves. Illrd, potatoes. railway sleepers, etc., and received
from Maniii-iiiis silver. gunny bags, cotton-piece goods, etc. Of the
$230.s51 worth 1f imports from Reunion. -222.074 represented to-
Ib)icCo and .,.'.741) ar;w;ia seed. u(nny bags, flour and other farina-
ceous foodst. ci.ttci-piece go'Iods. and ordinzlry sonp made lup chiefly
the $179,67iT wo\\rth of exports from Mauritius to Reunion in 1915.
The 'l;rge increase in the exports to Egypt was due to shipments of
s Fllar to th'lt colinl 'y.
Increased Trade with thie United States-Sugar Mill Machinery.
Tlh inporklt foiiim the United States into Mauritius in 1915 were
vlniied ;it $704,5:53. against $222748 inl 1914, an increase of $181.835.
The exports to tl!e' United States we're valued at $23,729, and con-
.sisted of 273 ton, of su.grar. valued iat $21.249. and 21 tons of aloe
fiber. valued at 2.45 So. In 191t tile exports to the United States,
valued at $.s-!9. con-isted of 9 tons of aloe fiber. Of the principal
articles imported fro]m the TUnited States in 1915. petroleum and other
miner:il oils were valued at $210,956l. against $113.109 in 1914. Of the
2'14 autonmobile-, im ipoited into the colony in 1913, 18s2 cars, valued
:it. $15;0.3,s2. eaine from tlie United States. compared with 29 cars,
;luiied ;it $24.0U,. in 1914.
Machinery for mechanical transport, amounting to 2.831 tons,
valued at $122.131. was imported from the United States in 1915,
against no imports of these goods in 1914. This material consisted
of hoisting machlinerv for unloading sugar canes from tramn and
railway wagon. in- mall carts, etc. In this connection a Mauritius
publication. in referring to improvements in sugar factory work in
1915. said: It is with great satisfeation that we record that the
problem of m n-'hani.catl unloading of cine, to which reference has been
made in previous issues, has now received an adequate solution. The
American C('rane & Derrick Co. have put uip at Britannia estate a
cane iunloader whiii h lwas given complete satisfaction." A note said
to have been furnished 1hv the Director of the AMauritius Board of
Agriculture would indicate that thie average cost of handling cane
per ton by tlie new'Vly intn.tduced machinery is 1.(3 cents, compared with
4 cents 1)b tlie methods employed in 191-1. It is further stated that
; large number of orders have been placed for similar machinery.
Other articles imported from the United States in considerable quan-
tity in 1915 were cigars andl cigarettes and other tobacco; iron and
steel,other than machinery ; cl emiicals; wood ind iimanufnctures there-
of ; and .salted a nd preserved meats.
List of Articles Imported from the United States.
A comparison of tle values of articles of merchandise imported
into Mlauritius from tlie United States in 1914 and 1915 is shown by
the following table:








MAURITIUS.


Articles. 1914 1915

Automobiles................. $21,003 $156,3;2
Cart rre.se ..................... I 190 2,00.)
Chemicals:
Ammonia sulphatoe................. 2,.1
Apothecary wares .................. 317
Brimstone or sulphur re-
fined) ............ ...... ... 1 73.
Disiniectanls............. ...... :2 .
Clocks and watehe ..........I 1,..0 717
Cotton piece poodls, gray or | 1
w hite..... ........ ...... .. 40 1
Electrical 'acessniries. ...... ;22 357
Fish, dried, pil led, and
salted............. .... .. 4,072 3,552
Flour ............ ................. .. 2,173
Glass, window..... ...... ......... 1,7.34
Hardware and cutlery.. ...... 3, s'-S 3, Ir
Iron and steel, other than
machinery.
Bars................. ... ti l 5, 2'2
Sheets ......... .......... 2, 2 5 16,i,.'1
O ther................... .......... 511
Lard......................... .. ........ 5 A
Machinery:
,.Triru ltura l............. 759 9-9
En ineerne .............. 4 6 .
M erhanircl tran-port. ............ 122,.1l
Sewing .. ............. I 1,2 L-
Typewrileri irid parts... i.......... 14l
I.


.\Artiel 191 1)1 i

Marrin.. ........ ..... 1.0 ..........
Meals, silted Jnd pret i 'I,1J-
ee rf .............. ..... 210 ., ,
I' rk .......... .. ... 1 i. 1 L
Oil;:
E rlill ... .. ... .. ... l i,,
P'elt roleum jnd u llici inill-
era.l ........... ....... II lu 1 10,')
Pjpcr ruanufajcilure.., uther
than slationere. ........... .. 1,371 1, .1
Proviegion, ., i're 'rve'Jl ........ 2.. I -.'. 7
Rilles. ................. ..... ...
Il lltul tr oodl-s ........ ....... 77 1 2 .
T in plates ................... 3 ...
Tobacco, manu acrItureil.
ticars and cigaret tes...... 17, 1 ; ;. V I
O iher........ ....... .. .5' .i.
Toys ... ................ ..... .'Ui 1 i
\\'od and mannifaetutrei of;
t'aiinet and uplhol-tery i
\ware................... .' ir
Shinr-li .. ........... .. .
T im lwer .................. 11 1.. 1. 1
O ther.................... .) '2
All other article. .............. 1. 0, 6 2. 1
Total................... 222, 71. 701. -'


Shipping Statistics-Duties Collected.
lhe number of _.team vessels entered at Port Louis in 1917) wa-. 141,
registerinQg :.3.... tons, and sailing vessels numbered 41, of lS.5-74
tons. again:-t 175 steam vessels registering 425.524 tons. and 32 sail-
ing vessels Of 1l.2O,. tons in 1914. Of the steam vessels entered in
1915. two. of British nationality, registering 7,052 tons, were from
the United States. and there was an American sailing vessel of
2,0.2 tons from the United States entered during that year. No
Americin .tie;iln or sailing vessel entered Port Louis from the united
States in 1911. aithougi. two British steam vessel- from the T'nited
States entered the port.
The total amount of duty collected on imports in the yeiar 1915
was $1.2L' .5iG. and on exports (sugar, ;olasses, :and aloe fiber),
$221.123, compared with $1.127,367 and 235.916., re-pectively. in
1914.
Railway Data-Public Roads-Telegraph, Telephone, and Cable Services.
On December 31. 1913. there were 120 miles of railway, owned and
operated 1) the Government. on the island of Mauritius. Tlhe total
railway receipts for the year amounted to $948,719, and the actual
earniings. including Government traffic. amounted to '$1.023.(47. Tile
expenditures were $720.3,0.
There are 432 miles of main public roads, which were Inainta:ined
by the Government during the year ended June 30. 1916, at a cost of
$95.332.
There are 432 miles of telegraph line and 120 miles of telephone
line, constructed at a cost of $73,919. The total receipts of the tele-
graph and telephone service in 1915 were $8,746. and the expendi-
tures $10,196. The number of telephone and telegraph messages sent
was 464,088.
Mauritius is kept in cable communication with the outside world
by the Eastern and South African Telegraph Co. (Ltd.). The rate






SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


per word to (Great Britain and other European countries is 1.90
rupees ($0.ii6) ; to the United States and Canada, 2.63 rupees ($0.86);
to 1M:dalg;1au:lr. 1.20 rilees ($0.39) ; to Reunion. 0.60 rupees ($0.19);
to lBritishi IEast. Africa, 1.50 rupees ($0.49), and to South Africa.
oU.,sI rupee ($0.2().
Shipping Service-Freight Rates.
The principal lines of steamers calling at Mauritiius are: Tilhe
Union Castle Mail Steamship Co. (Ltdl.). from England, via South
Afii'ha. with inward t and outward sailings about once a month: the
Comiupagniie des Mes-,geries Maritimes. from Marseille, via Mada-
g;'fis-ar and Reunion, with bimonthly sailings, both inward and out-
ward; and the Britisli India Steanm Na vigation Co., with monthly
saiilin's inward aind outward. Tie Ellermann H;irrison Line and
the Clan Line stenaers also )caIll at Port Loulis iat irregular intervals
on their outward voyages from the United Kingdom. The ships of
the frrmner line Is1:ni1lyi sail from Mauritius for Rangoon and Cal-
cutta. and the Clan Line ships sail usually for Australia and Hong-
kong, although with no fixed destination. The Bombay Persia Line
steamers coming from Karachi and Bomlmy, also call at Mauritius,
and return to the same ports. The ships of the Scandinavian East
Africa Line also make irregular calls at Maluritills.
Tlie rate (on sugar to London by the Union Castle Line steamers is
0 ($43.80) per -20 hundredweight. The same line charges 19
($92.46), per 20 hundredweight on aloe fiber, and 15 ($73), per 252
gallons, for rum. The rates of the British India Steam Navigation
Co., which handles most of tle freight between India and Mauritius,
vary considerably. although the present rate on rice and the like is
4 rupees ($1.30) per bag of 75 kilos (145 pounds) from Calcutta and
Bombay, andl the rate on bags of sugar of the same weight from
AlMauriti.us is 2 rupees for the same ports.
Currency-Banking.
The Indian rupee. valued at 15 to the pound sterling, is the legal
tender (currency of Mauritius. Throughout 1915, the average rate of
exchange for P90 days on London was 14.98 rupees ($4.86). as charged
by the banks. and 14.6is rupees ($4.76) by the public. The average
rate of exc.liange for bank bill- at 90 days' sight on London was
14.!).' rupees ($4.sS ) during each month up to and including August,
andl in the five last montlls of the year the rate of 15.05 rupees ($4.88)
W\a1- iiniitiiiled.
Tl he I pr money in .irriiiuation at tile 1nd of 1915 amounted to
$2,072.346;.
Th'lle Ma0uriti ls (C',inmercia I Bank and tile Bank of Mauritius (Ltd.)
are the only private banking establisliments of Mauritius proper.
Tlhe Mer'rantile Bank (if India also maintains an agency through a
prominent co iinerc'il finr (if Blth Bros. & Co.) of the island.
There are ar number of cool)erative banks, and various financial
institutions (f Europe annd tile United States have correspondents
at Port Louis. The paid-upl cal)ital of the Mauritius Commercial
Bank. as recorded in the official Blue Book of Mauritius, is 2,000,000
rupees (4'>;,4S.S.700), and that of the Bank of Mauritius (Ltd.)
12.5,).50 ($lU.!IS9 Thie deposits in these two banks on December
31, 1915. amounted to 12,892:,09 rupees ($4,182,760) and 6,311,608







MAURITIUS.


rupees ($2,047,696), respectively. The Mallurititis Government Sav-
ings Bank, which is a branch of the Receiver General's Department,
has its head office at Port Louis and branches inl the eight rural dis-
tricts and at Curepipe. The rate of interest allowed at this bank
is 3 per cent. The total deposits of the 29,749 depositors during the
fiscal year ended June 30, 1915, amounted to 1,2'2.51:3 rupees ($419,-
331), and the amount withdrawn was 1,142,422 rupees ($370,637).
The total amount to the credit of depositors \was :.4'. 2.. 1 rupees
($1.129,849).
How Payments for Goods Are Made.
It would appear that the Iusual methods of e(tfecting pay"lnllt for
merchandise ordered through Mauritius brokerage firms are: ('I) By
draft at 15 or 30 days' sight, with interest at 6; per cent per annum
from the date of hivoice to the approximate due date of arrival of the
remittance at the place of the drawer, and, if the merchandise is
purchased through an export commission house. :3 per cent commis-
sion to the latter; (b) draft at 90 or 120 days, from late of invoice,
documents against acceptance, with interest at 6 per cent, as above,
and a commission of 5p per cent to the export commission house;
(c) draft without documents attached, to be collected either through
local banks or financial agents.
According to Ordnance No. 46, of 180S, on each Iill of exchange,
promissory note, or acceptance, etc., drawn out of 1Mauritius and
expressed to be payable or actually paid or indorsed or in any man-
ner negotiated in Mauritius there is a stampl tax of from 0.25 rupee
($0.08) for those not exceeding'500 rupees ($1-2) in value to 20
rupees ($6.49) for those not exceeding 40,000 rupees ($12,977). For
each additional 10,000 rupees ($3.244) or part thereof the duty is
increased by 5 rupees ($1.62).
Besides the large volume of business done through commission
houses, European firms have placed agencies with the more im-
portant firms in Port Louis, the capital of Mauritius. to whom mer-
chandise is shipped on open credit or on consignment.
Prices quoted in Indian rupees or pounds sterling, c. i. f. Port
Louis, are preferable, the rupee, as previously stated, being valued
15 to the pound sterling.
Suggestions for Maintaining and Increasing American Trade.
Mauritian merchants appear to be in a receptive mood andl de(liroul
of extending their relations with manufacturers and exporters and
importers of merchandise in the United States, provided satisfactory
arrangements may be made with respect to terms of payment and
shipping facilities and provided an effort be made on the part of the
American firms to study and supply the peculiar demands of the
Mauritius market. A prominent Mauritian firm 'which is endeavoring
to further the sale of American merchandise on that island writes as
follows on this subject:
Trade between the United States and Mauritius before the war was naturally
restrained because freight between the two places was higher than between
Europe and Mauritius. This state of affairs continues to a certain extent, but
in certain articles-machinery, for instance-America has the advantage of
being able to guarantee delivery in a fixed period, and England, our principal
supplier, can no longer do so. The attention of American producers has not
been drawn to Mauritius, and they have not troubled to place their goods.




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SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS.


If wo ilivile the imnportsl of Mauritius in two categories, the light articles, such
:as iilrledasliery. Ihces, fancy goods, swearing apparel, jewelry, and'the heavy,
ines. such ias iruiimongery, paint, iron hars in ill shapes, iron sheets, galva.niite
;1:iii bluc(., cenient. and iiniahinery, iinld we sketch out the means employed by:
Euroiitpeai prodhilers to sei.'ure and retain the market, you will see immediately.
how a ;11111 v e I'Eupe hile rcans li n l had tht adlvanitage over the Americanis.
Takiniig ile tir'-t (cla, although they aire of less importance, we find that the
Eulilipelins li:1; here' representatives wholi had in hand samples of all their
)prii-ipipils' prIi l'ice which' they plii.ced before buyers and from which orders
(,iihdl I'e plhinu-e. Tlis system was aind is still adopted by such slops as Oxen-
4hll.1 & ('o.. Hal-rrods I .t)l. ), of LoDinlon, The Prinieiips, Louvre, Gallerie Lafa-
yett,', ;lnl many11 others, of Paris.
Methods Followed by Other Countries.
Th'I colioni ina1iiufactiirers if1 Manclihester haid in the hlinds of their repre-
seltiti\v. Iliiost extenliiv\ ranges of samples, knew the needs of Mauritius, and
roull L-ive the luinolll t satisfaction to their clients. Besides they gave great:
'irnilities of pniymenlt. They allowed their representatives to give credit on.
llioil tlile I'produllilCrs responsibility. simply stipulating that in case of non-
payliiielt the replre\ent;itiive should charge no commission. They agreed to
receive paymIent inl drafts of well-known commercial firms and did not insist
n11 ilnk ldrilafts whose rate of exchange is always higher than that of the com-
iiierial flni-. This was :n advantage to the clients and1 no loss whatever to
tie iprodtiier<. Il the heavy articles the systeui was different. The producers,
part from accepting orders, had also consignments in the hands of their
representatives who could always supply clients and so prevented others from
the trade. The producers kept their clients well informed as to prospects of
the future and advised them when to buy. etc. In times of difficulty the repre-
sentatives used their influence with the hanks to enable their clients to obtain
money with which to pay the producers' invoices. The American producers'
attitude has been and is still very dilffrent. They have always refused to
work on any Ibut the firm order basi-. anil have always insisted- on having a
conrfil'ed banker's credit with the cirler or a deposit. It is in consequence
lint natural that they should have hail no occasion whatever of placing their

It i- to l)e supposed that this attitude would change were they to make the
n tluaintance of the dealers of Mauritius, but up to now they have taken very
little trouble in tlis direction. The demand for machinery and principally
for tramway material has been considerable and lhas been supplied almost
entirely by England and Germany.
When the war broke out and England had difficulties in supplying rails, the
sellers bought them from America and sold here, after transshipping at Durban.
'Plis transshipping lias also been in the way of America, although of late a
ew\ \\w f.ool ~rnfildent that should Americans stir themselves a little and come down
'I'ri tll eil'r iriIn attitude, and adopt to a certain measure, the methods adopted
by tlliri, complletitorn' that sufficient orders would be secured in a short time to
iidlltlcc stemllieri; to make moree regular sailings direct from New York. We
aire o'iplii at all times to business and need not say that anything we may take
iup will li' pui!lhed wi\tlll tlie utmost leneray.
Thle most available shipping route from the United States to
iMalritins at present would appear to be from New York and other
castelrn ports, vin South Africa, over the Union Castle Line, which
li;is a1 shi1) to Mauritius from South African ports at least once
v\ve'y month. In normal times, trans-Atlantic lines, especially those
running from New York to ports in France, issue through bills of
Inlling for the islands of this section of the Indian Ocean, but it
wV\.-nil allppear that it is now impossible, because of war conditions, to
,ltainll sutch service.
C'orretpondence with Mauritian firms may be in English or French.
r UNIV. OF FL LU".
M TI WASHIYNGTON : GOVERNMENT PRInTIXG OFFICE : 191i
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